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# Service Source 



Twentieth Anniversary 

Macintosh 



# Service Source 



Basics 

Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh 



4m* 




Overview - 1 



Overview 

Because the Twentieth 
Anniversary Macintosh is a 
limited production product, 
not everyone will have an 
opportunity to personally 
view this computer. Some 
basic overview information 
and the Twentieth Anniver- 
sary Macintosh User 
Manual have been included 
here to familiarize all 
Service Source customers 
with the basic features and 
operation of this product. 



Due to the unique nature of 

4m* 



Basics Overview - 2 



this computer, any service requiring removal of enclosure 
screws must be handled by a centralized repair center; 
therefore, detailed repair instructions will not be 
distributed via Service Source CD. 

Details on the Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh service 
strategy will be documented on the next Service Source CD 
and through a Service Program notice. 



4m* 



Basics 



Rear Panel Connectors - 3 



:-2-;*- v ' r Rear Panel 

^^l^l^y' 1 ^ ^ ' ! - Connectors 




Pover-On 
Button 



Sound 
Input 
Port 




■ Sound 
Output 
Port 



TV Tuner- 
Port 



Security 
Lock 



FM Radio 
Port 



The graphic at left shows the 
connectors on the rear 
panel of the Twentieth 
Anniversary Macintosh 
computer. 



Basics 



Standard 
Back Panel 



Back Panel View - 4 



Back Panel View 

There are two back panels 
that can be installed on the 
Twentieth Anniversary 
Macintosh main unit: the 
standard back panel, and the 
expansion hatch that is used 
when optional cards are 
installed in the unit. 

The graphic at left shows the 
standard back panel. The 
graphic on the following 
page shows the expansion 
hatch installed on the main 
unit. 



Basics 



Connecting the Base Unit to the Main Unit - 6 



Connecting the 
Base Unit to the 
Main Unit 

When connecting the base 




unit to the main unit, be 
sure to align the bumps on 
the cable connectors as 
shown and then twist the 
metal ring to secure the 
connection. 



1 — Align Bumps — 1 




Sound System - 7 



Sound System 

The Twentieth Anniversary 
Macintosh features a custom 
Acoustimass sound system 
by Bose with integrated 
stereo speakers (built into 
the main unit) and 
subwoofer (built into the 
Base unit pictured on the 
left). 



# Service Source 



Specifications 

Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh 



4m* 



Specifications Processor - 1 

Processor 



CPU 250 MHz PowerPC 603e processor 

Built-in floating point unit (FPU) 
32K of on-chip cache memory 



4m* 



Specifications 



Memory - 2 



Memory 

DRAM 32 MB DRAM, installed as either a single 32 MB DIMM or two 1 6 

MB DIMMs. 

Each DIMM socket can accommodate a DIMM up to 64 MB, for a 
maximum of 1 28 MB. Requires 64-bit wide, 5 V, 1 68-pin 
EDO or FPM, 60 ns or faster DIMMs with 2K refresh rate. 



Note: SIMMs from older Macintosh systems cannot be used in 
this machine. DIMMs that require a 4K refresh rate and 3.3 V 
DIMMs cannot be used in this machine. 



4 MB 



Specifications Memory - 3 

VRAM 2 MB of built-in video memory using synchronous graphic RAM 

(SGRAM) 

Cache 256K level 2 cache 

Clock/calendar CMOS custom chip with long-life lithium battery 



4m* 



Specifications Disk Storage - 4 



Disk Storage 

Hard Drive 2 GB IDE hard drive 

CD-ROM Custom front-loading CD-ROM drive 

Floppy Drive 1 .4 MB Apple SuperDrive Manual Insert 



4m* 



Specifications 



I/O Interfaces - 5 



I/O Interfaces 



SCSI 
Serial 



One external SCSI port; supports up to six external devices 



Two RS-232/RS-422 GeoPort-compatible serial ports; mini 
DIN-9 connectors 



Apple Desktop Bus 



One Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port; mini-Din-4 connector 
Maximum power draw 500 mA; maximum of three devices 
total; additional ADB port on back of keyboard 



TV/Radio 



One TV tuner card that provides connection to an external TV 
antenna or cable TV (F-type connector) and FM radio antenna. 
(The Apple TV/FM Radio System card is already installed.) 



Specifications 



I/O Interfaces - 6 



Video Input Built-in video card provides S-video input port for VCR, 

camcorder, or other video input device; adapter for composite 
video input devices; supports NTSC, PAL, and SECAM video 
standards. (Note: this card is different than the video cards used 
in earlier entry-level Macintosh systems.) 

Sound 1 6-bit stereo input and output ports (3.5 mm) on back panel 

Sample rates of 1 1 .025, 22.05, and 44.1 kHz 
Built-in Bose sound system, including Bose bass unit 
Front-panel push-button control for volume level and muting 
Front headphone jack (3.5 mm) 
Built-in omnidirectional electret type microphone 
Sound input port (3.5 mm) for stereo sound related to video 
recording 

Sound Input Port (on Input impedance: >3.5 kilohms nominal, each channel 
back panel) 



Specifications 



I/O Interfaces - 7 



Video Audio Input 
Port (next to S-video 
port) 



Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR): 75 dB minimum, 80 dB typical (A- 
weighted, 2 Vpp output, 1 kHz, digital record and playback, 
sound input port to sound output port) 

Frequency response: 20 Hz-1 8 kHz (-3 dB relative to 1 kHz 
under the same conditions as the SNR measurement) 



Expansion Slots 

COMM II slot One internal (comm slot II) expansion slot, supporting 

communication cards, such as an internal modem or Ethernet 
card 

PCI slot One internal PCI expansion slot, supporting 6.88-inch, 1 5 W PCI 

cards. 

Note: Install only PCI expansion cards that come with 
Macintosh drivers and are compliant with the PCI 2.0 standard. 



Specifications 



I/O Interfaces - 8 



Video slot 



One internal video expansion slot, supporting a video input card 
using the NTSC, PAL, and SECAM formats. (The video input card 
is already installed in this slot.) 



4m* 



Specifications 



I/O Devices 



I/O Devices - 9 



Keyboard Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh custom keyboard; draws 

25-80 mA (varies with keyboard model used) 

Trackpad Solid-state keyboard-mounted trackpad (ADB device); can be 

removed and repositioned; draws up to 1 mA 

Microphone Apple PlainTalk microphone (optional) 



4m* 



Specifications Video Support - 1 



Video Support 

Display 1 2.1 -in. diagonal, active matrix flat-panel display with 

backlighting; 800x600 pixels; color liquid crystal; 256 or 
thousands of colors; color depth: 6 bits each R, G, B 

Graphics Modes Resolution Color Bit Depth* Vertical Scan Rate 



Supported 640x480 8 60 

640x480 1 6 60 

800x600 8 60 

800x600 1 6 60 



Video input and 2D acceleration supported in all modes. 1st and 
3rd mode do not support 3D acceleration; 2nd mode supports 3D 
acceleration, as does 4th mode, depending on the window size. 

