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Princeton 's Weekly Community Newspaper Since 







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Volume LIX, Number 29 



www.towntopics.com 



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Town Topics 
On Page 17 



Contemporarv Allusions 
to Michael Jackson 
and Hip-Hop Enliven 
Princeton Summer 
Theater's Revival of the 
1971 Off-Broadway Hit 
Godspell 25 

Miranda Utilizing 
Command of Princeton 
Culture As He Starts 
Tenure in Director of 
Athletics Post 30 

Cancer Survivor Tredup 
Hitting the Road To Raise 
Awareness of Treatment 
Options 35 




"Don't be Afraid of the 
Opera." Scott Altman, 
the Artistic Director of 
the New Jersey Opera 
Theater, Offers a Preview 
of NJOT's Summer 
Performances at the 
Princeton Public Library 
This Friday 22 

Art 18 

Books 11 

Calendar 37 

Cinema 28 

Classified Ads 40 

Clubs 38 

Consumer Bureau 35 

Mailbox 16 

Music/Theater 22 

Obituaries 38 

Religion 39 

Sports 30 

Topics of the Town 3 

Town Talk 6 

Weddings 8 



Delays in Bo& Project 
Addressed as Residents 
Consider Financial Hits 

Borough officials were still scrutiniz- 
ing the stalled downtown development 
project last week in response to con- 
cerns about revenues lost during the 
delay. 

Originally scheduled to be well un- 
der way by now, Phase II ot the project 
— a five-story building on the Tulane 
Street surface parking lot — has been 
held up by the continuing water prob- 
lem on the lower level of the Spring 
Street municipal garage. The issue 
must be resolved before Phase II can 
begin, according to a stipulation in the 
agreement between the Borough and 
developer Nassau HKT & Associates 
(NHKT) calling for the acquisition of 
a permanent certificate of occupancy 
(CO). While the garage is bringing in 
over $14,500 per week, it is still "way 
under" initial estimates, said Borough 
Administrator Robert Bruschi. Finai 
losses incurred 

softened somewhat by the fact that the 
Tulane Street lot remains open, even 
though it has also siphoned off some 
of the new garage's business. 

The revenue from the Spring Street 
Garage combined with the Tulane 
lot brings in over $900,000 — about 
$15,000 less than what Borough offi- 
cials had estimated. 

Mr. Bruschi said he was "comfortable" 
with where the Borough stands with that 
number. 

However, "We're not where we thought 
we would be in 2002" when the Borough 
signed off on the plan. By taking out 
the Park n' Shop lot, where the garage 
currently stands, the Borough has been 
losing revenue since the project's in- 
ception. Nearly $1.8 million in subsidies 
are being held up for a project that is 
now delayed over one year, according 
to Mark Alexandras of Princeton Av- 
enue. 

It's just not obvious that [the proj- 
ect] will ever be cash-flow positive," he 
said. 

Councilman David Goldfarb said to 
view the delay as an ultimate loss in 
revenue was "not fair," pointing to the 
Borough's projections once the 24-res- 
idential-unit Witherspoon House, and 
the future 53-unit Tulane Street building 
are fully occupied, and once the garage 
has a permanent CO 

Continued on Page 13 



TTTT^l 



Wednesday July 20, 2005 



Board Spurns Senior Housing Bid 



A proposal to build age-restricted 
housing along Bunn Drive failed to re- 
ceive a recommendation from the Site 
Plan Review Advisory Board (SPRAB) 
at last Wednesday's meeting. 

The failure to win a referral, however, 
will not prevent the application for 140 
units in five three-story garden-apart- 
ment style buildings Horn going to the 
Regional Planning Board of Princeton, 
possibly sometime in September, for 
final review. 

At the hearing, representatives of K. 
Hovnanian, the planned developer of 
"Four Seasons," heard a litany of rea- 
sons that led SPRAB representatives 
to find the proposal inappropriate for 
the area. 



1 



The 20.9-acre tract, on which Four 
Seasons would lie, presents a geo- 
physical challenge that would require 
extensive blasting due to the rocky soil 
and bedrock in the region, and the slop- 
ing nature of the site in general. 

Additionally, the site straddles the 
Transco pipeline and the 85-too\ wide 
corridor that surrounds it. Any blasting 
would have to be coordinated and over- 
seen by Elizabethtown Water Co. 

SPRAB Chairman William Wolfe said 
that while he has "seen a lot of improve- 
ments" to the general design — includ- 
ing one reducing it from nine buildings 
to five — the buildings themselves are 
"insensitive" to the nature of the site. 

"It's very clear fo me that those I ii 




LADY LIBERTY: Holding the torch (or is it an ice-cream cone?), Lady Liberty 
is Alex Hopkins; the boy wearing the Eiffel Tower is her brother Thomas. Last 
Thursdays Bastille Day festivities at the Halo Ffite featured a Lady Liberty 
contest, "French waitresses" pretending to be from our sister city, Colmar, 
and big band music from the SummerSwing Orchestra. 



mgs are designed to sit on flat grounds, 
rather than being designed fo sit on a 
slope and fake advantage of that slope," 
he said. 

As a result, Mr, Wolfe added, the Hov- 
nanian proposal is calling tor building 
on "gtound that is no\onous\y erwmon- 
mentatly sensitive." Mr. Wolte added 
that items such as additional retaining 
walls could be discounted if the build- 
ings were designed to meet the grade 
of the terrain rather than "bulldoze the 
hell out of the land" to accommodate 
the complex. 

"I find these really environmentally 
offensive," Mr. Wolfe said, with several 
other SPRAB members concurring. 

Shirleen Roberts, Hovnanian's at- 
torney, said the developer has "done a 
lot" to work wtfh the site constraints, re- 
minding the board that while the entire 
site is 20.9 actes, the actual building 

Tod: lonng plan." slu 

would require tlw developer to sj 
<v»f fhe complex 

"It's impossible to do that and provide 

A Spotlight on Density 
As Residents, Planners 
Eye Hospital Campus 

As area planners moved toward es- 
tablished zoning parameters that would 
accommodate any future development 
on the site of the University Medical 
Center at Princeton, questions of den- 
><)t use. are still most on the minds 
of residents. 

At Thursday's Regional Planning 
Board session focusing on the hos- 
pital site, some board members also 
examined the idea of the Borough and 
Township employing a joint consultant 
to study the future use of the hospital 
site. 

At the fourth public forum where 
members of the Planning Board looked 
at both use and density of approximate- 
ly nine acres to be developed along 
Witherspoon Street if UMCP leaves as 
planned, residents in the immediate 
neighborhood were largely opposed 
to the eight-story tower being retained 
for future use. But while planners have 
demonstrated a determination to come 
up with some zoning parameters that 

Continued on Pag* 



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TOWN TOPICS 

Princeton's weekly community newspaper since 1946 

DONALDC. STUART. 1946-1981 DAN D COYLE. 1946-1973 Founding EdUors/Pubtishen 
DONALD C STUART III. 1981-2001 Editor/Publisher 



LYNN ADAMS SMITH 
Publi 

KEN SMITH 
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ROBIN BROOM I K 
Advertising Dim loi 

khll.LY UMARI in 
Retail Ad Manager 

CLAUDIA SPENr \- 
■ ■ Manager 
Real Estate A.I Manager 

IREN1 

ulaiion Man 



LYNN ADAMS SMITH. Managing Editor 
MATTHEW HERSH. Assistant Editor 

BILLALDEN. Sports Editor 

CANDACEBRAl'N. Reporter / Writer 

BILLALLEN. GEORGE VOGEL.EJ GREENBLAT. Photographers 



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4 MeKCT Street, Princeton. NJ 08540 tel: 60V-V24-2:OO fax:609-924-2460 

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YWCA's Executive Director 
Announces Her Resignation 

Princeton YWCA's Execu- 
tive Director Eileen Conway 
announced her resignation on 
Monday. July 18. 

Ms. Conway began her post 
as executive director in 2000. 
Prior to that she was a mem- 
ber of the YWCA Board of 
Directors, and an active 
volunteer. 

"My vision Is for the YWCA 
to be a place of welcome, ser- 
vice, and advocacy for the 
community's women and girls 
of all ages, races, and cul- 
tures," said Ms. Conway. "We 
now have a strong organiza- 
tional infrastructure, a cohe- 
sive staff vision, and contin- 
ued healthy growth. I am 
honored to have assisted in 
creating these strengths, and 
feel very satisfied and fulfilled 
to have successfully com- 
pleted my charge of five years 
ago." 

Ms. Conway has served the 
YWCA with "great distinction 
for many years," said Micky 
Weyeneth, president of the 
YWCA's Board. 

Under Ms. Conway's direc- 
tion, the YWCA refocused its 
commitment to its mission of 
eliminating racism and 
empowering women through 
programming and advocacy, 
and the expanded its commu- 
nity relations. During her 
time there, the organization 
grew its after school pro- 
grams, revamped its adult 
programming efforts, and 
recently established a new lit- 
eracy initiative. 

"She has been tireless in 
her efforts to infuse the mis- 
sion into all aspects of the 
YWCA's programs and into 
all components of its work, 
energizing us through her 
enthusiasm and leadership." 
said Ms. Weyeneth. 

The YWCA's board will 
move quickly to Identify a 
new director, as the YWCA is 
currently poised to renovate 
Its athletic building with the 
YMCA and is also in the early 



Corrections 

Due to an editing error, a 
July 6 article on a John 
Wltherspoon Middle School 
substitute teacher's arrest 
Incorrectly identified the 
teacher as Kathleen Bower. 
The teacher is Kathleen 
Bowler. 

A July 13 front page photo 
of Chess Day at the Princeton 
Public Library was incorrectly 
credited to E.J. Greenblat. 
The photo is credited to 
George Vogel. 

Town Topics regrets the 
errors. 



stages of reviewing the 60- 
year-old program building 
and will be making a decision 
as to whether it is still able to 
meet the needs of the com- 
munity, said Ms. Weyeneth. 

"The YWCA's board and 
staff remain committed to 
providing mission-based pro- 
grams and initiatives in a 
comfortable and modem set- 
ting in the heart of the 
Princeton community," she 
said. 



Friday Trolley Rides 
Free at Trent House 

Free trolley rides to Tren- 
ton's premier historic site, the 
1719 William Trent House 
Museum, will be available Fri- 
days around lunchtime 
throughout the month of 
August. Riders can picnic on 
the grounds, participate in the 
"Fresh From the Garden Fri- 
days" colonial era kitchen gar- 
den activities, and tour the air- 
conditioned museum. 

The ride back takes partici- 
pants along the Delaware and 
through the last Olmstead- 
designed urban park, home to 
Ellarslie Mansion and the 
Trenton City Museum, where 



riders are free to disembark. 

The Trent Trolley departs 
from and returns to the Marri- 
ott Lafayette Yard Hotel on 
August Fridays between 11:30 
a.m. and 2 p.m., rain or shine 
(last hotel departure 1:30 
p.m.). 

The trolley is open to all, as 
space permits. The 1719 Wil- 
liam Trent House Museum is 
open daily for tours from 
12:30 to 4 p.m. and the Tren- 
ton City Museum at Ellarslie 
Mansion is open Tuesday 
through Saturday from 11 
a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sundays 
from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Both 
can be visited at www.william 
trenthouse.org and www.ellars 
lie.org. 



Town Topics 

ONLINE 

www.towntopics.com 



Topics In-Brief: 

A Community Bulletin 



The Zoning Amendment Review Committee of the 

Regional Planning Board has scheduled a hearing for 
next Thursday, July 28, to discuss proposed changes to 
Princeton Township's residential standards. -^ i t 



"M} 



Road Paving Update: Alexander Street, below Uni- 
versity Place, will be detouring inbound traffic between 9 
a.m. and 4 p.m. this Thursday, July 21. Drivers are 
asked to detour east on Faculty Road to north on Wash- 
ington Road, west on Nassau Street to University Place 
and/or Alexander Street. Southbound and northbound 
Alexander Street traffic will be maintained the entire day; 
The Great Road between Mountain Avenue and Stuart 
Road will be closed until further notice. Drivers are asked 
to detour using Stuart Road to Cherry Hill Road to Route 
206 to Mountain Avenue and back to the Great Road. 
Snowden Lane will remain closed between Overbrook 
Drive and Franklin Avenue between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. 
Additionally, the section of Snowden between Franklin 
Avenue and Rolllngmead will be closed beginning Mon- 
day, July 25. between 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Drivers are asked 
to detour from Franklin Avenue to Levitt Lane to Hamil- 
ton Avenue. Clearview Avenue and Grover Avenue, 
between Clearview and Franklin, will be closed between 
7 a.m. and 5 p.m. for repairs until further notice. Prince- 
ton Township Department of Public Works will be paving 
Woods Way. Beech Hill Circle, and Crooked Tree 
Lane for the next 10 days. Beginning this week and 
extending into next. Autumn Hill Road, and Philip 
Drive — south of Riverside Drive — will be closed between 
7 a.m. and 5 p.m.; Lovers Lane will be closed for 
repairs Thursday, July 21 and Friday. July 22 between 9 
a.m. and 5 p.m. It will again be closed Saturday, July 23 
between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. for resurfacing, if weather 
permits. For the week of July 25, Edgerstoune Road 
between Route 206 and Wlnant Road will be subject to 
one-lane alternating traffic between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. 



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On Princeton Rep Shakespeare Festival 



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After hitting a scheduling 
crossroads with little chance 
of resolution in sight, the 
Princeton Rep Shakespeare 
Festival has decided to lower 
the lights on a season that 
never actually got off the 
ground. 

Held at the Pettoranello 
Gardens Amphitheatre at 
Community Park North, the 
annual summer festival that 
has received acclaim since 
2000, cited difficulty in co- 
ordinating a performance 
schedule with the Princeton 
Recreation Department. In 



a recent letter to the editor, 
festival Artistic Director Vic- 
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TOPICS 
Of the Town 



the alternatlvti that we of- 
fered worked," Mr. Roberts 
added. 
At issue was the sharing 

of the stage with NJOT. Mr. 
Roberts said. 




Continued on Next Pagij 



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crucial Issue" that had yet to 
be resolved. 

But on Monday, the deci- 
sion was made to forego this 
season, according to Recre- 
ation Department Director 
Jack Roberts. 

This season was the first 
season that the amphitheater 
played host to other perfor- 
mances outside of the festi- 
val, Mr. Roberts said, and Die 
two parties could not arrive 
at a consensus on schedul- 
ing. He added that the fes- 
tival had wanted to put on 

two productions throughout 
the summer. However, since 
the Pettoranello Gardens are 
playing host this year to per- 
formances by the New Jersey 
Opera Theater (NJOT) and a 
film festival, it made it diffi- 
cult to meet Princeton Rep's 
desires. 

Ms. Liberator! said the 
cancellation was due to a 
matter of "instability. 

"We had put into that 
space, at the very least, 
a half million dollars of 
productions, advertising, 
marketing, signage, and 
certainly the incalculable 
aspects of goodwill, space, 
and visibility," Mr. Liberatorl 
said Tuesday. 

But she said the 2005 sea- 
son began to dissolve when 
the Recreation Department 
expressed plans to turn the 
amphitheater Into a "mini 
performing arts center." The 
festival director said Shake- 
speare Rep Is accustomed to 
putting on two full produc- 
tions throughout the sum- 
mer, but when scheduling 
would not allow equal time 
to two productions, the fes- 
tival balked. 

"We have no problem 
working on a schedule where 
other arts organizations use 
the space," she said, but 
added that other outside per- 
formances fell during dates 
reserved for Shakespeare 
Rep in previous summers. 

Mr. Roberts said the Rec- 
reation board offered three 
scenarios to the festival in 
an attempt to factor in the 
scheduling of all the events 
at the gardens 

"We thought we were be- 
ing as accommodating as we 
could be. "We were a little 
surprised that they felt com- 
pelled to say that none of 



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And when you bought some- 
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knew that if littJe Tommy's bathing 
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work you'd get your money back. 
Period. Because you were like family 
and she wanted things to be all right 
with you. 

That's where we got our re- 
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Shakespeare Festival 

Continued Irom Page 3 

The August 5 and August 6 
dates of an NJOT production 
would have fallen In a hiatus 
between Shakespeare Rep's 
two productions, scheduled 
to be The Tempest and 
Twelfth Night. However, 
the issue of sharing lighting 
and equipment with NJOT 
created an impasse. 

"How else could NJOT 
do it if they don't share the 
stage?," Mr. Roberts said. 
Under the latest schedule, 
which would have started 
July 15, the first play would 
have run for three weeks, 
with a week off for opera. An 
additional four weeks would 
have followed. 

With only a handful of free, 
professional Shakespeare 
festivals remaining, the pro- 
gram was exceedingly pop- 
ular in Princeton. So much 
so, in fact, that the 2001 
season was shut down due 
to overcrowding and other 
safety concerns at the am- 
phitheater. Both Mr. Roberts 
and Ms. Liberator! expressed 
a desire to resolve the Is- 
sues that have curtailed this 
year's productions. Roberts 
said he "hoped" Pettoranello 
Gardens would continue to 
be home to the festival. 

"1 would love to return 
there," Ms. Liberator! said. 
"We don't expect to be treat- 
ed like royalty, but we don't 
expect to be treated like sec- 
ond-class citizens either." 
— Matthew Hersh 



Open Space Preserved 
In Mercer County 

Mercer County Executive 
Brian M. Hughes recently 
announced that the County Is 

continuing Its efforts to pro- 
tect open space by acquiring 
a 32-acre property in Hamil- 
ton Township. 

It was another Important 
step In the area's efforts to 
preserve open space, said Mr. 
Hughes: "This acquisition and 
others like it show how criti- 
cally important it is that Mer- 
cer County voters supported 
the open space ballot ques- 
tion last fall. Protecting open 
space is an investment we 
make today, but a legacy we 
leave for future generations." 

The property, located along 
the Doctors Creek In Hamil- 
ton Township, and adjacent 
preserved farmland and other 
preserved corridors of the 
Doctors Creek, has significant 
environmental Importance. It 
contains several vernal 
ponds, wetlands, and wildlife 
habitat. The property will 
provide for passive public 
access. 

Mercer County paid 
$61,000, which was the cost 
to the seller to redeem taxes 
owed. Hamilton Township 
also contributed by waiving 
the additional and future 
taxes owed. The property was 
purchased from Americo I., 
LLC. 

"In the past year — indeed, 
In the past six months — 
escalating land costs In Mer- 
cer County have made It 
more difficult for us to meet 
our preservation goals," said 
Mr. Hughes. "We must act 
now to protect our precious 
open space." 



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HARRY COMES TO PRINCETON: Matthew Kim was 
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Harry Potter Block Party last week. The occasion 
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Residents Look for Answers 
To the Question of Racism 



How to define race was one 
of the main issues discussed at 
the Princeton Human Service 
Commission's (PHSC) commu- 
nity dialogue, the second held 
in as many months. 

Ethnicity, culture, social 
construct, and color were 
some of the answers to that 
question from approximately 
20 residents who gathered at 
the Princeton YWCA on Tues- 
day, July 12. 

A former worker for the 
U.S. Census, Bill Strong said 
he remembers a time when 
everyone was labeled either 
black or white, and other eth- 
nicities had to choose which 
term best described them. 

"Our country has racism in 
its DNA," said PHSC member 
Wayne Meisel. who added that 
he has had to counter what he 
he had been taught through- 
out his life in order not to 
become a racist himself. 

"I have felt more racism in 
this town than ever before in 
my life," said Ivonne Clark, 
who grew up in New York City 
before moving to the area. "I 
just grew up being Ivonne.... It 
was never a race issue.... I see 
myself as who I am; 1 don't 
know how other people see 
me." 

The Latino community liai- 
son for PHSC, Ms. Clark said 
that since moving here she 
has felt a difference in the way 
others treat her, such as being 
asked how she manages to 
speak and dress so well, and 
being followed around suspi- 
ciously by store owners while 
shopping. 

She even recalled how one 
realtor told her that there was 
"nowhere to live in Penning- 
ton" when she was looking at 
houses. 

"I didn't make the connec- 
tion at the time that I was the 
wrong color," she said. 

There are even realtors in 
the Princeton community who 
discourage people from buy- 
ing a house In the Community 
Park School area because 
their children would go to 
school with "those people," 
said Cynthia Mendez, director 
of PHSC, referring to the 
minorities In town. 



A 40-year resident of address race before they 
Princeton. Lance Liverman ^corne ad" ,,s 
said that he observes more "There are people who 
segregation today than he did thought In our lifetime racism 
growing up. would be gone: why isn't it?" 

-I think were more sepa- asked John Powell, a member 
rated in our groups today than of Princeton school boards 
I've ever seen In my life. " he minority ed ucation committee, 
said, adding that he has 

observed groups of students The community dialogue will 
who stick together In crowds continue In August with an 
outside John Witherspoon ongoing discussion of race 
Middle School or Princeton Issues. For Information on 
High School and never mingle how to get involved, contact 
with one another Princeton Human Services at 

(609) 688-2055. 
Race In Society — Candace Braun 

■ While some may divide 

Princeton into black and ■ 

white, there were more than ... _,_ M _„^. r TTZIZTZ, 
12 nattonaUt.es In .he back- J" ™ "Tn IT'L" T»". 
grounds of those attending the vwvw towntopics com 

dialogue, from Chinese to _ — 

Cherokee Indian. 

Residents were asked to 
recall the first time they real- 
ized there was race In society. 

Pamela Elmi. director of 
program development at 
YWCA Princeton, recalled the 
shock she felt when she 
moved from New Jersey to 
Georgia at the age of 25. 

"It was so Intense; it really 
hit me," she said, adding that 
divisions such as black, white, 
gay, or straight, were 
extremely visible In the 
community. 



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One resident, Linda Oppen- 
heim, recalled growing up In a 
school district with an excel- 
lent choir, led by an even 
more excellent choir director. 
However, she recalled that the 
director wouldn't allow blacks 
to sing, because "the quality 
of their voices was different." 

One of the biggest Issues In 
today's society. Is that many 
people feel that race Issues 
don't affect them, said K.P. 

Wesoloh: "You can be a Cau- 
casian adult In this world and 
never think about race." 

Discrimination Is taught In 
the home, through a passing 
comment at the dinner table, 
or even by referring to the 
maid as a "girl," when she is a 
40-year-old woman, said Ms. 
Mendez. 

Several residents agreed 
that today's children need to 
be taught the right way to 



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The Trenton Time* 



IT Police 
Blotter 




A 1 5-year-old Morrisville. 
Pa. youth was arrested on 
July 14 and charged with 
assaulting and robbing an 
unidentified 37-year-old man 
on Maclean Street. The youth 
was seen running from the 
scene of the crime and 
chased by Borough Ptl. Wil- 
liam Perez. The officer had 




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been summoned to the scene 
by a witness to the assault, 
who reported that it also 
involved another youth 
described as a black male 
wearing a long T-shirt. 

The victim of the crime, 
who spoke no English, told 
police through an Interpreter 
that he had been confronted 
by the two assailants, 
knocked to the ground, then 
punched and kicked while 
they tried to steal his wallet. 

During the interrogation 
that followed the arrest, the 
accused youth was found to 
have several cell phones in 
his possession. He was 
placed in the Mercer County 
Youth Detention Center. 

The investigation of the 
crime is being handled by 
Det. Kenneth Riley, who may 
be reached at (609) 
921-8108. 



A black 2002 Suzuki GS5 
motorcycle valued at $4,000 
was reported stolen on July 
14 by a Dodds Lane resident, 
who told police the motorcy- 
cle had been parked in her 
driveway throughout the day 
before she returned home at 
11:40 p.m. to find It gone. 
Police have no suspect(s). 




Nine drivers were arrested 
over a two-week period on 
charges of driving while 
intoxicated: Jeffrey M. Sax- 
ton, 34, of Trenton, on July 
2; Elizabeth A. Szenasl, 54, 
of Monmouth Junction, on 
July 2; Romuald Cleciuch, 
58, of Clifton, on July 3; Ger- 
hard Sommer, 35, of Oxford, 
on July 10; Wilfredo Marro- 
quln of Witherspoon Street 
on July 12; Lany Gelger of 
Woodbury on July 8; Christo- 
pher Robert, 39, of Valley 
Road, on July 12; Michael J. 
Mears, 45, of Whitehouse 
Station, on July 16; and 
Chris Proulx, 21, of Audu- 
bon, on July 17. All were 
released after being assigned 
court dates to answer the 
charges. 



Michael Fitton, 47, of Mers- 
hon Drive, was arrested on 
July 14 on a contempt of 
court warrant from Princeton 
Borough Municipal Court for 
violation of a restraining 
order. He was released after 
posting ball of $2,500. 



Ruplnder Singh, 38, of 
Devereaux Avenue, was 
arrested on July 14 at Prince- 
ton University on charges of 
having stolen a computer val- 
ued at $3,500 from the 
McCormlck Art Museum in 
April. He was also charged 
with computer criminal activi- 
ty. The arrest followed a 
lengthy Investigation by Bor- 
ough Det. Michael Bender, 
who was assisted by a Prince- 
ton University Department of 
Public Safety officer. Mr. 
Singh was released on his 
own recognizance with sev- 
eral complaint summonses. 



A Trenton man suspected 
of shoplifting at the Princeton 
University store attempted to 
flee police after leaving the 
store shortly after noon on 
July 15. He was chased by 
Borough and Princeton Uni- 
versity Police officers, who 
caught and captured him on 
the New Jersey Transit train 
tracks near the dinky station. 
The accused man. Clarence 
R. Walker. 50, was taken Into 
custody, then held for a July 
25 court date after he was 
found to be wanted on war- 
rants from multiple jurisdic- 
tions totalling $8,058. 



TOWN TALK 

A forum for Princeton residents to express 
opinions about local and national issues. 

Question of the Week: 

"Why do you think Harry Potter is 

so popular and what are some of the 

most memorable scenes?" 

(Asked at the Harr\ Potter part) on Hullish Street 




V I 



"Harry Potter is popular because a lot of people some- 
times believe in magic and sometimes there can be a 
lot of funny parts in it. It's also fun to watch as it has 
magic and power. 1 liked when Harry sees into the Three 
Broomsticks to hear what McGonagall and the Minister 
of Magic have to say." 

— Nina Cerminaro. Monmouth Junction 




"Harry Potter is popular with the teens because the actors 
are cute and the books are simply fabulous. I loved when 
Harry conjured up the stag to help him." 

— Jill Work, East Brunswick 




"It's really, really well written. You see a lot of books 
these days that talk down to you and she doesn't. She 
doesn't write it like a kids book. She writes for herself 
and you see that she doesn't try to water it down. The best 
scenes? They arc all the best. I couldn't choose because 
they are all great." — Leah Bartels, Greenhriar Row 




"These stories have a whole bunch of things going on that 
are not everyday events, but they tie into every day and 
Ihej are very compelling. The most memorable scene is 
reading about Diagon Alley which is in London but only 
the Wizards can gel to it" — Paul Morin 

with Hannah(in the hat) and Haley. Pennington 




"What I like most aboout the book series is the imagina- 
tion and the beautiful wa\ that J.K.Rowling introduces 
children to what is right and what is w rong. She captures 
everyone's child within them. My favorite scene is when 
Miss McGonagall is greeting the new class with Harrv 
and Ron in it and she is at the top of the stairs where she is 
drumming her fingers a bit and says, 'here's another year, 
here we go again.' She is a good stern woman and I like 
her." - Chita St. Lawrence. East Windsor 



SnowdenA/an Dyke Subdivision Plan 
Tabled at Planning Board Review 



The Regional Planning 
Board of Princeton once 
again had to table a plan to 
build a seven-home subdivi- 
sion on a wooded property at 
Snowden Lane and Van Dyke 
Road. The hearing was cut 
short due to the late hour. 

The 15-acre property has 
been at the center of a debate 
between residents and the 
developer, Township resident 
Joel Schwartz. Residents 
worry that traffic conditions 
will worsen at the intersec- 
tion, near Herrontown Road, 
and that an increase in Imper- 
vious surfaces in the area 
could lead to an increased 
risk of flooding. 



Last Wednesday, at a site Protection (DEP) th.^t had 
walk of the Princeton Town- been obtained by the current 
ship Shade Tree Commission, property owner, Myerson 
Township Arborlst Greg Associates. 
ONeil said that approxi- The proposal is expected to 
mately 500 trees would be return to the Planning Board 
removed If the project were sometime in September. 



approved. That number, how- 
ever, could change as the 
applicant works on the subdi- 
vision's site design. 



— Matthew Hersh 




Mr. ONeil added that there 
would also need to be some 
moderate blasting as that 
area is supported by bedrock. 

At the application's initial 
hearing in May residents not 

The plot which also con- opment> ^ m hou ^ s 5^^ 
tarns wetland areas at points 4 ^ an(J 80QQ ^ 

northeast and southeast, lies .. ... .. „„„„„. __. 



Town Topics* 

wclljovcd 

and 

well rend 

since l L )4to 



near the unnamed north trib- 
utary of Harry's Brook — a 

stream that has seen an Wetlands Utter of Interpreta . 
Increase In flooding over the rinn n on . . Npuf , 



but that the property was 
Incorrectly analyzed based on 
a five-year-old Freshwater 



past years. 



tlon (LOF) by the New Jersey 
Department of Environmental 





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Rebecca Hersh and Randall Solomon 

Hersh-Solomon. Rebecca Marie Hersh, daughter of Pam 
Hersh of Princeton and Richard Hersh of Paris, France, to 
Randall Edward Solomon, son of Anita Solomon of Chapel 
Hill. N.C., and Albert Solomon of Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Princeton Township Mayor Phyllis Marchand officiated at 
the July 3 ceremony at the Nassau Inn. 

Ms. Hersh and Mr. Solomon met through Mr. Solomon's 
dog, Hannibal. Hannibal came to work every day with Mr. 
Solomon, and Ms. Hersh would notice them walking by her 
office window. One day she decided to go out to meet the 
large white fluffy dog she saw every morning. The rest is 
history. 

The bride, 32, of Princeton, is a policy analyst for New 
Jersey Future, a nonprofit smart-growth advocacy group and 
public policy think-tank based In Trenton. A graduate of 
Princeton High School, she received her B.S. from Carnegie 
Mellon University and her M.S. from Columbia University In 
urban planning. Before taking her current position, she was 
the communications director at the Tri-State Transportation 
Campaign In New York City, where she worked on transpor- 
tation policy reform for the tri -state region. She was also a 
project associate at the Clinton Housing Development Corpo- 
ration In the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan, 
where she worked on low-Income housing development and 
community revitalizarJon for the neighborhood. She serves on 
the executive committee of the board of the New Jersey 
Chapter of the American Planning Association, and as the 
Association's newsletter editor. 

The bride's mother Is Director of Community and State 
Affairs for Princeton University, as well as a newspaper col- 
umnist and former managing editor of the Princeton Packet. 
Her father is a retired retail trade association executive and 
consultant. 

The bridegroom, 35, born in Park Slope, Brooklyn, is Exec- 
utive Director of the New Jersey Sustainable State Institute, 
and a doctoral student at the Blousteln School of Planning 
and Public Policy at Rutgers University, where he received an 
M.S.P.P and held the honor of Eagleton Fellow. He has held 
several public policy positions In the area of environmental 
policy and sustainable development, including policy adviser 
for the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, director of the 
States Program for Resource Renewal Institute In San Fran- 
cisco, and Senior Policy Analyst and Director of the Sustain- 
able State Project for New Jersey Future. 

His mother is the owner of Solomon Holly Farm and a 
retired senior administrator for the New York City Board of 
Education for 30 years. His father is a retired educator and 
performance artist. 



Weddings and Engagements 

Town Topics welcomes wedding and engagement notices and photo- 
graphs. They should be sent to the office at 4 Mercer Street. Princeton, N.J 



Amber 

16 South Main Street • Pennington 

609.737.8400 

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Naomi Lindenfeld and Michael Bosworth 

Lindenfeld- Bosworth Naomi Lindenfeld. daughter of 
Peter and Lore Lindenfeld of Princeton, to Michael Louis 
Bosworth, son of Marjorie Lou Bosworth of Granby, Mass., 
on June 18 at Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vt. The wedding 
was conducted by John Sprague, a minister of the Universal 
Life Church. 

Bom In Princeton, the bride attended Princeton public 
schools and graduated from Princeton High School. She 
received a bachelor of applied arts degree from Boston Uni- 
versity in 1980. She is a potter in Brattleboro, Vt., and Is the 
ceramics teacher at the Putney School In Putney, Vt. She is a 
co-founder of the Brattleboro Clayworks, a potters collective, 
and now has her studio In her home. 

The bridegroom graduated from the College of the Holy 
Cross with a bachelor's degree in English, received an MBA 
from Western New England College in 1978, and a master of 
regional planning degree from the University of Massachu- 
setts In 1993. He is the former executive director and current 
business manager of the Brick House Community Resource 
Center in Turners Falls, Mass. He has served on many com- 
munity boards, and has been chair of the Franklin County 
Community Development Corporation and the Town of Mon- 
tague Planning Board. 

The bride's father is a professor emeritus of physics at 
Rutgers University; her mother is a fiber artist. 

The groom's father, William Ezra Bosworth, now deceased, 
was a high school teacher of mathematics in Holyoke, Mass.; 
his mother is an elementary school teacher In Granby. 

The couple met at a contradance at the Guiding Star 
Grange in Greenfield, Mass. in 2000. They now make their 
home in Brattleboro, Vt. ^ 




Shulie Cowen and Kai Narezo 

Cowen-Narezo. Shulie Cowen, daughter of Judge Robert 
E. Cowen and Toby Cowen of Princeton, to Kai Narezo, son 
of the late Theresa Narezo, of Mexico City, formerly of 
Princeton. Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal and the bride's father, 
a Judge of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, co-officiated at 
the June 1 2 ceremony at Mountain Lakes House in Princeton. 

The bride is a graduate of Princeton High School and 
Northwestern University. A former member of the Second 
City National Touring company in Chicago, she will be 
appearing in the upcoming Dreamworks fUm, Just Like 
Heaven. She is currently a director, performer, and teacher at 
Improv Olympic West in Hollywood, and teaches at the Sec- 
ond City Los Angeles. 

The groom graduated from the Lawrencevllle School and 
holds degrees from Columbia University and the Berklee Col- 
lege of Music in Boston. He Is a flamenco guitarist and 
recently completed his first solo CD, Vueltas. He has per- 
formed throughout North America and In Europe and Asia. 
He is currently teaching guitar and starting an Independent 
record label that will focus on contemporary music for the 
guitar. 

The couple met during the summer between high school 
and college when both were 18. They continued a friendship 
for many years even while living In different dries and for a 
time In different countries. They started dating three years 
ago and were married on the anniversary of the day they met. 




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Foundation to Ai 

Over $4.6 Million in Grants 

The trustees of the Geral- 

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The Geraldine R. Dodge 

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1974 through the foresight 

and generosity of Geraldine 

. Rockefeller Dodge. The Foun- 
have announced their datJons ftw 



r6^^ 



s ttve areas of giving 

are the Arts. Education. Envi- 
2005 Arts grants. Nlnety-stx ronmen( Mq ^ s c , 

r*r-*r\1e hum hoon m^rli) tf\ - ■* 



approval of $4,660,000 In 



grants have been made to 
museums and galleries, com- /^j^ij" 
munlty and media arts organi- 
zations, and performing arts 
organizations In the disciplines 
of theater, dance, and music. 



fives, and the Welfare of 



Area Students Receive 

throughout the state of New Hfcn^ Book Award 

Seven ar*>a students were 
the winners of the annual 



Jersey. These grants also 
Include a variety of organiza- 
tions that provide services to „ 
*, am Md and ,o New Je, ™g%*& &&$% 



sey artists. 
Princeton's 



McCarter The- 



Central New Jersey. In recog- 
nition of a secondary school 



Play Development program; 
the New Jersey Opera The- 
ater. $10,000. for support of 
the Summer Vocal Institute; 
and first-time grantee Prince- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 
$5,000. for general operating 
support. The American Boy- 
choir School will be given 
$15,000 for the development 
phase of a new multimedia 
touring program prototype. 



pen 

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275c ™i Mr « • k i uniors a^demlc environment 
Ncw and community service. 

Students received presenta- 
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school ceremonies held this 
spring. 

The award recipients are: 
Melissa Welch. The Hun 
School; Mary Crawford Rob- 
erts, Stuart Country Day 
School; Alexa Hoyne. West 
Wlndsor-Plainsboro High 
School South; Jhoany Benitz, 
West Wlndsor-Plainsboro High 
School North; Tess Edmonds. 
Other Mercer County orga- Princeton High School; Nan 

nizations receiving grants are Ni, The Lawrenceville School; 

Trenton's New Jersey Network and Amy Seymour. The Pen- 

($75,000), Boheme Opera nington School. 

($10,000), and Passage The- 
atre ($65,000). 
According to David Grant, 

the Foundation's president 

and CEO, "The art that is 

being created In New Jersey 

continues to be Impressive. 

From north to south and east 

to west, the arts organizations 

that the Foundation supports 

are truly making a difference 

in their communities — urban, 

suburban and rural — and 

making lasting impressions on 

audiences of all ages." 




NEWCOMERS: New Board members at the Princeton Senior Resource Cen- 
ter are (from left): Bill Barnhard, Nancy Arnold, Tom Stange, Judy Yaskln, 
and Deborah Blanks. Not pictured are Eric Lear, Megan Thomas, and Kay 
Heidere. 



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Six Births Reported 
At Princeton Hospital 

The Princeton HealthCare 
System has reported six 
births to area residents during 
the week ending July 1 7. 

Sons were bom to Jyoti 
and Ravi Bhagavan, Prince- 
ton, July 12; Kristin and 
Michael Bailey, Skillman, July 
15; and Sara and John 
Dacruz, Princeton, July 16. 

Daughters were bom to 
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hett, Skillman, July 1 1 ; Linda 
Nowicki and Gerard Dls- 
mukes, Princeton, July 12; 
and Karen and James 
Trolano, Lawrenceville, July 
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Acting Governor Codey 
Issues "Do Not Call" Alert 

A letter from Acting Governor Richard J. Codey says 
that the "Do Not Call" law protecting New Jersey residents 
from telemarketers Is at risk. Since numbers began being 
registered more than a year ago, some 3.2 million tele- 
phone numbers are no longer subject to the machinery of 
telemarketing. 

According to Gov. Codey, however, the American 
Teleservices Association (ATA) has filed a petition with the 
Federal Communications Commission that seeks to have 
certain portions of New Jersey's "Do Not CalT law pre- 
empted because of alleged conflicts with the FCC's niles. 
In addition, a group of 33 organizations (including the 
ATA) has filed another petition that seeks to have the FCC 
declare it has exclusive Jurisdiction over interstate telemar- 
keting. 

The FCC is accepting comments from the public on both 
petitions until July 29. New Jersey residents who want 
continued protection from telemarketers are urged to con- 
tact the FCC and tell the agency how the "Do Not Call" 
law has Improved their quality of life. 

Residents will find more Information about the two FCC 
petitions on the main page of the state's web she, 
www.state.nj.us., where a link for emailing comments 
directly to the FCC Is provided. 

One indicator of the effectiveness of the state law Is that 
two lawsuits have been filed this spring against companies 
that allegedly violated the law by calling telephone num- 
bers on the "Do Not Call" registry. 

Consumer Affairs is the enforcement agency responsible 
for ensuring compliance with the "Do Not Call" law. Under 
the leadership of Director Kimberly S. Rickerts, the Divi- 
sion continues to investigate other consumer complaints 
about alleged violations of the law and remains committed 
to taking action against violators. 

Consumers can register their residential landline and 
mobile telephone numbers by calling the Federal Trade 
Commission at 1-888-382-1222 or by logging on to 
www.donotcall.gov. For the convenience of New Jersey 
residents, the FTC's database Is used, so there Is no need 
to register a second time with the state. 

Once a telephone number is registered, telemarketers In 
New Jersey have up to three months to stop calling. Also, 
the law does allow certain calls to continue, Including 
solicitation from charities, queries from polling organiza- 
tions, messages from poltical campaigns, and calls from 
businesses where a consumer has an established relation- 
ship. 

In order to help with the enforcement of the "Do Not 

Call" law, residents who receive a telemarketing call at a 

registered telephone number should: 

(1) Note the date and time of the call. 

(2) Write down the name of the company on whose 
behalf the call Is being made. 

(3) Write down the caller's telephone number (If caller ID 
is available). 

(4) Ask the caller the name of the telemarketing firm that 
he/she is working for If It hasn't been disclosed. 

(5) Note the purpose of the call. 

Residents are urged to file complaints with Consumer 
Affairs about calls that allegedly violate the "Do Not Call" 
law. To file a complaint, call 1-888-NJNOCALL (1-888- 
656-6225) or log on to www.nJ.gov/donotcall for a com- 
plaint form. Consumers may file their complaints online or 
fill out a complaint form, sign It, and return It to the New 
Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, P.O. Box 45025, 
Newark. N.J. 07101. 



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PREPARING TO LAUNCH: Area residents gather to prepare for the Anything 
That Floats race, which will be held on Saturday, July 30, from 10 a.m. to 
noon, at the Plainsboro Public Library. Entrants are encouraged to create a 
craft out of any materials that are not normally used for marine craft. Past 
entrants have modified bikes, sheets of styrofoam insulation, garbage 
bags, soda bottles, sleds, and construction sponsons. Literally anything 
that floats is a go. For more information, visit the library's Web site, at 
www.lmxac.org/Plainsboro.com. 




Siroka in Town Topics, or visit 
www.EvaSiroka.com. 



Eva Siroka 

Author Writes on Scandals 
Of 16th Century Rome 

Artist, writer, and art histo- 
rian Eva Siroka recently pub- 
lished a book that reflects all 
of her Interests, Maddalena, 
the first in a trilogy of illus- 
trated books based on 16th 
century Rome. 

The author, a Princeton res- 
ident, will hold a signing for 
her book on Tuesday, July 26, 
at 7 p.m. at Chestnut Tree 
Books, located on Harrison 
Street in the Princeton Shop- 
ping Center. 

The book tells the story of 
Maddalena, who lived during 
the harsh days of the Catholic 
Inquisition. Despite the severe 
moral climate of the Church, 
the Vatican's most powerful 
cardinal has an illegitimate 
son, a Jewish mistress (Mad- 
delena), and an ongoing affair 
with a 16-year-old boy. Along 
with a story based much on 
facts of the time, the story is 
illustrated through ink and 
water color drawings created 
by the author. 

European-born and edu- 
cated in the U.S., Ms. Siroka 
forged her interest in art, liter- 
ature, history, and languages 
at Hunter College. CUNY, and 
at Princeton University, where 
she earned her doctorate. 
Since 1972, her dual training 
in art history and fine arts 
continues to merge in varied 
projects, including academic 
and creative writing, and her 
art. particularly book Illustra- 
tions and copies of old mastCT 
paintings and drawings. 