*1 6 bit color depth displays 32,768 colors, 8 bit displays 
256 colors. 




4m* 



Specifications 



Electrical 



Electrical - 1 1 



A/C Line Input 
Voltage 



90-1 30 V or 1 80-264 VAC; RMS single phase, manually 
configured 



Input Line 
Frequency 



47-63 Hz 



Input Power 



140 W maximum continuous 



Power Supply DC 
Output 



70 W maximum continuous output 



Sleep Mode 



AC power usage in sleep mode (without PCI cards) less than 30 W 



Physical 



Main Unit 



Height: 1 7.25 in. (43.8 cm) 
Width: 16.5 in. (41.9 cm) 
Depth: 10.0 in. (25.4 cm) 
Weight: 14.9 lbs. (6.8 Kg) 



Bass Unit 



Height: 10.63 in. (27 cm) 
Width: 8.31 in. (21.1 cm) 
Depth: 1 1 .75 in. (29.8 cm) 
Weight: 10.5 lbs. (4.8 Kg) 



Keyboard 



Height: 1.0 in. (2.5 cm) 
Width: 1 1.5 in. (29.2 cm) 
Depth: 8.13 in. (20.7 cm) 
Weight: 1.86 lbs. (.84 Kg) 



I X$ Specifications Environmental - 13 



Environmental 

Operating 1 0-35° C (50-95° F) 
Temperature 

Storage -40 to 47° C (-40 F to 1 1 6.6° F) 
Temperature 

Relative Humidity 5-95% (noncondensing) 

Altitude 0-3,048 m (0-1 0,000 ft.) 



4m* 



Getting Started 



Chapter One 

Setting Up 2 

Chapter Two 

Learning to Use Your Computer 30 



Chapter Three 

Using Software 40 



Chapter One 



Setting Up 



The illustration below and on the next page shows all the equipment you received with your 
computer, including everything you'll need to set up your computer and begin using it. 

Before following the setup instructions in this chapter, you may want to read "Arranging Your Office" in 
Appendix A (in the section on health-related information) for tips on adjusting your work furniture so 
that you're comfortable when using the computer. 

You will follow these general steps in setting up your equipment: 

■ Unpacking the equipment 

■ Connecting the bass unit to the computer 

■ Plugging in the power cord 

■ Connecting the keyboard 

■ Connecting the GeoPort Telecom Adapter (for the modem) 

■ Turning on the computer 



Batteries 




PCI card adapter 



Mono audio adapter cable 





Communication card adapter 



Expansion panel 



Chapter 
One 

2 




Composite video to S-video adapter cable 



Setting Up 
3 



Unpacking the equipment 

Take all the parts of your computer out of the boxes. Then follow these instructions: 
Place the computer face-up on your work surface. 
Choose a sturdy, flat surface near a telephone jack. 




Place the 

computer on a 

flat, clean, stable surface. 



2 While holding the computer's base firmly, raise the computer to a comfortable viewing position. 




Setting Up 
5 



The screen should be vertical, tilted back by no more than a 15-degree angle, or tilted forward by no 
more than a 5-degree angle (to ensure that the CD-ROM drive operates correctly). 




Chapter 
One 

6 



Positioning the bass unit 



Place the bass unit near a grounded outlet, within six feet of the computer. The bass unit is designed to 
be placed under your work surface and will perform best acoustically when placed on the floor. It can 
also be placed on any stable, flat surface. For proper cooling, be sure that the air flow around the bass 
unit is not restricted. 

important The bass unit contains a very strong magnet. To prevent the magnet from interfering with 
the computer's operation, do not place the bass unit next to the computer. Do not place floppy disks 
on top of the bass unit (data may be lost). 



Plugging in your equipment 

Before you plug your equipment into a wall socket, carefully read all the setup instructions in this 
chapter. Then, before you connect anything to your computer, follow the instructions in this section 
to plug it in. The plug grounds the computer and protects it from electrical damage while you are 
setting up. 



Setting Up 
7 



Attaching the bass unit to the computer 

Follow these steps to attach the bass unit to the computer: 
1 Locate the large cable attached to the computer. 
This cable plugs into the bass unit. 




Chapter 
One 

8 



2 Turn the bass unit upside down. 

Locate the recessed well on the underside of the bass unit, and the groove containing a short cable 
already attached to the bass unit. 

Note: The recessed well also contains the bass unit's level control. The control is preset at the level 
that is appropriate for most conditions, so don't change the setting now. Note the location of the 
control in case you want to adjust it after you start up the computer. (Chapter 7 explains how to adjust 
the speakers and bass unit.) 

3 Pull up on the cable that is connected to the bass unit to release it from the groove where it has been 
stored. 




Setting Up 
9 



Plug the connector at the end of the computer's cable into the bass unit's connector. 

Align the two connectors until the small internal ribs and grooves line up, and press the connectors 
together. Do not force the connectors. 




Setting Up 
11 



6 Press the cable back into the groove and route the computer cable through the cutouts in the base of 
the bass unit. 




Chapter 
One 

12 



Plugging in the power cord 

Follow these steps to plug your equipment into a wall outlet: 

1 Make sure the voltage switch inside the well on the bottom of the bass unit is set for the voltage you 
connect to. 

The voltage switch is preset at the factory to the correct voltage for the area where you bought the 
computer. 

If there is any chance that the setting has been changed, or if you take the computer to a country with 
a different voltage system, it's important to check the voltage and change the setting if necessary. The 
voltage switch must be set correctly to avoid damaging your computer. 



I Country 


Voltage switch setting I 


France, Germany, and United Kingdom 


230 


Japan and United States 


115 




Beforeyou plugyour computer in, 
\ check to see that the voltage 
\ switch in thebassunitis 
] properly set. If you need 
J to change the setting, 
v/ insert a small screwdriver 
^in theslotand slidethe switch. 

Set the switch to show "115" for 
voltagesin the 100-130 V range. 

Set the switch to show "230" for 
voltagesin the 200-270 V range. 



Setting Up 
13 



Plug the socket end of the power cord firmly into the recessed power plug (marked with the 
symbol ~) inside the well on the bottom of the bass unit. 

Route the cable through the cutouts in the base of the bass unit. You can store any extra length of the 
power cord in the well. 



3 Plug the other end of the power cord into a three-hole grounded outlet or power strip. 

▲ Warning This equipment is intended to be electrically grounded. Your computer is equipped with a 
three-wire grounding plug— a plug that has a third (grounding) pin. This plug will fit only a grounded 
AC outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact a licensed 
electrician to replace the outlet with a properly grounded outlet. Do not defeat the purpose of the 
grounding plug! A 

4 Turn the bass unit right-side up and position it where you want it. 

important The only way to disconnect power completely is to unplug the power cord. Make sure the 
power cord is within easy reach so that you can unplug the computer when you need to. 



Setting Up 
15 



Removing the port cover plate 

Before you can connect the keyboard and modem, you must remove the port cover plate. Follow 
these steps: 

1 Squeeze the cover plate between your fingers and swing it away from the computer. 




Port cover plate 



2 Set the cover plate aside. (The cover plate is made up of two sections that can be easily separated and 
reassembled if needed.) 

The port cover plate covers the ports for the modem, keyboard, printer, and video equipment (such as 
a video cassette recorder or camcorder). For now you'll just connect the keyboard and modem. 



Chapter 
One 



Connecting the keyboard 

To connect the keyboard to the back of your computer, follow these steps: 

1 Pass the keyboard cable under the computer. 

2 Plug the keyboard cable into the port marked with the 5* icon on the back of the computer, and press 
the cable into the cable guides. 

Be sure to use the correct port, which is marked with the 5* icon. Don't use any other port, even if the 
cable seems to fit. 




By the way: A port marked with the > icon is called an Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port. 



Setting Up 
17 



Connecting your modem to a telephone jack 

The GeoPort Telecom Adapter that came with your computer lets you connect your computer's high 
speed Express modem to a telephone jack so you can send electronic mail (e-mail) and fax messages 
and connect to the Internet. 




GeoPort Telecom Adapter Telephone cord 

(In some locationsthe GeoPort Telecom 
Adapter hasonlyoneport.) 

important If you're planning to install telephone wiring or telephone jacks, follow these 
precautions: 

■ Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm. 

■ Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jacks are specifically designed for wet 
locations. 

■ Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been 
disconnected at the network interface. 

■ Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines. 

■ Avoid using a telephone, other than a cordless type, during an electrical storm. There may be a 
remote risk of shock from lightning. 

■ Never use a telephone to report a gas leak while in the vicinity of the leak. 



To connect your modem to a telephone jack, follow these instructions: 

1 Plug the GeoPort Telecom Adapter's cable into the computer's modem port and press the cable 
into the cable guides. 




Setting Up 
19 



Plug one end of the adapter's telephone cord into a telephone jack. Plug the other end into the line 
port on the adapter. 

If a telephone is plugged into the jack you want to use, unplug the telephone's cord from the jack. 

important When connecting a modem, make sure you connect the modem to an analog phone 
line— the kind used typically in homes. Connecting to a PBX or ISDN line could damage the modem. 
If you want to connect the computer to an ISDN line, follow the instructions that came with your ISDN 
equipment. See Chapter 4, "Connecting Your Computer to a Telephone Line," for more information. 




Note: If your GeoPort Telecom Adapter has only one port, skip step 3. 



Chapter 
One 



3 



If you want to have your telephone use the same jack as the adapter, plug your telephone's cord into 
the telephone port on the back of the adapter (marked with the S icon). 



If you don't want your computer and telephone to share a jack, skip this step. 




important During lightning storms, disconnect your modem from the telephone jack to prevent 
possible damage to the modem. 



Setting Up 
21 



Replacing the port cover plate 

Put the port cover plate back on. 



Adjusting the keyboard (optional) 

If you wish to adjust the angle of the keyboard, rotate the keyboard feet down. 




Repositioning the trackpad (optional) 

If you like, you can remove the trackpad from the keyboard and place it directly on your work surface. 
Follow these instructions: 

1 Loosen the trackpad cable from the grooves on the back of the keyboard. 

Do not unplug the cable from the keyboard while the computer is turned on. Attaching or removing an 
ADB device while the computer is turned on could damage the ADB device or your computer. 

If you put the trackpad back in its original position later, be sure to snap the cable back into either the 
left or right groove on the back of the keyboard. 

2 Lift up on the edge of the trackpad. 




Setting Up 
23 



Lift the trackpad out and put it to the left or right of the keyboard. 

Using your finger, remove the leather palmrest section from underneath the keyboard. 

The palmrest section is for covering the space created when you remove the trackpad. 

yTEr= _ /^\ Palmrest section 



5 Snap the palmrest section into place, positioning the finger keyhole toward the rear. 




Setting Up 
25 



Turning the computer on 

To turn on the computer for the first time, follow these instructions: 
1 Turn on your computer by pressing the Power key on the keyboard. 
The Power key is marked with a triangle (O). 




You hear a tone from the computer as it starts up. (Information on adjusting the speakers and bass unit 
is in Chapter 7, "Sound.") 



Chapter 
One 

26 



2 



Check to see what's on your screen. 



The first time you turn on your computer you should see a multimedia Welcome Tour or the Macintosh 
desktop (pictured below). Skip now to "What's Next?" later in this chapter. 




■ If you see a blinking question mark, see Chapter 12, "Solutions to Common Problems." 

■ If you see anything else on your screen, or if you see nothing at all, see "Problems Turning Your 
Computer On?" next in this chapter. 

important If you want to turn off your computer, press the Power key on your keyboard and follow 
the proper shutdown procedure explained at the end of Chapter 2 in "Turning the Computer Off." 



Setting Up 
27 



Problems turning your computer on? 

If you don't see anything on the screen, check these items to see if you can identify the problem: 

■ Is the computer connected to the bass unit, and the bass unit plugged into a power source? If it is 
plugged into a power strip, is the power strip turned on? 

■ Is the status light underneath the bass unit on? If it isn't, try plugging the equipment into a different 
outlet. 

■ Is the status light on the front of the computer on? If it isn't, check to be sure the computer's power 
cable is plugged into the bass unit's cable. 

■ Is the keyboard cable connected correctly? It should be plugged into the ADB port, marked with 
the 5* icon. (Don't connect or disconnect this cable while the computer is on. You could damage 
your equipment.) 

■ Is the brightness control adjusted correctly? (The brightness control is marked with the symbol 
and is on the left under the screen on the computer.) 

What's next? 

Congratulations— you've finished setting up your computer. What you do next depends upon your 
experience with a trackpad and with Macintosh. 

Have you used a trackpad? 

If you've never used a trackpad, you can see a quick introduction to the trackpad and practice using it. 
Turn to Chapter 2, "Learning to Use Your Computer," for instructions on starting a tutorial that teaches 
basic skills, including trackpad skills. 

Are you new to Macintosh? 

If you've never used a Macintosh computer, turn to Chapter 2, "Learning to Use Your Computer," for 
instructions on starting a tutorial. 



Are you already familiar with Macintosh? 

If you are already familiar with the Macintosh, you probably don't need any printed instructions to 
explore your computer, so you can set this book aside for now. Later, return to this book if you want to 
do any of the following: 

■ Learn more about your computer 

■ Read basic information on connecting to other computers and to the Internet 

■ Watch TV and video or listen to audio CDs or FM radio 

■ Attach a printer or other additional equipment 

■ Add memory or an expansion card 

■ Find solutions to problems 

■ Maintain your equipment and accessories (such as the leather palmrest) 

If you need to adjust the volume of your speakers and bass unit, see Chapter 7, "Sound." 



Setting Up 
29 



Chapter Two 



Learning to Use Your Computer 



I f you have never used a Macintosh computer, you'll find that taking the Macintosh Tutorial is the 
fastest way to become comfortable with your new computer. 

Learning the basics 

Follow the instructions in this section to start the Macintosh Tutorial. 
1 If the computer is not already on, turn it on by pressing the Power key on the keyboard. 
The Power key is marked with a triangle (<d). 