For more information, see 
next weeks story on Ms. 



Franklin Fever Continues 
At Plainsboro Library 

Plainsboro Public Library 
will continue its summeT pro- 
gram Franklin Fever series 
with three offerings at the end 
of July. 

Back by popular demand Is 
the Next Stage Ensemble of 
The Shakespeare Theatre of 
New Jersey, performing Irish 
playwright Dion Boucicault's 
comedy of manners and mis- 
taken identities, London 
Assurance, on Wednesday, 
July 27. at 7 p.m. The play, 
with its madcap store of crazi- 
ness, was an Influence on bet- 
ter known playwright Oscar 
Wilde's famous play. The 
Importance of Being Ernest. 
The Next Stage performers, 
working in the manner of trav- 



eling troupes from bygone 
eras, arrive shortly before the 
scheduled event, set up a tem- 
porary stage, and leap into 
rollicking, professional action 
within an hour on an intimate 
stage. 

Following the event Is a 
cardboard canoe race, where 
entrants build a boat on the 
spot, with one roll of tape, 
one sheet of cardboard, one 
razor knife and one hour of 
time. Registration will take 
place on the day of the event, 
which is held at Water's Edge 
Park off Pond View Drive. 

All events are free and open 
to the public. For more Infor- 
mation, call the library at 
(609) 275-2897. 




— 



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Senior Housing 

continued from page 1 

sufficient density which we 
need to be able to work on 
the site," she said. 

She said that the costs in- 
curred from spreading out 
the site would make the proj- 
ect more difficult to build, 
and that Hovnanian had 
already cuts costs by pro- 
posing fewer, albeit, larger 
buildings. 

Citing results from various 
market surveys, Ms. Roberts 
said her firm found that se- 
niors 62 and over tend to 
want to be in a "home" set- 
ting rather than an apart- 
ment. 

"Why would people move 
from a three-bedroom ranch 
to an apartment?," she 
said. 

After the meeting, Jeffer- 
son Road resident Roz De- 
nard said she was surprised 
that the Hovnanian proposal 
had received as much resis- 
tance from SPRAB as it had. 
"We've done all this: the 
buildings had been changed 
to suit all of the complaints 
and all the criticism." 



A founder of Community 
Without Walls, an organi- 
zation dedicated to ensur- 
ing that seniors can age 
"in place" without having 
to move to the fringes of 
the community, Ms. Denard 
said she found it puzzling 
that SPRAB had revisited 
the initial concerns offered 
after Hovnanian presented a 
concept plan to the Regional 
Planning Board of Princeton 
in April 2004. "What are 
they doing? We're past this 
stage," she added. 

A former Township Com- 
mltteewoman, Ms. Denard 
cited the priority long put 
forth by Committee to pro- 
vide more senior housing 
in the Township. Currently 
there are no market rate 
senior housing units in the 
Township. 

"I was disappointed with 
the reaction of SPRAB, par- 
ticularly in light of the num- 
ber of years we have been 
trying to get senior hous- 
ing In the community," said 
Committeeman Bill Enslln in 
a separate interview. 

He added that the zoning 
of the site, in this case, the 
Township's Office Research 
Zone with a Residential Se- 
nior Community District 
overlay zone, accommodates 
the housing. Mr. Enslln also 
cited the nearby 606 New 
Jersey Transit bus, and the 
Princeton Shopping Center In 
his defense of the proposed 
locale of Four Seasons. Mr. 
Enslln said the environmen- 
tal Issues Involved with the 
site would be carefully moni- 
tored. However, Ms. Denard 
suggested that additional ob- 
stacles could be addressed 
In the application's pre-con- 
structlon phases. "The time 
has come, the changes have 
been made. Let's move on." 
— Matthew Hersh 



Recycling 

MONDAY 

For 
Borough 

and 
Township 



Local Fare 

from Princeton's kitchen* 

Blueberry Pie 

In this season of wonderful blueberries. 
it is appropriate to pass along this 
recipt pos tibly originally 
appeared in an old Keebler 
rtisement. 




1 cup hot water 
3 tblsp Cornstarch 
'/» scant cup sugar 

Mix and cook on medium heat 

until thickened (about the consistency 

of honey). Remove from heat. 

Sprinkle in one package of sugar-free Lemon jello. 

Add 2-3 cups blueberries. 

Mix together and pour into a Keebler' s butter shortbread 

pie crust. 

Refrigerate until cold and jello is set. 

Spread top with Cool Whip and serve. 

More to Come ... Watch this space weekly for Princeton's 
favorite recipes... Provided by Robin Broomer. Town Topics 

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For a complete listing of events and times, 
call 800-843-723 1 , ext. 11 95 or log on to 
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July 

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A taste of the world. 

If you need a special cheese from across the 
Atlantic — don't pull out your passport just yet 
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Borough Project 

continued from pjge 1 

The original projections of 
raising the parking fees by 
15 percent by 2007 could 
Increase the profit margin If 
the Borough decides to hike 
rates before that date. 

"I think we may revisit rates 
before 2007. particularly 
when it comes to Sundays." 
Mr. Goldfarb said, adding 
that while the Borough has 
lost revenue throughout the 
delay. It ha* gained the ad- 
ditional parking, the new 
library, and the nearly-open 
public plaza next to the li- 
brary. Although the plaza 
Is open to the public. It still 
awaits the construction of a 
pergola that will surround 
the periphery. 

"People can make their 
own value judgment about 
which Is better, but 1 feel 
what we have is better than 
what we had before." he 
said, predicting that th« 
project will turn cash-flow 
positive shortly after it Is 
completed. 

However, to mitigate rev- 
enue lost In the first two 
years, "drastic changes" 
will be required down the 
line, including the afore- 
mentioned Increase In park- 
ing fees. According to Mr. 
Bruschl's financial update 
to Council, 2005 will be the 
first year the Borough profits 
on the development project. 
But that profit, $46,882, is 
still $650,840 short of the 
2002 estimate. Mr. Bruschl 
added that while those Initial 
projections will not be real- 
ized In the short-term, the 
eventual yield will be In line 
with the original estimates. 
Garage repairs to correct 
the damp basement are ex- 
pected to be undertaken by 
fall, according to the devel- 
oper. NHKT principal Robert 
Powell was not certain how 
much repairs might cost, but 
estimates have reportedly 
fallen within the $400,000 
area. Borough officials said 
the municipality will not be 
responsible for shouldering 
that cost. 

—Matthew Hersh 



Better Business Bureau 
Warns Online Shoppers 

Better Business Bureaus 
have issued an International 
alert warning the public about 
individuals who are fraudu- 
lently using the BBB name to 
extort money from online 
shoppers seeking to purchase 
"big-ticket" Items advertised at 
"low ball" prices. 

BBBs In eight states, from 
Ohio to California, have 
received queries from online 
shoppers who were directed 
to use bogus BBB services or 
received bogus BBB Invoices 
when purchasing jet skis, cars, 
motorcycles, and similar Items 
advertised on auction, classi- 
fieds, and other Web sites. 
Sites where such Items were 
allegedly listed Include eBay, 
Cralgsllst, Carbuyer.com, and 
Motorcycletrader.com. 

Complainants reported that 
when they attempted to buy 
the item by communicating 
directly with the seller, they 
were advised that their finan- 
cial payment would be "han- 
dled securely through the 
"Better Business Bureau Com- 
pany's Insurance service." 
Buyers were told to email the 
seller, whom, they were 
advised, would send their 
email to the BBB, which 
would let them know if they 
were preferred customers and 
could begin the transaction. 

Mr. Hunter advised consum- 
ers to take note of the 
following: 



• The BBB does not operate 
a "Better Business Bun 
Insurance Service." and it 
does not offer a "BBB Auto 
Buyers Protection Program." " 

•The BBB is not a "pre- 
ferred insurance provider" for 
eBay or any other entity. 

•The BBB doe* not manage 
financial transactions for 
online merchants. 

•The BBB does not issue 
profiles or reports on IndMdu 
als BBBs report on businew 
es. 

Email addresses affiliated 
with the scam Include 
support@bbb-paysafe.com, 
support@bbbsafe.com, and 
support@lnc-bhb COOL 
The BBB advises consumers 

to: 

•Always contact the BBB 
when there are questions con- 
cerning the legitimacy of an 
offer. 

•"Click to verify" 
BBBOn/me Reliability or 
BBBOnLine Privacy program 
seals displayed on merchant 
Web sites, or go to 
www.bbbonllns org foi b list 
of merchants meeting 
BBBOn/me standards. 



COX'S 




MARKET 

A Princeton Tradition 

Full Service Catering, 

Sandwiches, Salad Bar, 

Desserts and morel 

All items made fresh or\ premises. 

This means 

QUALITY • FRE5HNE55 

ar\d COMPETITIVE PRICES for you. 

Stop by and see our menu. 

1 80 Nassau Street, Princeton 
609-924-6269 



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Hospital Campus 

continued from page 1 

mesh with the neighborhood, 
a certain amount of building 
density is needed to achieve 
goals such as senior hous- 
ing — a concept that has 
not been endorsed, but one 
that has been put forth in 
architect J. Robert Hlllier's 
280-unit plan that includes 
a park and some commercial 
spaces. 

Princeton HealthCare 
System, the parent entity of 
UMCP, employed Mr. Hillier, 
a minority owner of Town 
Topics, to put together a 
concept that would give mu- 
nicipal planners an idea of 
what kind of zoning would 
be attractive to prospective 
developers. PHCS Is also 
banking on the land sale 
to finance a portion of the 
hospital's proposed $350 
million state-of-the-art cam- 
pus. 

However, the municipali- 
ties are hoping to use any 
new development as an op- 
portunity to act on afford- 
able housing requirements, 
as mandated by the state in 
the Council on Affordable 
Housing's new third round 
regulations. While neither 
the Borough nor the Town- 
ship have yet put together 
an affordable housing plan 
that is compliant with the 
new rules, the hospital site 
Is seen as a potential loca- 
tion of affordable units. 

Building and population 
density, however, will deter- 
mine how many affordable 
units can be built. As the 
density increases, the more 
affordable housing options 
present themselves, said Lee 
Solow, planning director for 
the Planning Board. 

The Hllller concept en- 
visions about 510,000 
square-feet for total floor 
area, just slightly under the 
amount currently used by 
the hospital. Twenty per- 
cent of the units fall under 
the mandatory designation 
of affordable housing, and 
the Planning Board has 
asked that the designation 
be increased to 25 percent. 
The Planning Board has also 
recommended that, in or- 
der to maximize affordable 
housing, at least 75 percent 
of the units not be age re- 
stricted. 

That recommendation 
did not sit well with some 
board members like Wendy 
Benchley, who characterized 



a 510,000 square-foot com- 
plex as a ""very, very dense 
housing development." 

"I know a lot can be done 
with good design, but It's a 
lot of density and housing 
units for that neighborhood," 
she said. 

Another planning board 
member, Borough Mayor Joe 
O'Neill, warned the board 
not to play a "shell game with 
any future developer," and 
to avoid "rigging the deal" 
for the hospital before a deal 
is actually done by creating 
master plan amendments 
that would dictate zoning 
and possibly restrict density 
allowance. 

"We do not.yet know what 
the square-footage is going 
to be on the Wltherspoon 
Street campus, and though 
we know what the acreage 
is, we want to make sure 
we're not cheating the prop- 
erty owner," he said. 

But several residents won- 
dered how much the issue of 
density — specifically the re- 
duction of density — actually 
means to the hospital and 
the sale of its land, and that 
the design of any future de- 
velopment be done In keep- 
ing with the surrounding 
neighborhoods. Residents 
called for the Borough and 
Township to employ its own 
consultant to explore the 
possibilities found on the 
Wltherspoon campus. In a 
statement, PHCS President 
and CEO Barry Rabner said 



the reason the hospital con- 
tracted with Mr. Hlllier's firm 
at the onset was to answer 
re-use questions. 

Additionally, Mr. Rabner 
was afraid that bringing in 
new consultants would de- 
lay the planning process 
further: 

"Since so much work has 
been done on this project al- 
ready, we are uncertain about 
what value a new planner 
could bring to the process. 
Most Importantly, the delays 
caused by repeating the pro- 
cess will actually jeopardize 
the viability of the hospital 
relocation project." 

Other conclusions drawn 
up by the Planning Board 
are that the hospital-owned 
homes along Harris Road re- 
main as private residences; 
the surgical center at the 
corner of Henry Avenue and 
Witherspoon Street should 
remain for office use; the 
parking garage should be 
re-used to serve whatever 
development follows the 
hospital's planned departure; 
and that the existing zoning 
that permits a general-use 
hospital should remain until 
UMCP relocates. 

The Planning Board's 
Master Plan Subcommittee 
has scheduled a meeting 
for Tuesday, August 16, at 
9 a.m. at Township Hall to 
begin drafting language for 
possible amendments to the 
master plan in regard to the 
hospital site. 

— Matthew Hersh 



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Fire Wire 



The Princeton Fire Depart- 
ment reports the following 
activity between July 12 and 
July 18: 

The Department answered 
calls for false or malfunction- 
ing fire and carbon monoxide 
alarm systems on Prospect 
Avenue, Magnolia Lane, Der- 
went Drive, Province Line 
Road, University Place. North 
Road, Washington Road, and 
Spring Street. 

On July 15, Tower 62 
responded to an unfounded 
report of a natural gas leak at 
Westerly Road. 

Also on the 15th, Tower 62, 
and Squirt 63 responded to a 
report of smell of electrical 
burning at an educational 
facility on Broadmead Street. 
The cause of the odor was 
determined to be a malfunc- 
tioning light ballast. 

On July 16, Tower 62 
responded to a Boudinot 
Street residence for a reported 



water main leak. Upon Investi- 
gation the cause of the leak 
was determined to be a 
backed up toilet. 

On July 17, Engine 61 
responded to wires down In 
the roadway on the Great 
Road. 



Fire Safety Fact 

Smoke detectors and carbon 
monoxide detectors that are 
powered by electricity often 
have a battery back-up system. 
Residents should remember to 
replace these batteries once a 
year. When the batteries are 
low In these types of units they 
often will sound intermittently 
to notify you that the batteries 
need changing. 

The Princeton Fire Depart- 
ment is one of the oldest vol- 
unteer fire departments in the 
country. Approximately 50 
active members respond to 
emergency calls each year. 
The Department is always 
looking for more members to 
join. If interested, call (609) 
497-7645. or (609) 
731-1314. 




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The Princeton First Aid & 
Rescue Squad responded to 
46 calls between July 9 and 
July 15. Twenty-nine calls 
were located In Princeton 
Township, 15 were in Prince- 
ton Borough, and two were In 
Lawrence Township. Included 
in these numbers wen rifl » .ills 
to Princeton Unlv< 

On Saturdav .ifu'rnoon. July 
9. the Squad responded to an 
assisted care facility for 
erly male who came dost to 
losing consciousness. Accord- 
ing to reports from th. 
ty's staff, the patient suddenly 
slumped over in the dining 
room and was diaphoretic and 
pale. The staff brought the 
man up to his room and lay 
him In bed, and when the 
Squad arrived they found that 
although he felt better and his 
color had Improved, his pulse 
was quite slow. He was trans- 
ported to the University Medi- 
cal Center at Princeton (UM 
CP) for further evaluation. 

On the afternoon of July 1 5, 
the Squad was dispatched to a 
cardiologist's office on Harri- 
son Street on the report of a 
possible heart attack. Upon 
arrival, the crew was Informed 
that a 64-year-old man had 
just completed a stress test 
and was preparing to leave the 
office when he collapsed. 
Because a pulse could not be 
detected, the crew Initiated 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation 
on the patient and attached 
him to an automatic defibrilla- 
tor. The crew administered 
CPR as the man was trans- 
ported to UMCP, where a 
pulse was regained In the 
Emergency Department. 

On the evening of July 15, 
the Squad was dispatched to 
Palmer Square where a crowd 
was gathered to watch an out- 
door showing of a motion pic- 
ture. A 43-year-old member of 
the audience had experienced 
seizures while watching the 
film. Upon arrival of the 
Squad, the seizures had 
stopped and the patient was 
fully alert and conscious. The 
patient, who has been manag- 
ing a seizure condition since 
childhood, ultimately refused 
transport to the hospital after 
being evaluated by the Squad. 

The Princeton First Aid & 
Rescue Squad relies on dedi- 
cated volunteers to meet the 
emergency medical and techni- 
cal rescue needs of the com- 
munity. For more information 
about joining the Squad, visit 
www.pfars.org, or call (609) 
924-3338. 



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New Sources of Revenue Would Permit 
Maintenance of Borough Police Force 

To the Editor: 

The Borough's struggle to effectively manage its budget is 
leading to a serious reduction in critical services, most point- 
edly that of public safety. The proposal to permanently 
reduce the size of the police force by two officers through 
attrition Is both unfair and potentially dangerous. 

The Borough police, unlike their counterparts In surround- 
ing semi-rural communities like the Township, meet the 
everyday challenges similar to those experienced in most 
small cities across the country. In terms of competence, 
professionalism, and friendliness, the Borough's police force 
ranks with the best. From 1998 to 2003. the addition of 
new officers resulted In a 19.8 percent reduction In crime; 
In 2004 when the attrition policy was adopted, this number 
reversed itself. 

We are now facing a situation where this manpower short- 
age Is putting considerable stress on the remaining members 
of the force. The Increase in workload results in a reduction 
In the amount of discretionary time that an officer has for 
writing reports, processing arrested persons, and answering 
calls for service. Community policing programs and patrols, 
popular in Princeton with residents and business owners, 
will be significantly scaled back, leaving an enormous vai 
uum In overall municipal safety, not to mention public per- 
ception. 

One of the primary reasons a family makes a choice to 



live or shop In a town like Princeton is because of the 
community's commitment to public safety. Most families 
who decide to live here or operate a business here are 
willing to accept high rates of taxation because they know 
there is a corresponding level of service. Now we are look- 
ing at the service dissipating while taxes continue to 
Increase. 

The position is made even more confusing to business 
owners when you consider the bureaucracy that holds up 
projects like Hulfish North, which could bring in millions In 
rateables into the Borough coffers. Shouldn't the Borough 
focus on increasing its tax base? Why cut vital services when 
all the Council needs to do Is assign priority to projects that 
will help solve the budget problem? Why put our families 
and businesses at risk when the solution to maintaining 
services, like police staffing levels, could be waiting for 
approval at the planning office? 

It Is my understanding that in January Hulfish North 
received unanimous conceptual approval from the planning 
board, but since then the project has been bogged down In 
bureaucratic delays and questionable scheduling conflicts. 

Isn't it the responsibility of the Borough to protect Its 
residential and commercial taxpayers, not penalize them for 
the municipal government's lack of Initiative in opening the 
way to new sources of revenue? These are challenging times 
for merchants. Why make things even tougher for us with 
unnecessary service cuts when a positive solution like Hul- 
fish North Is within our reach? 

KATHLEEN MOROLDA 

Cranbury Station Gallery 

Palmer Square East 



Palmer Square Housing Development, 
Long Overdue, Deserves Top Priority 

To the Editor: 

In 2002 we put our names on the list to purchase a 
residential unit at the proposed development on Palmer 
Square. Periodically we call the Palmer Square office to get 
an update on when the units will be completed. We always 
receive the same answer, which is in about eighteen months 
to two years following final approvals by the planning 
board. So naturally we ask when will final approvals occur, 
and we are told that plans are still under review and no 
dates have been set for a hearing. 

Following the January 2005 conceptual hearing we were 
somewhat encouraged when the planning board gave their 
"thumbs up," but once again this project has been stalled by 
what appears to be a ridiculously long, overly bureaucratic 
review period. 

Anyone driving along Paul Robeson Place knows that this 
project needs to be underway. The current site, with or 
without the garden and the Writers' Block, has been an 
eyesore since the early 1990s. The new development must 
provide the municipality with a significant Increase in rate- 
ables to help them with their budget problems. And busi- 
nesses in the Borough will benefit from all the new residents 
and increased activity. 

Why put this project on the back burner when it should be 
a top priority?! 

ANDREW STEGINSKY 
Hulfish Street 



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Town Topics® Reader Survey 

ENTER TO WIN! 

GRAND PRIZE* 

One Night Stay at the historic Nassau Inn accompanied by dinner at the Yankee Doodle Tap Room. 

ADDITIONAL PRIZES* 
Voucher for two tickets to any McCarter Theater series performance during the months of September 2005 

through June 2006 

• Two Subscription passes to the Princeton Summer Theater 

• Travel Mug and T-Shirt from Small World Coffee 

• Six Movie Passes (good for one year) to Princeton Garden Theater 

• Redflower candle and T-shirt from Rouge Boutique on Withei spoon Street 

SAVE TIME AND MONEY... Fill this survey out online at www.towntopics.com 

OR fill out the following survey below and mail to Town Topics Reader Survey, 4 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540. 

Please indicate your name and contact information for the prize drawing. 



3 

z 
2 



INTEREST QUESTIONS 

1) How satisfied are you with Town Topics in general? 

(1=Very Dissatisfied, 5=Very Satisfied) 

O 1 

O 2 

O 3 

O 4 

O 5 

2) How often do you read the paper? 
O Every week 

Almost every week 
O At least once a month 
O Less than once a month 
O Hardly ever 

3) Which part of the paper do you like most? (Please pick up 
to 3) 

O Arts 
O Theater 
O Culture 
Q Calendar 

) Classifieds 
O Real estate 
O Sports 

~) Municipal News 

O Feature stones mt ^■ wmi 

O Advertisements 

4) Of the following, which would you like to see more of in the 
paper? (Check all that apply) 

O Municipal news 

( ) Human Interest 

O Feature Stories 

O Business 

O Financial coverage 

O University news and announcements 

O Coverage of children's events (at schools and in town.) 

5) Which one of the following additions to Town Topics 
would you like us to pursue? (Please indicate any additional 
suggestions in the comments section at the end of this page.) 

) Section dedicated to the University 
O Spanish page 

Opinions and commentary page 
O Style and society section 
Political/social cartoon ("New Yorker" Style) 
O Cross-word puzzle 
O More interactive web site 
O TV show on local cable access 

6) Which other papers do you read? (check all that apply) 
) Times of Trenton 

O New York Times 
) U.S.1 

O Wall Street Journal 
O Princeton Packet 

7) What would you think if Town Topics began running a 
color photo on the front Page? 

O I would like it a lot 
O It might be nice 

3 It does not matter to me at all 

) I would not like it 

LOOK AND FEEL 

8) How do you feel about the paper visually? 
(check all that apply) 

The paper is charming the way it is-don't change a thing 

) The paper could be more modem 
O The columns are too narrow 

D The text is too small 

O I don't like how I have to follow the stones throughout the paper 

(stories aren't contained on one page) 

3 There are not enough pictures 

O The space between columns is too narrow 

D The paper appears too cluttered 



9) In which of the following locations would you like to see 
color added to the paper? (Check all that apply) 

) Title and logo 
) Photo on front page 
3 Real Estate section 
i ) Masthead (see Page 2 of Town Topics upper left hand corner) 

Advertising 

) Sports photos 

1 3 Nowhere — I like the current black and white look 

SPORTS 

10) Which of the following statements best describes how 
you feel about the sports section? 

) I am satisfied with the sports coverage in Town Topics 
O I would like to see a greater emphasis on Princeton University 
sports 

) I would like to see a greater emphasis on high school sports 

) I would like to see an athlete of the week or month column 

) I do not read the sports section 

SUPPLEMENTS 

Throughout the year Town Topics runs special insert supplements 
that either pull out of the paper or are printed on the center pages 

11) Which of the following statements best describes how 
you feel about the Town Topics supplements? 

) I enjoy reading all ol the different supplements 
O I only read the supplements that pertain to me and people I 
know 

) I don't remember the last time I read one of the supplements 

) I throw the supplements out 

12) Which of the following supplements was useful and/ or 
enjoyable to you? (check all that apply) 

) Special Event Planning Guide 

) Summer Camp Guide 

) Home Improvement Supplement 

) Communiversity Guide 

) Mother's Day Issue 

) Graduation page 

) Fitness Guide 

) Back to School Supplement 

) Home for the Holidays 

) A Whole New You 

13) If we were to change the design of the supplement sec- 
tion, which of the following changes would you like most? 
(Please lets us know any suggestions in the comments sec- 
tion below.) 

) A glossy magazine style supplement 
) As a center section in the paper 
) Letter sized newsprint booklet 
) Different subjects for the supplements 

WEB SITE 

14) How often do you log on to the Town Topics web site, 
http://www.towntopics.com? 

) Once a week or more 
) More than once a month 
) Once a month 
) Less than Once a month 
) Never 

15) Which of the following would you like to see added to our 
web site? (check all that apply) 

) Ijete breaking editorial news 

) Local election results 
O Movie listings 
Weather report 

3 Classified ads 

) ReaJ Estate 

) SAVE pet of the week 

) Town Talk 
Police Blotter 

) Sports scores 
O Local sports schedules 



) Advertisements 

) Topics in Bnef 

) Town Topics TV on TV 30 

16) How interested are you in watching a Town Topics weekly 

news program on TV 30 that airs on Thursday evenings? 

) Vi'iy int<'h",h' ( | 

) Somewhat interested 

) I would maybe watch every once and a while 

I I would probably not watch the show 

) I am not able to view TV30 

) I am not familiar with TV30 

DEMOGRAPHICS (OPTIONAL) 

1 8) 7n/s section is optional. The purpose is to help us understand 
more about our readers. 

Which of the following best describes where you live? 
i ) Princeton Borough 

I I'unceton Township 

) Montgomery Township 

1 i r.inklin Township 

) Plainsboro Township 

) West Windsor Township 

) Lawrence Township 

) Hopewell Township 

) Other 

19) Piemee indicate your gender: 
) Female 

) Male 

20) Please indicate the range that includes your current age: 
) 18 and under ) 56-65 

) 19-25 86-75 

16-35 »>-85 

» 16-45 ) 86-95 

> 46-55 i ) 96-105 

21) Please indicate the highest level of education that you 
have achieved: 

' I ess than high school 
) High school 
1 ) College 
) Graduate or professional school 
) Post-graduate 

22) How long have you lived in this area? 
) Less than 2 years ) 1 1 -20 years 

) 3-5 years » more than 20 years 

' ) 6-10 years 

23) How many people live in your household? 
) 1 

) 2 ) 6 

' ) 3 7 

> 4 ) more than 7 

24) How many members of your household read Town 
Topics? 

> 1 ') 5 
') 2 ') 6 

) 3 >7 

> 4 ) more than 7 

25) Which of the following statements best describes your- 
self? (check all that apply) 

O I am a student 
O I am marned 

) I am single 

) I have young children 

) I am not marned, but in a relationship 

) I have children that are in middle school or high school 

) I am retired 

Disclaimer This information will solely be used internally by Town 

Topics and will not be shared 

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ATTACH COMMENTS. 






Triank you very much for takmg the t.me to complete this survey. Your responses will better help - hnng you your local news in the way that is more appropnate for you. 

Thank you again and good luck in the prize drawing' Winners will he notified on or about August 5th. 2005. 

Topics reader Winner* will be notified via lelephone and e-mail and nave tevca day* to respond berore a new winner will be *eiecico « co> ^^^ •certain resinclions may apply 
age ori8 musi have (he pemrnsion of a paren. or legal guardian Only *nou» readm, ptcaae Pnxe* are sublet to certain rennctiom a« «ne d. wreiion or .be ipomo, 




"THE RED SAIL": The Coryell Gallery in Lambertville is celebrating its 24th 
Annual Summer Exhibition with an exhibit from several artists who have 
shown there in the past, including the artist who created this oil painting, 
Barbara Kes Farnham. The gallery artists will show oils, acrylics, water- 
colors, and pastels with a variety of subjects such as landscapes, figura- 
tive work, and cityscapes. The Coryell Gallery is located at 8 Coryell 
Street, Lambertville. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 
5 p.m. For more information, call (609) 397-0804. , <^1D 



/ 









"APPLE JAM": This watercolor painting by Princeton artist Lucy Graves 
McVicker will will be on display at the Pennswood Village Art Gallery 
through September 5, as part of an exhibit, "Watercolor and Beyond." Ms. 
McVicker is the Artist in Residence at the Center of Arts in Skillman. Her 
work has been shown in various juried exhibitions, including the American 
Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition, the annual Salmagundi show in New 
York, and more than 30 others in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and 
Moscow. An artist's reception and talk for the exhibit will be held on 
Sunday, July 24, at 3 p.m. The Pennswood Village Art Gallery is located at 
1382 Newtown-Langhorne Road, Newtown, Pa. For more information, call 
(215)968-9110. 



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Coryell Gallery Exhibits 
Artists Over The Years 

The Coryell Gallery In 
Lambertville Is holding the 
24th Annual Summer Exhibi- 
tion of distinguished artists 
associated with the gallery 
over the years, with a recep- 
tion to meet the artists on 
Sunday, July 24, from 3 to 6 
p.m. The exhibit will continue 
through September 25. 

The gallery artists will show 
oils, acrylics, watercolors, and 
pastels with a variety of sub- 
jects such as landscapes, figu- 
rative work, and cityscapes. 
The artists have exhibited in 
many major invitational and 
Juried shows throughout the 
country and abroad, winning 
top awards. 

Among the artists In the 
show are Joanne Augustine, 
Gabrielle Baumgartner, Albert 
W. Bross, Jr., W. Carl Burger, 
Vincent Ceglla, Marge 
Chavooshian, Tom Chesar, 
Harriet Ermentrout, Alexander 
and Barbara Farnham, Mike 
Filipiak, Richard Lennox, Lucy 
McVicker, Pamela Miller, Ben- 
ham Khavaran, Charles Ross, 
Elizabeth Ruggles, Robert Sak- 
son, Joanne Scott, Colette 
Sexton, Nancy Silvia, Judith 
Sutton, George Van Hook, 
Valerie Von Betzen, Luiz Vile- 
la, Barbara Watts, Charles W. 
Ward (1900-1962), Anne 
Steele Marsh (1901-1995), 
and Ranulph Bye 
(1916-2003). 

Sculptors will include Josie 
Dellenbaugh, George Douris, 
Richard Gerster, and Jeanne 
Pasley, and there will also be 
pottery by Ann Tsubota and 
Katherine Hackl. 

The Coryell Gallery at the 
Porkyard, located at 8 Coryell 
Street, Lambertville, is in a 
remodeled sausage factory 
built alongside the Historic 
Delaware and Raritan Canal. 
Gallery hours are Wednesday 
through Sunday, noon to 5 
p.m. 

For more information, call 
Janet M. Hunt, director, at 
(609) 397-0804. 
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Mkhener Museum Exhibits 
Native American Artworks 

The Mlchener Art Museum 
in Doylestown, Pa., Is cur- 
rently exhibiting. "Art in 2 
Worlds: The Native American 
Fine Art Invitational." a con- 
temporary art exhibition orga- 
nized by the Heard Museum in 
Phoenix, Az. 

This exhibition runs through 
October 16. in the Wachovia 
Gallery. Sponsored by Ameri- 
cans for Native Americans In 
Doylestown with additional 
support froii. a friend of the 
Mlchener Art Museum, "Art In 
2 Worlds" celebrates the cre- 
ativity and Innovation of 
Native American artists, draw- 
ing on the dynamic work fea- 
tured In the Heard Museum's 
seven Invitational fine art exhi- 
bitions from 1983 through 
1997. 



"INSIDE OUT": An exhibit titled, "Works in Wax" 
will be on display at Johnson & Johnson's World 
Headquarters Gallery in New Brunswick through 
September 19. The exhibition features paintings 
by Alyce Gottesman, a New Jersey-based painter. 
The works are built up as layers of wax which are 
painted on wooden panels. The Johnson & 
■nhnson W^-td Headauart»r<; Gallery is locate at 

• 
The gallery is open by appointment only. For more 
information, call (732) 524-6957. 



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"Like the Invltatlonals it 
draws from, 'Art In 2 Worlds' 
Is not just an exhibition." says 
Margaret Archuleta, curator of 
fine art for the Heard Muse- 
um. "It challenges visitors, giv- 
ing them the opportunity to 
expand their understanding 
and gain new knowledge 
about contemporary Native 
American fine art." 

Among the artists whose 
work Is featured are painter 
Marty Avrett (Coushatta); 
sculptor and mixed media art- 
ist Nora Naranjo-Morse 
(Tewa); painter Norman Akers 
(Osage/Pawnee); painter Kay 
WalkingStlck (Cherokee); and 
Winnebago artist Truman 
Lowe. 



art, unique exhibits, special 
events, and Innovative 
programming. 

Americans for Native Ameri- 
cans (ANA). Is a Doylestown- 
based non-profit organization 
and the lead sponsor for Art 
In 2 Worlds at the Mlchener 
Art Museum. ANA was 
founded by Bill and Com i w 
Eastbum after they learned 
that 17 Native Americans had 
frozen to death on a reserva- 
tion near Gallup. New Mexico 
during the winter of 1990 
because of Inadequate protec- 
tion from the harsh elements 
of the high desert. The East- 
bums organized a grass-roots 
effort In Bucks County. Pa. to 
send two tons of blankets to 
the reservation. Since 1991 
ANA's blanket drives and 
shipments have continued 
every year, along with other 
aid Initiatives in the areas of 



medical care, literacy, 
Ing, education, 
agriculture. 



hous- 
and 



Contemporary Native Amer- 
ican artists address social, 
political, and artistic Issues 
that parallel the complexity of 
Native American life In the 
modem world. Each artist 
makes a personal statement 
about these issues. One of the 
leading forces in the Native 
American Fine Art Movement 
since the early 1960s, the 
Heard Museum's recurrent 
Fine Art Invltatlonals offer 
emerging and established art- 
ists a prestigious and unique 
opportunity to exhibit their 
work in a museum setting. 

A non-thematic exhibition 
that encourages Innovative 
artistic expression and the cre- 
ative process, the Invitational 
has worked to expand visitors' 
understanding of Native Amer- 
ican artwork. 

"The Heard Museum Invita- 
tional has become incredibly 
important In promoting con- 
temporary Native American 
fine art," said Ms. Archuleta. 
"These recurring exhibitions 
Illustrate that Native American 
art is continually evolving and 
isn't just about pottery and 
baskets. It's also about paint- 
ing, sculpture, and a variety of 

The Heard Museum is a pri- 
vate, non-profit organization 
that was founded In 1929 by 
Dwtght B. and Marie Bartlett 
Heard to house their personal 
collection of primarily Native 
American artifacts. Today, the 
Internationally-acclaimed 
museum is known for Its 
extensive collections of Native 
American artifacts and fine 



The James A. Mlchenei An 
Museum Is located at 138 
South Pine Street. 
Doylestown, Pa. Gallery hours 
are Tuesday through Friday, 
10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Satur- 
day, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun- 
day, noon to 5 p.m.. Uld 
Wednesday evenings until 9 
p.m. The gallery Is closed 
Monday. 

Members and children under 
six are free; general admission 
Is $6.50. student (with current 
ID) $4, senior citizens age 60 
and older. $6. For more Infor- 
mation, call (215) 340-9800. 
or visit www.mlchenerart 
museum.org. For group tours, 
dial extension 140. 




NATIVE AMERICAN ART: This lithograph on paper 
was created in 1983 by David P. Bradley of the 
Chippewa Indians. It will be on view as part of an 
exhibit at The Mlchener Art Museum, "Art in 2 
Worlds: The Native American Fine Art Invitation- 
al," a contemporary art exhibition organized by 
the Heard Museum In Phoenix, Az. This exhibition 
runs through October 16, in the Wachovia Gallery. 
The Mlchener Art Museum is located at 138 South 
Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa. Gallery hours are 
Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat- 
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.; 
and Wednesday evenings until 9 p.m. The gallery 
is closed Monday. For more information, call (215) 
340-9800, or visit www.michenerartmuseum.org. 



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"MOTHER'S LOVE": This photograph, taken by Terry Lyont, will be exhib- 
ited at the Montgomery Center for the Arts from July 29 through September 
11. The Center is exhibiting photos from the Princeton Photography Club's 
artists, including this four-year member of the organization, who has had a 
passion for photography for 25 years. The Montgomery Center for the Arts 
is located at 124 Montgomery Road, Skillman. Gallery hours are Tuesday 
through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. For additional information, call (609) 921- 
3272, or visit www.montgomerycenterforthearts.com. 



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Princeton Photographers 
Hold Exhibition of Work 

The Montgomery Center for 
. the Arts will hold the Prince- 
ton Photography Clubs 
'annual members exhibition 
from July 29 through Septem- 
ber 11. A reception, open to 
the public, will be held on 
Sunday, July 31, from 1 to 4 
p.m., with a gallery talk at 2 
p.m. by participating artists. 

An estimated 40-50 photo- 
graphs will be Included in the 
show, both traditional and dig- 
ital processes and prints. 

The Princeton Photography 
Club, founded In 1983 in 
Princeton, is a group of local 
professional and amateur pho- 
tographers Interested in art 
education and growth. Mem- 
bers come from all over cen- 
tral New Jersey. The Club 
provides an environment 
where members meet to 
exchange Ideas and Informa- 
tion and to share philoso- 
phies. Meetings are held Sep- 
tember through May, on the 
second Wednesday of the 
month at 7:30 p.m. In the 
Montgomery Center for the 
Arts. Programs include field 
trips, visits from teachers and 
professional photographers, 
and critiques of members' 
works. At the Mercer County 
Photographic Exhibition the 




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Club sponsors an award in 
memory of John Apostolos, a 
founding member. 

Club member Philip A. 
Cruickshank of Princeton, 
said, "My Interest In photogra- 
phy began as a child when my 
mother gave me a Kodak 
Baby Brownie camera and 
taught me how to develop and 
print the film. By high school I 
had progressed to a 35 mm 
range finder camera, a full- 
fledged darkroom, and a posi- 
tion as a photographer for the 
high school publications. Dur- 
ing subsequent years I found 
little time to devote to photog- 
raphy. Upon retirement I 
invested in new equipment, a 
digital SLR camera, lenses, 
and everything to go with a 
digital darkroom.' I signed up 
for my first formal photogra- 
phy courses, seeking to 
enhance my skills as a nature 
and landscape photographer. 
Five years ago I joined the 
Princeton Photography Club 
to find the comradeship of 
people with similar Interests." 

Said Terry Lyons of 
Hillsborough, "Photography 
has been my passion for over 
25 years. Landscapes, wild- 
life, and geometric abstracts, 
both color and black and 
white, comprise the bulk of 
my portfolio. Through photog- 
raphy, 1 have learned to cher- 
ish, appreciate, and see the 
beauty of the moment. The 
practice of its principles has 
strengthened and heightened 
both my visual and intuitive 
senses, and allows me to bet- 
ter connect with the world 
around me. And though 
inspired by the work of con- 
temporary photographers, I 
seek to create a look that is 
both genuine and unique. I 
have been a member of the 
Princeton Photography Club's 
for four years." 

The Montgomery Center for 
the Arts Is located at 124 
Montgomery Road, SkJllman. 
Gallery hours are Tuesday 
through Sunday, noon to 4 
p.m. For additional informa- 
tion, call (609) 921-3272, or 
visit www.montgomerycenter 
forthearts.com. 



Artist Autin Wright 
To Speak on Works 

On Friday, July 22, 2005. 
Grounds for Sculpture's artist 
lecture series in conjunction 
with Toad Hall Shop and Gal- 
lery's exhibit "Figure and 
Form," will present artist 
Autin Wright. He will speak 
about his work and the pro- 
cess used In creating his 
bronze forms. 

Mr. Wright was bom and 
educated In Jamaica. After 
completing a degree at Con- 
necticut Institute of Art, He 
moved to Trenton where he 
now holds a position on the 
Johnson Atelier Technical 
Institute of Sculpture staff. 
Quintessential to his work, his 
forms are smooth and pure, 
and his surfaces are simple. 

"I'm inspired by subtle pat- 
terns of nature," he said. 

The lecture and reception at 
Grounds For Sculpture Is open 
to the public. The lecture 
begins at 7:45 p.m., and will 
take place in the domestic art 
building. The reception at the 
Toad Hall Shop and Gallery's 
"Figure and Form" will take 
place from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. 

Grounds For Sculpture, a 
public charitable organization, 
consists of a 35-acre sculpture 
park, two Indoor museum 
facilities, and Rat's restaurant. 
It Is located on the she of the 
former New Jersey State Fair- 
grounds, 18 Fairgrounds 
Road. Hamilton, New Jersey. 
08619. For more information, 
call (609) 689-1089. or visit 
www.groundsforsculpture.org. 



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Photographer's Book Shotvs ^ w *••«**««■*« 

Beauty of Art and Artist Mr - BarTOS bM ***" the 

I . ^1 ^>. principal photographer at 

..... , -, ,„ . , ' *° <?o*— Grounds for Sculpture since 

Acclaimed photographer I liken her to a rock star in Just as Mr. Wrights sculp- 1992. and his photographs 

Ricardo Barros is currently the art world said Mr. Bar- ture emphasizes the eyes, Mr. regularly appear in Sculpture 

displaying his photographs in ros. as he showed the audi- Barros wanted to emphasize Magazine. His studio Is 

the second floor Reference ence the black and white pho- , he sculptors eyes, which he located In Morrtsvtlle. Pa. 

Gallery at the Princeton Pub- tograph In which he captured does through a black and His exhibit will be on dls- 

lic Library. On Monday. Mr. her likeness ust as the wind white photograph highlighting play at the library through 

Barros gave a talk on his was blowing through her hair thc white of his eyes, with a October 30. Framed prints of 

kuk 3 ". k" . c 06 "^ f aIu I W3S m,Cd UP blurTcd *»» of h,s "^P*™ the artists work are available 
published book Focng toward the sky. behind him. through Marsha Child Con- 

scu ipture: A rortjoho oj Jhe /Vcjrf ^^ Another artist he photo- temporary In Princeton. For 

Related Ideas After his third commission. S^Pr** In 1999 was Martha more Information on Mr. Bar- 

, Grounds for Sculpture asked Posner » wno creates three- ros. or to sign up for one of 

^^i^K.?.' £ Mr. Barros If he would like ,o d'™nslonal art based on (airy hi. digital phologr.phy 
hold an exhibit of his work Barros said he went classes to be held this fall, 



Barros's work is the first in a 

new series of collaborative ., 

contemporary art exhibitions *e following year 



to her home in Pennsylvania visit www.ricardobarros.com. 



in partnership with the Arts 
Council of Princeton. 

"We're very fortunate to 
have Ricardo be part of our 
first exhibit in the Reference 
Gallery," said Leslie Burger, 



It was quite a feat because 
I had a show but only three 
photographs," he told his 
library audience. 

It was then that he realized 
he needed a theme for his 
show, which later became his 



and did an entire photo 
shoot, after which Ms. Posner 
offered to show him some of 
her watercolor paintings. 

"They were like nothing I 
had ever seen before," said 
Mr. Barros, describing the 



— Candace Braun 




director of the library, adding J now - wn,cn [ater became his h . » 

that Mr. Barros had been book, where he observes v^rl- TSu\e P lZ " 

involved in the process of ous sculptors, discovers what 

selecting and commissioning their TV* aboUtl and ^°" 

artwork for the library's new to 9™pns them in a way that 

facility. portrays the artist s character. 
Facing Sculpture, which Whi,e Mr Barros had 

was published last year by Mr. numcrous art, s* Mends he 



When he asked her how she 
had created the pieces, she 
told him she had taken her 
completed paintings and put 
them under the faucet. Asked 
why, she told him: "I wasn't 



Get the scoop 
from 

Town Topics" 



CAPTURING THE ARTIST: Photographer Ricardo 
Barros photographed sculptor Martha Posner for o 
his book, "Facing Sculpture." Ms. Posner creates ° 
three-dimensional art based on fairy tales as well 
as watercolor paintings. Here Mr. Barros attempts 
to capture Ms. Posner Inside one of her 
paintings. fwwo,-, 



make It better." 

Inspired by the courage 
behind this notion, Mr. Barros 
decided to return to Ms. 
Posner's home for another 



Srp'fxx, jSjgttiz stvisara 

received the "Best of 2004" f tran 9 crs by contacting gal- 

Philly Gold Award. The Philly ler V curators a "d asking them 

Gold design competition iden- J° set h,m U P wlth sculptors 

tifies the Philadelphia region's from var,ous exnib,ts - 
finest creative work. ,Eacn of ^ portrait ses- 

tl l__i, »«•*.««« ~. M «. sions was about studying the 

sto'jEESJE; &L*Jxsr* srSSfJisc 

Hicr,l a .. a * *Ko UKrar,, TK most cases ne was given four wm one OI ner waiercoior 
tti^tt when hours to photograpn the art- Mnt.ng, which he felt truly 
Mr. Barros was commissioned f 1 " Some wou,d & ve ]} lm ]ff 
by Grounds for Sculpture to time than *?. wa l n,cd ' Me 
photograph some sculptors others w ? uld ' et him , sta V on 
with their works. One of the a nd watch as they worked, 
first sessions was with Isaac 

Wltkln. who, after posing with ,n one . photograph, Mr. 
his work indoors, was coaxed Garros features Jamaican- 
outside by Mr. Barros for born sc^Ptor Autln Wright, 
what he felt was a photo- ***** n,s cast aluminum sculp- 
graphic opportunity. turcd t,t,ed - " Thc Sleep." 

which shows the facial pro- 
Another photo session was gression of the eyes and 
with Magdalena mouth as one moves towards 
Abakanowicz. sleep. 




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FACING SCULPTURE: Acclaimed photographer Ricardo Barroa gave a talk at 
the Princeton Public Library on Monday on hit book, "Facing Sculpture: A 
Portfolio of Portraits, Sculpture, and Related Ideas." The book is filled with 
more than 60 photographs of sculptors and their work. ipwdo 



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*NJ Opera Program at the Library 
I Kicks Off Summer Series at Berlind 



cnj The New Jersey Opera The- organization.... and to Intro 
5 ater (NJOT) will offer a pre- duce people to the world of 
3 view of its summer perfor- opera," said Scott AJtman, 
>: mances this Friday at the the artistic director for NJOT. 
2 Princeton Public Library. The company is presenting 

i2 The program, to be held at a season celebrating operatic 
1 7:30 p.m. In the library's first versions of the works of the 
g floor Community Room, will French dramatist Beaumar- 
. feature works from Mozart's chais at McCarter's Berlind 
"? The Marriage of Figaro, Theatre In August. 
z . Rossini's Barber of Seville, In previous years, McCarter 
gand Massenet's Cherubin, served as home to the Opera 
t along with music by Palsiello, Festival of New Jersey, before 
£ Corigliano, and Mllhaud. It closed in November 2003. 

E The library event will give According to Mr. Altman, 
*". residents a chance both to NJOT Is the "torch bearer for 
o preview the company's first the Opera Festival." He co- 
o-summer season at McCarter founded NJOT with his wife, 
°and to mingle with members Lisa Altman, who serves as 
| of NJOT. the company's executive 

o "This is a great opportunity director. Before starting their 
*"for us to link to an area own company In 2002, the 




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two had been working at the 
Opera Festival. Ms. Altman 
was the artistic administrator 
for the company, and Mr. AJt- 
man had sung In seven pro- 
ductions there. 

When the Opera Festival's 
financial situation began to 
look grim, they decided to 
start their own opera compa- 
ny, with the intention of 
showing world class opera 
from September through May. 
Although the couple never 
intended to have summer pro- 
gramming, they quickly went 
Into action to fill the void as 
soon as they learned of the 
Opera Festival's closing. 

Now, as a year-round pro- 
fessional opera company with 
an active board of directors, 
NJOT has really taken off, 
said Mr. Altman: "We have 
grown enormously.... We gar- 
ner some of the greatest con- 
ductors and stage directors in 
the country." 

Last summer the company 
performed at the Hamilton 
Murray Theater at Princeton 
University, which sold out all 
of Its productions, with the 
company adding an additional 
performance night. 

"You should not be afraid 
to come to the opera," said 
Mr. Altman, pointing out that 
performances that are not in 
English have "supertitles" 
projected above the stage so 
that audience members can 
follow along. 

As well as performing pro- 
fessional opera in Princeton 
with "rising stars in the opera 
world," the group gives per- 
formances throughout the 
state, Including Jersey City, 
Monroe Township, the Zlm- 



merli Art Museum in New 
Brunswick, and at Grounds 
for Sculpture In Hamilton, 
said Mr. Altman. 

The Opera Theater also 
offers master classes in New 
York City, and does an "Op- 
era Outreach" program for 
children In both New Jersey 
and Pennsylvania. A summer 
camp for children is planned | 
for 2006. 




ur 




S 



While some of this sum- 
mer's performances are avail- 
able by purchasing tickets 

through McCarter Theatre, 

there are others that will be 

free and open to the public, 

including "Musical Theater 

Under the Stars," to be held 

on August 5 and 6 at 8:30 

p.m. at Pettoranello Gardens. 

The concert will feature 

staged scenes and solos from 

musicals such as West Side 

Story, Carousel, Annie Get 

Your Gun, Guys and Dolls, 

and South Pacific. 
Other free programs will 

include an event featuring 

staged excerpts from the sea- 
son's offerings as part of the 

West Windsor Arts Council 

Summer Series at Nassau 

Park on Saturday, July 30, at "THE CAN-CAN": Paige Cutrona, soprano, per* 

7 p.m., and an afternoon con- formed in "Ba-Ta-Clan" by Offenbach as part of last 
cert of soprano and mezzo summer's programming with the New Jersey 
soprano arias and ensembles, Opera Theater. She will also take part in this sum- 
titled "Ladies of the After- mer's series, which kicks off on Friday, July 22, at 
noon at the Opera," at Ber- 7:30 p.m., with a preview program in the Princeton 
lind Theatre on August 20, at Public Library's first floor Community Room. 
2 p.m. Tickets for this event 
are limited, and are available - 
through McCarter's box 
office, by calling (609) 
258-2787. 

For more information about 
NJOT's summer program 
series, call (609) 799-7700, 
or visit www.NJOT.org. 

— Candace Braun 



{Photo courtesy olJelt Rttder. NJ Opera Theater i 




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UNLOCK THE MYSTERY! 

Thursday, Jury 14, 12-2 p.m. 

Meet mystery author Ann Waldron 

in the Nassau Room at Princeton Windrows. 

ReservaUons required. Tours follow presentation. 

Call 1.800.708.7007 
for a Private Preview! 




PATRICIA'S 

HAIR DESIGn 

357 llassau Street 
683-4114 

Tuesday-Saturday 8am-5pm 




"DON GIOVANNI": Michelle Sexton and Benjamin 
Savoie performed as part of the 2004 summer 
series with the New Jersey Opera Theater (NJOT) 
in Mozart's "Don Giovanni." Last year was the first 
time that NJOT presented a summer opera pro- 
gram, following the closing of the Opera Festival of 
New Jersey in November 2003. The company is run 
by co-founders Scott and Lisa Altman, who were 
both previously employed by the Opera Festival. 

(Photo courtesy ol Jett Reeder. NJ Open Thatet) 




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SINGLE TICHETS ON SALE MONDAY. JULY 25 ! 



THEATRE CENTER 



THEATER 



World Premiere 
Prior to New York! 

Miss 14/itherspoon 

By Christopher Ourang 
Directed by Emily Mann 

If it's not one thing, it's another, even in the 
afterlife. The devilishly funny Christopher 
Durang makes his McCarter playwriting 
debut with a comedy about a persnickety 
woman forced to reincarnate against her 
better judgment. Widely acclaimed for his 
remorseless skewering of contemporary 
American culture. Durang is a no-holds- 
barred comic genius. 
The Berlind Theatre 
September 9 — October 16 
sponsored by The Blanche and 

Irving Laurie Foundation 

andThe Geraldine R. 
Dodge Foundation 

GEM of THE 

OCEAN 

By August Wilson 

Directed by Ruben Santiago -Hudson 

In 1904 Pittsburgh, when slavery is still a 
living memory. Citizen Barlow arrives at the 
home of Aunt Ester looking for guidance on 
how to build a better life At 285 years of 
age. Aunt Ester is not too old to heal, and 
she guides him on a soaring, lyrical joumey, 
leading him to startling spintual discoveries 
Fresh from its critically acclaimed Broadway 
production, McCarter's pleased to present 
this celebratory and poetic story of a young 
man's spintual emancipation 
The Matthews Theatre 
October 1 1 — October 30 




/4 /MiWfrT&r tie 

MISBEGOTTEN 

By Eugene O'Neill 
Directed by Gary Griffin 

In this powerhouse of a play by one of 
American theater's greatest playwrights 
three unforgettable characters do battle 
with the deepest yearnings of the human 
heart over the course of a single whiskey- 
soaked moonlit night. 
The Berlind Theatre 
January 13 — February 19 



MUSIC 



Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano 
Tuesday, October 18 - 8 pm 

Christian Tetzlaff, violin 
Lars Vogt, piano 
Monday. October 24 - 8 pm 

Hilary Hahn, violin 

Natalie Zhu, piano 

Tuesday, November 15 - 8 pm 

sponsored by 

The Frank and Lydia Bergen Foundation 

Bach's Brandenburgs 

with the Chamber Music Society 
of Lincoln Center 
Monday. December 19 - 7.30 pm 
Please Note: Performance at Ricrardson Audilorium 

Opera at McCarter: 
Mozart's The Magic Flute 
with the Mozart Festival 
Opera Company & Orchestra 
Tuesday, January 31 - 7 30 pm 



A MIDSUMMER 
NIGHT'S DREAM 

By William Shakespeare 
Directed by Tina Landau 
Original music performed by 
GrooveLily 

McCarter and Paper Mill Playhouse team 
up to present a beguiling new production of 
one of Shakespeare's most popular plays 
The spritely and eclectic rock tno GrooveLily 
will be on hand to lend a captivating musical 
element to this divine comedy about two 
sets of lovers and their disapproving elders 
The Matthews Theatre 
March 21— April 9 

World Premiere 

R'D'CW 
rRfiup 

By Beth Henley 

Directed by Lisa Peterson 

A disastrous wedding rehearsal dinner is the 
latest in a series of unfortunate events that 
befall the Clay brothers in Beth Henley's 
boisterous and bittersweet new comedy 
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Crimes of 
the Heart, Henley returns to her Southern 
roots with a vengeance in Ridiculous Fraud. 
The Berlind Theatre 
May 5 — June 11 

New American Plays sponsored by 

The Harold and Mimi Steinberg 
Charitable Trust 



25th Anniversary of McCarter* Holiday Classic 

A Christmas Carol 

The Matthews Theatre 
December 4 — December 24 



Tickets: 
609-258-ARTS(2787) 

Select your seats online @ 

www.mccarter.org 

91 University Place, Princeton, NJ 



King's Singers 

Tuesday, February 7 



8 pm 



Anoras Schiff, piano and conductor 
with the Cappella Andrea Barca 
Chamber Orchestra 
Wednesday. February 22 - 8 pm 

Mozarteum Orchestra 
of Salzburg 

Ivor Bolton, conductor 
Stephen Hough, piano 
Tuesday, March 7 - 8 pm 

Lang Lang, piano 
Monday. April 24 - 8 pm 

Zukerman Chamber Players 
with Pmchas Zukerman, violin 
and Benjamin Hochman, piano 
Sunday. May 7 - 4 pm 

Photo Credit: Wynton Marsaas. photo by Keith Major. 
Kate Fry t\ My Fair Lady. Rosemary Hams n All 
Over. Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Jwnmy Smss 
n Anna m the Tropics 



JAZZ 



Wynton Marsalis 
Monday. October 17 - 8 pm 
Matthews Theatre 

Marian McPartland 
Friday, October 21 - 7 30 pm 
Berlind Theatre 

Dianne Reeves 
with special guest Freddy Cole 
Monday. December 19 - 8 pm 
Matthews Theatre 

McCoy Tyner Trio 
with special guest the 
Luciana Souza Quartet 
Friday. February 10 - 7:30 pm 
Matthews Theatre 

Brad Mehldau 
Sunday. March 19 - 4 pm 
Berlind Theatre 

Joshua Redman's 
SF Jazz Collective 

with special guest the Taylor Eigsti Trio 
Monday. March 27 - 8 pm 
Matthews Theatre 

HlROMI 

Sunday. April 23 - 4 pm 
Berlind Theatre 

Dave Brubeck Quartet 
Saturday. April 29 - 8 pm 
Matthews Theatre 

Matthews Jazz Series V-^-""^ 
sponsored by VetlTOn 



DANCE 



BOWFIRE 

Saturday. January 28 - 7:30 pm 

Nuevo Ballet Espanol 

Flamenco Directo 
Thursday. February 2 - 8 pm 

Julio Bocca's Boccatango 
Wednesday. February 1 5 - 8 pm 
Thursday. February 16 - 8 pm 

Ladysmith Black Mambazo 
with special guest Vusi Mahlasela 
Friday. February 17 - 7:30 pm 

Marcia Ball and Beausoleil 
avec Michael Doucet 
Friday. February 24 - 8 pm 

The Chieftains 
Friday. March 10 - 8 pm 
mjofttftyGUJNMKDti 

Swan Lake with the 
Tchaikovsky Perm Balcet 
& Orchestra 
Sunday. March 12 - 4 pm 

David Sedaris 
Monday. April 3 - 8 pm 

Soweto Gospel Choir 
Tuesday. April 4 - 8 pm 

The Mikado 

The New York 

Gilbert & Sullivan Players 

Saturday. April 22 - 8 pm 

Zakir Hussain's 
Percussion Masters of India 
Friday. May 19- 7 30 pm 



COMPAGNIA ATERBALLETTO 

Wednesday. November 2 - 8 pm 

Savion Glover 
Classical Savion 
Wednesday. November 16 - 8 pm 

Nuevo Ballet Espanol 

Flamenco Directo 
Thursday, February 2 - 8 pm 

Julio Bocca's Boccatango 
Wednesday. February 15 - 8 pm 
Thursday. February 16 - 8 pm 

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago 

Tuesday. February 21 - 8 pm 

Swan Lake with the 
Tchaikovsky Perm Ballet 
& Orchestra 

Sunday. March 12 -4 pm 

Mark Morris Dance Group 

Tuesday. April 11 - 8 pm 

Edward Villella's 
Miami City Ballet 
Tuesday. May 2 - 8 pm 

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane 
Dance Company 
Tuesday, May 16 - 8 pm 

sponsored by (A 



o 



Htm tnfrl 
lo»»«. Aft 



WORLD 



^ 



" „. _ , «^,„ t.,^, m mm* Jersey Suae Co*** on the Arta/Dspsrtrrtent 

T*s program .s made possWe « pan Oy ^^l^^Z^mtitrtt^x^k^fhetmonm 

of Stale, a Partner Agency o» the Nstonai Endowment tor tr* Arts •"" «r 

Endowment tor »» Arts _^^^_^_^^_^^^^^_^^_ 



COMPAGNIA ATERBALLETTO 

Wednesday. November 2 - 8 pm 

The Salzburg Marionettes 

in Hansel and Gretel 
Thursday. November 3 - 7 pm 

Audra McDonald 
Sunday. November 13 - 3 pm 

Vienna Choir Boys 

Monday. December 12 - 7 30 pm 
Pleats Mole: Pcrlormance at Richardson Auditorium 



a 



o 



o 
o 



Savion Olover. Hubbard Street Dance Chicago 
and Bill T. Jones/Arnle Z»n» Osnce Company 
are sponsor** by BIOOITlberg 



o 



FAMILY 



Cirque Eloize in Rain 

Friday, January 20 - 7 30 pm 
Saturday. January 21 - 7:30 pm 
Sunday. January 22 - 3 pm 

Ralph's World 
Saturday. February 4-11 am 

Dan Zanes 

Saturday. February 25 - 11 am 

sponsored by jQ .„".*/.* 

Peking Acrobats 

Sunday, March 5 - 3 pm 

sponsoredby KmlSllllHl 



POP & FOLK 



Los LOBOS 

Saturday. October 1-8:30 pm 

Richard Thompson 
Tuesday. October 25 - 8 pm 

Joan Baez 

Tuesday, November 1 - 8 pm 

Pat Metheny Trio 

with Christian McBride 
and Antonio Sanchez 
Friday. November 4 - 8 pm 

Taj Mahal Trio 
Mavis Staples 

Thursday. March 9 - 8 pm £fe 



CABARET 



Ann Hampton Callaway 
Saturday. October 29 - 7:30 pm 

Benefit Performsnce at 9:30 pm 
sponsored by DrutkcrlikkUc 

Stacey Kent 

Saturday, December 17 - 7:30 pm 

Christine Andreas 
Saturday, March 18 - 7:30 pm 

All Cabaret Events at The Berlind Theatre 




TORRID TORRES: Employing a jazz style 
described as "unrestrained improvisation," the 
emerging vocalist and trumpeter Crystal Torres 
and her Latin jazz trio Huejaz will perform for one 
night only in The Hopewell Valley Bistro and Inn's 
Starlight Room, on Saturday, July 30 from 7 to 10 
p.m. Still in her 20s, Ms. Torres has performed at 
jazz festivals in South America and Europe, and 
for U.S. audiences from Birdland to the White 
House. A $15 minimum will be charged per person 
for her Hopewell appearance. For reservations, 
call (609) 466-9889. 



Micawber Books 

new, useti 

110-114 Nassau Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 

(609)921-8454 

Mon-Sat 9-8. Sun 11-5 



FORER PHARMACY 

160 Witherspoon St. 

Pharmaceuticals 
Orthopedic Supplies 

921-7287 



Grounds For Sculpture 
To Host Unusual Band 

Grounds For Sculpture will 
host a concert appearance by 
the five-member group, the 
Car Music Project, on Friday 
evening, July 29 at 7 p.m. 
The group performs on instru- 
ments created from old car 
parts. 

The Car Music Project was 
conceived in late 1991 by 
composer Bill Milbrodt, when 
his personal car was nearing 
the end of its useful life. Mr. 
Milbrodt performs on "air gui- 
tar"; Dave Homan on tenor 
and alto convertibles and 
"tube flutes"; James Spotto, a 
brass jazz musician, on the 
"strutbone" and "xhausta- 
phone"; Wllbo Wright, a bass- 
ist, on the "tank bass"; and 
percussionist William Trigg on 
"percarsion." 

The performance will take 
place In the courtyard of the 
Domestic Arts Building, which 
houses one of the museum's 
contemporary art exhibitions 
by day. In case of rain the 
concert will move indoors. 

Tickets are $8 and Include 
admission to the park and 
museums. Tickets will be sold 
at the door as seating is avail- 
able. For advance reserva- 
tions, call (609) 586-0616, 
ext. 20. 

Grounds For Sculpture is 
located on the site of the 
former New Jersey State Fair- 
grounds at 18 Fairgrounds 
Road, Hamilton. 

For more information on the 
Car Music Project, visit 
www.carmuslcproject.com. 



c u p h o w B I A 

iii » i. ii ■ i <j i i 



MUSIC REVIEW ^ 

Miro Quartet Arrives Shorthanded 
And Dazzles Audience Nonetheless 



One never wants to rejoice in some- 
one else's misfortune, but when 
Mir6 String Quartet violinist Sandy 
Yamamoto was unable to perform on 
Thursday night, the ensemble took an 
Imaginative approach and replaced the vio- 
linist with a pianist, thereby opening new 
possibilities In repertoire. The resulting 
concert, part of Princeton University's Sum- 
mer Concert Series at Richardson Auditori- 
um, was a more than pleasant surprise for 
the audience. Pianist Shal Wosner Is a 
native of Israel and is equally at home in 
composition and improvisation at the 
piano. With this background, he was a nat- 
ural to fit in with violinist Daniel Chlng. 
viollst John Largess, and cellist Joshua Gin- 
dele. The ensemble took this opportunity 
(they have apparently been performing 
without Ms. Yamamoto for several months 
now) to mix piano quartet with string trio 
repertories, drawing music from the past 
three centuries. 

Mr. Wosner joined the 
ensemble for piano quartets 
of Mozart and Brahms. He 
was definitive in his perfor- 
mance of Mozart's Piano 
Quartet in E flat Major, a 
work which exploits the piano 
as if the piece were a mini- 
concerto. Accompanied by a 
rich and full violin, light viola, 
and stabilizing cello, Mr. 
Wosner was an equal player, coming to the 
forefront precisely In solo passages. 
Although the beginning of the second 
movement "Larghetto" was almost Inaudi- 
ble over the entrance of late-comers, the 
ending of the movement was especially ele- 
gant, with an even and steady piano. The 
quartet consistently brought out the drama 
in the music, which is often overlooked in 
Mozart in favor of his melodies. 

Brahms' Piano Quartet in g minor 
(which the quartet has been playing on tour 
with other guest pianists) was a more 
expansive work, with four lengthy 



movements full of drama and continual ebb 
and flow. The first movement "Allegro" 
featured cellist Gindele, accompanied by 
forceful playing by the violin and viola, and 
a definitely bass register from the piano. 
Unwavering cello playing and a closing 
piano flourish characterized the second 
movement "Intermezzo," and a typically 
Brahms Hungarian flavor marked the 
fourth movement "Rondo," all of which 
were executed effectively by the quartet. 

Interspersed between these two works 
was a trio for string players alone by Jean 
Francaix, a French neoclassical composer 
and virtuoso pianist who lived less than 
fifty years. A student of Maurice Ravel, 
Francaix wrote more than 200 works in his 
short life, and his Trio for Violin, Viola 
and Cello reflected the lightness and inter- 
play between instruments which character- 
ized his compositional style. There was so 
much going on in this work, and the musi- 
cal patter among instruments 
was so clean that one had to 
concentrate to hear every- 
thing. This piece did not give 
the players time to breathe, 
yet the ensemble's collective 
restraint and discipline never 



The final performance in 
Princeton University's Sum- 
mer Concert Series, on 
Wednesday. July 20 at Rich- 
ardson Auditorium, will fea- 
ture music of Pleyel, 
Shostakovich, and Beethov-' made things seem out of con- 

information. ^ante ,n „ Pabular was a con- 

___^^___ tinuous flow of music, with a 
dry ending indicating 
Francalx's compositional wit. 

he Mir6 String Quartet mixes an 
active touring schedule with their 
residency at the University of Texas 
at Austin. Through this double-sided 
career, the ensemble can maintain its com- 
mitment to the next generation of musi- 
cians while delighting audiences such as 
the full house at Richardson last week. The 
Princeton audience was lucky to get the 
best of both worlds: a mesmerizing mini- 
piano recital through the piano quartets 
and an exquisite string ensemble 

performance. —Nancy Plum 



T 



• Recitals • Voice • Piano • Choral • Organ • Christmas 



Westminster 



°Wextminslrr f'ftoir f'o&qe offfddrr 7/nwmnty 

For current information, call the Box office: 
609-921-2663 / On the Web. westminster.rider.edu 



Opein OutmRS • Children's Concerts • And Much More 



Wedding Invitations 

Baby A nnouncements 

Personal Stationer)' 

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Calligraphy 

609 896 4841 
TUE - SAT 10:00 - 5:30 

6 Gordon Avenue in the 
Village of LawrcnccvlUe 



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350 Nassau Street 

Fnnceton, NJ 0&540 

609-921-1900 




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A Princeton Tradition for Over 50 Years 



ARB's Princeton Ballet School has been serving 
the Princeton community for over 50 years. With 
over 1,200 students in three locations, we are 
New Jersey's largest and oldest dance school, 
teaching the joy of dance to the dancers, doctors, 
lawyers, and business leaders of tomorrow. 

Register Today! 

Be part of our next 50 years. For information 
on placement classes: Call: 609.921.7758, 
or visit www.arballet.org 



ARB's Princeton Ballet School Advantages 

• A tradition of excellence for over 50-years 

• Outstanding team of dance educators 

• Live musical accompaniment for all classes 

• Performance opportunities with 
American Repertory Ballet 

• Convenient locations in Cranbury, 
New Brunswick and Princeton 

• Safe and age-appropriate training 

• Classes in ballet, modern dance, jazz, Spanish 
dance, tap, yoga, and Pilates-based exercise. 





AMERICAN R£P3tTORY IAUETS 



ft 1 Princeton 
w J Ballet 
School 



GRAHAM lUJIKJ | ARTUTIC ORECTOR 



GRAHAM IUSTKJ | ARHSnC WRECK* «ARRt C HUCHSON | EXECUTIVE DOCTOR MARY PAT ROBERTSON , SCHOOL D.RECTOR AUORSE ESTEY I fOUNDER 



Photo 8y: VAl FORD 



THEATER REVIEW "UtZJT 

Princeton Summer Theater Revisits "Godspell" After 34 Years; 
Rock Musical Delivers Playful, Poignant Rendition of Gospels 

Godspell opened off-Broadway In 1971 and quickly chain link fence at upstage right and a garbage can onttagi 
became a huge hit. It ran for five years, then moved left. Crickets chirp. The excellent four-man band - drums, 
to Broadway where it played for another fifteen guitar, bass keyboard - directed by Briar. Walsh. Is forth* 
months, a total of more than 2600 performances. A young, upstage In the background. All are casually *»*•»** 
capable, and resourceful Princeton Summer Theater com- ently en oyinj , a day in the park. Mr. Elliott and the cast 
pany has brought this celebratory mass of a rock musical, fucceed In achieving here a natural spontanel^ anc I convlnc- 
with Jesus and his disciples telling parables and re-enacting «ng slmplkll^ d«|rtte the compilations of staging with 
the Passion of Christ, to the Hamilton Murray Theater for clarify and polishing this complex production. 

two more weekends D **\ °™ ™»** ™P ,d, V , lnto * *e«* of chaos - * T ouw t ^ 

-« . , . nrx . a *u„ Ai~ n rH nn «i Babel of conflicting voices and characters, betim- tin- 

The ambmous PST troupe, under the direction o entrancc of Rob ^ ^ John ^ ^ who u 

Jonathan Elliott, faces a number of challenges here. Will ^ ^ Ieads a ^ rend|(|on q| ^^ Y| . ( , u . 

what resonated so powerfully In the early 1970s - the w of ^ ^ .. Je( , p eterson then appears froni tru . 

years following the "summer of love and the Vietnam War audjcnce as Jesus procceds to ta ke charge, to spread the 

- translate effectively to contemporary audiences? In this ^^ -..^^ ^ p^,^ and narratc key segments of the 

era of extremes of religious feeling, will the subject matter |ot The boisterous ensemble collaborates with great humor 

put off non-Christians? Will the Informality and Irreverence and ^^ , n ac(lng out the parables. 

of style offend conservative Christians? And then there are ln ^ Cj| . Vo , becomes (he flrsl to make her 

the difficulties of staging this unusual theater piece which s(atem y ent of falth bringing the production to a stirring focus 

keeps all ten actors onstage virtually all the time and com- ^ hef beautiful rendition of "Day by Day." An efferves- 

blnes an untraditional plot, song and dance numbers in an ccnt V|rglnla p our akls follows up with the short and lively 

array of dlffetent styles, acrobatics, charades. Juggling, pan- admonltlon t0 "Learn Your Lessons Well." Liz Hemming. 

tomlme and a tone that shifts frequently from comical to ^ OU q^ not always able to project her voice with power ova 

tragic with many shades in between. me surrounding action and musical accompaniment, pre- 

The merits of the music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz sents a deftly comical "rich man" In the mode of Paris Hilton 

(creator also of the Broadway hits Pippin and Wicked) and and leads the company effectively In "O Bless the Lord My 

the book by John Michael Tebelak, along with the Intelll- Soul." 

gence, creativity, and talent permeating this updated PST R b Walsh, now In the role of Judas, and Mr. Peterson 

production, overcome these challenges and deliver to audi- pr0 vide yet another change of pace with a show-stopping. 

ences an entertaining and moving theatrical experience, soft-shoe pas de deux, "All for the Best" — a masterpiece of 




RISING COMEDIAN: Princeton University student 
Patrick Cunningham, the winner of Catch A Rising 
Star Comedy Club's College Comedy Challenge 
this spring, will take the stage at the Hyatt 
Regency club on Friday night, July 29, at 8 and 
10:30 p.m., where he will appear with headliner 
Hal "Chlckie" Spear and Steve "The Beer Man" 
Lazarus. Mr. Cunningham, from Akron, Ohio, 
honed his comedy skills as a member ot the 
Princeton University comedy club, and in clubs in 
New York City and Philadelphia. Tickets are $15; 
show-goers must be at least 18 years of age. For 
reservations, call (609) 987-8018. 



Contemporary allusions — to Michael 
Jackson, hip hop, and other recent cul- 
tural phenomena — liven up the produc- 
tion while maintaining the spirit of the 
original. 

Godspell, Mr. Tebelak's response to 
what he described as a deadeningly bor- 
ing Easter Sunday church service, cele- 
brates the message and, the story of Jesus, 
but It Is also a joyful, captivating celebra- 
tion of community, love, humanity, and 
also of music, dance, and theater. 



Godspell runs through July 
31, Thursday. Friday and 
Saturday nights at 8 p.m. 
and also 2 p.m. on Saturdays 
and Sundays, in the Hamilton 
Murray Theater. Call (609) 
258-7062 for rickets or visit 
www.princetonsummerthea 
ter.org for information. 



synchronized teamwork. 

The act ends with Tim McDonough lead- 
ing the company In "All Good Gifts." then 
an amusing French-accented version of the 
story of the prodigal son, and finally an 
upbeat production number "(You are the) 
Light of the World." 

The second act rums darker as Jesus 
announces "this Is the beginning," and the 
company starts to portray the events culmi- 
nating In Christ's crucifixion. Craig Jorczak 
leads a reprise of "Learn Your Lessons 



■ "th7T»mllyTl>r?tJ7 \ ) 



The Gospel According to St. Matthew, supplemented Well." Martsol Rosa-Shapiro presents a steamy Mariene 
jSXSS other partf o, th« , Bible. maUes^ , compeHIng %^^~^*_ZZ2* *"■* 

aXini^oHt :,ttherrm h U mor riSt ene r r C Uadln 9 up to the Las, Supper and the drama,, ,,na, 
SSS and sSnei - In ,us. 9 .he proper propor,.ons. Its scene. Amy Wlddowson and Ms. Fknnj* *™£* 
a likable, energetic, carefully rehearsed, well coordinated contribute a poignant ballad By _My Side. Kyle Booan 
PST ensemble. Mr. Schwabs music and lyHcs some phased ^ft^-ntte l^Tnd'me XXCX 
on lines from the Episcopal hymnal or the Bible con*- *J.^ £ ,. m f Btim Walsh (r0 " m lhe k( , yboilr< i 
tent v hit home. Day by Day, the most famous number In J** 1 "** " a * «v y • u ,„u llIC ■ 

the "show, is onlyU of many richly varied mus.al ^*ZZ%^ % ™%^ 
highlights. ^^ choreography, Brian Walsh's musical direction, and 

The ten performers, undergraduates and recent graduates ^J Jonathan Bulava's sound design all contribute dynam- 
of Princeton University and other area colleges, share the |ca |j y tQ ^ en g a ging production. 

musical and dramatic responsibilities. Each leads In the tf> ^ enthralling show, with memorable music and a 
telling of at least one parable, and each delivers a solo powemj | messa g C . The PST production does suffer from Its 
segment of at least one song. uneven moments: one or two fumbled lines, uncertain move- 

Godspell Is set In an urban park In the present, with the mcnts or blocking, occasional lack of focus or Imbalance 
actors already on stage as the audience enters the theater, between the main action and the surrounding stage busl- 
The actors' names are the character names. Their goal Is to ness -\\^ xe arc voices that sometimes. In projection or 
be themselves, realistic, down to earth, and sometimes the pltcn> are not quite up to the superb level of acting through- 
most difficult acting of all Is to "not act." A chess game out me production. But production values are outstanding 
takes place on stage right. Two young women are picnicking here, and the Informality Is part of the appeal and power 01 
on the ground at center stage. Another young woman sits this show. The blemishes are minor and in some cases even 
on a park bench upstage reading a book. A boy and girl contribute to the appealing ease and humanness ol the 
throw a ball back and forth and chat on stage left. There's a experience. — Uonaw unpin 






Dr. Michael Wong introduces a major 
breakthrough for cataract patients. 



Introducing the ReSTOR* Lens Implant. A pioneer in the field of cataract 
surgery, Dr. Michael Wong has been singled out by the makers of the ReSTOR Lens Implanl 
to be the first to perform this select procedure for cataract patients in Central New Jersey. 
The FDA-approved ReSTOR Lens provrics both distance and near vision ranges ;,ti,r 
cataract surgery. Once again. The Princeton Eye Group leads the way. 

Drs. Felion. Wong, Wong, Reynolds. Miedziak, Liu and Epstein 
are listed among "America's Top Ophthalmologists" by Consumers' 
Research Council and they have been named as "New York-New 
Jersey Top Dou. i 
Castle Connolly. 

If you have cataracts, there's a very clear reason to focus 
on us for help. loin our ReSTOR Revolution. To schedule a 
consultation, call 609-924-9200 or visit our web site at 
www.princetoneyegroup.com. 



I 




STYPHB* M FtUDS. KD, PH.0,M»OtA£l I WC»s 

The Princeton Eye Group RjcHAMiRwwc.Mn.siDAviDiEYsoLw.MD. amtalwimmicud. 

SAMUa M UU. KD.. PH XJOHH k EFSTll.S.K D 



Princeton Healthcare Center 

419 No Harrison SL, Suite 104 

Princeton, SI 08340 

609.9219437 



Somerset Village 
900 Easton Avenue 
Somerset. NJ 08873 



Concordia Medical Building 

1600 Perrinevill* Road 

Monroe TWp..Nj 08831 

609.65S.8808 



Mercer County 
Community College 

1200 Old Trenton Rd., 
West Windsor 
609-584-9444 



l 



Princeton ^„„ l „ v,,,,,,,, 

Junior y %. 

School pk-kiwoi niromhcndt v *• 



Please call for 

Admissions Information 



go FACKLI R ROAD Ibtlwttn Prlnction Plht x Rf« 061 

i.ii'i •» 1 1 >-.i .m> www p|i oi); tdmlMlon»0 plt.org 



Perna's 

Plant and Flower Shop 

Serving lhe i ommunlty f<» <>■"•' £> y (, ' jrs ' 



Visit our website and order on line at 
www.pernasflowers.com 



Local tU Worldwifli I Mivcry • ()|)«mi / I ».»;•• 
189 Washing"! , Rd (' mlla eati ol Rl L) 
45X i Ij I • Local & Worldwide Dellvi 



* 



Frank il><- Barber 



^ 



( 'omplete Hair Care 
for Men & Women 

We Do Roller Sets 



V 863 Ki 



e 206, Princeton (r«ai en!i 
921-1834 



.•id 



Family & Children's 

Services 
of Central New Jersey 

What kind of cement does it take to 
hold a family together? 

Family counseling can help your family 
develop the right foundation to 
strengthen family relationships. 

Individual, family, group and addiction services. 

Managed Care, private insurance 

and sliding scale fees available. 

1-800-479-3779 



Princeton 
609-924-2098 



Highlsiown 
609-44K-0056 



I Brunswick 
732-418-7077 



iW? 



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Princeton 
jHj University 
\m Concerts 



Season Subscriptions Now on Sale 
Telephone: 609.258.2800 M-F I0am-4pm 




HOST 
HELPERS 

609-921-0990 

Bartenders 

Servers 

Kitchen Help 

Full Service 

Party 

Rentals 







0-1 



°l 

zl 
$1 



PRINCETON SUMMER THEATER PRESENTS 

the imash-hu mutical celebration \/s.» Pitying. .. 

GODSPELL jungle 

M 11,,...!^,.,. S -W/IU..U., .I..UM U.I..I.L |u | illlK ,.| K BOOK 

JULY 14- 17,21 -24, 28-31 

Thura, I "i. Sol ••! HVW, S.ii. Sum .ii _' I'M | or ll( | u . l;s anc J information: 

"The best summer theater (609) 258-7062 
group we have had in years." V / 

• Stuart Duncan, Princeton Packet Ham.lton Murray Theater on the Pr.nccton Un.vcrvty Campus 

ii n w.Princ i ro.N'Si mmi rTiieater.org 




You share 
a home 
with pets. 

Wouldn't it 
be nice if you 
didn't have to 
live with allergies? 

Pets fill your life with |o\ and companionship 
But tlu-v can also till your home sviili germs, 
fortunately, we can provide reliej with a 

\v .\\\\w vK'.uM'.iV program: 

• 24/7 Monitoring ot jour home's uii qu»0Jt\ forM^enddajh 

• Reports iIi.m pinpoint problems in youi home 

• Professional suggestions for improving air quality 

Call 609-799-3434 now to schedule an indoor air 
quality test and take advantage of this great offer! 




Princeton Air 

www.princetonair.com 




advice* 

www.airadvice.com 



Allen Crowed 

Choir College Continues 
Summer Concert Series 

The annual summer concert 
series at Westminster Choir 
College will continue with a 
sing-In on Tuesday, July 26 
and a recital on Thursday, 
July 28. Both programs will 
be held at 7:30 p.m. in Bristol 
Chapel on the Westminster 
campus and are open to the 
public at no charge. 

On Tuesday, July 26, Allen 
Crowell will conduct audience 
members in a slng-in of 
Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass. 
Participants are encouraged to 
bring their own scores; howev- 
er, a limited number will be 
available for borrowing at the 
door. 

Prof. Crowell is the Mildred 
Goodrum Heyward Professor 
of Choral Music and director 
of choral studies at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, where he 
conducts the Concert Choir 
and the men's Glee Club while 
teaching graduate and under- 
graduate conducting. He pre- 
viously taught and conducted 
at Westminster Choir College 
for 20 years. 

A native of Mobile, Ala.. 
Prof. Crowell studied at Flor- 
ida State University and 
earned his bachelor's degree 
from Westminster and a mas- 
ter of music degree from The 
Catholic University of Ameri- 
ca. He served for five years as 
bass soloist and enlisted 
leadeT of The United States 
Army Chorus of Washington, 
D.C., and later became associ- 
ate bandmaster of The U.S. 
Army Band and director of 
The U.S. Army Chorus. As a 
vocal soloist, he has appeared 
with Washington's National 



Symphony, the New Jersey 
Pops, and Princeton Pro Musl- 
ca, among others. 

A piano recital on Thursday, 
July 28, by Radek Materka 
will feature works of Mozart, 
Chopin, and Szymanowski. 

Mr. Materka has performed 
recitals and appeared with 
orchestras in the United 
States, Europe, and Asia, and 
recorded for American and 
Polish radio and television. In 
1999, he was selected as a 
student performer In the First 
International Piano Sympo- 
sium under the auspices of the 
Moscow Conservatory. He Is a 
laureate of several piano com- 
petitions in the United States 
and Europe. He holds a bach- 
elor of music degree from 
Westminster and a master of 
music degree from the Univer- 
sity of Southern California. He 
teaches at the Thornton 
School of Music at the Univer- 
sity of Southern California, 
and maintains a private studio 
In Los Angeles. 



Engelbert Humperdinck 
Coming to State Theatre 

New Brunswick's State The- 
atre will present the romantic 
singer Engelbert Humperdinck 
on Saturday, August 6 at 8 
p.m. The program will feature 
Humperdinck's best known 
hits and tunes from his newest 
album, Let There Be Love. 
Tickets range from $20 to 
$55. 

In a career spanning 35 
years, Mr. Humperdinck has 
sold more than 130 million 
records, in the process earning 
64 gold albums, 24 platinum 
albums, four Grammy Awards, 
a Golden Globe, and a star on 
the Hollywood Walk of Fame. 
His biggest hits include Re- 
lease Me, Quando, Quando, 
Quando, Spanish Eves, and 
There Goes My Everything. 

Born Arnold George Dorsey, 
Mr. Humperdinck started 
studying music at the age of 
11. In 1959, he released his 
first single, under the stage 
name Gerry Dorsey, called 
Crazybells/Mister Music Man. 
Soon after the release, he con- 
tracted tuberculosis, which 
silenced him for six months, 
nearly putting a stop to his 
music career. Upon regaining 
his health, a former manager 
suggested the new name 
Engelbert Humperdinck, taken 
from the Austrian composer 
who wrote the opera Hansel 



and Gretel. It was outrageous 
enough to be memorable, and 
thus was bom the soon-to-be 
legend Engelbert 
Humperdinck. 

Let There Be Love encapsu- 
lates 40 years of hits featuring 
classics from Nat King Cole to 
contemporary songs from 
Ronan Keating and Bryan 
Adams, along with three new 
compositions. 

For tickets, call the State 
Theatre box office at (732) 
246-7469, or visit 
www.StateTheatreNJ.org. 

PIANO SOUND PECULIAR? Get 

thee to the TOWN TOPICS classifieds 
to find tuners & teachers 



design consulting 
eclectic girts & accessories 

Malleo & Co. 



Fine Home Furnishings 

Princeton Shopping Center 
301 N. Harrison St. 