Chapter 
Two 

30 



2 Check to see what's on your screen. 



The first time you turn on your computer you should see a multimedia Welcome Tour or the Macintosh 
desktop (pictured below). 




Macintosh desktop 



If you see a multimedia Welcome Tour, press and hold the 3€ key on your keyboard while pressing Q 
(for "quit"). A dialog box appears asking what you want to do next. Press 3€-Q again. 

Note: You can wait for the Welcome Tour's startup message to finish playing, and quit whenever you 
are ready to start the Macintosh Tutorial. 



Learning 
to Use Your 
Computer 

31 



Move your finger on the trackpad to move the arrow pointer (k) on the screen. 

Place your index finger on the trackpad and your thumb on the trackpad button. Don't press the 
trackpad button yet. Move your finger across the trackpad, watching the arrow on the screen. Notice 
that the arrow on the screen moves in the same direction that you move your finger on the trackpad. 



Trackpad Trackpad button \ \ 

The trackpad is sensitive not only to the direction you move your finger, but also to how fast you 
move your finger. If you want the pointer to move a short distance across the screen, you move your 
finger slowly across the trackpad. The faster you move your finger, the farther the pointer moves 
on the screen. 





o 

© ° 



4 Move the tip of the arrow (k) to the question mark (G8) in the upper-right portion of the screen. 

5 With the tip of the arrow on the question mark, press and hold down the trackpad button. 

A list of choices (called a men u) appears. This is the Guide (GS) menu, which is the place to go when 
you have a question about how to use your computer. 




6 While holding down the trackpad button, move the arrow until the words "Macintosh Tutorial" are 
highlighted, then release the button. 

A window appears welcoming you to the tutorial. You can set this book aside for now and follow the 
instructions on the screen. When you have completed the tutorial, return to this book and read the 
next section, 'After You Take the Tutorial." 

important You can stop the tutorial at any point and go back to it later. If you want to turn off your 
computer, however, be sure to follow the proper shutdown procedure explained at the end of this 
chapter. 



After you take the tutorial 

If you are comfortable with the basic skills taught in the tutorial, you are ready to use your computer. 
You may, however, have additional questions while using the computer. This book can answer some of 
your questions, but there are many other convenient sources of information. The next section shows 
you where to find answers to your questions. 



Learning 
to Use Your 
Computer 

33 



Where to find answers 

When you havequestionsabout using 
your Macintosh, there a re several 
places you can look for answers. 




Macintosh 
user's manual 

Use this book to help you 
set up your computer and 
learn about it, or to find 
solutionsto problems. 




Apple Guide 

If you need help or experience a 
problem while using the computer, 
open the Guide (GB) menu and 
choose Mac OSGuide. The Guide 
menu isthemain source for 
information whileyou areusing 
the computer. 





Other manuals 

For answersto questionsabout 
other equipment or about 
application programsyou have 
purchased, see the manuals 
that ca me with the equ i pment 
or programs. 



Apple's customer 
support hotline 

If you can't find an answer in 
any of the materials provided, 
call the customer support 
hotline. (The phone number 
for the hotline is in the service 
and support information that 
came with your computer.) 



Chapter 
Two 

34 



Four simple tips for using Guide effectively 

When you don't see Mac OS Guide in the Guide menu 

Mac OS Guide is only available while you're in the Finder. (The Finder is the application that displays 
the desktop, or background of your screen, where you find and open other applications and 
documents.) 

To go to the Finder, do one of the following: 

■ Click the desktop (the colored or patterned background area of your screen) . 

■ Open the Application menu (to the right of the Guide menu) and choose Finder. 

When you can't find the information you need 

■ In searching for help topics, use all three buttons at the top of Guide's initial window: Topics, Index, 
and Look For. 

■ If you're in a series of steps and want to return to a list of help topics, click the Topics button. 
When you can't see what's behind the Guide window 

Guide windows stay in front of other windows on the screen so that your instructions are never 
covered. 

■ Drag a Guide window by its title bar to move it out of the way. 

■ Click the zoom box once to shrink a Guide window. (To expand the window, click the zoom box a 
second time.) 

When you need more information about an instruction or term 

■ Click the "Huh" button if it is available. 

. Zoom box 
.Title bar 



How do I set the time and date? 



You set the time and date in the Date & Time control 
panel, 

For instructions, click the right arrow. 

? Topics ][ ] l~n>l 



"Huh?' button 



Navigation buttons 



Identifying Objects 

If you see something unfamiliar on the screen, open the 
Guide menu and choose Show Balloons. Then pointto the 
object you want to identify. When you're done, choose 
Hide Balloonsfrom theGuide menu. 



This is an example 
of Balloon Help. 




Welcome to the Macintosh Tutorial. 
This tutorial teaches you the basic 
skills you need to work effectively 
with your Macintosh. 

You begin by clicking the words 
"Start the Tutorial" below. 

Do this: 

* Move your mouse, trackball, 
or other device until the 
pointer is on the words 
"Start the Tutorial," 

* Press and release the button. 



Start the Tutorial 



□ED 



Learning the Basics 

To learn basic skills, open theGuide menu and choose 
Macintosh Tutorial. Then follow the instructionson the screen. 



File Edit Uiew LabeT'^Spjecjal 



Getting Help Through the Internet 

If you havean Internet connection, you can get information 
from the Apple World Wide Web site at http://www.apple.com. 
( For more i nfor mati on a bout the I nternet, see Cha pter 5.) 



Chapter 
Two 

36 




The Guide Menu 

To find an answer to a question, look in theGuide (O) menu- 
, your main source of information aboutyour computer. 



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* Getting Answers to Your Questions 

To get answers to questionsyou have while working with 
your computer, open the Guide menu and choose Mac OSGuide 
or a Guidefor the programyou areusing. Then click oneofthe 
three buttons at the top of the wi ndow: Topi cs, I ndex, or Look For, 
and follow the instructionsto choose a topic. 



' Getting the Latest News 

Double-click the hard disk icon to see "Read Me" files, which 
contain last-minute tipsand news. Manyother Read Medocuments 
are in the Apple Extrasfolder. 

Read Me documents that have "PDF" in the icon or in the filename 
open in the Adobe™ Acrobat™ Reader application, which isalready 
installed on your hard disk. 



Learning 
to Use Your 
Computer 



37 



Turning the computer off 

To turn your computer off, follow these instructions: 
Press the Power key (O) on your keyboard. 
The following dialog box appears on the screen: 

j% Hrc- yp* w? ftu mnr >o lhui 4?lmi u#w 

/j\ LUIIipjlh'l UIIU ■ 



Press the Return key on the keyboard. 

You will be prompted to save any unsaved work before the computer shuts down. 

To turn the computer on again, just press the Power key on the keyboard. 
Note: There are two other methods of shutting down: 

■ In the Finder, choose Shut Down from the Special menu. 