609.430.1400 



SPOTLIGHT ON: 





Presented by 

Roberta E. Scharff, PT 

SPACE-AGE REHAB 

Irnd.l.onally. pulicms who 

undergo hip or other lower- 
extremity surgeries must delay 
their active rehabilitation 
until they can use swimming 
pools, parallel bars, or walking 
devices. Now. however, 
researchers report a quicker 
road to rehabilitation that 
involves the use of a positive 
air pressure chamber, which 
provides buoyancy equal 
to talking a moonwalk. The 
patient steps into a special 
lower-body chamber that 
contains an exercise treadmi 
and a Neoprene sleeve fits 
around the waist to create an 
airtight seal. Then, technicians 
adjust the air pressure to vary 
the amount of weight that the 
patient experiences on the 
treadmill. As the patient heals, 
the pressure in the chamber 
and the amount of body weight 
carried is gradually increased to 
match patient progress. 

Whether recovering from sur- 
gery, an illness or injury, or 
just enhancing your fitness and 
wellness.THE REHABILITA- 
TION CENTER can help. Phys- 
ical therapy addresses the treat- 
ment, healing and prevention of 
injuries and disabilities. PT fo- 
cuses primarily, but not sole- 
ly, on pain relief, promoting 
healing and restoring function 
and movement. Our telephone 
number is 732-329-1 181 Lo- 
cated at 155 Raymond Road 
(Buckingham Place Facility), 
we offer day, evening and Sat- 
urday hours. We accept out-of- 
network benefits from many in- 
surance companies. 



Please send your questions 

or comments to my office 

or e-mail me at: 

t herehabcenter®comca tt . net 



P.S. In the air-pressure chamber 
described above, air pressure 
can provide sufficient buoyancy 
so that the patient's legs cany 
just 5% to 10% of his/her actual 
body weight while exercising. 



e 



THE 
fl^* REHABlUTAnON 
CENTER 



www.therehabilitationcenter.com 



Tickets on Sale Monday 
For New McCartcr Season 

McCarter Theatre has 
announced that single tickets 
for Its 2005-06 season will go 
on sale at 9 a.m. this coming 
Monday, July 25. Tickets may 
be purchased at the theater's 
University Place box office, 
online at www.mccarter.org, 
or by calling (609) 258-2787. 

During the 2005-06 season 
McCarter will present world 
premiere plays from two 
American playwrights, Chris- 
topher Durang and Beth Hen- 
ley. 

The season will open Sep- 
tember 9 through October 16 
with Miss Witherspoon, Mr. 
Durang s latest comedy. His 
other plays Include Sister 
Mary Ignatius Explains it All 
For You and Beyond Thera- 
py. 

The season will continue 
with August Wilson's Gem of 
the Ocean directed by Ruben 
Santiago-Hudson. Fresh from 
Broadway, the ninth install- 
ment In Mr. Wilson's cycle of 
plays about African-American 
experiences in the 20th cen- 
tury will play McCarter from 
October 11 through October 
30. 

The new season will also 
Include Eugene O'Neill's A 
Moon for the Misbegotten, 
directed by Gary Griffin; 
Shakespeare's A Midsummer 
Night's Dream directed by 
Tina Landau; and the world 
premiere of Pulitzer Prize win- 



ner Beth Henley's Ridiculous 
Fraud, a saga of three grown 
brothers trying to outrun a 
troubling family history. 

New programs added to the 
2005-06 schedule since it was 
first announced include three- 
time Grammy Award-winner 
Los Lobo on October 1; 
English folk-rock singer Rich- 
ard Thompson on October 25; 



verslty's Hamilton Murray 
Theater. Show times will be 
Thursdays at 2 p.m., Fridays 
and Saturdays at 1 1 a.m. 

Written by Princeton Sum- 
mer Theater company mem- 
ber Jonathan Elliott, Tales of 
Wonder offers a new take on 
folk tales from around the 
world. The show is targeted at 
theatergoers ages three and 



folksinger Joan Baez on up. Tickets are $5 and may be 

November 1; and jazz purchased by calling the box 

guitarist-composer Pat Meth- office at (609) 258-7062. 

eny and his trio on November Mr E1I|ott , s a p^^^^ 

4- native and former student at 
A highlight of the upcoming West Wlndsor-Plalnsboro High 
season is expected to be the School. He graduated from 
return of the Berlind Cabaret Th e College of New Jersey in 
Series, with the debuts of 2004 and will graduate In 
singer/songwriter Ann Hamp- December from Virginia's 
ton Callaway. English jazz sen- George Mason University with 
sation Stacey Kent, and New a mas ,er S degree in arts man- 
Jersey's own Broadway diva age ment. Last year he served 
Christine Andreas. A new Ber- as tne ^mmer theater's pub- 
llnd Piano Jazz Trio Series will u c ny director and director of 
feature Brad Mehldau. Hlroml. Private Lives. His play For- 
and the "First Lady of Piano u , ar <j Motion is forthcoming 
Jazz," Marian McPartland. from Playscripts, Inc. 

For more Information on pgj a | so ff ers a S€ries f 

McCarter's 2005-06 season, educational theater workshops 

call (609) 258-2787 or visit f or children ages 7 to 12. The 




BLOWING UP A BASTILLE DAY STORM: John Nobile's SummerSwing Orches- » 
tra gave a big band flavor to last Thursday's Halo Fete in downtown Prince- g 
ton. All proceeds from ice cream sales and tickets for the Labor Day Vespa 
raffle will benefit the Institute for Children with Cancer. 



www.mccarter.org. 

Princeton Summer Theater 
Slates New Children's Play 

Tales of IVonder. the final 
play In Princeton Summer 
Theater's 2005 Family Enter- 
tainment Series, will be given 
its world premiere July 21 
through 23 and July 28 
through 30 at Princeton Unl- 



remalning workshops will take 
place on July 22 (perfor- 
mance) and July 29 (musical 
theater). Each workshop, $25 
per child, runs from 1 to 4 
p.m. To register, call (609) 
258-7062. 




6 



urnmer 



3 a \+^M$& 



vP%- 



rf\ 



^~%\ Q MUSIC LESSONS 

^ I PIANO ^ GUITAR^ DRUM I VIOLIN 

i" TRUMPET J VOICE ^ SAX I FLUTE ^ CLARINET 
Only$18V 2 hr. 
www.farringt0n3music.com 
609-897-0032 609-924-8282 609-448-7170 609-387-9631 

PRINCETON JCT PRINCETON HIOMTSTOWN BURLINGTON 

^Lesson^Ont^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 






TICKET & EVENT INFO 
www.pnnceton.edu/richaud ( 
609 258 5000( 



in iiiiiitti >tu www.princeton.edu/uiickets 

Enso Quartet (J) 

Presented by Princeton Summer Concerts 
Wednesday. 07/20/2005, 8:00 PM 

Tickets are free and available at the Richardson Auditorium 
Ticket Office at 7 00 PM on the evening of the performance 



Princeton Summer Theater 
B Schedules Comedy Night 

Princeton Summer Theater 
will host a night of stand-up 
comedy on Wednesday, July 
27 at 8 p.m. at the Universi- 
ty's Hamilton Murray Theater. 

New York City comedian 
Jeff Krelsler will headline the 
event, which will also feature 
guest comedians from the 
area. Most recently, Mr. Kre- 
I isler performed In the political 
comedy tour, Comedy Against 
Evil, and has been featured on 
Air America radio. 

Tickets are $10 for general 
admission, $8 for students, 
and may be ordered by calling 
(609) 258-7062. 

A summer stock theater 
company located on the 
Princeton University campus, 
Princeton Summer Theater 
produces four mainstage 
shows during the summer, 
stand-up comedy acts, musical 
performances, staged read- 
ings, children's workshops, 
and two shows for children. 
For more Information, visit 
www. PHncetonSummerTheat- 
er.org. 



MART A KAUFMAN were wrong 
You CAN take it with you Call TOWN 
TOPICS today at 924-2200 for sub- 
scription information 





MAKE IT MEMORABLE. 




II 



Award Winning Digital Video Production 

Corporate • Special Events 
Documentary • Photo-Montages 

Setn fcWman • Producer /Drector 

(609)2794172 

www4mpvtde0.com 

New York • Princeton • Los Angela* 




PATRICIA'S 

HAIR DfSIGIl 

357 dassau Street 
683-4114 

Tuesday-Saturday 8am -5pm 



PRINCETON 

BALLET SCHOOL 

Classes in ballet, modern, 

jazz & Spanish dance. 

609-921-7758 



Town Topics* 

well loved 

and 

well read 

since 1946 



Whnt INK JET AND PRINT CARTRIDGES 

Ia.£<tf9 Rttommtndtd loi v\t on HP PonlJil popti and tron^poitniics lo( hiqht\l qualify 




THE OFFICE STORE 

28 Spring Street (next to Chuck's) 
www.hinksons.com • 609-924-01 12 



Stonebridge at Montgomery's Complete 
Lifestyle Includes Skilled Nursing and 
Rehabilitation 



SKILLMAN, NJ - When Stonebridge at 
Montgomery resident Ami < ilpi needed 
rehabilitation th< rapy following bai I 
surgery she didn't hgvt to go fai to Find 
it I hanks i<> Stonebridge's on 
skilled nursing and rehabilitation sei li 

Mrs ( .ips was quit kly on lli- mm ml 

Ining strength and hei ability t«> live 
Independently 

Work i hk with r< habituation din i tbi 
Rob n S( arpa, Mrs ( rips r> 

sonalized program ol stn ngth ig ind 

balant i training exen ises that Int ludcd 
weighted leg lifts and support d walking 
between parallel bars Mrs (.ips' therapy 

alio ii 'i r. al lii« i halli i 

such as negotiating sti pi getting in and 

out of a car and even gi 

with occupational therapist Sarah 

I mi, mr. - in ouragt mi 

"Robert was just Incredible, helping 

me physu ally to get 

helping nu psychologically He w.js 

Mrs < . II fob 

I m living 

For Mrs Cips and other 

Stonebridge Is knowing irn 

.jddition.il < arc and at si .tarn - ll they 
should need It whih n mainlng 

ds in a familiar setting I hat's 
because Stoncbndi>" ependeru 

living, assisted living and skilled niU 
care in a State-of-the-art health cart 
tcr - right on campus, all under one rool 

And, when it comes to rehabilita- 
tion Stonebridge patients benefit from 
the resources of Genesis Rehabilitation 
Services, one of the nations largest reha- 
bilitation organizations with the most 
up-to-date techniques and equipment. 



PaUi nls i an all o go b yond th< rt hablli 
tation 1 1 iii« i i" use thi Stont bi Idgt 

1 1 1 1 1< ss i entei with Its si i fri< ndly 

hj draulli stn ngth >>■ i qulpmi nl 

While St hrn 

ip, n n sidi nls i"i its n hab program, 
Mi s» arpa points oui thai thosi sin ad) 
living at Stont brldgi h intagi 

el to know the indepi ndi nt living 

,, ildl m , •/. i , W4 II 10 il ill' V ' ■■■• > lii' ' 

to come to us, they feel mui h n 




Robt tt s« arpa and Am 

nl "And. we already 

etty ; I Id 

hi- 1 tyli and ll ■ 

Stonebridgi Indi p< ndent living 
nts enjoy priority placement in 

I <\ living or skilled nursing but 

l well "ii" 'I "n ■' 
available basis 
Slonchndgt iit Montgomtry offtn mdtpaidtnl 
living. aSStttfd living and ikilUd nursing aire 
To learn more, stop by any time or 
schedule a personal appointment by 
calling 609-759-3649 Join us at our 
weekly open house every Thursday 
from 4:30-6 00p.m. ♦ 



4? 



Affiliated with Pmbylrrun Homo M. S>rwt«, Inc , 
a not U>f -profit, non-wt tar un c •jryonl Kin 



rk 



£> 



, tttiAiHOutaa 
V««X V o»'0»njtin 



AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE 



\J I/ I Theonl) Thai Restaurant in Princeton 

A> X CL ^CX Eat-In & Take-Out 

x \ v ^*^ < 235 Nassau St., Princeton 

683-3896 •683-1981 

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OICHIBAN: Japanese Cuisine 
Take-Out 
Sit-Down Dining • Outdoor Cafe 

Open 7 Days » 66 Witherspoon Street • 683-8323 




lahici 



Tahieres 

" ^3 I ~ * *, 19 19 



ipi ,i ..I | '.'ii Rli \ i i Rl IP1 '•■ ■ ' UISINE 
ii w « 1 1 . ■ Princeton 609^ 2798 



PRINCETON DAY CARE 

Unique Program 
for childen up to kindergarten 
.ari All Year 



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I'iiik i ton Borough 

609-921-7414 

www.priocetondayi an i om 



HALO PUB 

ESPRESSO 9 Hulfish Si. From 7 am 



Where the best things in life are cheap! 



HALO PUB 

ICK C.Ul-.AM 9 llulli.li Si. To 1 \ pm 









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IRISH TREEEXPERTS 

• Shade tree pruning and trimming 


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• Tree and stump removal 








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Fresh fish. 
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Now Open 7 Days a Week! 



Shallow Bachelors Chase Bridesmaids in Ribald Romantic Comedy 



only to abandon them the next day. However, the con- 
firmed bachelors reconsider their womanizing when 
they meet Claire (Rachel McAdams) and Gloria (Isla 
Fisher), daughters of the suspicious Secretary of the 
Treasury, William Cleary (Christopher Walken). 

John goes after Claire and Jeremv pursues Gloria. 
At this point, the movie changes from a buddy adven- 
ture Into a dysfunctional family comedy. Against their 
better judgment, our heroes accept an invitation to join 
the eccentric Cleary clan for a post-reception getaway 
at their posh waterfront estate. 
Brother Todd (Keir O'Donnell), is a gay sadist with 

eyes for Jeremy. 
Mrs. Cleary (Jane 
Seymour), is a solici- 
tous alcoholic who 
puts the moves on 
John — Mrs. 
Robinson-style. As 
comic relief there is 
the grandmother 
(Olen Albertinl Dow), 
a butler (Ron Cana- 
da), and a minister 
(Henry Gibson) who 
is oblivious to all the 
Inane antics. 

Directed by David 
Dobkin (Shanghai 
Knights), Wedding 
Crashers never 
really pretends to be 
about anything 
- ARE THEY WITH THE BRIDE OR THE GROOM?: John Beck- J^««P«r than the next 
mates. These con with (Owen Wilson, left) and Jeremy Klein (Vince Vaughn) j?JS ™!Jl°5!r .ih 
artists hatch elab- have infiltrated yet another wedding celebration, where they ma telv reform it 
orate plans tai- will convince a pair of bridesmaids that they are interested in seems unfair that 
lored to each forming a lasting relationship with them, only to break the they are rewarded 

occasion, assum- women's hearts at the end of the weekend. for their Dast 

ing fake names - ^^ by get ^ g tQ 

settle down with a couple of very rich, well-connected 

debutantes. 

edding Crashers will disappoint fans expect- 
ing more from Owen Wilson and Vince 
Vaughn, especially when they are working 

with the support of Will Ferrell, Christopher Walken, 

and Jane Seymour. 
Good for a few belly laughs, but no match for the best 

of the genre. 

Very Good (•• I /2). Rating: R for nudity, graphic sexu- 
ality, profanity, coarse humor, and suggestive content. 
Running time: 119 minutes. Studio: New Line 
Cinema. — Kam Williams 



Unless you check your political correctness at 
the box office, expect to be offended by this 
outrageous comedy. Not only does Wedding 
Crashers revolve around a sexist premise, but the 
picture also relies primarily on a lowbrow brand of 
humor with stereotypes about females, gays, and 
assorted ethnic groups. Still, the film is funny 
enough to be recommended. 

John Beckwith (Owen Wilson) and Jeremy Klein 
(Vince Vaughn) are best friends. During the work- 
week, the pair of divorce mediators share a flourish- 
ing practice devoted to talking quarreling couples 
into settling their 
differences ami- 
cably. On week- 
ends, however, 
the pair rum into 
shameless sexual 
exploiters who 
put their powers 

of persuasion to 

perversely 

seduce, abandon, 

and break the 

hearts of naive 

bridesmaids. 
They arrive at 

weddings uninvit- 
ed, knowing they 

can count on 

finding vulnera- 
ble young women 

there who are 

desperate for life- 




and identities picked to fit the bride and groom's 
background. Their Impersonations include pimps, 
cowboys, veterinarians, pro baseball players, and 
even soldiers with Purple Heart medals. 

For Instance, as Lou Epstein and Chuck Schwartz 
they don yarmulkes and lead a Jewish congregation 
In shouts of "Mazel Tov!" Or. as Seamus OToole 
and Bobby O'Shea, they arrive at an Irish wedding 
announcing to everyone, "We're going to get 
drunk!" They know precisely what to say to attract 
the prey they're stalking In each case. 

We see John and Jeremy quickly proceed to pres- 
sure victim after victim Into compromising positions, 



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Bad News Bears (PG-13 for crude behavior and language, adult themes, and some 
sexuality). Remake of the 1976 classic stars Billy Bob Thornton as an ex-pro baseball 
player with alcohol and anger Issues who takes on the unenviable task of coaching a 
hapless Little League team with a woeful record. Cast includes Greg Klnnear. March) 
Gay Harden, and a cast of children. 

Batman Begins (PG-13 for violence, disturbing Images, and mature themes). 
Christian Bale is the latest incarnation of the Caped Crusader in this prequel which 
retraces how, as an orphaned young lad, Bruce Wayne abandoned Gotham Clt 
study martial arts in Asia, returning to defend the metropolis as his crime-flghtlng 
alter ego. Expanded cast Includes Michael Caine, Morgan Freem.m, Kati« Hob] 
Liam Neeson, Ken Watababe. Gary Oldman. Tom Wilkinson, and Rutger Hanoi 

The Beat That My Heart Skipped (Unrated). This remake of James Totack's 
cult classic Fingers (1978) revolves around a 28 year-old Parisian who would prefer 
to pursue his dream of becoming a concert pianist rather than follow In his shady 
father's footsteps. In French. Mandarin. Russian, and English with subtitles. 

Bewitched (PG-13 for sex. expletives, partial nudity, and drug references). Nicole 
Kidman brings the Elizabeth Montgomery role to the screen In this adaptation of the 
television series (1964-1972). Plot has a real witch unknowingly cast to play a witch 
on a television sitcom about a witch married to a human. With Will Ferrell «is 
husband Darrin, Shirley MacLaine as mother Endora, Steve Carell as Uncle Arthur, 
Jim Turner as Larry Tate, and Amy Sedaris as Mrs. Kravitz. 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (PG for quirky situations, mild epithets, and 
action sequences). Tim Burton directs this adaptation of Roald Dahl's children '« 
novel of the same name. Freddie Hlghmore, who was In Finding Nevertand, plays 
the Impish title character joined by Johnny Depp as Willy Wonka, a role first brought 
to the movies in 1971 by Gene Wilder. 

Crash (R for sex, expletives and violence). This sllce-of-llfe melodrama revolves 
around an assortment of social issues faced by an ethnically diverse set of strangers 
who cross paths by chance in the wake of a car accident. The cast Includes Sandra 
Bullock, Don Cheadle, Brendan Fraser, Tony Danza, Thandle Newton, Matt Dillon, 
Jennifer Esposito, Terence Howard, Ryan Phllllppe, Ludacris, Keith David, Larenz 
Tate, Loretta Devine and Nona Gaye. 

Dark Water (PG-13 for frightening sequences, profanity, disturbing images, and 
mature themes). Jennifer Connelly stars In this remake of a 2002 Japanese horror 
flick as a divorcee in the midst of a bitter custody battle who moves with her 
daughter (Ariel Gade) into a dilapidated house which happens to be haunted by the 
ghost of a previous resident. 

The Devil Rejects (R for profanity, sadistic violence, drug use, and graphic sexuali- 
ty). Rob Zombie directs sequel to the House of 1000 Corpses. Gruesome mayhem In 
this road movie about a couple of bloodthirsty gangs engaged In a fight to the death. 

Fantastic Four (PG-13 for suggestive content and action sequences). Live-action 
adaptation of the Marvel Comics classic about a team of astronauts who develop 
superhuman powers after exposure to cosmic radiation. Julian McMahon as the 
diabolical Doctor Doom squares off against Ian Gruff udd as Mr. Fantastic, Michael 
Chlklls as the Thing, Jessica Alba as the Invisible Woman, and Chris Evans as the 
Human Torch. 

Heights (R for profanity, nudity, and sexuality). New York City serves as the 
backdrop for this serendipitous ensemble drama about the Intersection of five lives 
over the course of a most eventful 24-hour period. With Glenn Close, Elizabeth 
Banks, James Marsden, George Segal, and Isabella Rosselllnl. 

Hustle & Flow (R for violence, pervasive profanity, and sex and drug references). 
Memphis melodrama features Ten-ence Howard as a struggling pimp who turns to 
friends for help in making a fresh start as a rapper. With Anthony Anderson, Ellse 
Neal, Ludacris, Taraji Henson and DJ Quails. 

The Island (PG-13 for profanity, Intense action sequences, and some sexuality) 
Special effects expert Michael Bay directs this thought-provoking, post-apocalyptic, 
scl-fl adventure about the Inhabitants of a carefully-controlled, self-contained environ- 
ment eager to escape to a Utopia which promises to be the last uncontamlnated spot 
on Earth. The cast includes Ewan Mcgregor, Scarlett Johansson, Michael Clarke 
Duncan, Djimon Hounsou and Steve Busceml. 

Madagascar (PG for crude humor, mild epithets, and mature themes). Animated 
family adventure about four animals raised in captivity at New York's Central Park 
Zoo who escape but end up crated and carted off to Africa where they have to fend 
for themselves in the wild. Starring Ben Stiller as a lion. Chris Rock as a zebra, David 
Schwimmer as a giraffe, and Jada Plnkett-Smith as a pregnant hippopotamus. 
Supporting voice cast includes Cedric the Entertainer and Andy Richter. 
Mad Hot Ballroom (PG for mature themes). Dance documentary retraces the 
inspirational rise of eleven year-old New York City public school kids from humble 
circumstances who master the tango, fox trot, rumba, swing, and merengue In 
preparation for the annual, cltywide competition. 

March of the Penguins (G). Ornithological documentary follows a flock of pen- 
guins for a year, focusing on one pair of birds in particular, during their annual 
migration across the Antarctic. 

Me and You and Everyone We Know (R for profanity and disturbing sexual 
themes involving children). Newcomer Miranda July writes, directs, and stars In this 
arresting melodrama about the budding relationship between a struggling artist and a 
recently-separated shoe salesman (John Hawkes) ; with a couple of precocious com- 
puter savvy children. 

Mr. & Mrs. Smith (PG-13 for sexual content, expletives, and Intense violence). 
Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolle share the title roles In this crime thriller about a 
seemingly sedate, suburban couple who are unaware that they are both assassins and 
under contract to kill each other. Support cast includes Vince Vaughn. Angela 
Bassett, Kerry Washington, and Keith David. 

My Summer of Love (R for sex, expletives, and drug use). Coming out/comlng-of- 
age drama about the Yorkshire countryside escapades of a couple of 16-year-olds, 
one a working class tomboy (Nathalie Press), the other a spoiled debutante who lives 
in the mansion down the road (Emily Blunt). 

War of the Worlds (PG-13 for disturbing images and frightening sequences of 
violence). Steven Spielberg directs this remake of the 1953 sci-fi film based on the 
1938 radio play narrated by Orson Welles adapted from the original H.G. Wells 
classic novel about a Martian invasion of Earth. Tom Cruise stars as a dockworker 
struggling to save his family. Cast includes Dakota Fanning. Miranda Otto. Tim 
Robbins, and Gene Barry. 

Wedding Crashers (R for sex, expletives, and nudity). Owen Wilson and Vlnce 
Vaughn star in this over the top comedy as divorce mediators who devote their 
weekends to attending weddings in search of women. Tension arises when one of 
them falls for the daughter (Rachel McAdams) of an eccentric politician (Christopher 
Walken). Cast Includes Will FerTell and Jane Seymour. — Kam Williams 



Top Video Rentals 

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Current Cinema 

Titles and times sub/ect to change, call theater. 
PRINCETON GARDEN THEATRE, (609) 683-7595 

160 Nassau Street 
Friday. July 22 — Thursday, July 28 
March of the Penguins (G): Fri . 5. 7. 9; Sat.-Sun., 1, 3. 
5. 7. 9; Mon -Thrs., 5. 7. 9 

Me and You and Everyone We Know (R): Fri., 5:15, 
7:15. 9:30; Sat.-Sun, 1:15. 3:15, 5:15. 7:15. 9:30; 
Mon.-Thrs.. 5. 7. 9 

MONTGOMERY CINEMAS, (609) 924-7444 

1325 Route 206, Montgomery Shopping Center 
Friday, July 22 — Thursday. July 28 
The Beat that My Heart Skipped (French NR): 
Fri.-Thrs.. 2:20, 4:45. 7:10. 9:35 
Happy Endings (R): Fri.-Thrs.. 2. 4.30. 7. 9:30 
Mad Hot Ballroom (PG): Fri.-Thrs.. 2:30. 4:50. 7:10. 
9:30 

March of the Penguins (G): Fri.-Thrs.. 2. 3:50. 5 45 
7:40. 9:35 

Me and You and Everyone We Know (R): Fri.-Thrs., 
2:50.5. 7:10.9:20 
Yes (R): Fri.-Thrs., 2:20. 4:40. 7. 9:20 

HILLSBOROUGH CINEMAS, (908) 874-8181 

1 1 1 Raider Boulevard, Hillsborough 
Friday. July 22 — Thursday. July 28 
Bad News Bears (PG-13): Fri.-Thrs.. Noon, 2:30. 5. 
7:30. 10 

Batman Begins (PG-13): Fri.-Thrs., 6:45. 9:40 
Charlie & The Chocolate Factory (PG): Fri.-Thrs.. 
12 30. 1 30, 3:15, 4:15. 6, 7.8:45.9:45 
Dark Water (PG-13): Fri.-Thrs.. 7. 9:30 
Devil's Rejects (R). Fn -Thrs.. 12:25. 2:45. 5:05. 7:25. 
9.45 

Fantastic 4 (PG-13): Fri.-Thrs., Noon, 2:30, 5, 7:30. 10 
Herble Fully Loaded (PG): Fri.-Thrs.. Noon, 2:20. 4:40 
The Island (PG-13): Fri.-Thrs., 12:30. 3:30, 6:30. 9:30 
Madagascar (PG): Fri -Thrs.. 12:15. 2:25, 4:35 
War of the Worlds (PG-13): Fri.-Thrs.. Noon. 2:30, 5. 
7:30, 10 

Wedding Crashers (R): Fri.-Thrs., 1:30. 4:15, 7, 9:45 
Unlfd Artists Theatres at Market Fair 10, 
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t Miranda Utilizing Command of Princeton Culture 
* As He Starts Tenure in Director of Athletics Post 

T 



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he blueprint for the construction of 
the new Princeton High athletic facili- 
ties stared down at him from the wall 
In his office. His desk was crammed with 
paperwork that demanded his attention. 

John Miranda knew he had plenty on his 
plate, literally and figuratively, when he 
arrived for work on July 1 at PHS for his 
first day on the job as the new Director of 
Athletics for the Princeton Regional 
Schools. 

"I had 
stacks of 
papers on my 
desk," s.iid 
the genial 
Miranda with 
a smile, sit- 
ting in his 
office in the 
lower level of 
Princeton 
High. I 



this 
the 



"We're unique, we have a different 
combination of athletics and academ- 
ics here than in most schools in the 
state. We are ... academically oriented 
...we are able to produce some great 
athletes and outstanding teams. n 



baseball team to an 11-14 record 
spring, a marked improvement on 
teams 2-19 mark in 2004. 

"I felt It was time for me to put that 
knowledge and experience to good work for 
the district. I've coached In the CVC for a 
while so from an athletic standpoint. I 
understand what's going on here. I've been 
teaching here for a while so I understand the 
culture of Princeton." 

From 
Miranda's 
vantage point, 
that culture 
promotes 
excellence in 
the classroom 
and on the 
playing fields. 
"Were 
unique, we 
have a differ- 



threw away a whole trashcan of stuff and 
ili.il was just from the desk. I still have one 
more drawer to go." 

Miranda, 46, a longtime PHS business 
('(liH.itinn lc-K hci ,mi(I In, id baseball coach, 
realizes thai he has fl lol more than paper- 
work to tackle Bfl he replaces Eric Amkraut 
in the AD post. 

"With all this construction, I'm trying to 
help minimize the distractions and maybe 
some of the obsta< les," said Miranda, noting 
thai the school's new gymnasium Is I Ul 
rently under construction with new tennis 
courts and playing fields to be built later. 

"I'm concerned with the fields we have 
right now and working with our grounds 
crew to make sure that we are on top of the 
maintenance and upkeep of the fields. I 
want to try to Improve the condition of the 
fields. I want to make sure that our coaches 
have all of the equipment they need to 
compete." 

For Miranda, his extensive experience on 
the PHS diamond and In the classroom 
drove him to take Of] the i h.il/enge of the 
athletics d/re< for job which has seen 
Amkraut, trnie Benson, and John Curtis 
serve in the post since 2002. 

"I've hren .) leacher here for a while and 
I've been a coach here for a while," 
explained Miranda, who guided the PHS 



ent combination of athletics and academics 
here than in most schools in the state," 
asserted Miranda. 

"We are extremely academically oriented 
but we are able to produce some great ath- 
letes and outstanding teams. Look at the 
golf team this past spring, it was amazing. 
file swimming and soccer teams are usually 
strong." 

Miranda points to such stars as the 
recently graduated Robby Begin as exempli- 
fying what can result from the dual empha- 
sis at PHS. 

"My best baseball player this spring was 
Robby Begin," said Miranda, who noted that 
he will likely stop coaching the baseball 
team due to the responsibilities of his new 
post. 

"Not only Is he an outstanding baseball 
player, he's going to Georgetown to play 
baseball. That Is a great academic institu- 
tion. The kids here have a great opportunity 
to be • good athletes and fantastic In the 
school setting." 

Miranda's duties aren't limited to PHS as 
he Is also in charge of the John Wither- 
spoon middle school athletics program. 

"One of things I've been charged with this 
year is the continuation of the effort to 
Improve the middle school program," added 
Miranda. 




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"Last year, the number 

of practices was increased 

from three a week to five. 

This year we are going to 

increase the amount of 

games. I think that it's a 

three-tiered program. By 

the third year, we want to 

have the amount of games 

at the same level of every- 
body else we are compet- 
ing against. 
Whether it's at PHS or 

the middle school level, 

Miranda sees coaches as 

the vital link in the sports 

chain. 
"The coaches are the 

whole key to this," main- 
tained Miranda. "We have 

some really good coaches, 

I know just about every 

one of them personally. I 

have been touching base 

with the coaches to make 

sure that the lines of com- 
munication are open." 

The community as a 
whole has been communi- 
cating positively with 
Miranda. 

'it's been very positive," 
said Miranda, reflecting on 
the response he has 
received since being 
announced as the new AD. 
"I've gotten all kinds of 
calls from the community; 
people have been congrat- 
ulating me and telling me NEW DIRECTION: John Miranda surveys the action 
they are excited and that on the diamond this spring in his role as the Prince 
they can't wait to talk to ton High head baseball coach. Miranda, a longtime 
me. It's a window of coach and business education teacher at PHS, was 
opportunity. There are a recently named to replace Eric Amkraut as Director 
lot of new ideas that can of Athletics for the Princeton Regional Schools. 
be brought forward M j ran da started in his new post earlier this 
think we can use some of mon tj| t 

those Ideas they have out 

there." 




post 

I Photo by Bill Men/NJ SporlAciion) 



Miranda believes his experience in the 
Marines, which saw him serve a stint in the 
Middle East in 2002-03 as a logistics offic- 
er, gives him the wherewithal to execute 
new approaches. 

"You leam about teamwork and having 
everybody working toward one goal," 
explained Miranda, who noted that he dealt 
with multi-million dollar inventories in 



helping to move and support troops in the 
Iraq conflict. "You leam the importance of 
character and hard work. These are all 
things that carry over into athletics." 

With the leadership qualities that Miranda 
brings to the table, it appears that the 
Princeton athletics program is in good 
hands. — Bill Alden 



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Post 218 Laments Missed Opportunities 
As It Falls Short of Playoff Appearance 



When Princeton Post 218 
manager Tom Parker and his 
players look back on the 2005 
season, they will likely find 
more good than bad. 

Post 218 won four more 
games than it did in 2004. 
sent nine players to the Mer- 
cer County American Legion 
League (MCALL) Intraleague 
All-Star Game, and boasted 
several league leaders in key 
statistical categories. 

Unfortunately for Princeton 
players and coaches, they will 
likely remember the 2005 sea- 
son as the one that got away 
as they fell just short in their 
bid for a first-ever playoff 
MCALL playoff spot. 

After running its record to 
9-6 at the 15-game mark, 
Princeton stumbled to a 2-5 
finish over their last seven 
games, leaving them at 11-11 
and one game short of the 
MCALL's sixth and final play- 
off spot. 

Despite jeopardizing its 
postseason hopes by falling to 
11-10, Post 218 had one last 
chance to sneak in with a win 
over Bordentown Post 26 in 
the final game of the season 
last Wednesday. Bordentown 
entered the contest 12-9, but 
needed to win, thanks to a 
home loss to Princeton earlier 
in the season. 

With Princeton's home field, 
Smoyer Park, unplayable, the 
game was moved to Borden- 
town's Gilder Field. Although 
Princeton served as the home 
team, Bordentown protected 
the home field advantage, 
dealing Princeton a heart- 
breaking 7-6 loss. 

With the game tied at six in 
the seventh and final inning, 
Bordentown's Matt Walsh 
doubled in the go-ahead run 
with two outs to take a 7-6 
lead. 

Princeton came right back 
and put runners on second 
and third with no one out in 
the bottom of the inning. Zak 
Perkins, the MCALL leader in 
saves, then retired Brian Scan- 
Ion before walking O'Brien. 
Colin Sarafin stepped in and 
ripped a hard grounder, but 
Bordentown converted it into 
a double play to end the game 
and Princeton's season. 

"We came out playing like 
we did the last few games," 
said Post 218 veteran Alex 



Sugiura. "We didn't play well 
and we dug ourselves a hole." 

With Princeton trailing 3-0 
in the bottom of the first. 
O'Brien launched a home run 
to deep right-center to tie the 
game at three. O'Brien ended 
his season on a high note, 
going 3-for-3 with two home 
runs and four RBls. 

"I hadn't really hit the ball 
like I wanted to all year, but I 
feel like I've been in the zone 
lately.'' O'Brien said. 

"When Danny hit that home 
run, that got us going," Sug- 
iura said. "It lit a spark in us 
and we rode that spark for the 
rest of the game. We Just 
didn't finish the job." 

Nonetheless, Princeton left 
its mark on the MCALL in 
2005, primarily on the league 
leader board. Post 218 play- 
ers led the league in six of the 
nine listed offensive categories 
and had at least one of the 
top three players in eight of 
those nine categories, accord- 
ing to the Trenton Times. 

O'Brien went from a slump- 
ing after-thought to a near 
triple-crown winner in the 
span of three weeks. He led 
the league in batting (.514), 
hits (36), home runs (6), and 
slugging percentage (.943), 
while finishing second in RBls 
by four (30). 

Begin served as the lighten- 
ing to O'Brien's thunder, lead- 
ing the league In triples (4) 
and stolen bases (21). Begin 
also finished third in runs (25) 
and ninth in hits (29). 

Princeton has always had its 
share of notoriety offensively, 
but Welsh brought Post 218s 
pitching to light for the first 
time In recent memory. The 

tall right-hander emerged as 
one of the most dominant 
pitchers in Mercer County, 
evidenced by his 4-1 record 
and 48 strikeouts (second in 
the MCALL) in 37 innings. 
Welsh also posted the league's 
sixth best ERA (1.51) and 
recorded two saves. 

According to Parker, Welsh 
has earned the respect of the 
league to go along with the 
respect of his teammates. 

"He's the guy we go to 
when we need an out," Parker 
said. "When we were dividing 
up the all-star teams, he was 
the guy everyone wanted, so 



the other coaches have been 
very impressed with him 

Welsh was one of nine 
Princeton players to be 
selected to the intraleague all- 
star game. Andrew Davidson. 
Will King. John Lauri, Logan 
Laughlin, Jake Horan. Begin, 
O'Brien, and Sugiura all 
joined Welsh in the game. 




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Post 218 also saw resur- 
gence from their two college 
players, King and Sugiura. 
King, who played at the Uni- 
versity of the South, finished 
sixth in the league in strike- 
outs (29), and was one of the 
most dependable starters on 
the team by the end of the 
season. 

Suglura's season on the 
mound was cut short by shoul- 
der trouble, but he hit .480 
before the league's all-star 
break and finished above the 
.300 mark for the season. 

"(Alex and I) have been on 
the team for three years so we 
know what to expect," King 
said. "We Just tried to help the 
rest of the team with whatever 
we could." 

Sugiura was not sure he'd 
return to the team for this sea- 
son, but he received a call 
from King before the season. 
"Will convinced me that we 
had a good shot to put 
together a playoff run with all 
the talent we had," said Sugiu- 
ra, who will be a sophomore 
at Oberlin College In the fall. 

"I wanted to play this sum- 
mer," said King. "I also 
wanted to play with someone 
else who was In college to 
make It a little easier." 

King and Sugiura were both 
key pieces to the early season 
run and despite the failure to 
make the postseason, both 
feel they have left their mark 
on the program. "I Just tried 
to extol whatever wisdom I 
could to the younger guys." 
Sugiura said. 

Although the good may 
have outweighed the bad for 
Post 218 this season, all the 
players agree that the promise 
they showed serves as a 
reminder that they should 
have accomplished more. 

"We could have easily won 
15 or 16 games, but there 
were Just too many Inconsis- 
tencies," Sugiura said. 

"I think the younger guys 
learned a lot this year and 
they have a chance to be good 
next year, but unless the 
coaches and players take care 
of those Inconsistencies, It will 
be the same thing next year." 
—Mart Manley 




MISSING THE CUT: Princeton Post 218 catcher Logan Laughlin takes a cut 
in Mercer County American Legion League (MCALL) action earlier this 
summer. Laughlin and his teammates fell one win short of qualifying for the 
MCALL playoffs as they finished with an 11-11 record. 



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" Princeton Little League lis Forged Bond 
I Despite Falling Short of Final Nine Spot 



Midway through Hs third RnMN.no phase of '"« J^X^^ ^ 
> game of Pool C play in the competition. o V 7 >.7 « L r*n\ta\\?P on 

| District 12 tournament last Building a 7-1 lead over But failing to cap taHze on 
- Wednesday, the Princeton Lit- East Windsor. Princeton was two bases-loaded situations 
i tie League 11-year-old all-star on the verge of going 2-1 and and then being : hurt IJV*™ 
| team appeared to be well on putting itself into second place defensive m.scues ^seeing 
I its way to advancing to the in its poo. in a competition eye^ase^ ^jJ^J™ 

Two days later. Sunnybrae 
shut down Princeton 10-2. 
thereby eliminating it from 
contention for a spot in the 
Final Nine. 

In assessing his club's effort. 
Princeton head coach Billy 
Ray rued what might have 
been. "I know that a lot of 
coaches say this but a couple 
of bounces just didn't go our 
way." said Ray. whose team 
finished with a 1-3 mark in 
pool play. "The kids played 
like a 3-1 team. 1 just wish 
that I had more time with this 
group so that we could've 
shored some things up." 

One player who emerged as 
the leader of the group was 
star pitcher Chris Harwood. 
"This was the first time Chris 
played summer ball and he 
gave us two good six-inning 
performances." said Ray. who 
also cited the mound work of 
Ian Flnnen and Jacob Eisen- 
berg. "Chris pitched his heart 
out; we couldn't have asked 
for more. He also hit well for 
us in every game." 

Princeton also got good 
offensive production from 
David Bronsteen. Michael 
Ray. and Alex Bauman. 
"David Bronsteen had a cou- 
ple of doubles In the first 
game and then had some 
good bunts throughout the 
tournament," added Ray, not- 
ing that the team's win over 
HTRBA in the pool opener 
marked the first time that the 




Princeton program had beaten 
the perennial power in District 
12 play. 

"Michael Ray did a good job 
for us offensively and did a 
good job catching. Alex Bau- 
man was our clean-up hitter 
and he did a nice job sharing 
the catching with Michael." 

While Ray was impressed by 
the strides made by his play- 
ers individually, it was the 
team's spirit that set it apart. 

"It was wonderful to get to 
know players that I hadn't 
coached before." said Ray. 
whose assistant coaches were 
Tom Dunlap and Steve Eisen- 
berg. "It was a great group of 
kids and they really did bond. 
They practiced hard for three 
weeks. They had some fantas- 
tic practices and they really 
came together." 

Ray, for his part, believes 
the hard work his players put 
in this summer will pay off in 
the long run. 

"I saw a lot of development 
in the last month," asserted 
Ray. "This experience will 
make them stronger and will 
help them win more games in 
the future." 

—Bill Alden 




MAKING STRIDES: Princeton Little League 11- 
year-old all-star Michael Ray speeds around the 
bases last week in District 12 tournament play. 
While Ray gave the squad a spark, the Princeton 
11s fell short of the Final Nine phase of the com- 
petition as they went 1-3 in Pool C play. 

(Ptwto \n D*vnJ GoWtmiifi) 



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THE RIGHT STUFF: Princeton Little League 11- 
year-old star Chris Harwood fires a pitch in action 
in the District 12 tournament. Harwood starred on 
the mound and at the plate for the Princeton 11s 
who posted a 1-3 mark in Pool C play as they 
missed out on a spot in the Final Nine of the 
tournament. ipioio by dmo cousmnn) 



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Princeton Little League 10s 
But Doomed by Final Inning 



Competitive 
of Pool Play 



When Rick Hrabchak 
started coaching the Princeton 
Little League 10-year-old all- 
star team in late June, he real- 
ized that he faced an uphill 
battle. 

"Three weeks ago we just 
had a bunch of individuals 
who play baseball," said Hrab- 
chak. "Princeton was viewed 
by the other teams in the dis- 



trict as an easy win." 

Hrabchak molded his group 
of players into a team that 
turned a lot of heads as it bat- 
tled hard in Pool B of the Dis- 
trict 12 tournament. 