■ Shut down more quickly by pressing the Power key and holding it down for a few seconds. The 
dialog box appears briefly and then dismisses itself, and the computer shuts down. 

important Do not use the power button on the back of the computer to turn the computer off 
unless there is a problem that prevents it from being turned off with the Power key. (You could lose 
unsaved work.) To make sure your work is saved, use the Power key. 



Chapter Three 



Using Software 



"You'll probably want to purchase and install application software to use with your computer. 
Application programs let you, among other things, do word processing; create spreadsheets, databases, 
and graphics; play games, alone or with others; and explore the Internet. 

Your computer includes some basic application programs as well as other software. Some are 
preinstalled and ready for use. Others are optional; if you want to use them, you must install them first. 

This chapter explains how to install and work with application programs and describes the software 
that came with your computer. 

Installing application programs 

Most application programs come on a floppy disk or a CD-ROM disc with an Installer program that 
makes it easy to install applications onto the computer's hard disk. Follow the instructions in the 
manuals that came with the specific applications to install them. Refer to the general instructions below 
for additional help on how to use the applications with the Mac OS. 

If you have virus protection installed, you should turn it off before you install an application program. 
Also, use the Extensions Manager to turn off system extensions. For more information about 
Extensions Manager, see "Checking Your System Extensions" in Chapter 13, "Techniques for Diagnosing 
and Solving Problems." 



Chapter 
Three 

40 



Using a floppy disk 



Some application programs come on floppy disks. The illustration below shows how to insert a floppy 
disk into the computer's floppy disk drive. 




After you insert a floppy disk containing an application, you follow the instructions that came with the 
application to install it on the computer's hard drive. 

To eject the disk after installation is complete, click the disk icon to select it and choose Put Away from 
the File menu. 



Using 
Software 

41 



Using a CD-ROM disc 

In most cases, you'll install an application program on your internal hard disk from a CD-ROM disc 
that contains the application. To insert a CD-ROM disc, follow these instructions: 

1 Open the CD-ROM drive door by pressing the Stop/Eject button. 

The door opens automatically when you press the button. Never pry or pull the door open. If the 
door doesn't open when you press the button, see "Problems With CD-ROM Discs and Drives" in 
Chapter 12. 




2 Press the center of the disc onto the CD-ROM drive's spindle, label side out. 

Center the disc in the drive, handling the disc by its edges, then press on the center of the disc (near 
the hole) to be sure that the disc is firmly in place. 



Close the CD-ROM drive door. 




After you insert the disc containing your application program, follow the instructions that came with 
the application to install it. 

To eject the disc after installation is complete, click the disc icon to select it and choose Put Away from 
the File menu. 



The illustration below shows how to remove a CD-ROM disc. 




important Do not copy the entire contents of a CD-ROM disc onto your hard disk. (Don't drag the 
disc's icon to your hard disk.) If you copy the entire contents of a CD-ROM disc, it will take up a lot of 
space on your hard disk. When you open applications on some CD-ROM discs, you may get a message 
telling you to copy or install the application onto your hard disk. If you get this message, refer to the 
installation instructions that came with the CD-ROM disc, or double-click the CD-ROM disc's icon to 
open it, and then copy the CD-ROM disc's application onto your hard disk. 

Remember that you only need to copy an application once. From then on, open the copy that's on the 
hard disk. 



Using 
Software 



45 



Installing applications over a network 



If your computer is connected to a network, you may find applications on it that you can install on your 
computer. Though you can run Installer applications over a network to install applications, it is usually 
faster to first copy the application and its Installer onto your computer, and then run the Installer to 
complete the installation. Double-click any Read Me file you see, and carefully read it and other 
instructions you find with the application you want to install. 



Opening an application program and its documents 

You open an application the same way you open other items— by double-clicking its icon. 

When you double-click a document's icon, both the document and the application that created 
it open. 

Once you are working in an application, you can open other documents in that application by opening 
the File menu and choosing Open. 

Working with several applications at a time 

You can open as many applications and desk accessories as your computer's random-access memory 
(RAM) allows. (If you see a message that you have insufficient memory to open an application or 
document, you may have too many applications open.) 

The Application menu in the top-right corner of the screen lists the applications you have open. The 
name of the active application (the one you're using right now) has a checkmark next to it, and its icon 
appears in the menu bar. 

Application menu (Theicon changes to show 
theactiveapplication.) 

\ Commandsto hideor display open windows 

A checkma r k i n d i cates the a cti ve a ppl i ca ti on . 



Hide Finder " 
Hide Others 
Show nil 



J^D F'nder |_|_ Open applications 

4$ SimpleTeHt}^ 



Finding out which applications are open 

If you have several applications and windows open, you can find out which application is active and 
which other applications are open by opening the Application menu. 

Switching applications 

You can switch to another open application by choosing its name from the Application menu. 

If an application's icon is dimmed in the menu, that means its windows are hidden. If you choose the 
application from the Application menu, its windows become visible. 

You can also switch to another application by clicking in one of its windows or by double-clicking its 
icon or the icon of a document that was created with the application. 

Hiding and showing windows on the desktop 

You can hide all windows except those of the active application by choosing Hide Others from the 
Application menu. The other applications remain open even though their windows are hidden. When 
you switch to another application, its windows become visible again. 

When an application is active, its name is displayed in the Application menu next to the word "Hide." 
Choose the Hide command to temporarily hide the application's open windows. (This helps to quickly 
clear up a cluttered screen.) For example, if the Finder is active, you can hide it by choosing Hide 
Finder from the Application menu. 

If you want to see all the open windows, choose Show All from the Application menu. 



Using 
Software 

47 



Five tips for using application programs effectively 



1 Use Power Macintosh applications. 

Your computer is compatible with most application programs intended for use with Macintosh 
computers, but it's best to use applications designed especially for Power Macintosh computers. 
(Sometimes these applications are marked "Accelerated for Power Macintosh.") 

2 Put only one copy of each application on your hard disk. 

Having more than one copy can cause errors. 

3 If you experience problems with an application, try reinstalling. 

If an application malfunctions consistently, try installing a fresh copy. If that doesn't help, find out from 
the software manufacturer whether your version of the application is compatible with the hardware 
and system software you're using. 

4 Don't install additional System Folders. 

Whenever you copy an application disk to your hard disk, be careful not to copy another System 
Folder. Your startup disk should only contain one System Folder. Drag any extra System Folders on 
your hard disk to the Trash. 

5 Use virtual memory if necessary. 

If you run out of memory while using Power Macintosh applications, you can use space on your 
computer's hard disk as additional memory (called "virtual memory"). For instructions, choose Mac OS 
Guide from the Guide (O) menu and read the information under "memory" in the Guide's index. 

You can also add more memory to your computer, as described in Chapter 10, "Installing Expansion 
Cards and Memory." 



Chapter 
Three 

48 



About the software included with your computer 



Your computer includes several kinds of software. Some is preinstalled and ready for use; other 
software you need to install before you can use it. The types of software that come with your computer 
include these: 

■ the Macintosh Operating System (Mac OS) software and preselected system software additions, 
already installed on your computer 

■ extra system software additions that you can install yourself 

■ application programs 

The following sections provide details about the included software. 

Mac OS software and preselected system software additions 

The Macintosh Operating System (Mac OS) is the basic software that runs the computer itself. It tells 
the computer what to do when it starts up, keeps track of your documents, files, and other software, 
and helps your computer find out what devices— such as printers and network cables— are attached 
to it. 

The Mac OS was installed on the internal hard disk at the factory, and starts automatically when you 
turn on your computer. Here is some of the software that makes up the Mac OS basic system: 

■ The Finder, the program that displays the desktop and allows you to organize documents, files, and 
application programs into folders 

■ QuickTime, which lets you play digital video on your computer 

■ OpenDoc, which lets you build a document that can include text, graphics, movies, links to the 
Internet, tables, and many other types of information 

An OpenDoc document isn't created within a specific application program. Instead, you create a 
document first, and then embed in it the "parts" you want to use. Each part is like an application 
program, offering a rich set of features; a single document can draw on the resources of many parts. 
A variety of parts will be available from both Apple and third-party sources. 

■ PC Exchange, which lets you work with DOS and Windows disks as if they were Mac OS disks 



Using 
Software 

49 



■ AppleScript, which allows you to automate tasks in the Finder and other scriptable applications 
(applications that support AppleScript). Instructions for using AppleScript are in the Apple Extras 
folder on your hard disk. 

The following are preselected system software additions, already installed on your computer along with 
the Mac OS basic system: 

■ QuickDraw 3D, to view and manipulate 3D images on your computer 

■ MacLinkPlus translators, to easily open documents (including DOS and Windows documents) 
created in applications you don't have. These translators work with the Mac OS Easy Open control 
panel. 

important System software is preinstalled on your computer. Do not reinstall system software unless 
you are experiencing problems or you want to upgrade to a more recent version. Consult Chapter 13, 
"Techniques for Diagnosing and Solving Problems," before attempting to reinstall system software. 

Extra system software additions you can install yourself 

Your computer comes with additional software that adds additional capabilities to the Mac OS. This 
software was not installed at the factory, so you have to install it if you want to use it. 

Tip: Some of this software can decrease the amount of random-access memory (RAM) available for 
use by application programs, even when it is not in use. To conserve RAM, only install the software you 
think you'll use. 

These are some of the extra system software additions that you can install yourself: 

■ QuickDraw GX, for enhanced printing and typographical capabilities 

■ English Text-To-Speech, to have your computer read text aloud 

■ Cyberdog, an application to access the Internet. 

■ Apple Remote Access Client, to connect to a remote computer (such as your computer at work) 
using a modem 

■ Open Transport PPP, to connect to the Internet using a modem 



You can install one or more of the extra system software additions from the system software CD that 
came with your computer. See the section "Performing a Custom Installation" in Chapter 13 for 
instructions. 



Application programs 

Your computer comes with application programs to play QuickTime movies, to play audio CDs in your 
CD-ROM drive, and to open HyperCard stacks. It also includes Internet access applications such as the 
Apple Internet Connection Kit. (For more information about the Apple Internet Connection Kit, see 
Chapter 5, "Connecting to the Internet or an Online Service.") 

To see which applications are already installed on your hard disk, double-click the hard disk icon to 
open it, then double-click the Apple Extras folder to open it. Many applications are in the Apple Extras 
folder. 



4 



Led 

CD 



.Apple Extras folder, 
containing extra applications 



You also received a CD-ROM disc that contains backup copies of the system software and the 
applications preinstalled on your computer's hard disk. It also contains additional applications that you 
can install yourself. 

To see what's on the CD-ROM disc, insert the disc into your computer's CD-ROM drive. Double-click 
the CD-ROM disc's icon to open it (if it is not already open). Then double-click the folders in the disc's 
window to find out what's included on the CD-ROM disc. 



Using 
Software 

51 



To install an application, look for an Installer icon (similar to the one below) for the application. 
Double-click the Installer and follow the instructions on the screen. 



If the application doesn't have an Installer, you can simply drag the application from the CD-ROM disc 
to your computer's hard disk. 

If you have questions about using an application program, open the Read Me file for the application, 
which is usually found inside the application's folder. Some applications also have onscreen help that 
you can access after you have installed the application. Look for onscreen help in the Guide (O) menu 
after you start the application. 

Backing up your files 

Making backup copies of important files is good protection against possible damage to the originals. 

■ You can back up files stored on your hard disk by putting copies of them on floppy disks. (To copy a 
file onto a floppy disk, insert the floppy disk into the floppy disk drive, then drag the file's icon to 
the floppy disk's icon.) 

■ You can back up an entire floppy disk by copying it to another floppy disk of the same capacity or 
larger, or by copying it to a hard disk. 

■ You can use a commercial backup application to copy new and changed files from a hard disk to 
another hard disk, a tape drive, a series of floppy disks, or to another form of removable media. 

■ If your computer is on a network, you may be able to back up files by copying them to a shared disk 
on the network. 




Installer 



Part Two 



Communicating With Other Computers 



Chapter Four 

Connecting Your Computer 
to a Telephone Line 56 

Chapter Five 

Connecting to the Internet 
or an Online Service 78 

Chapter Six 

Connecting Your Computer 
to a Network 84 



Chapter Four 



Connecting Your Computer to a Telephone Line 



A world of information is now available online. By connecting your computer to a telephone line, 
you can access the Internet, send and receive electronic mail (e-mail) and faxes, and connect to online 
services like America Online and CompuServe. You can also use a telephone line to connect to other 
computers. For example, you can telecommute by connecting to your company's computers from 
home. 

When you connect over the telephone line to a spread-out network like the Internet or an online 
service, you are participating in a wide area network. This is different from connecting to a local area 
network where the computers are linked together by cable connections. You may have a local area 
network at your work place. 

This chapter provides a brief introduction to the equipment you need to connect to a telephone line. 
This chapter also explains how to use the modem that came with your computer to place and receive 
telephone calls and voice mail, and to send and receive faxes. 

For information on connecting to an online service or the Internet, see Chapter 5. If you want to set up 
or connect to a local area network, see Chapter 6. 



Chapter 
Four 

56 



Types of equipment 



There are three types of equipment you can use to connect to a telephone line: a modem, an ISDN 
line, and telecommunications equipment you share with others on a local area network. 

Modem 

A modem is the most common means of connecting a computer to a phone line, particularly if you are 
using your computer at home. A modem works with standard analog telephone lines. Your computer 
comes with a GeoPort adapter that gives you access to the computer's modem. For instructions on 
using your computer's modem, see 'About Your Computer's Modem," later in this chapter. 

ISDN line 

An Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) line is a special digital phone line that is about four 
times faster than the fastest modem used over a standard analog telephone line. However, an ISDN line 
typically costs more than regular phone service and may not be available in your community. 

Connecting to an ISDN line 

If you routinely need to send and receive large files, and find that a 33.6 kbps modem is not fast 
enough for your needs, you may want to consider connecting your computer to an Integrated Services 
Digital Network (ISDN) digital telephone line, which can transfer data at up to 128 kbps, nearly four 
times as fast as a 33.6 kbps modem. 