Princeton entered the final 
inning of pool play leading 
Cranbury-Plainsboro by 7-3 
with the winner advancing to 
the Final Nine phase of the 




dllfltt. Every one of the kids 
got along. They didn i ,ill 
know each other at the begin- 
ning but they all became 

competition. {ri ™* s \ 

Unfortunately. Princeton u L P ^ ^"^rl °l,/ 

was unable to hold that lead ^l ^ J' S ,, ^ , I < 
,_ it i„ii Q i _ , , , were really into it, added 

as it tell 8-7 to end up 1-3 u u u i .c . 

nm^n ™a .u .j Hrabchak, pointing out that 

overall and on the oukuU- , i j 

looking in when It came to the h{ * "™ ^ °' P '/ 

Rnal Nine. J bl,! ,W L ° **** mm . *■ Usl 

„. , , three weeks 

It was a combination of -r\ i. j 

,. ra ibc kM. a - 1j 0ur pra C tlCM were KtNO- 

Klfchai ' n r° rS ' £* M fo ' < h ™ tHHirs but many 

ESftj .7f JV^* - Hn» *«SI wanted to stay 
ateful final inning. You have , |0 he| |hem ^ 

£j? !k a nb . u, y p,am * oro A lot of the pmctkS ended 

credit Oiey made some plays. , ^ hmiIs S() , m . 

1™? K P ? ^ but ,T nights I had to tell them It was 
was a big disappointment. off (he fte|d .' 

Hillnn^A ft WaS u 0t W,th *»t Wnd of effort. It's 
£ °^ ^ ,he ™* 55 no wonder that the Princeton 

£ ™ ^7 a ^ 3S thC 10s established themsdus M 

tournament progressed. h 11(ors 

W f. be u cam k e u! te l m ' -Bill Alden 

asserted Hrabchak, whose 

club topped West End 8-1 but 

fell to Sunnybrae 10-1 and 

Millstone-Roosevelt 7-4 In Its 

other pool games. "We came 

together as a team. Each and 

every kid improved. We really 

proved to the other teams in 

the district that we could be 

competitive in every game." 



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BY GEORGE: Princeton Little League 10-year-old 
ail star George Blinick delivers a pitch last week 
in the District 12 tournament. Sparked by Blin- 
ick's all-around play, the Princeton 10s came ago- 
nizingly close to qualifying for the Final Nine 
phase of the competition. Princeton led Cranbury- 
Plainsboro 7-3 in its final game of pool play but 
lost 8-7 to fall one win short of advancing in the 

tournament. (Photo by 0md Goldsmith) 



For Hrabchak, players like 
George Blinick exemplified the 
team's competitive spirit. 
"George got on base nearly 
every time he came up during 
pool play," said Hrabchak, 
who also cited the contribu- 
tions of Alex Kim, Ellis Bloom, 
and Will Greenberg. "George 
pitched for us and he caught 
for us. He was just a good .ill 
around player."' 

Although Hrabchak was 
proud of how the players pro- 
gressed individually, the 
emphasis was squarely on 
teamwork. 

"We not only wanted to help 
them to work on improving 
their skills, we wanted to bring 
them together as a team," 
said Hrabchak, noting that he 
got extensive help from the 
other parents with five or six 
aiding him with the coaching 



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IN THE SWING: Princeton Little League 10-year 
old all star Alex Kim prepares to take a swing in 
action in the District 12 tournament. Kim pro- 
duced at the plate for the Princeton 10s but it 
wasn't enough as the squad went 1-3 in Pool B 
play, just missing out on a spot in the Final Nine 
phase of the tournament. (photon OMSGoumimi 



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s Princeton Babe Ruth 13s Produced Drama 
But Can't Script Happy Ending in Districts 

The Princeton-Cranbury Inning. Unfortunately for 
Babe Ruth 13-year-old all Princeton, Etherton uncorked 
stars proved to have a flair for two wild pitches to help 
drama as each of their games Hopewell push across the win- 
In the District 1 tournament n | n g run In a 7-6 
turned Into one-run nallblters. heartbreaker. 

After opening the touma- 

jjj ment with a 3-2 extra inning Tak|ng on W est Windsor- 
is win over Ewing, Princeton- p| a i nsDO ro on Thursday and 
5 Cranbury (PC) found Itself fac , ng elimination, P-C took a 
^r locked into a tight contest 2 -0 lead In the top of the third 
J with Lawrence. w | m Barsamian picking up an 

z - Trailing 5-4 after four rbi in the rally. WWP, how- 
o Innings and deadlocked at 8-8 evCTi responded with a three- 
£ In the sixth, P-C broke wn ra ||y „, the fifth and then 
z through in the bottom of the held P-C to one hit over the 
cc sixth as Trevor Barsamian | aS ( j w0 innings to eam a 3-2 
. scored to give it the lead, triumph, 
o P-C's Steve Etherton then did Although the final loss was 
£ the Job in relief as he held hard , swa || w, Slpprelle had 
H Lawrence to one hit In the top no qualms aDO ut his players* 
| of the seventh to secure the c ff or , s "The boys played 
o victory. hard," asserted Slpprelle. 

While PC coach Scott Sip- "They had four one-run 
prelle acknowledged his team games, they lost two and they 
wasnt at its sharpest in the won hv . They just couldn't 
win over Lawrence, he was ge j over the top. The kids 
happy with his club's resil- weu , ,, |j n | r disappointed that 
ience. they didn't go further 

"The game was not crisp in i n Sipprelle's view, the team 
the field but we hit the ball mac j e a statement notwith- 
hard and played good enough s t an dlng the f..« i ihal it didn't 
to win," said Slpprelle, who ultimately prevail. This is a 
got two hits and three RBIs g roU p of 1 3 year olds that has 
from Jordan Metro with Tho- hpen nlavina toaether for 

mas Hrabchak chipping in two many y P ear y s an d it started a. MOON SHOT: Princeton-Cranbury Babe Ruth 13- 
hits and two runs. ground zero to raise aware- yea'-old all star Will Mooney delivers a pitch last 

Heading Into the winners' ness for Princeton baseball," week in District 1 tournament play. P-C finished 
bracket of the semifinals, PC aS serted Slppfelle, whose club 2-2 in the tournament and was eliminated in the 
played good enough to keep will be competing in the Lou semifinal round. Each of the team's four contests 
things close as it battled Gehrig tournament in Hamil- in the competition was decided by one run. 
Hopewell last Wednesday, ton starting this weekend. fPhoiobyBiiiAiienMSponAciion) 

The topsy-turvy game was tied "The kids put in a good effort 

at 6-6 headed into the bottom | n the tournament." 

of the seventh and final —Max Woolley 




Princeton Senior Babe Ruth Gets Offensive, 
Wins Three Straight to Climb Into Third Place 




Sports Fans'. 

\BET 
YOU 

DIDN'T 

m KNOW — /f 

STURHAHN, DICKENSON & BERNARD 

I low can a pitcher be crcd Slum alter went nose to nose 
iled with a win on a da\ with the umpinaspit-llying 
when he doesn't even pitch? argument over a checked 

Mi. us wh.it happened to swing, and he prompt!) goi 
Cleveland's lason Davis, tossed Hut wouldn't you 

al the expense ol mound know. Show alter was sick as 

mate Hob Howry a Utile a dog with a fever, and se\ 

known rule made it pos- eral days later, the umpire 

sible In a Ma) 2005 victor) came down with the same 

over Toronto, starter Jake nast\ hug. 

Wetbrook did not go the + + * 

required h\e innings to get D . . 

i . ,., n k... . . i Sometimes truth is stranger 
B decision, but as it turned ,, ... 

„„ ,i i i i llu " fiction On Mas 3 

out. the Indians alreads )nA . .... - " 

■ , , , .. ' 2 (Mb, the iden its o the 

had scored enough runs foi . , ..,, ,. 
,. , , . ., legendary Deep hroat 

the eventual VICtOH DaVtS , . . 

, u , . , vvas revealed Former FBI 

and How r\ (unshed out the .. . N , . , 

. Official Mark let was the 

game. SO nndei rule 10.19, , 

man whose information 




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the decision on who gets 
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SCOrer Alter the game, SCOI 



helped bring down President 
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ci ( had Hroski gave it to ... . 

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After his Princeton- 
Cranbury Senior Babe Ruth 
team fell to Nottingham Jo 
drop to 1-4, head coach Scott 
Goldsmith knew that his hit- 
ters had to come alive if the 
team was going to make any 
noise this summer. 

Rebounding from its slug- 
gish start, Princeton-Cranbury 
(P-C) has reeled off three 
straight wins to improve to 
4-4 and move up to third 
place in the nine-team league. 

"I think the batting practice 
we have taken over the last 
three weeks has really 
helped," said Goldsmith. "Al- 
most everyone is hitting better 
and driving In runs." 

The team's hot streak 
started with a 74 win over 
Hamilton Lou Gehrig Grey on 
July 7 as it came up with a 
four-run rally in the top of the 
seventh to get back on the 
winning track. With P-C trail- 
ing 4-3 entering the seventh, 
Erik Cooper produced a clutch 
bunt to drive in Brian Parson 
with the tying run. Cooper, 
Chris Brooks, and Matt Ger- 
ard each scored to put the 
game out of reach. Ryan 
Gordy pitched five strong 
innings and then Danny Ether- 
ton came on in relief to get 
the win. 

Three days later. Brooks led 
the way as P-C exploded for a 
15-5 win over Nottingham in 
a game that ended after five 
innings under the 10-run 
mercy rule. Brooks went 
three-for-four at the plate and 
scored twice in a game which 
saw P-C jump out to a 7-0 
lead in the first inning and 
never look back. Etherton 



went the distance on the 
mound and also scored two 
runs. 

Last Thursday, P-C kept 
rolling as it put on a power 
display in topping Lou Gehrig 
Grey 10-6. P-C got homers 
from five players in the win as 
Etherton, Brooks, Richie Von 
der Schmidt, Joe Geramo, and 
Bryce Metro all produced 
round-trippers. Gordy, Dera- 
mo, and Metro shared the 
mound duties in the win. 

In Goldsmiths view. Brooks 
has been a catalyst during the 
squads hot streak. "We have 
gotten tremendous impact in 
the field and in batting from 
Chris Brooks," said Gold- 
smith, who also cited the pro- 
duction he has been getting 
from Von der Schmidt and 
Etherton. 

"I had him batting In the 
number two spot earlier in the 
season. I moved him up to 
lead off and he has done the 
job getting on base and 
scoring." 

Goldsmith saw last Thurs- 
day's win as a potentially piv- 
otal moment of the summer. 

"I told the team at our last 
game that if we can win this 
one, we have a real good shot 
at winning the rest of our 
games," said Goldsmith, 
whose team is scheduled to 
play Hopewell on July 21 at 
Hilltop and then play at Tren- 
ton on July 26. "The kids 
started that game with five 
home runs to get a big win." 

If Goldsmith's batters can 
keep up their power surge, 
P-C may be producing some 
more big wins this summer. 

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situ keratomileusis) perma- be free of wearing con- 
nently changes the shape tact lenses'? If yes LASIK 
of the cornea as a means of may be a good solution 
reducing refractive errors. LASIK is a surgical proce- 
n is performed for varying dure appropriate for most 
degrees of nearsighted- people who are at least 

^Sm a a r » S,9ht ^ dr l e A s ?'. and 21 years old - have hea *% 
SSSSkS; u" LASIKl a eyes ' and are moderately 
m£rll ? ° Wn aS a nearsi 9hted or fars.ghted 

microkeratome is used to r^u um,^^ 
make a flap in the cornea. £ J' ^ ? T C G ° MERY EYE 
leaving a hinge at one end ? RE al 6 °9-279-0005 
of the flap. The flap is then l0 ,f hedule a LASIK con- 
folded back to reveal the > J? tl0n We are Seated 
middle layer of the cornea at Montgomery Center at 
called the stroma Pulses I 5 Route 206 0ffic e 

from a computer-controlled vA? U I S -2. re Mon 10 " 8 ' Tues ' 

exc.mer laser vapor.ze a We . d c Thur s 10-7; Fri 10-6, 

portion of the stroma, and Sat 9 " 3 

the flap is then replaced. p S. With LASIK, the laser 

By removing the tissue, the doe s its work on each eye 

shape of the central cornea m le ss than a minute and 

is altered, and the refrac- Patients are typically back 

live error is reduced. to work or normal activities 

Would you like to be able w,th,nlhr eedays. 

to see the alarm clock first ******* 

thing m the morning with- Ij^WWj^^c^] 



U.S. by a team of 24 people 
by 
cancer. 

More than 1.100 people 
applied to be part of the 






Cancer Survivor Tredup Hitting the Road 
To Raise Awareness of Treatment Options 

In December 2000. Jeffrey °P tloi V\ ? a ! ,,e ca,,ed 
Tredup went to the hospital to Cliwcaltrials com. 
have some thyroid goiters This fall. Tredup will be tak- 
removed in what was sup- ,n S a more aggressive step in 
posed to be a routine surgery, spreading information about 

When he woke up a day lat- ™ ceT t rcsear ^ h *£f n * e P ar " 
er. a groggy Tredup learned **"£* T ln ^e Bristol-Myers 
that the one-hour procedure §*»"* T ? Ur , ° f H ° pe ' a ""if 
had turned into an eight-hour ?fV bicycle journey across the 
marathon operation after his U . S - b V a tc K am of . 24 J*T 
doctors discovered he had thy- w 
roid cancer. 

In dealing with the radical 
surqery In which his thyroid 
was removed and then under- foup. which is organized into 

going iodine radiation treat- f™ ° s,x *"\ f e f rc,a V 
7 t ~a „•,. i«..„ ~r — 4i fashion for about five hours a 

r d * ™.r° -Ik S £, ^y from San Diego to Wash- 
has been a major ally In that ^ DC ff J ^^ 

-i il j -re ,i u,i -.j 29 to October 8. Along the 
I had a 75-mlle bike ride (eam members share 

the Sunday before my opera- ^ s(orles and |nform 
tion recalled Tredup an avid , e on (he route about canccr 
cycUst who started riding with ^^ tions Thc cvenf 
the Princeton Free Wheelers webs|te www.tourofhope.org. 
cycling dub after moving to ^ hriher detal|s on thc 
the area In the early 1990s. riders and canccr research . 

"I think that helped my -, dec|ded f0 ue the 

recovery. I was up and walk- Tour because , cou|dn . ( tnink 

Ing In two days Going of a better way to raise aware- 
through the pain of a long .. said TreduPf who 
bike ride helps develop physi- h that hls $t and mose 
cal toughness and a positive of hls c0 „ eagues on ^ ridc 
mental outlook. ^ ^e as motjvatlon f or 

This Sunday, Tredup will be peop | c faclng canccr 
hitting the road to ride In a -, was ^^ when , found 
charity bike event being held out , had bcen chosen (or the 
In conjunction with the Pelo- team About a ha if. hour | ater , 
ton Project, a grassroots fund- I th ht what nave j got(en 
raising group associated with |f jnt0 , Mn do a ccntury 

the Lance Armstrong Founda- ride (100 ^.^ ^ onc day but 
tion (LAF). I never m0U ght about doing a 

The Peloton Project s objec- cenrury ri de for nine straight 
tive is to raise awareness and da y S » 

funds In their communities to 

help the LAF support people 

affected by cancer through j n order to ne | p condition 
advocacy, research, educa- them for mGir undertaking, 
tion, and public health pro- Tredup and his fellow team 
grams. members are participating In 

The event has a special slg- an individualized training regl- 
nificance since Tredup's pro- men developed by Lance Arm- 
fessional life is devoted to bat- strongs personal coach, Chris 
tllng cancer in his job as a Carmichael. 
research scientist at Bristol- "| ve been working with the 
Myers Squibb. Carmichael Training Systems 

Tredup. 40, specializes In (CTS) program for about a 
protein biochemistry, creating month and I have noticed a 
substances that may bind to a difference," explained Tredup, 
protein and stop cancers from who has also raced competi- 
growing. tlvely for Hart's Cyclery In 

"The Peloton Project is a Pennington, 
good way to get Information U I have never trained like 
out to the public on cancer that before. On a hard week, 
treatment," asserted Tredup, they have me on the bike for 
noting that the Lance Arm- 15 hours. I do things like hill 
strong Foundation website, repeats and one-legged spln- 
www.laf.org, serves as a n ing. The easy weeks have 
source of such Information. about 10 hours on the bike." 

"It's a good resource so For Tredup, it is fitting that 
people won't be as scared hc ,s rid,n 9 In a major event 
when they find out they have **»* ,s affiliated with Arm- 
cancer or that someone close strong s mission to help peo- 
to them does. They need to P'c tetter deal ^th canC€r - 
know the options and what "Armstrong's example gives 
can be done." you a positive perspective on 

In reflecting on his bout with what you can come out with 
cancer, Tredup emphasizes ™* f,ndln 9 out you have can- 
the value of having as much cer," said Tredup. I look at 
Information about the disease "V"™ as a c y c,lst *»* canccr 
as possible. "I remember and l ' eel there's a connection 
when the doctor explained with Armstrong." 
things to my wife and me," Tredup's situation has deep- 
recalled Tredup. ened his connection to his 
"I said OK what do we have dall y work at Bristol-Myers 
to do now. I had already SqiitoD. "Cancer has helped 
researched thyroid cancer focus me In my research, said 
before my operation in case Tredup. "I m hoping that If I 
things turned out that way. I can 9<* the word out to my 
still have cancer in my lymph colleagues that will give them 
nodes. I get checked every six an extra oomph^ as they go 
months and If my blood count about tne»r work 
numbers change, I'll have to This Sunday, he will enjoy 
go for more aggressive treat- seeing riders giving an extra 
ment. I've researched my oomph at the Hopewell event 

as they have a choice of 
routes of 15, 35, and 65 
miles. 

"It's a good cause, I love to 
see people involved," said 
Tredup. who plans to ride the 
65-mile loop at the event. "I 
would like to see more people 
out on the road biking; it is so 
good for you physically and 
mentally." 

Cycling has certainly been 
good for Tredup as he has 
fought the battle of his life. 

-BillAlden 



^ For busy consumers who need services they can count on... 



CONSUMER BUREAU RECOMMENDS: 



• Accounting/Tax Preparation: 

GEER. ROBERT H., CPA i. ,g 

ft preparation lor ndrvduats corporations & 

fiduciaries Fmaroal statements, audAng, 
oookkeepmg. ft payroa Thompson Cl 
195 Nassau Si. Prmceton 



• Electrical Contractors: • Landscaping Contractors: 

JOHN CIFELLI rjctOf BIANCO LANDSCAPING 

insiasahons rep** v llesrientiaycorrscl Uc eusung landscapes Compute lawn mamte- 

Mi3i insured/bonded 921-3238 nance G»aa^ and backhoB •ervn, 

NASSAU ELICTMC irtsialation ft mg RR tie* Stent Onveways 921-753/ 

921-6220 rep*rs RfWtemal A commetCOl xr>x< JOHN KOCHIS LANDSCAPING 

— Upgtaftng Trouble shooting Outlets Speoaii/ing m blue stone ft bock waks & 

related Futy »«wed. kansBd & bonded panoa Fomdaton landscapra 

Fwb Esftmates 924-6823 SponMat systems Futy nsured 7S7-M76 



• Air Conditioning; 

LAWHENCCVILLE FUIL&ncB 1925 
16 Gordon Av Lawreneevl 896-0141 # FencinQ 

B^INCCTOai AIR CONWTIONINO. *UiURSAN FENCf IOCS Ol UvN* 

IMC, S*wb 1970 FtepUoBment spec«il*ts Vim our fence d«plav iu« oM U S 1 nut 
Freeest 39 Ev«rett O Ptn Jctn 799^434 Brunswck C*cte S32MutoenySt ' 



• Real Estate: 

PRUDENTIAL NEW JERSEY PROP- 
ERTIES 'Helping people lind non> 

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE Realtors. 
Smce 1974 MLS Sales, (ontall 
32 Chambers St. Pmceion 924-1416 



PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. Since 1942 T W0" 
125 Hovey Ave. Hamilton Twp 924- 1 1 00 



„>. BBg SOQO 



• Alarm Systems: 

QUANTUM SECURITY SYSTEMS 

Insui.ince approved Burglar, tire & home 
automaton systems 'Your local alarm 
prolessionais' 



i Appliance Repair: 

APPLIANCE TECH By Frank Lecalo 



• Floor Relinishing/lRstallatloas: 

APPLIED WOOD PRODUCTS. INC. 

Insured Free asimttes 1-800-731-9663 

• Fuel Oil & Oil Burners: 

;.. LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Smce 1925 
xwgxw*) Fu8| ^ pMTtong hlJig ,„ po^ & ^^^ 

audits 16 Gordon Av Lmncvt 896-0141 



• Lawn Maintenance: 

■UOMO LANDSCAP1NO. Inc. 

Complete lawn A garden marttenance 

B/cfc & blueslone w«S.s MS 2206 

LAWN DOCTOR of PRINCETOM- 
PENNINGTON HOPEWELL G09-737JJ161 

PRINCETON PROPERTY MAINTE- 
NANCE Mi-wng ^ nvunioivince 921-9116 

CHARLIE WAONER Low* A darter* 
Servtco Spnna & tail clean ups Mulchmg 
Shrub plantng & prumng Lawn 
maotamence BOB KM MOO 



• Recreational Vehicles: 

KADCO CAMPINO CTR. NlW & used 

npplioi Hitches i 
Rontals 1214 Rt 130 Robbmsviii. 



PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. Since 194; 
Sales installation & service ol qualify healing/ 



Smce 1972 60*5860262 a u condawnmrj CARRIER deateT 

FAIRHILLS APPLIANCE REPAIR 1 25 Hovcy Ave. Hamtfton Twp 

Expert repairs on maiof appliances retngera- _ r«r#l«ii p M t>M> 
tors, iree/ers. dishwashers, mi condnoners • uaraen tenters. 

washers, dryers, ranges Regular service in MA2UR NURSERY A FLOWER SHOP • LimOUSine StfV iCt: 



• Lawn Mowers, Garden & Farm 
Equip. Sales & Service: 

JOSEPH J. HEMES A SONS, Inc. 

g.. nQ0 CommerciaVreajdentiai S 

Echo mowers tractors, tnmmers & >now 
ihiowBts 1233 US 206 at 518 B 



• Restaurants: 

THE ANNEX RESTAURANT 

dors Not* ludenls & ordinary 

uti hearty, moderately priced tood. 
drink & high spirits Mon-Sal 11am to 1 a m 
DownttBti ii 1261/2 NAB tuSl OpposMi 
Firestone LI Hi 609-921 7555 

UTTLi SZBCHUAH RESTAURANT 
Chtfiese tood connoisseurs Irom miles around 
•io 7 days o wi-> v 
1 
& dofcAoes 0YOB Old Tronion Rd ( 1/2 mi 

li.ttlic light). 
k.v 609-443-5023 



Prim Bton 



609-393-3072 265 Baker s Basin Rd 

Glass: Residential/Commercial: 




CAR WASH 

3515 U.S. Route 1. Princeton. NJ 
609-987-9333 

$O0FF 

^m Any Special 

Expires 7/31AK TT 
Cannoibe combined with any otftei orler 



Auto Body Repair Shops: 

MAGIC FINISH AUTO iOOV Prinoeton , »*** •"»« * ALUMINUM | 

Pike. Lawrvl(10m.n Irom Prn ) 393-5817 wa * 5 ^"0 ninceton ȣ 

rico'S auto body • Gutter Cleaning & Repair: 

Foreign & domestic 601 Rte 130. OUTTERMANl QuTTER CLEANING He 



A-1 LIMOUSINE S-xe 1970 AH 
'4 rvs a day Car phones 



Robbmsvilie 



• Auto Dealers: 

HOUSE OF CARS, IHC. T/A ECOH- 

OMY MOTORS Cooksiown-New Egypt Rd, 
Cookstown 609-758-3377 

LAWRENCE TOYOTA 883-4200 

Free shuttle service to Princeton 
2871 Rte 1 . Lawtencevillc 



• Lumber Yards (Stt lids.. Math): 

COLEMAN'S HAMILTOH SUPPLY Co. 

iniMi'i. deck materials moldings windows 
doors, cutl '- hard- 

woods Showroom 65 Mockner Ave 

609-585-4343 nv . ,.«i, then HYOROFLUSHES Hamilton Twp 609-5874020 

them doan") Guttor repair/replacement ■*•«•»« r««t..»t. M > 

Seamioj s halt round • Mason Contractors. 

DESAHTIS A MAMMAHO M I 

I Handymen: toralion Buck & stono pomling 

MR. HANDYMAN TUCKER A ROSSI STOHE DESIGN 

•. services Bonded & insured itopair boloro you need 



• Roofing Contractors: 

FLESCH'S ROOFIHQ FfJ ill icwtmg A 

KoOTO '' M1 ° ^" K 609-394-2427 

R.A. McCORMACK CO. Since 1970 

BRUCE RICHARDS Home Improve- 
ments, llM 

THERIAULT ROOFIHQ m., i 

typos ol now tools, gutter-. 






609- 799-2346 toieptace St>- 



• Auto Rentals: 

ECONO-CAR Daily, weekly & monltily 

•esolcais New& used cars Free 
customer pick-up m Prn area 958 State Rd 
(Rl 206). Prn K447O0 



• Auto Repairs & Service: 

FOWLER'S OULF Foreign & Domestic 
cdi repairs VW Specialist Towing & emer- 
gency road service Open daily NJ Insp Ctr 
271 Nassau St , Princeton 921-9707 

LARIHI'S SERVICE CENTER 
Road service 24 hour lowing 272 fi 
Street. Princeton 924-8553 

PAUL'S AUTO REPAIR Foreign & 
domestic, i light tiuck repairs Flatbed lowing 
N J Inspection Clr 691 Rle 130, 
Cianbury 395-77U & 443-44 U 

• Bathrooms: 

OROVE PLUMBING A HEATINO 

Kitchen 4 bathroom remodeling 55 N Mam, 
Windsor 448-6083 



CONSUMER 

BUREAU: 

How it works: 

1 



No Business Firm Puy* A Ttt 



i Bathtub Resurfacing: 

SAVE YOUR TUil Prolossional Resur- 
facing Fiberglas & Porcelain Done in your 
home Insured ' Over 10 years 737-3822 



• Beauty Salons: 

LA JOUE Full service ha:r styling 
Massage therapy 4 Hullish Si Prn 924-1188 



> Building Contractors: 

BAXTER CONSTRUCTION Inc. 

General contractors specializing m additions, 
renovations, remodeling & new homes All 
phases ol residential & light commercial 
construction Please call 609-924-9263 

NICK MAURO A SON, Inc. 924 2630 
New homes, adddions, renovations, offices 

NIHI, SEBASTIANO General building 
contractor serving Mercer County lor a quar- 
ter century Additions, concrete, t>k 
Jctn 799- 1782 (FAX 799-5844) 

RAYNOR WOODWORKING, Inc. 
Custom builder specializing in quality renova- 
tions, millwork & cabinets 609-259-7285 

JULIUS SESZTAK BUILDER 
Additions, renovalons, restorations 
Relerences 

W.R.H. DESIGN/BUILD, Inc. 
New Construction Consulting & Ftannmg 
Additions & Renovations 609-730-0004 



Vny Kind In order to get on 
or stay on Consumer Bureau's com- 
plete unpublished Register of Recom- 
mended Buslntst People (which can 
be checked free of charge by calling 
609-924-0737). 

2 In Or der To Be and Remain 
On Consumer Jiureau'i Key 
later Of Recom mcnderf Hu\ 
loesses, each recommended business 
firm must resolve to the satisfaction of 
Consumer Bureau's all-consumer Volun- 
teer Panel each and every customer 
complaint of theirs (It sny) known or 
reported to Consumer Bureau, 

3niVI.V R...ln*.. rlrn.. In 
Gfuuf fitnnillng on the Bureau 
Recommended Register »n allowed lo 
advertise In these Consumer Bureau 
Town Topics classified columns (while 
sharing with other Consumer Bureau 
Recommended business firms the cost 
of such advertising), 
>FOR FREE INFORMATION t)l< 
'££ with any business firm 



• Moving & Storage: 

ANCHOR MOVING A STORAGE 

lor 22 yaars Pik 

BOHRENS Moving A Stora«e. LO ll I 

longdistance Ah 
relocation I 

www bohionsmoving com 208-1470 

PRIHCETOH VAN SERVICE The Mov- 
ing Eiperla I nil service moving packing & 

- 1- iftgt mi quj ■ HiA' rt ". pi in i 

Wl'llMll' Y.V..V (Mill Hill Mil") I '-"I 

» Painting & Decorating: 

BILL CUADRA PAINTING Rt I (ft ntiel 

■ 

Iniured 

JULIUS H. GROSS INC. BBTtflna Uio 

' ( vnce 1969 PioTetslonal 
i 
m opcrelod S silo supoi 
PVKO 924 14/4 



• Septic Systems: 

BROWN, AC 

,',!■, |-1 | ,,! I U'.l .'.Hi II I-' 

STINKYS Septic Tank Pumping $to 

I'ipoinspoclions 609 



• Siding Contractors: 

LAWRENCEVILLE HOME IMPROVE 
MENT CTR, o 1952 Vinyl sidin 

MAR CONSTRUCTION il 

HOU I 

• Slipcovers: 

MIRAHOA SHORT ' -iiiKOvers, curtains. 

, ir.lu.nr. .'. IkmiM' lumi'.liini)'. 'I. 'I I'KMI 



located within 20 miles of Princeton, call 

609-924-0737 




5/nCtT 1967 lWAICMfirJw Sired 
P Box 443. Princeton, NJ 08540 



v. ,l-i I I IW l-il V 

IRIf Pmtoikti - D*MMn4 L*rrn 



rBjna ■*• • 



• Hauling: 

AAA REMOVAL Prmceton rasldi 
remove any and all unwanted items from roof 
lo cellar Small demoliiiorVsame day servicB 
iH6 (home) or 609-861 -98S3 (cell) 
MITCHELL'S HAULIHQ A HOUSE 
CLEANING Personalized house cleaning 
609-466-0732 allies, basements, garages, etc Ughlhaulng 
Dump trailers lor rent 6 9 4 1896ft 



'"J I 
Rofs 609 584 aflOfl 

N.J. PAINTING CO. Intmioo 

Power washing Thorough preparalion 
Owner operalod 9 yrs e«p 609-468-1777 
PETROS PAINTING Co. ' 

work 100% guqianleed ' Insured Owner 
"fraSfrl 

TK PAINTINQ f •lemr/lnivrnr pamling 
Wallpaper removal Power *e*hmg 

..;, , , , j ■ , ,1. ,, l-'i 11/ I'll/ 

VITO'S PAINTING Speciali/ng .n ir.lwor 

rtOJ painting Wallpaper removal Power 

washing Free estimates 609-203-0353 

• Fainting A Paper Hanging: 

ANTAL aODOOH MATHI <li",oralrvo 
pamling wafpapanng & molding mstallalion 
"Professional c/aftsmanship- 1st 

GROSS, JULIUS H. 924 1474 

PanUng paper hanging & decorating by 
Prtxelon owner smce 1959 

O'HERH WORKS, INC. Parting 

i ipor hanging im, 7676 

B.R. PERONI Residential & commercial 
painting and wallpapering Custom color 
matching Freeest Fulrymsmod 921-6468 



• Snow Removal: 

LAWH A TREE CARE OF PRINCETON 

'. pajkmgloli MulUptohoma 

. 924-4777. Cell 417 -7739' 

• Stereo & Video Repair: 

f LECTRONIC SERVICB LAB 

Guaranteed work on all makes of VCR s. slere 

■ oirhRd 



• Surgical Supplies: 

FORER PHARMACY ' .lies & rentals ol 
oat' ■« ■ ipplKisftoquip 2bkx*s 

33-4228 from Prmcolon Hospilal 160 Wilhorspoon, 

Prn 921-7287 



a Tile Contractors: 

P.J. CIARROCCA A SOHSi.uilomlik) 



• Transmissions: 

LEE MVLES Free check A free towing 
859 Rl 130. E Windsor 



• Travel Agencies: 

AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL 

AGENCY lOrsASSmuS I'nnCBlon 921 -8600 
KULLER TRAVEL CO. OwnSfi 

-.mi i- I'M/ Compii la iravel arrangi menu 
344 Nassau Slreel, Pnnceion 



• Building Materials (Sss Lbbsbsy): 

HEATH LUMBER CO. Since 1857 
Home building ct; 1580 N Olden Av Ewmg 
Prompt delivery 1 -e00-85HEA,TH(43284) A^a* condlg eqmp CARRIER"deai8r 



• Paving Contractors: 

FELIX V. PIRONE A SON PAVING A 
" ' " " " LANDSCAPE CO./ pnal New & r Bturf M 

• Unatinn PnntrartnrB* lo Crushed stone Tar & chips Seal coating 

Heating Contractors. ^ M t e „ caval ^ fl ^^ ^ 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Smce 1925 Bdgisnl Dtoch Prmceton 924-1735 

16 Gordon Ave, Lawrenceville ,896-0141 uyejiuy HAVING Smce 1953 Blacktop p runmg, lopping & shaping Tree & slump 

PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. Smce drrveways & parking lots Fraa BSWnatw Mas '•wal spaciali»u 75 II bucket truck & 

1942 installation & service of quality haaimg i«Cafd 4 Visa accepted eOO-3e6-37'72 c/ « n « arvautabte Fully mau/Bd Fr«o consulLa- 

lions Senior crtuen discount 609-687-9140 



• Tree Service: 

LAWN A TREE CARE OF PRINCETON 

Tree planting & loflili/almn, pruning, spraying 
& grounds maintenance Masonry a 
pavers , walls & patios Kubota tractor rental 
References 924-4777 

TIMBERLAND TREE EXPERTS 



• CDs, OVDs, LPs & Games: 

PRINCETON RECORD EXCHANGE 

COs. DVDs. LPs New & used Bought & sold 
Rock jaz*. classical & more 
20 Tulane Street Princeton 



125 Hovey Ave. Hamilton Twp 



• Historical Restorations: 

FLESCH'S ROOFIHQ 
Open 7 days for all roofmg & gutter work Speaaii/mg m 
921-0881 hrsloncaJ resloraixm Bu*-m Yankee gutters, 
www pre» com WeBuyCDsAOVDsOprei com cornce 8 stale work «» ">94-2427 

• Home Improvement ft Repair 

ELLIOT BOLLENT1N 908-369-7311 

Ught carpentry Interor paribng Repair t 
Bathrooms Custom trm work 

MJLK. CONSTRUCTION Imprwcrrwnl', 



924'ioo • Past Control: 

COOPER PEST CONTROL Graduate 

artarrxtfodeii i aony own ■) '. <a» nw d 

smce 1955 Fu»y ms Freeest 



• Carpentry: 

DAVID SMITH Buut-m cabinetry Book- 
cases wamscoung. crown moldmgs, chaa 
rails & home offices 609-497-3911 

TWOMEY BUILDERS A CARPENTRY 
DETAILS Alter auora. bathrooms, kacnana, 



• Pharmacies: 

FORER PHARMACY Rehab aqup 

Prescriptions, surgicais. wck room supplies 
160 Witherspoon. Princeton 921-7287 



• Upholsterers: 

JP UPHOLSTERY Since 1968 Custom 

799 1300 reupholslery of Irving room, dmmg & antique 

lumiiuro Large labnc setocoon Foam cush- 

mns Pickup & deMrery 908-231-0772 



• Plumbing & Heating: 

M.J OROVE PLUMBING A HEATING 
Reprs & alterations Kitchen 8 bathroom 
& remodelmg Sa»ng & roofmg 800JJ21 3288 remodekng Lx No 489 No 3274 & No 
N. SOBS HOSBES, BMC Carpentry 08442 55 N Mam. Wmdsor 4484083 

decks basemenu, smail mba. too 466-2693 fepw , tiMt*vrr%. kXchans. addmons. etc LAWRENCE YUXE FUEL Smce 1925 

60»977-4802 pgaatt. ramodelmg & mstalaijons Mot water 
- ~ ~ ; heelers NJUct3S33, 16 Gordon Av. 

• House Cleaning: L*wr«mcev*e BBS 0141 

FUTURE BEST Home Mehe t enen f e MWHAEL J. MESS4CK W i—BB n A 

Wkry. b-wtoy or i -ume Pre & post moving Hoartletf. taw. Lx B8063 AJ plumbmg 8 

8908166 healmg serv 24-hr Insured 924-0602 



• Waterproofing: 

STA DRV BASEMENT WATER 
PROOFING CO. Free estmtales Alfordable 
prces Lrfeiene guarantee "30,000 saiisied 
customers ' CaH 24/7 800-272 3324 



• Caterers: 



COX S MARKET 

Creative, custom caiermg PnvatBrtjusmess 

Small to large events 180 Nassau Street. 

Prmceton 924-6269 CarpBts, floors, wmdowi Insured 



• Chimney Cleaning/Repair: 

I A t CMISBMIY SWEEPS Over 10 yra 
of ctvmey mslaMation. mspecuon & deanmg 
Vsuai arvj/cr camera evafciauon Masonry 
repaa-s Tutytown. Pa 215-945-2200 

ST JOHN CHIMNEY SWEEPS 
Charrmey deanmg and/or certrfcarxms 
Chm-mey kners. caps, dampers & masonry 
repa* Walerproo'mg 609-333-1334 



• iRSeiraacs: • Printers: 

ALLEN A STULTS CO. Smce I68t LPH BRBWTMI0 UeaKd Complete Prmung 

Property, casuafly. We. group Service Offset & Gator. Typesetting. Bmdmg 

100 No Mam Si r*rjM4town 44801 10 Fast service Rubber stamps Notary service 

Maclean agency Res— rcnPary 41 7 WMSl 924-4664 

3rd floor 138 Naseau Street. Pm 883-8000 



• Windows: 

LAWRENCEVILLE HOME IMPROVE- 
MENT CTR. All typos of windows smce 
1952 Free estimates 609-882-6709 

RJLMcCORMACK CO. Smce 1970 
AJ styles 8 mamr brands 737-6563 

Dining Out? 



its Ambassadors, Hotel prize 
winners, students & ordinary 

PlOftalS share hearty, moderately-priced 
lood. drmk & high spirits Mon-Sat 11am lo 
1 am at THE ANNEX RESTAURANT 



• Pumps * Well Drilling: 
• Kitchen Remodeling: samuel stothoff co. inc. smce 

FLEETWOOD KITCHENS A BATHS '886 Pump mstalalion ft service Well dnllmg 

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With Summer Hoops Playoffs Looming, 
Undefeated Merrill Lynch is Team to Beat 



With the playoffs in the Rec- points for Wherein which 
reation Department summer dropped to 0-7 with the loss, 
men's basketball league slated 



MAKE OR BREAK TIME: Upper Makefleld guard 
Jimmy Curran fires a no-look pass In action ear- 
lier this summer In the Princeton Recreation 
Department summer men's basketball league. 
Curran and his teammates will be looking to make 
a big run as the league playoffs start next Mon« 



to start next Monday. Merrill 
Lynch has stamped itself as 
the team to beat. 

Last Monday, Merrill Lynch 
improved to 8-0 as it put a 
70-40 whipping on second- 
place Upper Makefleld (5-2). 
Princeton University junior 
Patrick Ekeruo led the rout as 
he poured In a game-high 20 
points. Pete Fox starred from 
long distance for Merrill as he 
fired in six three-point field 
goals. Jimmy Curran led 
Upper Makefleld with 11 
points. 

Merrill had to dig deeper 
last Friday as It went three 
overtimes in edging Weidel 5- 
Stars 67-61. Princeton Uni- 
versity junior Luke Owlngs 
had a big night for Merrill as 
he scored 20 points while Fox 
nailed five three-pointers. 
Pierre Downing had 20 points 
to lead Weidel, which fell to 
5-2 with the narrow setback. 

Georges Roasters and Ribs 
has emerged as a contender, 
Improving to 5-2 after a 
51-33 win over Hoagle Haven 
last Monday. Princeton Uni- 
versity sophomore and former 
Hun School star Noah Savage 
paced George's as he scored 
13 points. TCNJ standouts 



opped 

While Merrill has put 
together a glittering record, 
two-time defending league 
champion The Cafe/Change 
Clothes is ominously starting 
to pick up steam. After start- 
ing out 1-3 this summer, The 
Cafe moved to 5-3 with a 
43-41 win over Hoagie Haven 
last Friday. Asmar Fortney 
scored 19 for The Cafe while 
Chris Hatchell chipped in 10. 

The league will wind up the 
regular season with triple 
headers this Wednesday and 
Friday. 

The playoffs start July 25 
with a triple-header on the 
Community Park courts 
matching the 10th seed 
against the 7th, the 9th versus 
the 8th. and the third against 
the sixth. The top two seeds 
get a bye Into the quarterfinals 
which are slated for July 27. 
—Bill Alden 




day. Last summer, Upper Makefleld advanced to Scott Flndlay and Mark Aziz Former Crew Star Crotty 
the championship series where it fell to two-time each scored nine for Georges. Add ^ { Coachinq Staff 
defending league champion The Cafe. Kareem Boswell was a one- ™™ £ <£"■ » 

ffwoivmAmwsportMon) man show for Hoagle Haven ™WL>^ , 1 l l S e !2L3 

- (3-5). pouring In a game-high the 1996 and 1998 national 

21 points. champion Princeton University 

heavyweight varsity eights, is 

In other action Monday, returning to Princeton to serve 
SMB nipped Where2Ball.com f assistant varsity and head 
4443. Ryan Stein scored 13 freshman heavyweight crew 
points for SMB which «™h. the program said last 



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FOCUS ON FITNESS 

WITH WILLIS PAINE, A.CS.M. 
FITNESS DIRECTOR 
KOKOPELLI FITNESS 

POPULAR MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS IN FITNESS 

A CONTINUING SERIES DESIGNED TO SEPARATE FACT FROM FICTION 

SPOT REDUCTION: 

A common myth that's promoted by some product manufacturers 
and "celebrity fitness experts" is know as "spot reduction." This is the 
belief that if you target a certain body part, you can specifically — and 
significantly — reduce the amount of body fat at that site. For instance, 
you've probably seen infomercials for products that promise to "melt 
away the fat" and give you a hard, flat stomach simply by doing lots of 
abdominal exercises — preferably with equipment that they sell. The 
same claims, in various forms, are made for flabby butts, thighs, arms 
and (insert your worst body part here). 

Unfortunately, none of the claims are true! Although doing abdom- 
inal exercises will make your abdominal muscles stronger, they'll do 
nothing to reduce the body fat stored in that area. Similarly, perform- 
ing tricep exercises will make your triceps stronger but won't selec- 
tively use fat from the backs of your arms; doing hip abduction (lateral 
leg raises) will make your "glutes" stronger but won't selectively use fat 
from your hips. 

When you exercise, fat is used at an even rate throughout your en- 
tire body and is only utilized when required as an energy source. It's 
physiologically impossible to selectively use fat from a specifically tar- 
geted site. 

Most fitness authorities agree that the best way to reduce body fat 
is to reduce caloric intake and increase caloric expenditure. In other- 
words, eat less and exercise more! 