ISDN lines are available to many but not all residential and business telephone customers. Check with 
your local phone company to see if ISDN service is available at your location. 

There are fixed monthly charges and per-minute usage fees for ISDN, just as for regular phone service. 
Typically, ISDN costs a bit more than regular phone service. However, one ISDN line can support 
several devices simultaneously— such as a computer, voice phone, and fax machine— so you may be 
able to replace existing extra phone lines with one ISDN line. 

Note: Because an ISDN line requires a power source at your location, a phone attached to an ISDN 
line will not work during a power outage. For emergency use, you should consider keeping your 
regular phone line (which receives power from the phone company) as a backup. 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 



57 



Setting up an ISDN line 

If you're interested in setting up an ISDN line, first contact your local phone company to see if ISDN 
service is available at your location. Your phone company can also provide specific information about 
monthly charges and usage fees. (Your phone company may also charge an installation fee, which is 
sometimes waived or refunded if you agree to keep the ISDN line for a specified amount of time.) 

In addition, you need to purchase either an ISDN terminal adapter or an ISDN PCI expansion card. 
The ISDN terminal adapter, also called an ISDN modem, is an external device that plugs into the 
modem port on the back of the computer. The ISDN PCI expansion card is an internal device that you 
install into the computer's PCI expansion slot. Either the terminal adapter or the PCI expansion card 
can supply the ISDN port where you connect your ISDN line. 

Some ISDN equipment may be difficult to configure with the network configuration of your employer 
or Internet service provider (ISP). Work closely with your Internet service provider or computer 
network administrator to make sure you purchase compatible ISDN equipment. 

Shared telecommunications equipment on your network 

One of the advantages of a local area network is that you can share equipment, such as printers and file 
servers. If your computer is linked by a cable connection to a local area network, there may also be 
shared telecommunications equipment connected to the network that allows you (or anyone else on 
your network) to connect to the Internet or an online service. Contact your network administrator for 
more information. You can also find general information about networks in Chapter 6, "Connecting 
Your Computer to a Network." 



About your computer's modem 



Your computer comes with a 33,600 bps (33.6 kbps) modem, one of the fastest modems currently 
available. To use the modem you must attach the GeoPort Telecom Adapter, following the instructions 
in Chapter 1, "Setting Up." 

What is a modem? 

A modem is a piece of equipment that takes data from your computer, converts it into a series of tones, 
and transmits the tones over telephone lines. A modem on the other end of the line converts the tones 
back into the original data, so the receiving computer can use the data. The modem that came with 
your computer can send and receive data in this way. 

The modem enables your computer to send and receive electronic mail (e-mail) and files, connect to 
the Internet, and access online services. Your modem also lets you transmit documents on your 
computer to fax machines and receive faxes as documents that you can view on screen or print. 

In some locations, the modem and telephone can share a single phone line. Keep in mind that if your 
phone and a modem share a line, you will not be able to use both at the same time, even if they are 
attached to separate phone jacks. While you use a modem, outside callers get a busy signal and you 
cannot call out. Conversely, when you use your phone, you cannot use the modem. If your telephone 
service has a call-waiting feature, turn it off while you're using the modem. 

If you miss phone calls because you often use your modem, you may want to get a second phone line 
installed or get a phone company message service which, unlike an answering machine, will record 
messages even when your phone is off the hook or you are online. 

Also keep in mind that long-distance charges accrue when your modem dials long-distance numbers. 
In most cases, an online service or an Internet service provider will have a local access phone number 
so that long-distance charges do not apply. 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

59 



Using your modem 

Your computer comes with several communications applications that use the modem. There are two 
applications you can use to connect to the Internet or an online service: 

■ The Apple Internet Connection Kit, a set of application programs that help you get onto the Internet 
quickly and easily 

■ America Online (AOL), an online information service that provides Internet access (not available in 
all regions) 

More information about these applications and the Internet in general is in Chapter 5, "Connecting to 
the Internet or an Online Service." 

Your computer also comes with the Apple Telecom software, including the following programs: 

■ Apple Address Book, which lets you create your own address books 

■ Apple Fax, which lets you send, monitor, and manage faxes 

■ Apple Phone, an automatic dialing and voice mail system for managing messages 

■ The Express Modem control panel for adjusting your modem's settings 

All four Apple Telecom programs are already installed on your computer. This section explains how to 
start using them. You can also find detailed information about using these programs in Apple Telecom 
Guide, available in the Guide (O) menu when one or more of these programs is open. 



Apple Address Book 

Apple Address Book lets you create detailed address books to store individuals' and companies' fax 
numbers, addresses, and other information. You can import information from other programs, search 
an address book for specific entries, and send faxes directly from an address book. 

To start Apple Address Book, follow these instructions: 

1 Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Apple Telecom Status. 

2 Click the Apple Address Book icon. 



Ill mm 1Mb . 


mm 


i— ii— .r 1 -!— i 


@3 © j2j] 



.Apple Address Book icon 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

61 



Enter the information you want in the Personal Info dialog box. 



PlMbl Ihlv \jLni~ pli hiiisl inluiniEi.lun 
ri",w Fwip lift ip nwHl wiln i[(ilp- fpn 



fnl few 



.Country pop-up menu 
provides name and 
country code. 



The information you enter in this dialog box is used by both the Apple Address Book and Apple Fax 
applications. Updating this information in one application also updates it in the other. If you have 
already opened and entered personal information in Apple Fax, this information appears in the 
Personal Info dialog box when you open Apple Address Book. 

If your country does not appear in the Country pop-up menu, you can add it to the Apple Address 
Book Country preferences, then update the Apple Address Book Personal Info preferences. For 
instructions, open the Guide (SI) menu and choose Apple Telecom Guide. 



Click OK. 



In the dialog box, enter a name and choose a location for the address book, then click Save. 



i i*uuli tlijlv luldi 
l"~|ilppip 1 p I f ■* ■ m 

i" ilni i hIitid 



uilHW 



■_ Mdi l Ui .K 



| Mm Q 



A new, empty address book window is opened for you. You can create as many address books as you 
want to organize your information. Each address book that you create is an independent file with no 
relationship to other address books. 

For more information on using Apple Address Book, open the Guide (G8) menu and choose Apple 
Telecom Guide. 



Apple Fax 



Apple Fax lets you convert any Macintosh document to fax format and send it to a fax machine or to 
another computer capable of receiving faxes. You can send a fax to several individuals at once, 
automatically resend it if the transmission fails, convert fax documents to text (using OCR, or "optical 
character recognition," technology), and view, print, and edit faxes. 

Apple Fax supports the following speeds: V.17, V.29, and V.27 high-speed fax, sending and receiving at 
14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, 4800, and 2400 bits per second (bps). 

To start Apple Fax, follow these instructions: 

1 Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Apple Telecom Status. 