CALL THE FITNESS PROFESSIONALS AT KOKOPELLI TO FIND OUT 
HOW YOf CAN' SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY REACH YOUR FITNESS GOALS 



KOKOPELLI PRIVATE FITNESS 

15 SPRING STREET PRINCETON W 08542 

609-683-3939 



1 couldn't be more excited 
to be working with a staff that 
I have admired for years as a 
rower." said Crotty. a 1998 
Princeton alum who majored 
in American history. "I look 
forward to giving student- 
athletes the same opportuni- 
ties that I had during my time 
at Princeton." 

Crotty replaces Greg Hugh- 
es, who recently became the 
head coach of the Princeton 
lightweights. 

Currently, Crotty is serving 
as the head coach for the U.S. 
Men's Junior National Team, 
which will be competing at the 
Junior World Championships 
In Germany from August 3-6. 

He has been coaching crew 
since he completed his post- 
graduate studies at Oxford in 
1999. Upon returning to the 
U.S., Crotty had a three-year 
stint coaching at the Loyola 
Academy Rowing Association 
In Wllmette, III. In 2003 he 
moved to West Windsor, N.J., 
where he coached the Mercer 
Junior Rowing Club. His var- 
sity eight won the 2004 and 
2005 Northeast Junior 
Regional championships. 

Crotty also has extensive 
administrative experience, 
including a two-year term as 
the executive director of the 
Princeton International 
Regatta Association and a 
two-year term as the Co- 
Director for the Annual Fund 
at Loyola Academy. 



miles, is being organized by 
Princeton resident Joseph 
Campisi and several of his col- 
leagues at Bristol-Myers 
Squibb. Their goal is to raise 
$10,000 for the LAF, which 
was formed by the famed 
cyclist Lance Armstrong to 
help people with cancer 
obtain the resources they need 
to live strong. 

The circuits will begin and 
end at the Hopewell Elemen- 
tary School. A registration fee 
of $10 ($20 on the date of the 
event) and a donation to the 
LAF of $50 is required to par- 
ticipate in this event. Registra- 
tion forms may be obtained 
through an e-mail message to 
pjcjr56@yahoo.com. 

The Peloton Project's objec- 
tive Is to raise awareness and 
funds in their communities to 
help the LAF support people 
affected by cancer through 
advocacy, research, educa- 
tion, and public health pro- 
grams. 

To learn more about LAF or 
the Peloton Project, please 
contact the LAF at (512) 236- 
8820 or visit its website at 
www.laf.org. 



Free Wheelers Club 
Bike Event August 6 

The Princeton Free Wheel- 
ers bicycle club is holding its 
25th annual Princeton Bicy- 
cling Event on August 7. The 
event features six bike tours 
ranging from 18 to 100 miles 
with the rides beginning and 
ending at Mercer County 
Community College starting at 
7 a.m. that day. 

The event is open to anyone 
who rides a bicycle safely and 
wears an approved cycling 
helmet. Services include free 
parking, rest rooms, emer- 
gency help, water, and snack 
stops. A post-ride lunch 
including a drink and dessert 
is also included in the event. 

The registration fee is $25 
for adults and $10 for ages 
16 and under. Those who reg- 
ister prior to July 24 are enti- 
tled to a free event T-shirt. 



For more information, call 
(609) 882-4739. e-mail 
lnfoguy@prlncetonfreewheele- 
rs.com, or log onto www. 
princetonfreewheelers.com 
Forms are also available 
local bike shops. 



at 




Summer Girls' Hoops 
Recent Results 

In recent games in the 
senior division of the Prince- 
ton Recreation Department 
summer girls' basketball 
league, the Sparks topped the 
Fever 33-23, led by the com- 
bination of Molly Barber and 
Brooke Sassman, who each 
scored nine points. Molly 
Lynch had a big game in a 
losing cause, firing in a game- 
high 14 points. The Liberty 
cruised past the Mercury 28-8 
as Rachel Basie scored 11 
points and Ashante Har- 
rington chipped in six. 

In action in the junior divi- 
sion, Georgia topped Tennes- 
see 28-16 as Isabel Blooston 
scored six points to lead a bal- 
anced attack. Molly Rubin was 
a one-player force for Tennes- 
see as she poured In 12 
points. Connecticut posted a 
17-11 win over Rutgers. 
Bridgette O'Donnell scored 
eight points to lead Connecti- 
cut while Shari Jones had six 
for Rutgers. 



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Bike Event Set for July 24 
To Aid Armstrong Group 

A charity cycling event is 
being held on July 24 in 
Hopewell in conjunction with 
the Peloton Project, a grass- 
roots fundraislng group asso- 
ciated with the Lance Arm- 
strong Foundation (LAF)- 

The event, which will 
include circular routes of 
approximately 15. 35. and 65 




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800-924-0616 

609-924-0609 

fax 609-924-0655 



CALENDAR 



Wednesday. July 20 

7:30 p.m.: Recital. Sum- 
mer Song, with soprano 
Nancy Froysland Hoerl and 
pianist Aklko Hosaki; Bristol 
Chapel, Westminster Choir 
College. Free. 

7:30 p.m.: Voices Cho- 
rale's "Summer Sing-in and 
Ice Cream Social"; Penning- 
ton Presbyterian Church. 

8 p.m.: Princeton Univer- 
sity Summer Concert with 
The Enso Quartet; Richard- 
son Auditorium. 

Thursday. July 21 

11:30 a.m.: Storytime for 
Children 2 to 4; Barnes & 
Noble, MarketFalr, Route 1. 

Noon: "Beat the Heat" 
Movie Series for Seniors; 
Princeton Senior Resource 
Center, Suzanne Patterson 
Building. Free. 

2 p.m.: Tales of Wonder; 
Princeton Summer Theater, 
Hamilton Murray Theater. 
Also Friday and Saturday at 
11 a.m. 

6 p.m.: Tom Kllmchock 
country band; Princeton 
Shopping Center Courtyard. 
Free. 

7 p.m.: The Media on Film 
Series, screening of Network; 
Princeton Public Library. 
Free. 

7:30 p.m.: Regional Plan- 
ning Board; Township Munic- 
ipal Complex. 

7:30 p.m.: Organ Recital 
with Kenneth Cowan; Bristol 
Chapel. Westminster Choir 
College. Free. 
, 8 p.m.: Annie Get Your 
Gun; Open Air Theater, 



Washington Crossing State 
Park. Also Friday and Satur- 
day at 8 p.m. 

8 p.m.: Godspell; Hamilton 
Murray TheateT, Princeton 
University. Also Friday and 
Saturday at 8 p.m., Saturday 
and Sunday at 2 p.m. 



Brooks; Mercer County Park. Center. Suzanne Patterson 



West Windsor. Free. 

7:30 p.m.: Folk/Rock 
Singer Jesse Colin Young; 
Grounds For Sculpture. 
Hamilton. 

8 p.m.: Golandsky Interna- 
tional Piano Festival concert 



Building. Free. 

2 p.m.: Tales of Wonder, 
Princeton Summer Theater, 
Hamilton Murray Theater. 
Also Friday and Saturday at 
11 a.m. 

6 p.m.: Linda Torchla & 



8 p.m.: Golandsky Interna- with Panamanian jazz pianist Ted Firth Quartet Jazz band; 

tional Piano Festival concert Danilo Perez; Taplln Auditor!- Princeton Shopping Center 

with Emanuele Arclull; Taplln um. 
Auditorium. 



Friday, July 22 

9:45 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.. 
Genies, Lamps and Dreams: 
Tales of the Arabian Nights; 
Kelsey Theatre, Mercer 
County Community College. 
Also Saturday at 2 p.m. and 
4 p.m. 

1 to 4 p.m.: Princeton 
Summer Theater Educational 
Workshop for children 7 to 
12; Hamilton Murray The- 
ater. To register, call (609) 
258-7062. 

7 p.m.: American Girl Mys- 
tery Party; Bames & Noble, 
MarketFalr, Route 1. To reg- 
ister, call (609) 897-9250. 

7:30 p.m.: Discussion and 
performance by NJOT sing- 
ers; Princeton Public Library. 

8 p.m.: Golandsky Interna- 
tional Piano Festival concert 
with Bach specialist Father 
Sean Duggan; Taplln Audito- 
rium. 

8 p.m.: Meshuggah-Nuns; 
Off-Broadstreet Theatre, 
Hopewell. Also Saturday at 8 
p.m., Sunday at 2:30 p.m. 

8 and 10:30 p.m.: Don 
Frlesen and Lee Levlne; 
Catch A Rising Star Comedy 
Showroom, Hyatt Regency. 
Also Saturday at 8 and 10:30 
p.m. 

Saturday, July 23 

6 to 8 p.m.: "Music In The 
Park" Concert with Wenonah 



Monday, July 25 
Recycling Pickup 

11:30 a.m.: Storytime for 
Children 2 to 4; Bames & 
Noble. MarketFalr. Route 1 . 

8 p.m.: Movies in the Plaza. 
Bella Martha; Mediten-a Res- 
taurant & Bar, 29 Hulflsh 
Street. Free. 

Tuesday, July 26 

7 p.m.: Screening of Spell- 
bound; Princeton Public 
Library. Free. 

7:30 p.m.: Borough Coun- 
cil; Borough HaH. 

7:30 p.m.: Slng-in, Haydn's 
Lord Nelson Mass, Bristol 
Chapel. Westminster Choir 
College. Free. 

Wednesday, July 27 

7:30 p.m.: Township Zon- 
ing Board of Adjustment; 
Township Municipal 
Complex. 

8 p.m.: Annie Get Your 
Gun; Open Air Theater. 
Washington Crossing State 
Park. Also Thursday, Friday, 
and Saturday at 8 p.m. 

8 p.m.: Stand-up Comedy 



Night; Princeton Summer 
Theater, Hamilton Murray 
Theater. 



Courtyard. Free. 

7 p.m.: The Media on Rim 
Series, screening of 2005 
Student Film & Video Fafttal 
winners; Princeton Public 
Library. 

7:30 p.m.: Piano itdtal 
with Radek Materka; Bristol 
Chapel. Westminster Choir 
College. Free. 

8 p.m.: Godspell; Hamilton 
Murray Theater. Princeton 
University. Also Friday and 
Saturday at 8 p.m.. Saturday 
and Sunday at 2 p.m. 

Friday. July 29 
9:45 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.: 
Nosing Around Circus SM«\ 
Kelsey Theatre, Mo 
County Community College. 
Also Saturday at 2 p.m. end 
4 p.m. 

1 to 4 p.m.: Princeton 
Summer Theater Educational 
Workshop for children 7 to 
12; Hamilton Murray The- 
ater. To register, call (609) 
258-7062. 

7 p.m.: The Car Music 
Project; Grounds for Sculp 
hire, Hamilton. 

7:30 p.m.: After Hours 
Courtyard Concert with I he 
Car Music Project; Grounds 



SENIOR CITIZENS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, July 20 - Wednesday, July 27 

Information Provided by Senior Resource Center. 924-7108 

SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER (SRC) at Spruce Circle (SC) oil Harrison St. 

Suzanne Patterson Bldg (SPB). Redding Circle (RC); Borough Hall (BH); 

Henry F. Pannell Learning Center (HPLC) 

Information about resources lor the older adult Call 924-7108. 

Wednesday. July 20: 

9:30 a.m. Aerobics. SPB 

10:30 a.m. Let's Talk; RC. 

1 00 p.m. Blood Pressure; SC. 

1 00 p.m. Health Screenings; SC. 

1 :30 p.m. Let's Talk in English; SC. 

3:00 p.m. Let's Talk Too; SC 

4:30 p.m. Children ol Aging Parents support group;SPB. 

Thursday, July 21: 

9:30 a.m. Yoga; SPB 

10:30 a.m. Let's Talk in English Too!; RC. 

1 :00 p.m. Movie & Munchies; SPB. 

1:00 p.m. Art Studio. SPB. 

6:15 p.m. Memoir Writing. SC. 

Friday. July 22: 

i m Aerobics. SPB. 

10 45am Ping-Pong; SPB. 

1:00 p.m. Art. SPB. 

Monday. July 25: 

9:30 am Aerobics; SPB. 

1 1.00 a.m. Chair Exercise; SC 

1 :30 p.m. Wonder of Wordplay; SPB. 

Tuesday, July 26: 

1 1:00 a.m. Strength Training; SPB. 

1 .00 p.m. Social Bridge; SPB. 

1:00 p.m. Scrabble; SPB. 

1 :30 p.m Computer Lab; SPB. 

Wednesday. July 27 

9:30 am Aerobics. SPB. 

10.30 a.m. Let's Talk; RC. 

1 30 p m Lot's Talk in English; SC. 

3:00 p.m. Lot's Talk Too; SC. 



BLACKMAIM 

LANDSCAPING 



Thursday, July 28 

11:30 a.m.: Storytime for 
Children 2 to 4; Bames & 
Noble, MarketFalr, Route 1. 

Noon: "Beat the Heat" 
Movie Series foi 
Princeton Senior 



For Sculpture, Hamilton. 

8 p.m.: Meshuggah-Nuns; 
Off-Broadstreet Th( 
Hopewell. Also Saturday B1 8 
p.m., Sunday at 2:30 p til 

8 and 10:30 p.m Hal 
Spear, Steve Lazerus, and 
Patrick Cunningham; Catch A 
Rising Star Comedy Show- 
Seniors; room, Hyatt Regency. Also 
Resource Saturday at 8 and 10:30 p.m. 



1 



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SPECIALS OF THE WEEK: 

Selection of Oval Coffee Tables 
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Mon-Fn9-S.Sat9-l 609-924-1881 




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A nally good 
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Family owned since 1955 

PRINCETON • 609921-3111 
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JULIUS H. GROSS 



The Professional and 
Business Singles Network 

will host an experiential sem - 
, nar and dance social on Sat- 
iurday, July 30 at Good Time 

Charleys restaurant In King- 
ston. The seminar will begin 
at 6:45 p.m., the dance' at 
8:30 p.m. 

Admission will be $20 for 
the dance Instruction and 
dance, or $25 for the semi- 
nar and dance. 

The seminar topic will be 
"Tips to Find Your Soul 
Mate," presented by author 
Pamela Cummins. 

Membership Is not required 
to attend. 

For more Information, call 
(888) 348-5544 or visit 
www.PBSNInfo.com. 



The National Italian 
American Foundation 

(NIAF). a non-profit organiza- 
tion based In Washington, 
D.C., will hold its 12th 
Annual NIAF Youth Retreat 
for Italian Americans In Princ- 
eton from August 5 through 



August 7 at AmeriSuites^ 
3565 Route 1 South. The 
Youth Retreat brings together 
young adults 18 to 32 who 
share a common Interest in 
Italy and Italian American 
Issues, for a weekend of cul- 
tural, educational, and social 
activities. 

A welcome dinner will be 
held on Friday, August 5 at 
the Macaroni Grill across the 
street from the hotel. On Sat- 
urday, participants will attend 
discussions from Italian 
American historians Including 
Dr. Peter Vellon, executive 
director of the Calandra Insti- 
tute. 

Retreat packages range 
from $90 to $285 and can 
Include two hotel nights, 
transportation to events, and 
meals. For reservations, con- 
tact Brock Ollvo at (202) 
939-3107 or e-mail bolivo 
@n!af.org before August 5. 



The Princeton Macintosh 
Users Group (PMUG) will 
meet on Tuesday, August 9, 
at 7:30 p.m. In Room A-10 
of Princeton University's Jad- 
win Hall. The speaker, Miles 
W. Truesdell III, will discuss 
Photoshop Elements 3, a dig- 
ital photo editor. 



Mr. Truesdell. of Leigh 
Photo & Imaging, will present 
an overview of Photoshop 
Elements 3, with a focus on 
correcting digital photos. 

For more Information, visit 
www.pmug-nj.org. 



Singles Speak-Up Toast- 
masters will meet on August 
12 and August 26 from 7:30 
to 9 p.m. in the meeting 
room at Mary Jacobs Memo- 
rial Library, 64 Washington 
Street, Rocky Hill. Future 
meetings will be held on the 
2nd, 4th, and 5th Fridays of 
each month. Meetings are 
free and open to guests. 

Toastmasters International 
Is the leading nonprofit dedi- 
cated to effective oral com- 
munication, with 9300 chap- 
ters and 195,000 members 
worldwide. Group members 
meet to deliver and evaluate 
prepared and impromptu 
speeches in an effort to over- 
come their fear of public 
speaking, and to learn to 
make more effective presen- 
tations. 

For more Information call 
(609) 371-0800 or visit 
www.toastmasters.org. 




With a full spectrum of fitness & wellness services. 



Physical & Occupational Therapy 

Pediatric rehabilitation services 

Special programs for individuals 
with diabetes, cancer, MS. heart 
disease and other health-related 
conditions 

Dedicated Therapy Pool 



Co-located with Princeton Healthcare 
System Community Education & 
Outreach Program, offering a range of 
health-related programs and seminars 

■ Stress Management 

■ Smoking Cessation 

■ Cooking Classes 

■ Nutritional Counseling 

■ Swim Instruction, LifeSaving 
Training, and more 



Relaxation 

■ Massage Therapy 

■ Acupuncture 

■ Sauna & Steam Room 

■ Spa Pool 

■ Spa Services 

■ Child Care & Youth 
Programs 



Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center brings together all of these disciplines in one convenient location 

Our unique combination of advanced f.tness services and medically-based programs, through our affiliation with University Medical Center at 
Princeton, provide an unmatched nurturing environment to address your total health and wellness needs. 

Tr y our monthly membership plan and experience for yourself how our approach to health and fitness is Redefining Care. 



:t> 



Princeton 

Fitness & Wellness Center 

An Affiliate of University Medical Center at Princeton 

Redefining Care. 



609.683.7888 | www.princetonhcs.com 
Princeton North Shopping Center | 1225 State Road 









MON.-FRI. 5a.m.-11 p.m. 
SAT.-SUN. 7 a.m.-7 p.m. 



Princeton HealthCare System: 

m University MedicaJ Center at Princeton 

, Princeton House Behavioral Health 

■ Merwick Rehab Hospital & Nursing Care 

m Princeton Home Care Services 

, Princeton Surgical Center 

m Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center 

■ Princeton HealthCare System Foundation 



OBITUARIES 



Elizabeth L. Giebel 

Elizabeth L Giebel, 42, of 
Wareham, Mass. died sud- 
denly at home on July 13. 

The daughter of Leal B. 
Randall of Cataumet, Mass. 
and Hubert W. Giebel of Char- 
lotte, N.C., she was the grand- 
daughter of Virginia and Tho- 
mas Blakeman and niece of 
the late Beatrice B. Karstad, 
all formerly of Princeton. 

She attended Princeton pri- 
mary and secondary schools, 
then Massasoit Community 
College and Bradford College. 
She enjoyed painting, cooking, 
and making jewelry- 
She is survived by a son, 
Robert J. Joyce Jr.; her part- 
ner, Richard Moore of Ware- 
ham; and a brother, Erich 
Giebel of Holmdel. 

A memorial service will be 
held at the Cataumet Method- 
ist Church, Cataumet, Mass. 
on Saturday, July 23. 

Memorial donations may be 
made to the Bourne Conserva- 
tion Trust, P.O. Box 203, Cat- 
aumet, Mass. 02534. 



&fi 



J> 



P 

Frederick Kronk 

Frederick Kronk, 93, of 
Princeton, died July 18 at 
Acorn Glen Assisted Living. 

Born in New Brunswick, he 
was a resident of Kingston and 
Princeton most of his life. 

He was employed for many 
years as a construction worker 
for Tocco Construction and 
Peterson Construction, both of 
Princeton. 

A World War II Army veter- 
an, he took part in the inva- 
sion of Normandy Beach. 

He was an avid woodworker 
and gardener who especially 
enjoyed working with flowers. 

Son of the late Adam and 
Elizabeth Eckert Kronk, and 
brother of the late Gertrude 
Kronk, Edith Kronk, Margaret 
Burke, William Kronk, and 
Charles Kronk, he is survived 
by his wife of 51 years, Helen 
Rumenero Kronk, and several 
nieces and nephews, great- 
nieces, and great-nephews. 

The funeral will be held at 
8:30 a.m. on Thursday, July 
21 at The Mather-Hodge 
Funeral Home , 40 
Vandeventer Avenue. A Mass 
of Christian Burial will be cele- 
brated at 9:30 a.m. at St. 
Paul's Church, 214 Nassau 
Street. 

Calling hours will be 
Wednesday, July 20 from 7 to 
9 p.m. at the funeral home. 

Burial will be in Evergreen 
Cemetery, North Brunswick. 

Memorial contributions may 
be made to St. Pauls Church, 
214 Nassau Street, Princeton 
08540. 

Vincent HaMU 

Vincent Hamill, 70, of 
Princeton, died July 15 at The 
University Medical Center at 
Princeton. 

Bom in Bronx, N.Y., he was 
a graduate of City University 
of New York and a U.S. Army 
veteran of the Korean War. 

He was the owner of Hamill 
Associates of Princeton. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Johanna Merone Hamill; two 
daughters. Deidre Hamill of 
Manhattan and Patricia Hamill 
of Pennington; and a brother. 
Lewis Hamill of Alberta, 
Canada. 

A memorial service was held 
on July 17 at The Mather- 
Hodge Funeral Home. 



45 



Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. 

We now carry SOLAR WINDOW 
FILM to protect yourfu rn itu re. 
Spring St • Downtov* n Princeton • 924-2880 



rh 




REAL ESTATE 

32 CHAMBERS ST 

PRINCETON. N J 

609-924-1416 



PRINCIPLES OF THE BAHAT FAITH 




• Unity of religion — Belief in one God. 
•All Races are members of one human family. 
•Work done in the spirit of service is worship. 
•Elimination of all forms of prejudice. 
•Equality of men and women. 
•Unity of science and religion. 
•Need for a universal language and currepcy. 
•Independent investigation of Truth facilitated by 
universal education. 

•Baha'is are followers of BahaVllah. 

The Baha'is of Lawrenceville, Princeton and Hamilton Township conducl 
classes each Sunday for children and adults and these are open to people of 
all ages and faiths. Classes are suspended for the summer and will 
resume in September. Please go to the website to find activities in our 
area. For more information about the Baha'i Faith, call Wendy Kvalheim 
at 609-683-8929 or go to the web at www.bahai.org. 
In September Weekly Devotions open to all 9: 1 5 to 9:45 AM. 
Sunday classes will be 10:15 to Noon at the Lanning School, 1925 
Pennington Rd., just south of the entrance to College of New Jersey. 
Please join us. 

FOSTER BAHAT SCHOOL 




JEWELRY & REPAIRS 

MAN> REPAIRS 
WHIU YOU WAIT 

Custom Creations 
lit affordable prices 




rilHCITOHl 



683-7133 




Acorn Gkn 

We 

understand 

that no two 

residents 

are alike... 

Discover 

the Acorn Glen 

difference' 

Call 609-430-4000 

775 Mi I ucas Road^^ 
Princeton, NJ f=^ 



Kingston Presbyterian Church 

4565 Route 27. Kingston '.<>M 921-8895 

Visitors Welcome Child Care and Nursei ) 

Sunday Services 

Worship Service at 10 a.m. 

Refreshments are served following the service. 

Pastor John Heinsohn www.kingstonpreshyterian.nrg 

Korean Worship. 2:00 p.m. Sang Lee, Korean Pastor 



Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 

124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 
Reverend M. Muriel Burrows, Pastor 

10:00 a.m. Worship Service 

9:00 a.m. Sunday School for Adults 

10:00 a.m. Sunday School for Children K-6th Grade 

Nursery Provided • Ramp Entrance on Quarry Street 

(A multi-ethnic congregation) 

609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 



St. Paul's Catholic Church 

214 Nassau Street, Princeton 

Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor 

Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. 
Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. 



QUAKER MEETING 
FOR WORSHIP 

Stony Brook Meetinghouse 

Quaker & Mercer Roads 

For information 

call 924-5674 

For further information 

call 452-2824 



All Saints' Church 



COME WORSHIP WITH US! 

SUNDAY SERVICES: 

Holy Eucharist 8 AM & 10 AM' 

WEDNESDAY 
HolyBuduim 9 JO AM 

'hoUount by coffer, refmhmrra. arki frliounhip 
'Niovry core prmtiied 

16 All Ww AW Princeton GfW-921-2420 
a*cprin<* aol.com www.alUaint.org 

(locAttd nort/i of the Princeton Sheppitf 
Center off Terhune/\'aitDyke Rd.) 



FIRST BAPTIST 

CHURCH OF PRINCETON 
at John St. ft Paul Robeson PI. 

03Sis Service: 8 am Every Sunday 

Sunday Worship 11a.m. 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

Prayer Service Tuesday 7 p. m. 

Youth Fellowship 4th Sunday. 6pm 

Bible Study Wednesday 12 15 A 7p.m. 

Office: 609-924-0877 



Princeton United 
Methodist Church 

Cnr Nassau St & Vandeventer Ave 
609-924-2613 
Gregory B Young, Senior Pastor 
SUNDAY SCHEDULE 

Worship 9.30am & 11 00am 

(nursery care provided) 

Church School 

9 30am A 11:00am 

Adult Education 
9:30am & 1 1 :00am 
Teen Choir 5:00 pm 




UMYF: 6:15 pm 
Alt Are Welcome 



:.& 



A Liberal Religious Community 

Unitarian Universalist Congregation 
of Princeton 

Route 206 at Cherry Hill Road • 609-924-1604 

Sunday Service at 10:00 a.m. child care provided 

The Rev Forrest G*ncre • The Rev Chnsone F. Reed • www uupnnoeton org 




Westerly Road 
Church 



37 Westerly Road 

Princeton. NJ 

924-3816 

www.westerlyroad.org 



Evangelical • Non-Denominational • Biblical 

Sunday Worship: 9:30 and 1 1 :00 a.m. 
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30 a.m. 

Fellowship Gtoups, AW AN A, Youth Ministry 
Men's FOCUS, Women's Bible Study, Missions 



The Jewish Center 

435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 
Telephone: 609-921-0100 

www.thejewishcenter.org 

Adam Feldman, Rabbi 

Dr. Dov Peretz Elkins, Rabbi Emeritus 

Murray E. Simon, Cantor 

Friday evening services at 6:30 p.m. 

Saturday services at 9:45 a.m. 

Religious School & Nursery Program • 921-7207 



Trinity Episcopal Church 

Crescent Ave., Rocky Hill, N.J. • 92 1 -897 I (01 

Rev. Janet Johnson, Vicar 

Sunday School: 9: 10 a.m. 

Sunday Services: 

Holy Eurcharist at 9:30 a.m. 

A^ "All Are Welcome" 



LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH 

407 Nassau St. at Cedar Lane. Princeton • 924-3642 
Pastor, Rev. Or John Mark Goerss 

Sunday Morning Worship at 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday School & Bible Classes at 9:00 a.m. 



THE 



princetAn 
NEW LIBRARY 



Visit 

Monday-Thursday 

Friday-Saturday 

Sunday 



9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
i p.m. to 6 p.m. 



Public library ■ 65 Witherspoon St. 
(60o)oj4-os2y • www prim 



o 



o 
-0 



o 
m 

H 
O 





PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL 



Welcomes you 

to worship 

Sund.iN 

July 24 at 10:00am 



Tin Ri:\ PaulB. Raishi SNBUSH 

ite Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel 
Princeton Unrvervty 

I mi Rj \ DB 

Thomas Brbidenthal 

Deinol I'm- Chapel 

PBNNA ROS1 

Director ol I hl| 

Eric Plutz 

Principal Unrvervty c h 

The Princeton University Chapel is lot 

-ction of Washington Road and William Street 



Join us at the Crossroads! 




PRINCETON 
ALUANCE 
CHURCH 



• Saturday Worship <> 00 p m 

•s.i ...I. in Worship 9 tO A 1 1 00a m 

•Nursorj & Presi hool programs 
,n ea< h houi 

•< in istian edui fttion i<>i 
Adults ,v Children 
•Kids Kub Church 
• . < iuih W orehip 
-' ftngV ( iroup 
•Late Circles 
•i 'ounselinj * 'enlci 



Rev. Robert R. (ashman, Seilioi PastOI 

P.( I Box 9000, Plainsboro, NJ 01 
609-799-9000 • www pact mi 

A I ["HE CROSSROADS OF 

SCUDDERS Mil I. & SCHALKS CROSSING 



TRINITY 
CHURCH 

1 1 Men ei Sin el Prim eton, nj 

924-2277 

Worship 

i dui if •« hi 
Outneai h 



i mIIc Smith, 
RECTOR 



SUNDAY SERVICES 
8:00, 9:00 and 1 1:15 am 

[NFANT/TODD1 ERCARE 

i ! I0p mi 

ADULTFORUM HOUR 
& SUNDAY SCHOOl 
10 15 a.m. 

I'H i' Bl Irinitypriiuilon.orn 



CHRIST CONGREGATION 

50 Walnut Lane • Princeton 
Jeffery Mays. Pastor • 921-6253 

Affiliated with the United Church of I 
and ft" 
American Baptist Churches. USA 

Worship Service at 10 ' I 

Fellowship at 1 1 a.m. ^ 

Education Hour at 11:15 a.m. ■ 



1 




R I A 



NASSAU PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

61 Nassau Street • Princeton • 924-0103 

(RiUnp intrant £ on right \ttlf .</ building) 
www ii;iv.,iijchur<.h onj 

8 00 -i in R;kIi<) Broadcast 

(WHWH H50AM) 
9:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study 
10 'Hi :i rn Worship Service 

(Child care through 12:00) 
' u s * * 1 1 : 1 s a.m. Education for All Ages 

David A. Davis. Pastor 

Lauren I Mcr-eater*. Associate Pastor 

Marti Reed Ha/elngg, Associate Pastor 

MacKichan Walker. Dirccior ol Christian Education 
Nancy Mikoski ' lirr.ii.m EduCllJOB ( ODHllttnl 

KeontxbB Kelte) Director of Millie 

Sue Hlen Page. Director of Choirs for Children and Youth 
Maureen Pranien, Church Administrator 

'One generation shall praise your works to another... " 




& 



Psalm 145:4 




I lizabeth M< ( rtiire 

Barbara ( rraham 

in 



No matter 
how you 
look at it. 

There's 
advantage 
in two. 



coLDiueu. 

BANKGKO 



■tMO INIMt ■ »"■ 

UbanJcermo' i 

609.921.1411 
exU09 

i. iiioiiL-.Hiiprinccion.com 



to place an order: 



l un 



tel: 924-2200 
fax:924-8818 

e-mail: 
classifieds@towntopics.com 



CLASSIFIEDS 



The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. 



QC | l=J Z-t**Ov>M,<£%>i* IWHa^QWBV*. 0~* «**Oimam lb , WT KapOTMd 



IT 253 NASSAU 




Heralded as ///«' Nassau Slnrt address, 253 NASSAU 
i Princeton's newest, in-town, luxury apartment 
community in the unsurpassed location of Princeton's 
eastern neighborhood. With construction nearly 
compIete ( ii is anticipated thai these spacious, bright, 

elevator serviced I and 2 bedroom apartments will be 
ready for occupancy very soon. 

Already one-half of the apartments are leased! 

Weinberg Management Corporation 
(609) 924-8535 

www.253Nassau.com 



YARD SALE ♦ 

TOWN TOPICS classified ad 

■ good weekend 



MOVING SALE: Furniture, dishes, 
glassware, interesting colleciables, 
pool toys, books & household misc. 
9-2 PM No Early Birds' 1 1 Arreton Rd 
(L turn off 206. 6/10 mile oft Ewmg St) 
July 23rd-24th 
07-20 

YARD SALE: Sat & Sun, July 23- 
24th from 9-3 PM Household goods, 
furniture, children' toys, books, 
clothes 20 Erdman Ave, Princeton 

07-20 

YARD SALE: Sat. July 23rd from 
9-1 PM 99 Moore St Household 
goods, garden items and tools, power 
tools 

07-20 

GARAGE SALE: Bench & weights. 
Rhodes bike rack, 2 children's bikes, 
rool rack, children's myth books, kay- 
ak Call (609) 252-0767 or slop by 
430 Ewlng St 

07-20 

YARO SALE: Sun, July 24th. 8 AM 
Vintage items, luggage, hats, jewelry, 
dishes Also good deals on retail 
shop close-out 6 Gordon Ave, 
Lawrenceville 
07-20 

P'TON SUMMER RENTAL: 

Lovely, airy, house, beautifully fur- 
nished, spacious living & dining 
rooms, large EIK, 3 BR. 2 studies, FR. 
4 baths; Stemway grand. Charming 
patio Walk to choir college. Universi- 
ty, shopping, bus No smokers, stu- 
dent shares or pets Yard mainte- 
nance included $3000/mo plus 
utilities Avail now- 10/31 Contact 
John at (609) 924- 14 16 

07-13-41 



IS YOUR PAD LOOKING SAD? 

Rearrange your home with whimsy 
and style I can move your furniture, 
hang your paintings, choose wall col- 
ors and fabrics, eliminate your clutter. 
find that perfect piece Call Anne Bat- 
tle ROOMS FOR IMPROVEMENT. 
(609) 924-2867 

HI 

WE BUY USED BOOKS: All sub- 
jects, but pay better for literature, his- 
tory, art, architecture, children's and 
philosophy Good condition a must 
Call Micawber Books 110-114 Nas- 
sau Street. Princeton 921-8454 

tf/3/05/52t 



NOME IMPROVEMENTS: From 
roofs to cabinets Carpentry and 
masonry repairs, large or small Call 
J at 924-1475, here since 1958 

tfc 

TEMPUR-PEDIC: Swedish Foam 
Mattresses, as seen on TV Autho- 
rized Oealer Capital Bedding. 1951 
Rl 33, Hamilton Square 
1-800-244-9605 

tf 

BEAUTIFUL, CUSTOM-MADE: 
Draperies, period window treatments 
of all types Slipcovers and fine 
upholstery Shades and blinds Fabric 
and wallcovering at a discount. Serv- 
ing all your interior design needs with 
m-home or office consultation Esti- 
mates cheerfully given Call Sherry, 
The Creative Heart (609) 397-2120 
tf 

FILM DOCUMENTARIES: Life 
Story Documentaries Family history 
films Corporate profiles, home video 
turned into DVD Movies Award- 
winning film-maker Commercials/ 
Advertising spots. Contact Cineray 
Films at cmeray@msn com or (609) 
947-5622 

05-25/11-16 



PRINCETON BORO: 2 3 BR, 2 

bath. LR, DR, eat-m kitchen, dish- 
washer, finished basement studio. 
W/D, A/C, off-street parking (3) No 
pets $2200/mo Call (609) 924-8746 
06-29-4t 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT: 

P/T flexible hours available to provide 
adult companionship, light yardwork, 
and errands Word games and read 
aloud are specialties Call Lon at 
(609)273-4615 
06-29-4J 

DAVILA LANDSCAPING: Expert 
Cut Lawns Fertilizer & Leaf clean-up 
Additional Services Cutting trees, 
Pruning, Mulching Landscape 
Design including patios - 6 diHerent 
pavers & installing Kentucky blue sod. 
Samples available in the Princeton 
Area References & Free Estimates 
Call (609) 882-4806 or (609) 
977-2819 
06-29-4t 

PRINCETON BORO: 1 room effi- 
ciency with private bath, kitchen & 
parking Easy walking distance to 
Nassau St rent $650/month & elec- 
tricity 1 year lease & 1.5 months 
deposit Call (609) 921 -7 177 

07-06-3t 

EXCELLENT CAREGIVER: With 
great experience seeks FT position 
caring for child(ren) or elderly Call 
(609) 306-5014 For reference call 
(609) 688-0909. 

07-06-31 

WANT A CLEAN HOUSE? 

You deserve a break Please call 
(609) 683-5889 for terrific cleaning 
Renata Yunque's trademarked busi- 
ness, the one and only original, 
A Clean House Is 
A Happy House ' Inc. 

tfc 



PRIVATE CHEF AVAILABLE: 

Full time, pan: time, special events 
catering No event too small or too 
large' Daily or weekly meal plans Call 
(609)306-1347 

07-Q6-3t 

KINGSTON HOUSE RENTAL: 
Ranch on 1/2 acre 2 BR, 2 bath, 
study, full basement, annual lease No 
pets, no smoking Security deposit & 
references required $1875/month 
plus utilities Call (609) 924-9700 
07-06-31 

LONG-TERM CAR STORAGE: 

Locked garage. $150/month and 
space in a small secluded barn, $100/ 
month Stokes. (609) 924-4786 

07-13-21 

PRINCETON APARTMENT: 
Attractive and bright LR, kitchen, BR, 
bath, private entrance, parking Heat 
& hot water included Professional 
person Year-lease available Septem- 
ber 1st $975/mo Leave message at 
(609) 924-9395 

07-1 3-2t 

FOR SALE: Minnesota Fats slate 
pool table 84 long Best offer 
accepted. Call (609) 924-8771 

07-13-21 

PRINCETON HOUSESHARE: 

Beautiful House and site with private 
trail through 60 acres of woods and 
wildlife 17' x 15' room shares bath 
with one and great kitchen/LR/FP with 
independent, friendly professionals 
$775/mo plus $100 for utilities/maid/ 
lawncare/wireless internet/premium 
cable. 15' x 10' room also available 
for $650/month Call (917) 582-6400 

06-15/07-20 

TUTOR: Math, Physics, Chemistry, 
MS Excel Calculus, trig, algebra, 
geometry PhD physicist, can travel to 
your home (Princeton and surround- 
ing area) Call Mark (609) 279-6992 
06-22/07-27 



CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: 



Irene Lee, Classified Manager 



• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. 
• 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add'l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. 

• 3 weeks: $40.00 ♦ 4 weeks. $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. 
* Ads with line spacing: $20.O0/inch • all bold face type: $6.00/wk • change orders: $5.00 






_PEYTON 



ASSOCIATES^REAL-rOR 




ttTxihltr* Y HR ^h E ACRES " 3 beaUt ' fUl hU1Side SeUing < this Strildn 8 William ^ompson designed residence offers a 
flexible floor plan with expansive rooms all providing panoramic views With cathedral ceilino, « J« . « , , 

flooring and granite and marble baths, this 4 bedroom 3 bath two^stoV^^^ i^^ f T^- kT^ 

entertaining spaces. For outdoor enjoyment an upper balcony offers ove^ S fee o coZl, fr 17 I * ^ ^^ 

Hopewe.1 Va.ley and a stunning custom-design/Zpool. .n Ho P ~l^ 

Marketed by Emily Schwab 
343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 609-921-1550 
^^^ 134 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 609-737-1550 

l=J Peyton People - We Make the difference. 

Theodore M Tod" Pevton. Rrnlcpr c:«j 

' r ° ker Find us at: www.peytonsales.com 



EQUAL MOUSING 
OPPORTUNITY 




bv„«, 



THE SOUND 
OF MUSIC 1 



nes from a charming classic con- 
npfoary design by Phil Holt III in 
||962 One ol Princeton s best 
cation-near University. Lake. River- 
side School, a most beautiful property 
tpart of the former Howe Est ) There 
■p harmony in site and structure - true 
Feng Shui 

[3 BR, 2 bath ranch suitable for a 
■young family, retirees, or ready for 
I expansion Exclusive new listing 
I by Joan Alpert. 

$849,900 

Levlnson Assoc. Realtors 

(609) 655-5535 
Marketed by Joan Alpert 

(609) 921-9527 
Nights and weekends 



INTERESTED IN A 
REAL ESTATE CAREER? 

Prudential Fox & Roach is offering 

a career seminar in your area 

Monday. July 25 at 12 PM 

Princeton Home Marketing Center 

166 Nassau Street, Princeton 

Please RSVP to Anne Keams 

at (609) 924-1722 x1232 or email 

akearns@foxroach com 



FURNITURE FOR SALE: T aDte «. 
chairs coffee table sofa, leather chair 
♦ ottoman, bar stools, antique rocker 
lamp Best offer Call (609) 947-5512 
07-13-21 



irS YOUR TIME 
AND YOUR HEALTH.. 







Stockton Real Estate, LLC 
Kcton, NJO 
Phone 800763 1416/609 924-1416 
Fax 609 
Email infotii siockion-reahoi com 

www.stocktoii-realtor.coii] 



New Price 
$799,000 



LAWRENCEVILLE CONDO: 

Society Hill, 1st floor, 2 BR. 2 bath 
fireplace, no pets Available Septem- 924*2282. 
ber 1st Security $1250/month Call 
(609)514-0555 

07-20-3t 



thefourmlnuteworkout.com 

The most time effective aero- 
bic workout ever developed, 
designed to give total fitness 
In only 4 minutes a day! 

ROM Machine exercise will 
Improve your bone density, 
reduce the risk of heart dis- 
ease, Increase flexibility, and 
recharge your sense of well- 
being. You will Increase your 
muscle mass and continue to 
bum calories even hours after 
the workout. 

Japan's National Fitness A 
Sports Institute observes: 
"More fat loss over 24 hour 
period using the ROM machine 
than with 60 minutes of tread- 
mill, bike or stepper!" 

Time Is your most valuable 
asset. Use it wisely and Take 
- the Challenge! Simply call for 
your THREE COMPLEMEN- 
TARY Workout sessions. (609) 



RENTAL: PRINCETON BORO 

Two bedroom, two story condo 

In historic house close to town 

Available immediately 

Two car garage, storage 

Private courtyard patio 

$2600 + utilities 

Call (609) 577-0476 

HOUSE FOR RENT: Single family 
home in W Windsor 3 BR. 2 5 bath. 
LR, DR, kitchen & family room & full 
basement 2-car garage Convenient 
to Princeton University & Train Station 
No Pets Available August $2100/ 
month. Even: (609) 586-1953 

07-20-3t 



FOR RENT: PRINCETON Walk to 
lown, 3 BR, 2 bath, LR, DR. kitchen, 
basement. Parking, no pets, no smok- 
ing Available Sept 1. 2005 Call 
(609)921-7303 

07-20-3t 

APARTMENT FOR RENT: 1 

bedroom includes heat/utilities, W/D. 
fireplace, patio, parking Available 
Sept No pets, no smoking Near 
shopping center $1050/month (609) 
921-1037. rent36A©aol com 

__+ 07-20-3t 

HELP AROUND THE HOUSE: 
Handyman service I do the dirty jobs 
no one wants Attic/basement clean- 
ing, yardwork. small repairs Call Tom 
at (609) 902-9917 
___^__ 07-20-3t 



MY COMPUTER WORKS! 

Thanks to Princeton Computer 
Repairs LLC Who can service PC. 
MAC. Networks, Printers, Scanners 
Whatever your needs are They are 
the most affordable in the area Plus. 
they make house calls Call (609) 
716-1223 anytime 10% discount it 
you mention this ad 1 

12-1-05 

IS YOUR HUT IN A RUT? 
Rearrange your home with whimsey 
and style I can move your lurniiure, 
hang your paintings, choose wall col- 
ors and fabrics, eliminate your clutter, 
find that perfect piece Call Anne Bat- 
tle, Rooms for Improvement, (609) 
924-2867 

tf1 

VACATION IN PROVENCE! 

Rent our village house (tennis, pool in 
season, golf nearby) and enioy the 
ambiance of Provence This is where 
Van Gogh painted - where Nostrada- 
mus was born The house is small, 
comfortable and wonderfully well situ- 
ated Call (609) 683-1640 

07-13/09-28 



ITEMS FOR SALE Roll-top desk, 
$50 Chest of drawers, $25 Glass 
colfee table. $35 Dining room table 
w/6 chairs, $200 Following items call 
for prices 2 like-new massage tables. 
1 light weight travel massage table, 
beige w/wings. Beautiful yellow sofa 
w/matching chair. Futon, like new w/ 
beautilul Japanese-pnnt cover; 1 TV 
or computer cabinet. Afncan wall 
blanket. Afncan mans robe, Other 
African pieces. 3 pure Quartz crystal 
bowls w/notes C. D & G Call (609) 
737-7773 

07-20 



FOUND A LOST ANIMAL? We'd 
like to help. Piece a classified 
ad at no cost In TOWN TOPICS. 
Please provide description and 
location where animal was 
found with contact phone 
number. 



FRENCH TUTORS: American citi- 
zens but French natives Adults and 
children Custom classes - beginner 
to advanced- giving you distin- 
guished French Diction & literature - 
French CNED - many years teaching 
experience Your home or ours Call 
Mary (609) 419-0075 

06-22/07-27 




CLUTTER CONTROL: Paper piles 
and cluttered spaces causing stress 7 
Professional Organizer will help you 
create greater order in your home/ 
home office Contact Cyndi at (609) | 
933-1550 or ckawa@]uno com 

07-13/11-02 1 

HORSEBACK RIDING: Piedmont I 
riding stables. Hopewell Lessons! 
beginners welcome, large/outdoor,! 
indoor arenas, trails, boarding with I 
abundant turnout Pony parties (609) | 
466-8990 

05-18/08-031 



A beautifully appointed custom two story, 5 bedroom Colonial features brick exterior with Tudor accents. 
In a very private location nestled among a heavily treed lot is just a short walk to Nassau Street the 
Princeton Shopping Center, Mountain Lakes park and Community Park Elementary. Designed with 
an open floor plan, there is a large living room, dining room, newly renovated kitchen and a spacious 
family room with a beautifully built-in fireplace and leads to an extra large game room. The basement 
has a sauna and shower, and in the back yard there is a nice in-ground pool. Walk to the schools in 
Princeton Township. MLS # 4496860 



N.tCallaw^ 

Real Estate Broker.LLC. *J 



4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 609 921 1050 




In a quiet Cranbury neighborhood of attractively detailed colonial style houses sits this classic beauty. Crisp, 
white siding and all new windows with black shutters are typical of this well maintained property. A formal 
dining room with chair rail has easy access to the kitchen, with butcher block-topped center island. The fam- 
ily room is bright, with bay window at the front and more windows looking out onto the beautiful backyard. 
A fabulous sun-room addition is open to the kitchen creating a great sense of openness. With sky light, and 
a wood burning stove, the sun room also opens onto the handsome deck. The front to back living room has 
a traditionally styled fireplace. Open off the living room is the generously sized guest suite with full bath, 
bedroom, kitchenette and sitting room which has a large bank of windows and access to the deck. The mas- 
ter bedroom with bath, and three additional bedrooms are on the second floor. $849,000 
Marketed by Christina Callaway 



Visit us at www.ntcallaway.com or call for details at 609 921 1050 



hxclujtvr AfllUtt of 

C HRISTIE'S r^j 

GREAT ESTATES " 



Heart of Downtown Princeton 
TWENTY NASSAU STREET 



Retail Space 



a 

UJ 

5 



-THE SHOPS AT NASSAU CHAMBERS." PRINCETON'S 

PRESTIGIOUS RETAIL GROUP AT THE CORNER OF NASSAU 

AND CHAMBERS STREETS. HAS ONE OPENING 

A LOVELY. SUNNY STORE WITH A LARGE W ' ND °W 

ON NASSAU STREET. ABOUT l.4«) l INI I I '" NGOm ?"f£j 

AND STORAGE SPACE. FEATURING HEAVY ^^WAN TRAFFIC 

AND A MULTI-STORY PARKING GARAGE ON CHAMBERS S I 

FOR TENAN TS AND CUSTOMERS _ 







LIMOUSINE SERVICE: Reliable, 
reasonably priced To a.rpons tra-n. 
n.ers, NYC. Phiia. etc Insured Lin- 
coln Town Cars Serv-ng you tor 16 
years Call Attache Limo. (609) 

924 ' 7029 06-01-06 



BROKERS PROTECTED » 609-924-7027 



ronimcnul cleaning wilh a difference 

"Change the quality 
of your life." 

Renate Yunque 
(609) 683-5889 



PEYTON 



£ S O c: I /N T E ^ 



• REALTORS 



IN ELM RIDGE PARK... 




A CLASSIC COLONIAL on a 
private lot with an in-ground pool 
and patio. Stunning light throughout 
this custom-built four-bedroom. 
IV* bath home in a very pretty 
neighborhood $765,000 



A 1-STORY CONTEMPORARY... 

on a beautiful cul-de-sac lot. 

i rtiqui I) designed with volume 
ceilings and extra large skylight! 
the 20' square conservator} is the 
centerpiece of this heme. A free- 
form in-ground pool completes this 
exciting property $825,000 




^rTncetoh afahtmemts 

Various Sizes. Prices & 

Locations In- Town 

Interview for September 

Occupancy Waiting List 

Weinberg Management 

(609) 924-8535 

WeinbergManagemenl com, 

GUITAR LESSONS: Available for 
all levels of students individualized 
courses set by professional musician 
Call Princeton Sludio at (609) 924- 

8255 

06-29/08-03 

ESTATE SALE: 

2 beautiful brand new 4 BR. 2 5 bath 
homes Nice neighborhood, commu- 
nity pool, fitness center, bike/walk 
path Best schools, easy commute to 
NYC Great view Convenient to 
everything $899,980 & $788,980. 
Must see 1 OPEN HOUSE Sundays 
1-4 PM Buyer's agent welcome Call 
(609) 683-8389 

07-06-tf 



PRINCETON 
APARTMENTS 

86 SPRUCE - 1 bedroom, living 
room, small bathroom, laundry $1050 
includes heat & hot water 

172 NASSAU - Studio apartment, 
central location in the CVS building 
$800 includes heat & hot water 

172 NASSAU - One bedroom, spa- 
cious, bnght, central loclion $1065 
includes heat & hot water 

41 SPRING - 1 bedroom, kitchen, 
living room & bedroom. 1 block from 
Nassau $900 includes heat & hot 
water 

197 WITHERSPOON 1 bedroom, 
spacious, central Princeton location 
$1030 plus heat & hoi water 

254 JOHN - 2 room apartment 
(good-sized kitchen & bedroom) 
$790 plus heat & hot water 

7 LINCOLN - 2 bedroom, brick row- 
home, 1 block trom Nassau, laundry 
$1500 plus heal & hot water 



BUtXtfQRff 



REALTORS " 



ERA 



Patricia Patty "O'Connell 
Sab.- Auedah •Biloeaiion Spedolul 

Licensed in NJ and PA 

Leaders Circle • President's Club 

264 Nassau Street -Princeton. NJ 08542 

609-921-9222 

Direct: 609-252-2333 Fax: 609-921-9438 

Cell: 609-658-2833 Evenings: 609-658-2833 

Email: patncia-oconnell@burgdorff.com 

www.burgdorrT.conVpatricia-oconneHy ^ ^ 

r>rad»d OreaedfoNfiTirpprated 



-^^Vt*>>u 



than you 
expect 




Gordon 

SALES ASSOCIATE 

609.921.141 lextl22 

OFFICE DIRECT 

609-688-4813 

coldwellbankermoves.com 
princetonrealestate.net 

C2OT3 (>*»••• B«rtit« CorpwMon C<*Jw«« &«*••• a ■ rtgatWKl ***<"** of rTJ 

r CoW«H B«r*w CaporMon An Equal Opportunity Company 6qu^ HouMng OpportuMy IJJ 

Owr»0 and Oparaled 6y NRT IncorpoialaO — "» 



COLDWeiX 

BANKGRC 



RtsrorWTlAl MOKERAf.! 



WELLS HOME 
FARGO MORTGAGE 



The Nation's Leading Retail Mortgage Lender* 

I am proud to be part of the community and invite you to discover 
how I can assist with your mortgage needs. 



• Extensive Product Line 

• Extensive Service 

Call todav for a complimentary consultation! 

Bonnie Gray-Rankin 

600 Alexander Road • Princeton, NJ 08540 
bonita.rankin-gray@wellsfargo.com 

609-750-5413 




•lUvou on 2003 yearend lUtUUCS by Inside Mortgage Finance I/30/tM 

Well* Fargo Home Mortgage b a division of Well* Fairgo Bank. N.A. O 2004 Wells largo 
B-ink N A All Rights Reserved »l4ftm 



For Sale By Owner 




plans have been approved. 
This is a very special 
buildable lot! 

The property is in 
Woodland Management 
Program effective with the 
2005 tax year. The 500- 
foot well is in. The driveway 
is in, the septic plan has 
been approved for a 5- 
bedroom, 5-bath house. 
Property is only 3 miles 
from Lambertville and 30 
minutes to Princeton. On 
one of 3 roads designated 
as "scenic" on the master 
plan of West Amwell 
Township. 



Victorian "Tree Street" Beauty 

23 Chestnut Street 

Princeton, NJ 08542 

Right hand side of a charming 1890s duplex in 
the heart of Princeton. Features 3 bedrooms, 1 Vi 
baths, central air, dishwasher, large backyard, 
off street parking. Many period details. Move 
in condition, walk to everything! One of 
Princeton's most sought-after neighborhoods. 

$599,000 

For house details, 

email: robertejordan@yahoo.com. 

Call 609-924-8928 for private showing. 

Buyers' Brokers Welcome, 2.5% commission 






GMAC 

-a 



vice You Deserve. People You Trust. 9 



Pennington Office, 609-737-9100 



P ' itk. 



Hopewell Boro -1 00 year old Victorian 
with wood floors, light filled rooms & high 
ceilings offers 3+ bedrooms. 1. 5 baths & 2 
extra rooms up. Great house flow & close 
to downtown. 

Pennington Office 609-737-9 1 00 
Offered at $579,000 




Hopewell Twp - Country bungalow 
among trees & stream offers 2 br, I ba plus 
laundry room and large attic for 
expansion, new septic & cert well with 
easy highway access. 

Pennington Office 609-737-9 1 00 
Offered at $329,000 



Montgomery Office, 908-874-5191 





Montgomery Twp. - Recent upgrades, 
including a new deck, are featured in this 
"Grosso" Colonial on a private cul-de-sac. 
4 br. 2.5 ba. formal LR and DR 

Montgomery Office 908-874-5 / 9 / 
Offered at $679,900 



Rocky Hill Boro - Charming Rocky Hill 4 
bedroom. 3 bath ranch w/master bedroom 
suite addition. Updated baths and gourmet 
kitchen. 

Montgomery Office 908-874-5/9/ 
. Offered at $77 S. 000 



www.gnrgmac.com 



Join us for a Real Estate Career Seminar! 

Wednesday July 27, 2005 • Call 1-877-551-6962 for details. 




A HOME THAT WILL EXCEED YOUR EXPECTATIONS. A CHARISMATIC 

blending of natural materials and phenomenal design. Superior new 
appointments in the kitchen and four baths, exceptional millwork and 
superb new construction will place this home a step above anything you 
have seen. This degree of excellence is reflected in such outstanding 
features as an elegant formal dining room adjoining the living room 
warmed by a natural lime stone fireplace. The "Viking" kitchen & 
breakfast room blend seamlessly with the family room and butlers 
pantry and access to the twin circular stone patios. The master boasts 
a tray ceiling, six closets and extravagant natural stone bathroom. This 
home must be seen to be believed! Make your move into Princeton's 
western section... This five bedroom home is absolutely perfect! 

PRT0578 Marketed bv Susan Gordon $1,500,000 



^h. ColdwdlBankerMovcs.com 

Coldwell Banker Mortgage Services 
(888)531-9130 



coLOUieu. 

ban Kef? a 



UiJDENTUL MOKDUGE 



Princeton Office 
10 Nas»au Street 
Princeton. NJ 
(609)921-1411 



LB^ 



Luxury Apartments for Lease! 




The Waxwood 

Conveniently Located in Downtown Princeton 

( tome sec the very best ui quiet downtown ii\ ing jusi a feu 

minutes walk from Pal inei Squan A llu puhli. librai 

Recently completed, thesi tai of-thi art, elevator servii 
apartments are jusl as populai as evei ! I eaturing maple Hoot 
high ceilings, stainless stei I appliam es, custom kitchen cabinetry, 

■ i mite i ounti rtops, washei dryei in the apa enl 

.iii.i mu( ii more « In site parking im luded 

Weinberg Management Corporation 

217 Nassau Street, run-. NJ0854 ' 

(609)924 8535 
win. <" i ollegetown i om 

i oi detailed information pl< a < refi i to 
TheWaxwood.com 







Bright and inviting, this well-maintained three bedroom, 
two bath cape is ready for you to move in. The interior 
is a pleasant surprise as it is much more spacious 
than one can imagine. Hardwood floors, built-in 
bookshelves, front-to-back living room with wood- 
burning fireplace and large front window, bright family 
room, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen, full bath and 
bedroom on the 1st floor. Two nice-sized bedrooms 
and one bath upstairs. Completely fenced back yard 
with a patio to enjoy the privacy. Princeton Township. 
Also available for rent. $730,000 




Stockton Real Estate, LLC 

liambers Street, Princeton. NJ 08542 

Rhone 800 763-1416/609 924-1416 

Fax:609 683-4308 

Email infoO stockton-rcaltor.com 

www.stockton-realtor.com 



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TOWN AND COUNTRY... 



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Ml UK'S I 1*0 SEE (his charming 
i olonial twin in the heart of 
Pennington Borough Originally the 

[hi loslin mansion; 

d to this prime location m 

1940. Large living room w/built- 

ins and fireplace, new kitchen w/ 

granite countertops, three comer 
irns and hardwcxxJ floors 
-houl $369,900 



A BRICK I RON! ' API 
in, h, ulousl) rii.iiFji.Ki.- d and update 
h\ original ownei Living room 
n fin plat i . dining room, eai in 
kjti hen, sunroom 2 BRi and bath 
on iw.i flooi I pi lain has 2BRfl 
and bath Beautiful grounds in the 
borough of |\ mnn;-i. .n $529,000 




ERRANDS, ETC: Do you fool 
alone? Mature. English-speaking 
woman with a car can do grocery 
shopping, doctors appointments, or 
lust sit and talk to you Please call 
Den.se (609) 424-0558. (609) 658- 
2832 or sbloched@comcast .net 

07-20-4t 



CURRENT 
RENTALS 



A COUNTRY RETREAT... on 2+ 
acres w/sweeping views in every 
direction! This 4 BR side-hall 
colonial has a 23' updated kitchen 
with cherr) cabinetry and upgraded 
appliance^. A finished walk-out 
11 hi hosts .1 spacious recreation 
i< - 'in and full bath. A new 2 -car pole 
bam. a wood barn with hay lofl and 
fenced pasture add to this pretty 
estate $684,000 



P-TON HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 

BR. 2 5 baths. LR. DR, family room. 
A/C. 1-car garage, beautitul garden. 
Litilebrook School $2000/month 
Available immediately (609) 

921-0708 

07-20-4t 

WINDOWS/STORM WINDOWS: 

Inside and out $7 each window Car- 
pet, upholstery, wall, panel and bath- 
room Complete home cleaning Fully 
insured All work guaranteed Call 
(609) 393-2122 or (609) 924-1404 

07-20-4t 



GET WORLD-CLASS Business 
building expertise at Princeton rates 
from retired senior NYC branding and 
marketing pro Details listed at 
www embrand com First consultation 
free Call (609)213-2999 

07-13-31 



HENREDON SOFA: Elegant, 
curved back, mint condition, rarely- 
used Was $5295, asking $1800 
OBO For dimension and email pho- 
tos (609)924-7177 

07-20-2t 



<2> 



H) NaMRu Stmt, Princeton, NJ 08540609 921 1 >0 
1 14 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 609-7)7- 1 S50 

Peyton People - We Moke the difference. 

Br0k«l I M,l ,- (|1 »»>,., H .. 



— c 



jHtiter 

3furtrihtr£ 




"line Quality Home Furnishings 
at Substantial Savings " 

12-14 Main Street. (Rt. 27) 
Kingston, NJ 
924-0147 

www.riderfurniture.com 
Mon-Fri 10-6;Thurs 10-8 

Sat 10-5; Sun 12-4 
\ AmEx. M/C & Visa / 



r 



New Listing 




N.tCallaway^ 

Real Estate Broker.LLC >J 

Four Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 
www.ntcallaway.com 

609 921 1050 



On Princeton's historic Palmer 
Square, this rare two bedroom 
condominium offers four win- 
dows overlooking the lower 
square, with marvelous views 
of the Nassau Inn and the annu- 
al Christmas Tree, and two win- 
dows overlooking the pictur- 
esque secluded residents' ter- 
race. An entrance foyer with 
coat closet opens to the living 
room, which features a brick 
wood-burning fireplace and 
French doors to the sunlit 
breakfast room and adjoining 
kitchen. Two cheerful bed- 
rooms, with two closets each, 
open onto the hall sharing a full 
bath with black and white 
ceramic tile mosaic floor. This 
charming pied-a-terre in the 
heart of Princeton is ideally 
located on the third floor. 
$575,000. 

Marketed by 
Barbara Blackwell 



T \nk m ai A0km if 

CHRISTIE'S 

GREAT ESTATES 



t=J 



Princeton Boro-S4000/mo 

4 bedrooms. 2 5 baths, living room/ 
great room, dining room, kitchen, play 
room m basement. Available now 

Princeton Twp-S3500/mo 

Cottage 4 bedrooms. 2 baths, eat-.n- 
kitchen. LR with fireplace Available 
now 

Princeton Twp-S30O0/mo 

2+ bedrooms. 4 baths. LR. DR. kitch- 
en Full basement w/bedroom, bath 
and office Available now -1 1/1/05 

Princeton Boro-S2800/mo 

2 bedrooms. 1 bath. LR, DR, kitchen 
Parking for one car Available now 

Lawrence Twp - $2200/mo 

3 bedrooms. 1bath. living room w/ 
fireplace, dining room, kitchen, 
screened in porch, on 2+ acres 
Available now 

Lawrence Twp-S2200/mo 

Either 3 BR, 2 full baths, and 1 office 
OR 2 BR and 2 offices Lawn care 
included Available 9/1/05 

Princeton Boro-S2000/mo 

3 bedrooms. 1 bath, LR, DR, kitchen 
Washer/dryer in basement Off-street 
parking Available 8/15/05. 

Princeton Boro-S1625/mo 

3 bedrooms. 1 bath. LR. DR. kitchen, 
laundry hook-up Back yard Shared 
driveway Available now 

Princeton Twp-S1600/mo 

3 BR. 1 bath. LR, DR, kitchen, base- 
ment Community park area Avail- 
able now 

Princeton Boro-S 1 350/mo 

1 BR, LR. kitchen, bath Beautifully 
renovated Convenient location Park- 
ing for one car Available 9/6/05 

Princeton Boro-$1 1 50/mo 

Studio apartment on 1st floor Conve- 
niently located. One parking space 
Available 9/6/05 until approximately 
June 2006. 

Princeton Boro • $1 1 50/mo 

Studio apartment. Walking distance to 
everythingin town Includes one park- 
ing space Available now 

We have customers 
waiting for houses! 

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE 
REAL ESTATE We list, We sell, We 
manage II you have a house to sell 
or rent we are ready to service you 1 
Call us for any of your real estate 
needs and check out our website at 
httpWwww stockton-realtor com 

See our display ad lor our available 
houses for sale 

STOCKTON 

REAL ESTATE, LLC 

32 Chambers Street 

Princeton, NJ 08542 

609-924-1416 

Anne S. Stockton, 

Licensed Broker 



PRINCETON 
THE WAXWOOD 
A Hillier Project 

A wonderfully convenient downtown 
Princeton location |ust 2 blocks from 
the Princeton Public Library, leatunng 
newly constructed spacious, bright, 
modern luxury apartments All ameni- 
ties, including central A/C, stainless 
steel appliances, granite counters, 
private laundry, maple wood floors, 
high ceilings, picturesque windows, 
elevator service, extra storage, 
parking 



WEINBERG 

MANAGEMENT 

(609) 924-8535 

The Waxwood.com 



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

With Pepper deTuro 
WOODWINDS ASSOCIATES 




"THE MOON TREES" 

Apollo 14 launched in the 
late afternoon of Janu- 
ary 31, 1971 on what was 
to be our third trip to the 
lunar surface. Five days 
later Alan Shepard and Ed- 
gar Mitchell walked on the 
Moon while Stuart Roosa, 
a former U.S. Forest Ser- 
vice smoke jumper, orbited 
above in the command 
module. Packed in small 
containers in Roosa's per- 
sonal kit were hundreds 
of tree seeds, part of a 
joint NASA/USFS project. 
Upon return to Earth, the 
Forest Service germinated 
the seeds. Known as the 
"Moon Trees", the result- 
ing seedlings were plant- 
ed throughout the United 
States (often as part of the 
nation's bicentennial in 
1976) and the world They 
stand as a tribute to astro- 
naut Roosa and the Apollo 
program. 

Seeds were chosen from 
five different types of trees: 
Loblolly Pine, Sycamore, 
Sweetgum, Redwood, and 
Douglas Fir. The seeds 
were classified and sorted, 
and control seeds were 
kept on Earth for later 
comparison. Roosa car- 
ried about 400-500 seeds 
in his personal kit, which 
stayed with him as he or- 
bited the Moon in the com- 
mand module "Kitty Hawk" 
in February 1971. 
The seeds were sent to the 
southern Forest Service' 
station in Gulfport, Missis- 
sippi and to the western 
station in Placerville, Cali- 
fornia to attempt germina- 
tion. Surprisingly, nearly 
all the seeds germinated 
successfully and the For- 
est Service had some 420 
to 450 seedlings after a 
few years. Some of these 
were planted with their 
earth-bound counterparts 
as controls, (as would be 
expected, after over thirty 
years there is no discern- 
able difference) but most 
were given away in 1975 
and 1976 to many state 
forestry organizations to 
be planted as part of the 
nation's bicentennial cel- 
ebration. 

Sadly, Stuart Roosa pass- 
ed away in December 
1994. However, the "Moon 
Trees" continue to flourish, 
a living monument to our 
first visits to the Moon and 
a fitting memorial to Stuart 
Roosa 

For a no obligation evalu- 
ation of your "Earth-bound 
Trees", call WOODWINDS 
(924-3500) 
Recall it as often as you 
wish, a happy memory never 
wears out. 




NURSERY & LANDSCAPE CO. 

Route 31 & Yard Rd., Pennington, N.J. • 609-737-7644 
www.stonybrookgardens.com 

LANDSCAPE INSTALLATION SERVICE 
Monday through Saturday 9-6:00; Sunday 9-5 



eu/eoi 



A PREMIER SERVICE COMPANY SINCE 1915 



VISITWWW.WEIDEL.COM AND DISCOVER A WORLD OF INFORMATION! 
Find Over 50,000 Local Homes For Sale, Including Access to a Worldwide Database of Luxury Properties 




CUSTOM COUNTRY COLONIAL 

SOUTH BRUNSWICK - Call today to view this truly custom 
built colonial set on over two lovely landscaped acres 
surrounded by open spaces in the East Village area of South 
Brunswick. Quality materials including hardwood flooring, six 
panel natural doors, energy efficient walls, windows, heater 
and cooling systems and so much more. 

Marketed by: Robert Southwick $649,900 



GREAT NEW PRICE! 

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP - This private hidden 
treasure with a circular drive has a view from every window 
and was refurbished in 2004. The kitchen features exposed 
beams, cherry cabinets and stainless steel appliances that 
any gourmet chef would appreciate. There are gleaming 
hardwood floors! This home is conveniently located in the 
award-winning Montgomery Township school district and is 
only minutes to downtown Princeton! 

Marketed by: Sue Ann Snyder $575,000 




CUSTOM HOME! 

PRINCETON — Are you looking for that special home? This 
custom-built home is ready to move into. Through the double 
doors you are greeted by a quarry tile entry, full brick wall 
and open staircase leading to a finished basement. If you 
like informal entertaining, you will love the spacious deck 
and in-ground pool. S2 zoning. Please call for details. 

Marketed by: Sue Ann Snyder $629,900 



PARK-LIKE SETTING! 
MONTGOMERY — This luxurious contemporary colonial 
is located in a serene neighborhood. Highlighted features 
include a sunken family room with a stone fireplace, relaxed 
yet gracious formal living and dining rooms with cathedral 
ceilings and gleaming hardwood floors and a large eat-in 
kitchen. A large deck off the kitchen overlooks the rear yard 
that is a private paradise complete with lovely landscaping 
and a fishing pond. Just perfect! 
Marketed by: Antoinette Williams $755,900 



Member of 0^ 

WHO'SWHO 
WLUXURJf 

REAL ESTATE 



(609) 921-2700 

E-mail: princeton@weideI.com 
REAL ESTATE ♦ MORTGAGE ♦ INSURANCE • Mill 




WEIDEL REALTORS AT THE COURTYARD ♦ 190 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON, NJ 




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609 921 1050 

4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 



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Landscape architect Holly Nelson has carefully structured this Hun Road property to create 
refreshing zones of sun and shade which compliment the striking exterior of this comfortable 
house. A pergola with handsome brick piers provides a contemporary flair that gives the first 
hint that this house has many attractive elements. A wide, single pane side light enhances the 
front door which opens onto an entry hall that is bright, spacious and unites the split-level 
floor plan. The raised living room is large and connects to the front-to- back family room 
addition which has a fireplace and two pairs of sliding glass doors that lead out to the expan- 
sive, sophisticated deck. The eat-in-kitchen was recently redone and features natural finish 
cherry cabinets, black Corian counters and the latest in fixtures and appliances. A library or 
study occupies a quiet corner with nice views. There are three bedrooms, each with its own 

bathroom. $sw,ooo 

Marketed by Ralph "Hun" Runyon 



Visit us at www.ntcallaway.com 
or call for details at 609 921 1050 



Exclusivt Affillatt of 

CHRISTIE'S fil 

GREAT ESTATES " 



ADOPT: Loving, marr.ed. & longing 
,o adopt newborn Will prov.de a 
beaut.tul nfe filled with happiness, 
secur.ty & love Expenses paid 
Hease call Robm & Paul toll-free at 

(866)863-8516 ^^ 



PRINCETON 
253 NASSAU 

253 NASSAU is Princetons newest 
m-town luxury apartment community 
m the unsurpassed location of Prince- 
ton s eastern neighborhood 

Each 1 and 2 bedroom apartments 
has nine foot ceilings and features 
individually controlled gas-lired fur- 
naces, a central A/C system, side-by- 
side full-size washer and dryer, maple 
wood kitchen cabinets, granite 
counters, gas cooking The apart- 
ment entry, kitchen and bathroom 
feature ceramic tile flooring while the 
living room and dining area features 
hardwood maple flooring 

Please call soon - 253 Nassau 
is leasing quickly 1 



WEINBERG 
MANAGEMENT 
(609) 924-8535 
253Nassau.com 



VOICE LESSONS: Philadelphia 

opera company member accepting 
new voice students for the Fall Princ- 
eton sludio Call (609) 577-6773 Of 
email wnhay@email com 

07-13/08-17 

CLEANING Ironing & Laundry by 
experienced Spanish woman Excel- 
lent references, bilingual, own trans- 
portation Please call (609) 937-1 107 

^ 07-13/08-17 

PERSONAL ORGANIZER: Over- 
whelmed Need your closets cleaned 
your office organized, bills paid, your 
paperwork and general affairs han- 
dlea" 7 Call this super efficient profes- 
sional for help 1 (609) 688-9853 

07-13/10-26 



ANTIQUE TWIN BRASS 

$350 Call (609) 497-2986 



Bed 



07-20 



MEDIA CABINET: Solid cherry 
with natural finish. Shaker style from 
Workbench 25' deep, 54" high, 32' 
wide Like new Swivel stand for 20" 
TV or smaller Shelf lor VHS and DVD 
players Drawers for tapes $400 Call 
(609) 924-0562 
07-20-3t 

APARTMENT FOR RENT: 1 unit 
of 2 family house 2 BR, large yard, 
fireplace, garage, all major applianc- 
es, near train Pets OK $1200/month 
plus utilities Call (973) 335-2063 

07-13-31 

FOAM CUT TO ANY SIZE: 

Cushions, mattresses, boats, camp- 
ers Capital Bedding, 1-800-244-9605 
for quote 

If 




Thinking of moving? Now is the time! 
Buy and/or sell your home with Rashmi. 

Enjoy the process, and get 

the professional service you deserve. 

609-921-1411x121 

OFFICE DIRECT: 609-688-4806 

E-MAIL: rashmi.bhanol@coldwellbanker.com 



Rashmi G. Bhanot 

SALES ASSOCIATE 



couMueu. 

BANKfSfta 



Risinrxmi MOkmAcr 



imi ¥ bom In Cinick 



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Your greatest investment deserves 
the greatest representation 



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Sales Associate 
Gloria NHson GMAC Real Estate 

(609) 921-2600 x.1 29 

elerkowitz@gnrgmac.com 

www.ellensellsprlnceton.com 



Gloria Nikon 

GMAC 

MriEl Esai* 



< i/*rirnrr /., rrrri///ilil'f 




Stockton Real Estate, LLC 

32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 

Phone: 800 763-1416 / 609 924-1416 

Fax: 609 683-4308 

Email: info@stockton-realtor.com 

www.stockton-realtor.com 




Excellent 

Hopewell 

Township 

Schools 

and 

Pennington 

Address 




nrisini iBiTai 





Traditional Colonial with 5 bedrooms, 3 full baths, one powder room on 1 .38 acres. Wonderful floor plan Beautiful Lot and manv .npr, 
details throughout the house. Hardwood floors upsta.rs and downstairs. Family Room with brick fireplace exposed beams ranrtnm 
width flooring and sliding door to terrace. Bright and spacious eat-.n kitchen. Formal Dining room with chairVa.l and front \oh^ 
living room with French doors to backyard terrace. Slate terrace runs behind the entire house. In addition to the master suit! "S^c 
a bedroom with its own private bath, a partmental.zed full hall bath and 3. additional bedrooms all with new "California rinttc p h 
F.n.shedbasementwitho ff.ce, playroom w 1 bu.lt in shelves and a room that is plumbed for future full bathroom $839 500 



Princeton 







350 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 • 609-921-1900 



www.weichert.coni 



2 

9 


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i 



Prinl ETON: Elegant beauty, exquisite taste! Everywhere you turn, this 
wonderful home, located in prestigious enclave ol Russell I si 
impeccable attention to detail. Lovingly maintained, you feel welcome from 
the moment you enter. Features include: Spa room with sunken hoi tub & 
screened sun porch . . . Call tor more details cs. appointment t< i 
$1,300,000 Marketed by Ruth I ibenll 



\\isi Windsor rwp , m < with \ BRs, ) 

i ' bath "ii 10 eh n l< hi In th< h rd with pa 

patio vv gas lin< foi barbe< u< I nwind In luxurious m i cei b< d 

sitting room & offtci Enjoy th< |acu I whirlpool tub in th< master bath tttlv 

ilo ns&librai 

$847,500 Marketed by Ruth I Y/vr.i// 




PRINCETON: New Price! Great house! Great location! Nicely maintained 

&. updated ranch with 2nd fl. addition including a mastei suite w/BR, 

sitting area, skylights, large walk-in closet ck new bath with soaking tub. 

Wonderful .26 acre lot— close to schools &. shopping! 

Directions: Harrison to Eu/ing #321. 

s ^4 C ),000 Marketed by Kathleen Murphy & Susan EelmMD 



PRINCETON; New I'm..'.' astombulll ibi Iroomhomi onpi 

1 ,5 acre lot la lot ati a on i i ul d< ta< tntnuti from downtown Prim i ton 

Kitchen totally renovated, liardwood floors throughout, oversized master 

be< In " "ii m nli /.i. it i bath. 



$899,999 



Marketed hfy Ivy Huang 




PRINCETON: Beautiful street lined with majestic trees, walk/bike to tin 
center of town. Freshly painted exterior, newer roof (98), newer deck. 
Remodeled kitchen w/pickled oak cabinets and Corian countertops , brick 
fireplace in cozy living room, back deck and so much more . . . 
$ 598,000 Marketed by Margaret J< met 



Princlton Twi\ : New Listing! I ml. I I treasure!* harming 4 BR, 2.5 

bath ( olonial on beautiful 84acr< pari tike lot with slab patio and ipecial 
gardi Many new i i m.iili to this lovely home! Great 

I", atii in, closi to si I I n and p ■ 

$929,000 Marketed by Beatrice Bloom 




WEST WINDSOR TWP.. New Listing! Spacious &. graci 

model in Princeton Oaks w/5 BRs and 3 full baths on 1.07 acres with 

luxurious heated Gunite in-ground pool. You'll wanl to vacation at home! 



$850,000 



Marketed by Anne Haas 



Prim I. [<>N: New Price! ( I his Cape Cod with 3 

BRs i ; intastic, freshly 

updated Idl oa warm family room with fin plai i , and sli 

ery privati verlooking a fenced-in yard. 

$ 5 79,000 Marketed by Ron Connor -^s 




RECOGNIZED. RESPECTED. 
RECOMMENDED. 

Eva Pet/uzzieiio is a nam* you can trust 
with an your real estate needs With a 

proven track record for the past 20 years. 

and a solid reputation tor service and 

dedication, Eva is the professional you 

want on your side She listens and she 

cares her goal is your satisfaction I 

EVA PETRUZ2IELL0. Realtor 

R&yVlforC Greater Princeton 

Princeton Forrestel Village 
600-951-4600 xtl 13 609-7M-6S56 

£ vRimaii9tol com 
www. QVQiett iullA.com 



Small Offices In Princeton 




PRINCETON 

36 MOORE 

A Hillier Project 

Distinctive Townhome living a few 
walk from downtown Prince- 
ton Uniquely designed, superbly 
appointed one bedroom apartments, 
on one floor or two Featuring private 
entrances, bamboo and ceramic 
flooring, brick accent walls, stainless 
steel appliances, granite countertops 
cabmetry central A/C. 
washer/dryer, oversized windows and 
A beautifully landscaped 
common garden and on-site parking 
mg touches to 
, one-of-a-kind must-see 
property 1 



CASH PAID FOR ANTIQUES: 

Buying Paintings rugs, clocks, 
lamps sterling, quilts weapons nau- 
tical mens jewelry, oak, walnut and 
mahogany furniture Also buying 
books, magazines, travel posters 
prints, postcards and old advertising 
Fair market value for house contents 
Reasonable rates for managing estate 
sales If you re moving, downsizing, or 
have any questions call Gerald 
Joseph Sr at 732-846-1515 or cell 
732-485-1710 All inquiries are 
confidential 

8-11-05 



MARCOS PAINTING 
FREE ESTIMATES: 

Interior/exterior, residential/ 
commercial - Power washing decks/ 
fences, aluminum siding, wall paper 
removal Family owned & operated, 
work all year-round Call for tree esti- 
mate 609-933-3413. 609-683-9099. 
609-586-3619 

11-04/11-05 



VIRUSES • GOOD RIDDANCE! 

Want a computer that never crashes, 
never gets a virus, is simple to use. 
compatible with everything, sets itself 
up Then you want a Macintosh Cre- 
ative Computing - 221 Witherspoon St 
(609) 683-3622 

05-02-0611 



J.O.HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

Painting, sheetrock. spackling, fram- 
ing, trim molding, tiles, floors, wallpa- 
per & removal, power washing, & all 
home repairs Call (609) 392-0754 

03-15-06 



Nassau Street Adjacent to Princeton University 

from 212 s.f-430 s f ($525.00 to $950 00) 

Princeton Township — Route 206 

110 Sf -$200-700sf - $1,775 

Princeton Jet. - Princeton Hightstown Road, 129 sf- $200 

Thompson Realty (609) 921-0808 



WEINBERG 
MANAGEMENT 
(609) 924-8535 



Trust Cl 
professional 
to guide you 
through the 

process 





CHARMING PRINCETON BORO 

Apartment for rent 2 BR apartment 
available Aug 1st Large kitchen, din- 
ing room/olfice. living room, sunroom 
& porch W/D, parking on 
Located in center of town $1500/ 
month No smoking or pets Contact 
Barbara (973) 476-6389 

07-13-31 

PRINCETON RENTAL: 2/3 BR 
1/2 Duplex House Close to town 
New EIK, BR, LR, porch, A/C. park- 
ing, shared laundry, storage No pels, 
* no smoking $1800/mo plus utilities 
Call (609) 937-6718 

07-13-31 

CHARMING SPRING ST: 2 BR 
apartment Parking, laundry, 1 block 
from Nassau St $1650/monlh plus 
utilities Call (609) 921-9454 

07-13-31 



NEED TO RENT? 

PRINCETON BOROUGH- 

2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment a block 
Irom Nassau Hall Newer appliances, 
windows and bathroom fixtures 
Washer/dryer Available August 15th 
$1750 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

2 bedroom/2 bath apartment in mixed 
use building across from Princeton 
Shopping Center New dishwasher, 
refrigerator and range Available 
immediately $1800 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP- 

4 bedroom, 2 bath ranch with large 
fenced m backyard Pets and short- 
term rentals welcome Johnson Park 
Schools Available immediately 
$3000 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

Charming 3 bedroom brick cottage 
with sleeping porch on 4 acres Hard- 
wood floors, stainless steel appli- 
ances and washer/dryer Available 
immediately $2750 

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP- 

Brand new 4 bedroom, 2 5 bath with 
gourmet kitchen, den, and hardwood 
floors in the dining room Available 
immediately $3400. 



HOUSECLEANING: Excellent refer 
ences Years of experience Call Vio- 
letta (609) 847- 1966 
02-23/08-17 

J A A MAINTENANCE: Land 

scaping, mulch, lawn care gutter 
cleaning, powerwashmg. painting, 
basement & garage cleaning. & mucr FLOOR SANDING, STAINING 

more Ability, experience & bondec and re fintshing Hardwood floors 
and insured, free estimates Please ins talled Call BEST FLOORS, 
call (609) 7 12-3924 (609)924-4897 
07-13/09-2E 8/25/05 




Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. 
"Yes, we also rescreen screens - 
regular & pawproof. " 
Spring St • Downtown Princeton • 924-2880 



liROKKh \SSQi nil 

609.921.1411 
ext. 220 



coLouieu. 

BANKeRQ 



RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE 
coldwellbankermoves.com 



I 



u 



** ,a >»"'» »«i»MlO|Hu.lu>«y Cooxot, t«Ml Houwnq Oppntunx, 111 



MULTITRACK 700 Shimanus 

AJtus 3 speed men's bike Never 
been used $300 OBO Call (609) 
924-5931 

07-20 

FOR RENT: Charming one- 

bedroom apartment in Princeton, 1 
mile to Nassau St Lots of windows, 
wall-to-wall carpeting, beautiful area 
near Hun School, immaculate $1250/ 
month plus electricity Call (609) 
924-1983 

07-20 



www.princetonreal 
estategroup.com 

PRINCETON REAL 

ESTATE GROUP 

34 Chambers Street 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

(609) 924-1000 






The Area's oldest, 
largest and most experienced! 

CARRYING 

THE UNUSUAL 

AND GOOD FENCE 

2nd & 3rd Generation Fence Crafters 

609-452-2630 

532 Mulberry Street, Trenton 



PEYTON 

ASSOCIATES^REA 



L ~T O R S 




such as vaulted ceilings, marbf fiTp ac es Sis o wmd™ ' S *? I ? ""* Spad ° US r °° mS ™ d custom fe *ures 
every amenity, living Lm/great rZ'Sfi^e C^S^^S^' ^T ^ «* 
suite with bedroom, master bath with double shower whirlnoo uTHa h bedrooms < incl "dmg a glamorous master 

- from our Pennington Office oul " e ^wer, wh^lpool tub and dress.ng room. A beautiful house on a lovely lot 

Marketed by Margaret "Maggie" Peters $998,000 

343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 609-921-1550 
134 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 609-737-1550 



EQUAL MOUSING 

OPPORTUNITY 



Peyton People - We Make the difference. 

Theodore "Tod" Peyton, Broker Find us «r< ^ 

nna us at. www.peytonsales.com 





MATT & JUD HENDERSON 



"THE GRQUP" Proudly 

Presents its Newest 
Princeton Exclusive... 




34 CHAMBERS STREET 




o 

5 




OPENING DOORS 

IN THE PRINCETON AREA 

SINCE 1953 



10 Bayard Lane 

Built in 1872, one of 

Princetons grandest 

homes has been carefully 

renovated into 9 one- 
bedroom condominiums, 
seamlessly blending the 
charm of another era with 
the conveniences of today. 
New cherry hardwood floors, 
granite countertops, Marvin 
windows, and custom 
cabinetry are some of the 
features incorporated into 
this gracious restoration. 
Walk to the Dinky station, 

McCarter Theater, great 

restaurants, and shopping 

from this Borough location. 

Seven units are currently 

available, priced from 
$381,000 — $699,000. 

Listed by 
Matthew Henderson 

<PRJNCETON 

RIAL E8TATI 

GRQUPu 





IXC 



info@PrincetonRealEstateGroup.com 

www. Princeton RealEstateGroup . com 

Serving NJ & PA 



m 



A Henderson Company 

34 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ • Phone:609-924-1000 • Fax:609-924-7743 



t=J 



th 



Open House Sunday, July 24 in 1-4 pm 




L 



N.tCallaway^ 

Real Estate Broker.LLC *~S 

www.ntcallaway.com 

10 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 

609 737 7765 



/ tcliulvtj\fflllaitoJ 

CHRISTIE'S 

GREAT ESTATES 



Come see for yourself the 
versatility of this expanded 
5 year-old Exeter model in 
Montgomery Township's 
Bedens Brook Estates. Its 
classic brick facade 
envelopes a traditional floor 
plan opened up for today's 
lifestyle. The detailed for- 
mality of the living room 
and dining room graciously 
gives way to the kitchen, 
two-story breakfast room, 
spacious family room and 
sunroom, areas designed for 
family pleasures and infor- 
mal entertaining. There's 
also a sunny study, powder 
room and laundry room/mud 
room. On the upper level, 
the master suite with bed- 
room, glamorous bath and 
den, four additional pleasant 
bedrooms and two baths. A 
large deck, with hot tub, at 
the back of the house over- 
looks the professionally 
landscaped yard, three year- 
old pool and separate pool 
house. Completing this fine 
offering is a 3-car garage. 
Newly Priced at $1,399,999 
Din: Bedens Brook Rd. to 
Gaitway Dr., to Blue 
Heron Way, #25. 

Marketed by 
Norman Callaway, Jr. 



SSsoiTAPT: Pnnceton Ave 

u rss " * <^ ished basement 

(908) 359-3349 QJ2Q 

^mHcFrO»T _ HOUSE _ FOR 

SALE: By Owner Beautifully reno- 



^oor~sandTng, staining 

And refinishing Hardwood floors 
installed Call BEST FLOORS. 

< 609)924 " 4897 8,25,05 

1988 TOYOTA CAMRY: For 

sale Runs, but needs work. $50 Call 
(609)921-7481 

07-20 



vaTec Mwo-siory home on large lot on 
desirable Prospect Ave Flowing Itaor 
SS offers large, foyer, ""rjp'oom 
w „h built-m bookshelves and fire- 
p ace. sUtmg room. fam..y roorn with 

,ew addition (which can be used as a 
master bedroom suite m addition to 3 
*c Koms on the 2nd floor), dming 
worn and completely renovated 
Mchen with stanless-stee. applianc- 
es, granite counteriops. and cherry 
cabinets Two full baths, also com- 
pletely renovated. Mature European 
styling and travert.ne marble Other 
■ nierior .mprovemen.s include 
updated 1st floor utility room with new 
washer/dryer; new Karastan wool car- 
pet on stairs and 2nd floor; ref.n.shed 
hardwood floors on 1st floor, elegant 
recessed lighting .n foyer, living room, 
and kitchen, new window treatments, 
and new paint throughout Exterior 
,mprovements include a new 30-year 
roof, new garage door, and new 
storm door in rear entry to patio Situ- 
ated m a lush, quiet, and exclusive 
setting convenient to University, town, 
and schools, this house is in move-in 
condition. Call (609) 865-351 3 



REMOVAL: You call we haul! 
Princeton resident will remove 
unwanted Items from attic, 
basement or garage. Interior 
and exterior demolition 
service/cleanup. Tree service 
at discounted rates. Match or 
beat anyone's price. Same day 
servlce/Sr. discount. Call John: 
(609) 720-9016 or cell (609) 
851-9853 

tf 



PARTY SERVERS: BARTENDERS 
AND GRILL CHEFS AVAILABLE. 
Home and corporate parties Have 
fun at your own parly Call "With A 
Twist" (856) 461-8702 or (609) 
410-1999 

02-23/08-27 

JOE'S LANDSCAPING, INC.: All 

phases of spring cleanup, shrub 
pruning, fertilizing, mulching, weed 
control, leaf cleanup, lawn cutting 
Also, rototilling Call anytime (609; 
924-0310. leave message 

03-16-06 

DAN-LUCIAN NOVACOVICI 
(609) 924-2684 General contractoi 
and Electrical contractor Engineer- 
ing, new construction, additions, 
remodeling, (house, kitchen, bath- 
room, deck, etc ) and repairs Rewir- 
ing, residential, commercial. Building 
Inspector 40 years experience (Euro- 
pean and U.S.) License # NJ AC 
006567 and lie. #08179 

03-30/09-21 

I BUY ALL KINDS 

Of OLD THINGS 

China glass. Linens. Books, costume 

jewelry, bric-a-brac Local woman 

buyer (609)921-7469 

04-13/07-27 

TUTOR/COUNSELOR 

Reading, Writing, Math, Special Ed 
Instruction ranges 5 to adult SSAT, 
PSAT. SAT. ACT Preparation Organi- 
zation and study skills. 30 years expe- 
rience Tutor while building self- 
esteem Certified Reading, Special 
Ed. Counseling - University of Pa. 
Call Judy (609) 520-0720 

06-01-06 



ESTHER A. CAPOTOSTA, GRI 

Broktr Ownar ■ Licensed In PA 



k/V&a 



GREATER PRINCETON 

Thinking of Buying or Selling? 

Let me put my 18 years 

experience to work for you. 

Se habla su idioma 

Greater Princeton 
PRINCETON FORRESTAL VILLAGE 
Office: (609) 951-8600 Res.: (609) 737-2063 

fu. (60S) 737*761 Toll Fr»«. |«T7) 4S2-ESTHEB 
E-m«il:ESCAPOe»Ol_COM 

www.EstrterSells.com 

<S) IB E»* Ortica lno*p*ndonOy Owned * Op»raiod 



RFAir* 




& Prudential 



New Jersey 
Properties 



wm 



I HAMILTON — Solid four-sided brick cape 
[.conveniently located near Independence 

i Mall and dose 10 all COmntUlei Inns 1 Ins 

I spacious home has Foui large bedrooms, 
I ample closei space and hadwood floors on 
J the mam level ami is complete with beautiful 
I yard and mature trees $292,000 




PRESTIGIOUS CREAM RIDGE - So 
man} commuting options — 20 min to 

Princeton Jet I rain, 10 mm to NJ Turnpike. 
Stately Colonial, upgrades galore. 4.600 
sqii.on l 13 acres Professionally designed 
and hmslied basement with dance room. home 
theatre room, with theatre system included. 

$975,000 



WEST WINDSOR - This fabulous 1st 
floor Belvedere model is crispy clean, with 
wood-look Pergo flooring throughout and 
recent neutral carpet in both bedrooms. Close 
to major commuter lines by road, rail, bus, 
also shopping, movies & restaurants. 

$259,900 



SKILLMAN — Imagine the possibilities! 
65 acres in Montgomery Township; call for 
details on this exclusive listing! $3300,000 




PRINCETON - Great semi-attached home 
on quiet street near Nassau St 4th bedroom 
on 3rd floor may be used as a study or den. 
Brick fireplace in living room, hardwood 
floors throughout. Full basement & door 
leading to backyard. Central air on 1st & 2nd 
floor. 2 parking spaces behind the house. 

$545,000 




PLA1NSBORO - Bright and Neutral 
Danbury model, move in condition. Newer 
carpel, finished loft, ceramic tile foyer, wood 
burning fireplaces in LR. Backs to open 
area $317,900 



PRINCETON - Charming Colonial that 
has maintained the character of the original 
home, while major renovations in 2003 
have increased the comfort. Originally a 4 
bedroom home, now the 4th bedroom is part 
of an enlarged master bedroom with a full 
master bath. $799,000 



TITUSVILLE - Why buy the view when 
it is free? Adjacent to Washington Crossing 
State Park, this homestead has access to 
equestrian trails, a 2 stall bam w/7nd floor 
office. 2-car detached garage and more. 

$650,000 






IMUJDKNTIAI.NEW JERSE\ PROPERTIES WEBSITE www.PruNewJeiscy.com 



Princeton Office 138 Nassau Street, Princeton ■ Telephone 609/430-1288 

OJJii.cs Serving Nwtlwn and t.Vllfrui New Jersey - All Independently < Hitli d .v: ( tperuletl Member <»/ I In- /Yu</< uluil ft <// Estate Affiliates In ■ 



GMAC Real Estate 



Princeton Office • 609-921-2600 




Spacious and elegant colonial nestled in an estate setting, five minutes from historic Princeton 
and trains. 7 bedrooms, 5.5 baths on nearly 3 acres of wooded privacy. Newly renovated for 
living, working and entertaining in style. Main house has a separate entry au-pair suite. A 
studio over the 3-car garage has a separate entrance and full bath. 




Marketed by Marcia Graves 



p m\\ i e r sTr r vm e - 




www.gnrgmac.com 



ra 



33 Witherspoon Street 



$1,625,000 



Regents 



New Listing 




HXCallamyr 

Real Estate Broker.LLC ^J 

Four Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 
www.ntcallavvay.com 

609 921 1050 



As you'll see for yourself, all 
the upgrades in this impeccable 
Twin Pines Townhouse 
testify to its having been the 
showcase for this enclave's 
Heatherwood model. This two 
bedroom, two and a half bath 
Heatherwood offers an over- 
sized deck off the master bed- 
room, a delightful E.P.Henry 
paver stone patio, and a fully 
finished basement. There's a 
gracious 2-story living room 
with dramatic floor-to-ceiling 
windows, spacious eat-in 
kitchen, and whimsically hand- 
painted nursery. Along with 
the deck, the master bedroom 
boasts a spacious master bath. 
Features include walk-in closets, 
recessed lights, and central 
vacuum and intercom systems. 
This is Hopewell Township's 
Brandon Farms community at 
its very best. $399,900 
Marketed by Laurel Cecila 



CHRISTIE'S t=l 

f ESI ; . m ' ■ wwsss 



F$BO:CAMAL POIHTE Patio 

home 3 BR. 2 5 bath, new applianc- 
es landscaping, move-.n condition. 
sw.mm.ng pool, tennis court. walkto 
Marketfair & Whole Foods $559,000 
Open House Sat. July 23 from 1-4 30 
pnV& Sun. July 24th. 1-4 30 pm Call 

(609)203-0698 Q? ^ 



HOPEWELL-OPEN HOUSE: 

EVERY SUNDAY 1-4 PM Luxury new 
construction by Landmark Homes 
Michael Bilgmer. Marketing Director 
Dir Elm Ridge Rd to Blue Spruce. L 
on W Shore, L on Tara Way Princeton 
Real Estate Group (609) 924- 1 000 



SUMMER HORSE CAMP: Riding, 
horse management and lots of fun 
June 27- Jufy 1, July 11-15. August 
1-5, August 15-19 Ages 7 to 13 (609) 
466-8990 
05-18/08-03 

APARTMEHT FOR REHT: Princ- 
eton Boro Great location near Univer- 
sity & stores Smoke-free, 1 BR, 3rd 
floor, good view, central A/C, Avail- 
able September 1st $925/month 
(609) 924-7799 or byOung23@ 
aol.com 

07-20 

PRIHCETOH RAHCH In Town- 
ship 4 BR. 2.5 baths. 2 car garage, 
vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, 
brick patio, spacious LR & FM Long- 
term lease possible, Available Imme- 
diately $2900/month Call (732) 
552-4928 

07-20 



TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: Pnn- 
ceton 3 BR. 2 5 bath, FP. end unit 
W/D, walking path, tennis & basket- 
ball courts Private parking Excellent 
Princeton Schooling Call (732) 
319-8758 

07-20 

ELEMENTARY TEACHER (Prin- 
ceton native, Jerusalem-based) Multi- 
lingual, experienced, energetic, cre- 
ative, loving, available for child-care, 
tutoring and other enriching act.vit.es 
(also a great cook!) Call (609) 
683-9073 
^ 07-20 

ST. JUDE'S NOVENA: May the 

Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, 
glorified, loved and preserved 
throughout the world now and forever 
Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us St 
Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us 
St Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray 
tor us Say this prayer 9 times a day 
By the 9th day your prayer will be 
answered It has never been known 
to fail Publication must be promised 
Thank you, St Jude 

^______ TMN 

HOUSE-SITTING All or first half of 
August. Male High School Teacher 
Call (908) 531-6500 
07-20 

LBI CONDO FOR RENT: 2 BR/ 

1BA Oceanslde Unit available. 
Central A/C, W/D, D/W, Micro- 
wave Included. Private 
enclosed patio. Sleeps 6. Close 
to beach, bay and restaurants. 
Call lor rates and availability, 
,«.„ 25*4191 omm 



Experienced • Knowledgeable • Reliable 




'RT A 



Roberta Tarfzer 

166 Nassau Street 

Princeton, NJ 08542 

Office: 609-924-1600 

Cell: 609-915-0206. 

www.ro9ertaseffsj)rinceton.com 

robertaparker@aol.com 



Prudential 



Committed to Excellence in Real Estate 




The Finest Properties 

Are Exclusive With 

"THE GRQUP" 




JUD AND MATT HENDERSON 



34 CHAMBERS STREET 




270 Pennington-Rocky Hill Road — Hopewell Township 

This charming Dutch colonial, surrounded by specimen trees & plantings, 
is beautifully sited on 5 exquisite acres just outside Pennington. Four 
bedrooms, including a 1st floor MBR suite with separate dressing room 
opens to a covered porch. Kitchen /family room focal point is a large FP & 
beamed cathedral ceiling. A private enclave surrounded by woods, this is a 
very special offering. Listed by Laurie Lincoln. $920,000 

Directions: Elm Ridge Rd. to Right on Pennington-Rocky Hill Rd. to #270 
(Just past Arvida Dr.) 



cpRJNCETON 

REAL ESTATE 

GRQUP 




03 



A Henderson Company 

34 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ • Phone:609-924-1000 • Fax:609-924-7743 (5j 



PEYTON 



ASSOCIATES- 



REALTORS 



a 

3 



3 



\ 




5 

8 



ON TWO ACRES in the sought-after Hopewell 
Hunt neighborhood, a luxurious and elegant 5 
bedroom, 4 l A bath New England Exeter Model 
with spacious rooms, vaulted ceilings, skylight, 
and lavish details throughout. Dramatic two- 
story entrance, living room with French doors 
to adjoining office, formal dining room, family 
room with fireplace, expansive kitchen with every 
amenity, inviting eating area with box window 
and doors to terrace. Upstairs a beautiful master 
suite, with bedroom, sitting room and glamorous 
bath, four additional bedrooms and two Jack and 
Jill baths. There is a finished walk-out basement 
leading to a lovely terrace and sparkling in- 
ground pool. Spectacular property in a terrific 
Hopewell Township neighborhood... $1,295,000 

Marketed by Helen Sherman 

343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 609-92 M 550 
134 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 609-7371550 

♦ Anna Andrevski ♦ Virginia Ashcnfelter ♦ Margaret Baldwin ♦ Margaret Barclay ♦ Iva Bam ♦ Mayneti Brttthau(M ♦ Jon Bufonofld ♦ Vlcr< II ♦ ElUabcth Crowley ♦ 

♦ Judith Erdman ♦ Mary Firmed ♦ Martha Gnncoh ♦ Sheila Graham ♦ Lynn Gnesinger ♦ Catherine Hegedu* ♦ Laura Huntsman ♦ Marjorie Jaeger ♦ Janet Klenert ♦Cecil Marshall ♦ 

♦ Bern Marshall ♦ Margaret Michael ♦ Drucilla Mihan ♦ Catherine Nemeth ♦ Margaret Petrn ♦ Diana Reichanl ♦ Elizabeth Saycn ♦ Emily Schwab ♦ Hrlen Sherman ♦ 

♦ Chnstine Short ♦ Virginia Snook ♦ Joy Ward ♦ Martha jane Weber ♦ Beverly Willever ♦ Nancy Willcver ♦ 




i 



£> 



Peyton People * We Make the difference. 

Theodore "Tod" Peyton, Broker Find us at: www.peytonsales.com 





Baumley 



4339 Route 27 

Princeton, NJ 

(609) 924-6767 



Nursery, Landscaping & Garden Center 



KM LIGHT 

Real Estate 

245 Nassau Street 

Princeton 

924-3822 




Stockton Real Estate, LLC 

32 Chambers Street. Princeton, NJ 08542 
Phone 800 763-1416/ 609 924-1416 

Fax. 609 683-4308 

Email: info@stockton-realtor.com 

vvwu.stockton-realtor.com 



Newly renovated in 2004 and 
very easy to see the inside! 








www.stockton-reaitor.coni 

Vi ew on our Y VKH SI I K: MIS // 4506384 

El ■ST 



One of 9 units in 

Witherspoon Mews An 

ideal starter house. Freshly 

painted interior, re-finished 

floors downstairs. The 

first floor has a cozy living 

room, a nice bright kitchen, 

a dining area and a full 

bath. The kitchen leads 

to a deep rear yard with 

designated eating areas. 

The second floor has 2 

good sized bedrooms. 

There is a full basement for 

extra storage 

Princeton Borough, 

WALK everywhere. 

Priced at $335,000 

DON'T RENT 

BUY 



door, red color. 175K Runs well. 
,ooKs good $2300 Call (609) 924- 

7760 07-20 



HANDYMAN - ODD JOBS Home 
Repairs masonary. water proofing. 
Br.ck & plaster work, pest control, 
root repairs, pressure cleaning, 
wooden decks treating lor wood 
destroying insects & refinishmg (ter- 
mite certification) (609) 638-9636 

07-20 



FOR SALE:RALEIGH BICYCLE 

Custom l.tted to brake by applying 

pedals (for arthritic hands') 4 yrs old. 

Put rarely ridden, like new $200 OBO 

(609)924-2670 ^ 



PRINCETON COTTAGE: 1 5 BR 

walk to NYC tram, minutes to down- 
town Parking, washer/dryer, large 
yard Available August 1 $1399/ 
month Call (917) 681-1049 

07-20 

ETHAN ALLEN FURNITURE: 

For Sale By Owner Dining set. couch, 
chair, ottoman coffee table Prince- 
ton (732) 803-6533 

07-20 



NEED SOMETHING DONE? 

interior/exterior painting, plumbing, 
carpentry, and roofing Big jobs too 1 
Seminary graduate with lots of practi- 
cal experience Also troubleshoot 
computers and networks References 
available Please call (609) 466-7799 

06-08/11-30 

"ANTIQUES TODAY": Furniture 
Restoration using old wood, old tools, 
color match, patch, repair and refin- 
ish 40 years experience in antique 
restoration, call Martin Reynolds (609) 
298-7731 

06-15/12-07 



COFFEE FRANCHISES: With 75 
freshly baked muffm vaneties Initial 
investment $25K, extensive training, 
support Prime locations (877) 859- 
1760, javasbrewin net 

07-13-2t 

INTERESTED IN A 

REAL ESTATE CAREER? 

Prudential Fox & Roach is offering 

a career seminar in your area 

Monday. July 25 at 12 PM 

Princeton Home Marketing Center 

166 Nassau Street, Princeton. 

Please RSVP to Anne Kearns 

at (609) 924-1722 x1232 or email 

akearns@foxroach com 



PRINCETON STUDIO APT: In 

Palmer Square Includes heat & hot 
water Available August 15th, 2005 
$l050/month Call (609) 924-9009 or 
(609)558-1723 

07-13-21 



For Sale By Owner 



r-^jHPtfs 




Beautiful Princeton Landing townhome. This 3 BDR, 2.5 
BA boasts wood & ceramic tile floors, new appliances, 
custom mantle & fireplace, 2-car garage & full basement. 
Private deck, elegant clubhouse, pool, tennis& basketball 
courts. Meticulously maintained — move-in condition. 
$459,900. Please call 609-514-0674. 




REALTORS 



ERA 



Visit us at burgdorff.com to see all our homes for sale. 




PRINCETON — Magnihcent New I upland i oloni.il on I S wooded acres hacking to preserved 
open forest. I Ins gracious home otters 4 BRs, 25 BAs. colonial wainscoting & denlil crown; 1st 
flr library w/wcl bar; 2 Ipls. finished basement, spacious deck, abundant closet and storage space; 
hudwood A tiled Roon; bluesione walkways Astonishingly wonderful home! 

Marketed by Ira Lackey $ | ,1 00.000 



SKILLMAN — New price! This spacious 4 BR, 3 BA home is nestled on your own nature 
preserve. Bnght & sunny floor plan that has room for everyone. Shiny wood floors, freshly painted; 
new windows; updated baths and much more. Beautiful views from every window. Relaxing patio 
overlooking frog pond. Separate studio/workshop. 
Marketed by: Donna Murray $4794)00 





PRINCETON - Large. 4 BR. 2_S BA bi-level on a gorgeous lot Wood floors. built-in bookshelves 
& cabinets. Eat-in kitchen opens to a big deck for entertaining Neutral paint and decor. New tile 
foyer. Short walk to Smoyer Park and pond. Herrontown Woods and Autumn Hill preservation 

Marketed by Suzanne Drabek $699,000 



PRINCETON - New Price' Charming & spacious center hall colonial; 4 BRs 25 BAs familv 

CW-^isi v a f^ **}"*' fl ° Wenng treC$ ^ Shn,bs Wginal owner. Near Lake 
Carnegie & New York bus Home Warranty available 

Marketed by: Marjory White 



$899,000 



PRINCETON OFFICE • 264 Nassau Street • Princeton, NJ 08542 • (609) 921^9222 
For all your mortgage needs Call ERA Mortgage at 88M00-7970 



yfi^i 



1 6 Offices Throughout New Jersey i^V 

OuneJ and Operated Bv \RT Incorporate J '—J 



N.tCallawar 

Real Estate Broker.LLC ^J 4 



Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 609 921 1050 



9 

| 

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Pennington — Custom colonial with imported English 
architectural details, award-winning lower level. Pool, 
tennis court. $1,990,000 



Hopewell Township - In a scenic and private 20 acre 
setting, this 5 bedroom house has rich!) detailed rooms 
and a spectacular living room. 



Hopewell Township with pool, r 

pastures, tx lutiful woodlands the Ideal letting for tins 
stone and wood house 609-737-7763. 




Princeton - Delightful 1 -story house with finished 
basement near Carnegie Lake. NYC bus line, close to 
center of town. $675,000 



to. 1, ' 


••. 


1 


1 In 









Lawrence Township — On a cul-dc-sac, this elegantly 
appointed Colonial is on 12 wooded acres surrounded by 
farm land. $1,650,000 




Princeton - Tins handsomely renovated 19th century 

« olom.il ;nul ii\ . h.nnnii)' bri( k i ottap > <>m| union are on 
a historic street. $1,160,000 




Princeton — Just across from Riverside School and 
offering a creative floor plan with 2-story solarium, with 
spa, family room. $685,000 



East Amwell — In a 17+ picturesque acre setting, this 
handsome custom house, along with crisp barns, paddocks 
609-737-7765. $1,350,000 



West Windsor - With a traditionally attractive floor 

plan, this Colonial has a family room and kitchen opening 

lick. $649,000 




Hopewell - On 3.45 acres, this home features a Great 
Room with stunning stone fireplace. Large master suite 4 
bedrooms in all. $979,900 



Lawrence Township — Lovely gardens and this 13-year- 
old Victorian style house are near I6X acres of preserved 
open space. $1,289,000 



Princeton This charming 4 bedr« ovi rlook . 

picturesque Harry's Brook. Sidewalks to Little-brook 
School. $665,000 



Princeton 

Judith McCaughan 
Willa Stackpofe 
Barbara Blackwell 
Candice Walsh 
Colleen Hall 
Gail Eldridge 
Cheryl Goldman 






Ralph Runyon 
Marilynne Durki 



Maura Mills 
Diane Kilpatnck 
Gary Kilpatnck 
Christopher Tivenan 
Elizabeth Brian 
Robin McCarthy 
Judy Matthies 
Merlene Tucker 
Amy Brigham 



Susan Cook 
Bonnie Wilson 
David Schure 
Victoria Irmen 
Meg Coghlan 
Betsy Hoover 
BJ Booth 
Laurel Cecila 



Pennington 

Sylvia Morrison 
Vic ton a Rutkowski 
Betsy Hoover 
Barbara Blackwell 
Candice Walsh 
Anthony Stefanclli 
Jennifer Branagh. 
Bnnton West 
Abigail Lieb 



Edwin Lawler 
Samia Saigh 
Susan Cook 



NORMAN "PFTE" CALLAWAY 
BROKER 

norman CALLAWAY, JR 
PRESIDENT 



tii 

IOU41 NOUUHC 



www.ntcallaway.com 



PEYTON 



A. S S .O C I A T E S ♦ R 



B /X L T O R S 




JUST MOVE RIGHT IN AND ADD YOUR OWN PERSONAL TOUCHES 
to this very attractive townhouse. With a terrific location in Hopewell Grant 
and backing to woods, it is truly impeccable. Living room/great room with 
fireplace, eat-in kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2 X A baths, central air, two-car garage, 
club house, tennis court and pool. In Hopewell Township just a few miles 

from Princeton, it is offered at $415,000 

Marketed by Victoria "Vicky" Campbell 



Qi 



343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 609-921-1550 

I 14 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 609-737-1550 

Peyton People - We Make the difference. 
Theodore "Tod" Peyton, Broker Find U-. at: www.pcvtonsataucora 






2001 AUDI A4: 2 8 Ouattro Sport 
Package Stick, silver with leather 
interior 74K. excellent condition, 
spare nms/snow tires Call (609) 

73 '- S2n 07.13-8 

UNFURNISHED APT: Lawrence 
Twp. Available immediately Cozy 1 
BR apartment, private setting. $900/ 
month includes utilities No pets, no 
smoking Call (609) 896-1785. (609) 
883-7271. or (732) 793-4139 

07-13-2t 

EXPERIENCED A HONEST Reh- 
able woman seeks house cleaning m 
your home near bus route Call (609) 
695-3741 

07-13-21 



~" RETIRE TO LOWER TAXES 
FOR SALE BY OWNER: 

Leisuretowne. NJ (Route 206/70) 
Enjoy active adull community ameni- 
ties 1 story. 2 BR. 2 bath, large LR. 
EIK private lot on creek Totally 
renovated Inside. $207,500 
(609) 575-1087 lor appointment or 

brochure 

07-20 

HOUSECLEANING: English 

speaking References Call Susan 
(732)873-3168 

07-13-31 



LOVELY MONTGOMERY Town- 
house For Rent On cul-de-sac 3 BR, 
2 5 bath, A/C. all new appliances, 
garage, deck, basement, tennis 
courts Avail immediately $2200/ 
month Call (609) 924-0084 

07-20 

DRUMSET FOR SALE: New. 
complete, made by WJM Paid $650. 
selling for $300 Call (609) 921-1544 

07-20 

ST. JUDE'S NOVENA: May the 
Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, 
glorified, loved and preserved 
throughout the world now and forever 
Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us St 
Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us 
St Jude. helper of the hopeless, pray 
for us Say this prayer 9 times a day 
By the 9th day your prayer will be 
answered It has never been known 
to fail Publication must be promised 
Thank you, St Jude 

^___ _Z 

PRINCETON: Furnished room with 
balcony lor female. $550 includes all 
utilities Full house privileges On 605 
busline Call Linda at (609) 851-1287 

07-20 

FOR SALE: Whirlpool Calypso 
washing machine. 3 5 years old $200 
OBO Must pick-up Call (609) 
203-7035 

07-20 



Open House Sunday, July 24, 2-4 PM 

Montgomery Township * 4 Bedroom w/3.5 
Bath * Two story foyer • Hardwood floors * 
Conservatory off Living Room * Sunroom • 
Gourmet Kitchen with Stainless steel appliances/ 
Granite countcrtops * Wet Bar with Wine cooler 
• Audio system * Security Alarm • Master 
bedroom with den • Much More $1,175,000 

Directions: 518 E to Burnt Hill to Schoolhouse to 
Covenhoven. 

Universal Real Estate, LLC 

Ratna Agharkar. Broker 
^ 609-924-0122 pr, 

sss universalrealestate(§ gmail.com jjj 




fi 




Ellen's clients are satisfied! 

"Ellen 's professionalism and 
throughness makes her a pleasure 
to work with. I don 't think there 
could be a better agent! " 
Office: (609) 987-8889 
Evening: (609) 655-0647 
Cell: (609) 577-9012 
e-mail: ellieaf@aol.com 



x 



Ellen P. Affel 



KELLER WILLIAMS 

TR.1NCFTON REAL ESTATE 




CRANBURY - - 2 BR. 1 BA Ranch. Flowenng Trees. WEST WINDSOR - 4 BR. 2.5 BA. New Paint. FR w/3 WEST WINDSOR - 5 BR Col. Reldstone Front. Form 
Front Porch. LR w/FP. Full Bsmt w/Bullt-lns. Minutes From Sliders. One Rm Cottage. Close To Major Trans. Shopping. LR/DR. FP & Built-ins In FR. 1st FI BR/Lib, H/W. Fenced. 
Downtown Cranbury. Shops. NJ Tpk. WW-P Schools. Landscaped Yard. 

Agent. Magdalena Amira Direct phone: 750-4146 Agent: Helene Fazio Direct phone: 750-4121 Agent: JoAnn Parla Direct phone: 750-4123 

PRJ#0260 $324,900 PRJ#0424 $485,900 PRJ#0343 $799,900 




HAMILTON - Corner Lot. Fresh Paint. Lg Rms. H/W. Stor. PLAINSBORO - 4 BR. 2 5 BA Brick Front Col. Open FI PI. LAWRENCEVILLE - 5 BR. 2.5 BACol, Newer Kit. Upgraded 
4 BR. 2.5 BACol. H/W In Foyer & FR w/FP. New Cpt. Fresh Paint. EIK. Deck. Appl. Lg FR W/Brick Wdburn FP. Form LR. DR. Remodeled 

Dlr.: Yardville Allentown, R Whippany. L Maketield. R Claridge Fin Bsmt. WW-P Schools. Powder Rm. 1st FI Laundry. New Hall BA. 

Drive #22. Dlr.: Plamsboro. Dey. Scotts. Madison #41 Dlr.: Rt. 1 S.. R Darrah #150. 

Agent: Kenneth Edgeworth Direct phone: 750-4112 Agent: Sally Franklin Direct phone: 750-4137 Agent Joyce Belfiore 

PRJ#0228 $469,900 PR J# 1004 $649,900 PRJ#0420 



Direct phone: 750-4119 
$479,900 



Experience, Trust, Reliabilit 



rwi 



www.ColdwellBankerMoves.com 






RVICE 



Coldwell Banker Mortgage Services 
888-531-9129 

Concierge Services 800.353.9949 

Global Relocation Services 877 384 0033 

Previews International Estates Division 800375.0952 

CX»V CoW«U hnk> ftal t— » C 



COLOUJCUL 

BANKeR G 



Residential Brokerage 



Princeton Hightstown Road 

Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 

609.799.8181 



NBA Opsnlkue 



H 



tdCiiMllateC 



.. A. E*- C*«-, C—— E^| fW , Ow— » O—i md 



V% Prudential 



o 



Fox & Roach, REALTORS 



In Real Estate, Our PEOPLE Make All the Difference 



featured properties 



_ 




Princeton $1,890,000 

Stately colonial brick front home close to town featuring 7 BR and 6.5 baths, au-pair 
suite, circular drive and 3-car garage. 

Call 924-1600 Marketed by: Roberta Parker 

Directions: The Great Road or Route 206 to Mountain Ave. #224 




Hopewell Township $473,500 

Wellington Manor 55+ Community Madison Model neutral decor, move ujhi m I .up- 

LR. DR. ElK, study. 2-car garage, fireplace, pool & tennis. 

Call 924-1600 Marketed by: Debbie Lake 




Montgomery Township $74 ( ),<)00 

Charming 4 bedroom, 2'/i bath in desirable Cherry Valley. Spacious yard with white 
picket fence. Large master suite. 

Call 924- 1 600 Marketed by: Karen Sullivan 

Directions: Great Road to John Blaw to Tanglewood #\ . 




Monroe Township $ 1 .495.000 

Property is perfect for the home based entrepreneur, hobbyist, car enthu 
someone who would like to relax in his own kingdom This 2 7 acre estate It 
newer buildings including a 5,000 iq.fi house. J-CB detached garage with sq.ft. above. 
and heated pool house w/fiagstone capped hot tub and pool. 
Call (609) 799-2022 Marketed b> : Sydney Chung & Nancy O'Brien 




Princeton $750.ooo 

Custom hom< on with nw Hoots, ! lull baths, now kitchen with pinto 

Counters 6 ceitmU tile Qualits tlmmgha through 

Call 924 I MX) Marketed by: Maureen Provenzano 




Lawrence Ibwmhlp $795,000 

Charming i BR : > » BA colonial on cul-di sai with formal living & dining rooms 
family room w/stom ftreplao & wetbai Beautiful concreti pool 
i all 924 1600 Mvketsd by i Denis* Mtngjtal 




Hopewell Township $ I . i so.inni 

i i 'in im ,i i bath homi in I [opt wi II R id flni bi d b> i ini ni 

Set majestically on a beautifully land ca] lol 

( .11 92 \ 1600 Marketed by: Roberta Parker 




Pennington $1,250,000 

Magnificent 5 BR/5 BA Colonial on a t* led lol you will love the 1st floor 

earned unmet kitchen in-law suite w/ deck, full finished wait oul 

basement, am) built in iiin-ri.iinmcnt center. 

( JJ(609) " "22 Marketed by: RudraBhatt 



www.prufoxroach.com 

■fe Prudential fox & Ro.ch. realtors 



S 

o 



166 NASSAU STREET 

PRINCETON 

609-924-1600 



44 PRINCETON-HIGHSTOWN ROAD 
PRINCETON JUNCTION 
609-799-2022 



A The Trident Group 



.. .. . . One place where vou can eel mortgage 

We are pledqed to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout . ? ° c . 

*e nation. We . ' support on oKirmonve odv.rrfsing ond n,orke.ing progron, in which *.r. or. no BlMlKIIlg, insurance Hid settlement SClViCCS. 

barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. 



Stockton Real Estate, LLC 

32 Chambers Siren Princeton, NJ 08542 

Ph< 763-1416/609 924-1416 

Em. nl JnfoO StOi Unn-rcaltor.com 

www.stockton-realtor.com 



A Princeton Borough Gem 



A wonderful in-town "tree street" Victorian. This house 
has new vinyl siding, a brand new eat-in kitchen with 
new appliances, granite counter tops and a ceramic 
tile floor. There is a new 1st floor powder room with a 
ceramictilefloorandlaundry hook-up. Thefull basement 
has a workbench. Freshly painted and sanded wood 
floors. This house is in MOVE-IN condition. A Princeton 
Borough must see! $829,000 



REAL ESTATE AND YOU 

By Tod Peyton 

DETAILS, DETAILS 

Arc you good at details? it you decide to sell your home without a real estate 
professional, you will need to pa) a great deal of attention to details. Before offering 

yOUf home I'oi sale, you must decide on a price I his involves an analysis of properties 
in your area that have rceentK sold and homes that are current!) on the market. It 
is useful to get an outside opinion about the condition o\' your home from a home 
inspector, and to make the recommended repairs or cosmetic improvements. 

You should he familiar with aspects of buyer financing, such as current 
interest rates, discount points, and fees that are subject to frequent changes. When you 
locate a bin or. you must prepare a binding sales agreement, including details on price, 
financing, inspection, title transfer and possession dates, and other deadlines. OnceyoU 
have a signed contract, the real work begins. You can spend mam hours or da>s on 
details that are critical to coordinating a snnxMh transaction. 

A real estate professional understands all the inner workings of a real estate 
transaction and is experienced in handling any complications. Rehe\ e \ our an\icl> and 
regain your peace of mind through professional representation! 

For dependable individual advice on buying or selling real estate, call Tod Peyton, 
Realtor or any Peyton Associate at 921-1550. Please feel free to stop by my office 
at 343 Nassau Street in Princeton. 

PEYTON ASSOCIATES REALTORS 

343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 
609-921-1550 




Employment Opportunities 
in the Princeton Area 



LIFEGUARD/ 
FITNESS 

YMCA Program at Stonebndge has 
openings in the afternoons & week- 
ends lor caring team players Come 
pm our family' Call Martha at (609) 
759-3613 

07-06-3t 



HELP WANTED: 

The Rocky Hill Pub (Mam St in Rocky 
Hill) is looking for personable bar- 
tenders, waiter/waitresses, cooks & 
prep cooks Please call (609) 921- 
2009 between 8 am-2 pm 

06-29-4t 



PRINCETON 

We are upsizing 1 Get your real estate 
license in as little as 14 days Call 
Josh Willon, Manager. Weicherl Real- 
tors. Princeton Office (609) 921-1900 

07-06-tf 



GREAT OPPORTUNITY 

To be come a member of Plumbers & 
Pipefitters Union Local 9. B Division 
Full-time position available for plumb- 
ers & HVAC Techs Package includes 
lull health benefits & pension Michael 
J Mess.ck Plumb & Htg (609) 
466-7971 

07-20-31 



HELP WANTED/ 
ADMIN. ASSISTANT: 

Princeton Charier School seeks a 
dynamic individual with strong inter- 
personal skills, ability to multitask, 
must be compuler-hterate and enjoy 
working with adults and children PCS 
is a Public Elementary School serving 
290 students grades K-8 Send inquir- 
ies to PCS, 575 Ewmg Street. Prince- 
ton. NJ 08540 PCS is an equal 
opportunity employer 

07-20-21 



RECEPTIONIST/ 
OFFICE ASST. 

International company looking for 
honest, reliable, genial individual for 
PH or F/T position Office located in 
the hean of Princeton please call 
(609) 921-3334 or fax resume to (609) 
921-1377 

07-20-21 



VOLUNTEER 
POSITION: 

Do you have a love of history, a pas- 
sion for historic homes or simply a 
desire to learn 9 If so, contact Morven 
Museum and Garden We are cur- 
rently looking for Docenis available to 
volunteer a few hours a month begin- 
ning in September Training will take 
place over the summer Please call 
(609) 924-8144 ext 102 for mor infor- 
mation 

07-06-41 



PERMANENT DELI 
& PREP COOK: 

Full & part time counter help & Prep 
Cook needed in our Natural Foods 
Vegetarian Deli Day, evening & 
weekend shifts available Please 
apply in person to Whole Earth Cen- 
ter, 360 Nassau St, Princeton 

07-13-31 



INDEPENDENT RETAIL 
SALES REP: 

Custom designed upscale jewelry 
Commission-based. PT/FT flexible 
opportunity for personable, warm, 
articulate, gracious self-starter exclu- 
sive NJ/Philadelphia territory. Contact 
pam@larandawaydesigns com 

07-20-31 

DATA ENTRY: 

Princeton Academy's Development 
Office seeks a person to manage the 
schools database Responsibilities 
include data entry, gift processing & 
report generating The position is 
part-time Interested applicants 
should send a cover letter & resume 
to |allen@pnncetonacademy org 

07-20-2t 



GARAGE SALE + 

TOWN TOPICS classified ad 

= good weekend 




EMPLOYMENT RATE INFO; Irene Lee, Classified Manager 

• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or 

check • 25 words or less: $25.00 • each add'l word 25 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for 

ads greater than 60 words in length • 3 weeks: $66.00 • 4 weeks: $76.00 • 6 weeks: 

$96.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available • Ads with line spacing: 

$20.00/inch • all bold face type: $6.00/wk • change orders: $5.00 

m TO PLACE AN ORDER: 

«i_ tel: 924-2200 • fax: 924-8818 • e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com Hal 



Recycling 

MONDAY 

For 
Borough 

and 
Township 



Matteo & C». 

I" inc I lunif I' urnixliiiio* 



Slip Covered 
Furniture i=i 

Princeton Shopping Ccnl«-r 

801 N, Harmon St. 

609.4:«).l4O() 

« ww.matteoanaeo.net 



Lester & Robert Slatoff 

APPRAISERS 

AUCTIONEERS • ANTIQUE DEALERS 

Furniture, China, Glass. Household, Silver & Jewelry 

Trenton, l\IJ 

| 609-393-4848 21 5-736-8989 



©Uterrnan! 



tM 



*" Gutter Cleaning +~ Gutter Jtepairipg 
«■*■ and.. Gutter Replacement! 



Hig hest Q ualit y Seamless Gutters 



F 921-2299 1 

\aervtng the Princeton area since 1986 S 








N.tCallawa^ 

Real Estate Broker.L lc ^J 



4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 609 921 1050 I 







In a sunlit woodland setting on the Princeton edge of 
Montgomery Township, a meandering brick path leads 
to the bluestone terraced front porch of this extraordi- 
narily well built and appointed brick front colonial 
home. Gracious formal rooms with vaulted and cof- 
fered ceilings, gleaming hardwood floors throughout, 
wide arched openings between rooms, marble and 
ceramic tile baths, and inviting covered porches and 
decks are just a few of the special features of this home. 
A two story foyer with oak spiral staircase opens to a 
private study and to a living room, which steps down to 
a beautiful library with marble gas-log fireplace, and 
porch beyond. An elegant dining room with bay win- 
dow leads to the exquisite maple and granite kitchen 
with professional Viking range, center island, broad 
breakfast bar, and adjoining breakfast room. A two 
story family room with brick wood-burning fireplace 
opens to a cheerful sunroom with lovely views of the 
deck and lush lawn stretching to preserved woodlands. 
Completing the first floor is a full bath, large pantry and 
laundry room, a back staircase, and an oversized three 
car garage. On the second floor is the fabulous master 
suite with sleeping and sitting rooms, an oversized clos- 
et with dressing area and built-ins, and a luxurious bath 
with whirlpool tub. A princess suite with private bath, 
two bedrooms sharing a bath, and a playroom simulat- 
ing a treed backyard playground complete the second 
floor. Not yet two years old, this home offers almost 
5500 square feet of extraordinary living space. 
$1,850,000. 
Marketed by Barbara Blackwell 



Visit us at www.ntcallaway.com 






5 

a 



Cherry Valley Country Club 




An immaculate home nestled on a corner location with golf course views in 

Cherry Valley Country Club. This Wheaton model is 7 years young and completely 
rebuilt due to a "Christmas Candle" fire. No expense was spared in this fabulous 
reconstruction. Choices for upstairs flooring, kitchen tile backsplash, window 
blinds and fireplace surround remain. Enjoy lovely professional landscaped yard 

plus two decks. Don't miss the chance to have a new home in this prestigious 

community. 

PRT0575 Marketed by Susan Gordon $950,000 



Dutch Colonial — Pennington Borough 




Set behind trees and back from the road, this lovely and cheery Dutch colonial 

greets you with a large welcoming porch. The home is on a deep lot and is surrounded 
by enchanting gardens and displays of flowering perennials. The freshly painted 
rooms are spacious with large windows, and the central entry is gracious. There 
are plaster walls and wood floors. The large walk-up attic is perfect for finishing 
into one or more beautiful rooms. All the amenities of the story book town of 
Pennington are in walking distance. The schools are excellent, as is the nearby 
library. Route 95 is a few minutes away, and Princeton is a 15 minute drive. 
PRT0571 Marketed by Rita Millner $685,000 



Your buyer could be anywhere. Coldwell Banker is everywhere. 



www.ColdwellBankerMoves.com/Princeton 

Coldwell Banker Mortgage Services 
888.531.9130 

EB 



COLOUJCU. 
BANKER □ 



RFSID1MIU BROKERAGE 



Princeton Office 
10 Nassau Street 
Princeton, NJ 
609.921.1411 ' 



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