2 Click the Apple Fax icon. 



IfllinrillriM 








I 




Bfl ffii rail ti 





Apple Fax icon 



3 Read the introductory text, then click Next. 



[filing Harlrt aMIIiUHih Vrnt 



fi 



i'Jkl nt HirbWiBWvh-^rM 



Chapter 
Four 

64 



4 Choose your modem type from the modem pop-up menu, then click Next. 



■ ir-i 113 "I'lilri *\'ilr I ni 



t ■ Li -Wl K-hUiiUI Ijp U 
l.pr I... lb ta.Vr.fr* -^.W^-H 

I Ih'h lb W«i k^'irriv fa n'di W 



| PrFuuy~| | hrah 



j Imi.- 



. Modem pop-up menu 



5 If you want to adjust any of your fax settings, follow the instructions in the "Changing your settings" 
panel that appears. 



fl 



. i ■■ .i-ni ■ 



-HP 'ILH^i rw IK Will 



6 Click Done to confirm your settings and close the "Getting Started with Apple Fax" window. 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

65 



After you start and specify your Apple Fax settings for the first time, the Apple Fax main window 
appears in Outgoing view. 

Outgoing view displays your sent faxes. Incoming view displays your received faxes. To choose the view 
you want, click the Outgoing or Incoming button. 







H 




21 H El OB 



1lf1|ll*gf4>i||| l^-i'-i 

^■"^ Ell_ 



L 



d_J [ Mwm\m ) f Ppr 



_You access other program 
features with these buttons. 



Preparing to receive faxes 

To set Apple Fax to receive faxes automatically, follow these instructions: 

1 Open the Apple Fax main window. 

2 Drag the Fax Answering button to "on." 




Chapter 
Four 

66 



3 Choose Control Panels from the Apple (#) menu and open the Express Modem control panel. 

4 Choose General Settings from the pop-up menu. 



--■ 



.Pop-up menu 



AiU-Hftrtr-nnp " i 

h m — « — i*f Qii . -.. 

□ 'In -r*mM I Blind tirkteiFWI 



5 Click to put an X next to 'Auto-answer incoming calls." 

If the Express Modem control panel is not set to auto-answer, you will not receive incoming faxes, even 
with Fax Answering on. Apple Fax now receives incoming faxes automatically. The Apple Fax window 
does not have to be in front, or even open, in order to receive a fax. 

For more information on using Apple Fax, open the Guide (GS) menu and choose Apple Telecom 
Guide. 

Apple Phone 

Apple Phone lets you place and receive telephone calls using your computer. You can also set up the 
computer to act as an answering machine. 

To start Apple Phone, follow these steps: 

1 Open the Apple (fk) menu and choose Apple Telecom Status. 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

67 



2 Click the Apple Phone icon. 









r a toll 





.Apple Phone icon 



3 Read the introductory text, then click Next. 



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1+4441 til. #4 , P 

if Ul *W 'h :+ gAiT UTaVriH 

In % ■ k ■ b 14 i*i rrl -nJ i . i*j f-h i 



I "Ni-LTl 1 



4 In the Telephone Tool pop-up menu, choose the telephone tool that corresponds to your modem. 



Lvl MlU 1-lEPlPlJ Willi 



I±m: I rhrmmrii h lr-i"|iniaiF | -i 



iBrj+ii ■ ix m r: x : n™;. m 
ltuu hid if uitvii im-n-jpof-^ 

II hjiIi uv^rkhn !■■-.-:»< 

HiV^ I lahpli m "iiJ 

V fii m hiv pcpip O'hhJI p%4ifi 
4riKJf*rinirNri nnil m-4 1 ■ -:ht 

K LhH Klhll -:r«H Hi^-H "zll'il 



I ■■■ l\ ■ I rli ■! 



.Telephone Tool 
pop-up menu 



Chapter 
Four 

68 



5 Click Next. 



6 In the 'Answering the phone" panel, click Edit; then enter the keyboard shortcut you will use to answer 
calls with your computer (letting you hear and speak through the computer's speaker and 
microphone). 



h-hn.jvifri"nii,ir h-ju-^ 



3 



p-rni q*lr-M^ r^JHbrflMi ■! | ■ ■■■ 
I Hi nfJ HP ■"Til T^r HJH 1 

IhrtHti ■Yl a p«i 'ITtutn lii-Hjp 

fir hvi-hum ihw mh 



f (YfeiMJk J [ «*Fl ] 



[ " ■■ ~] 



The default keyboard shortcut is Command (^)-Space bar, but you can use any key combination you 
like. If you select the checkbox, you can then use the keyboard shortcut to answer calls even when 
Apple Phone is not open and you are working in another program. 

Note: Choose a key combination that is not used frequently within other programs. For example, do 
not use 3€-P, 3€-Q, or 3€-A. 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

69 



7 If you want to adjust any of your Apple Phone settings, follow the instructions in the "Changing your 
settings" panel that appears. 



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Chapter 
Four 

70 



8 Click Done to confirm your settings and close the "Getting Started with Apple Phone" window. 



After you start and specify your Apple Phone settings for the first time, the Apple Phone main window 
appears in Phone view. 

Phone view lets you place and answer phone calls. Voice Mail lets you manage message box greetings 
and voice messages. To choose the view you want, click the Phone button or Voice Mail button in the 
main Apple Phone window. 



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.You access other program 
features with these buttons. 



Note: If you did not create an address book and add entries to it, "No Address Book" appears in the 
"Phone numbers from" pop-up menu. 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

71 



Turning voice mail on 

To turn voice mail on, follow these steps: 

In the Apple Phone main window, click the Voice Mail button to display Voice Mail view. 
Drag the Voice Mail button to On. 

-Voice Mail 

On | | | Off 

Note: Make sure that the Express Modem control panel is set to auto-answer. If it is not, you will not 
receive incoming calls, even with Voice Mail on. See "Adjusting the Modem," later in this chapter. 

Set up the Main message box and prepare a greeting for incoming calls. 

For more information on using Apple Phone, open the Guide (G8) menu and choose Apple 
Telecom Guide. 



Adjusting the modem 

You use the Express Modem control panel to turn the modem on and off, and specify certain settings. 

Note: Normally you use a modem in conjunction with communications software, which automatically 
controls your modem's settings. However, any settings you specify in the Express Modem control panel 
take precedence over settings made by your communications software. You may want to check the 
settings in the control panel if your communications software does not behave as intended. 

Turning the modem on and off 

If the Express Modem software is off, it is turned on automatically when an application needs it for an 
outgoing communication. But whenever it is on, the modem uses about 600K of system memory, so 
you may want to turn it off when you do not need it. Follow the instructions below. 

important If you turn the modem off, no communications program that uses the Express Modem 
software will be able to receive incoming calls. 

1 Choose Control Panels from the Apple (fk) menu. 

2 Open the Express Modem control panel. 

3 Click the On or Off button to select it. 



EMH11 M OIC*l 




4 If an alert message appears, click OK to acknowledge the message and complete what you are doing. 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

73 



Specifying the settings 

You specify Express Modem settings in the General Settings and Advanced Options panels, shown 
below. Press the pop-up menu to choose either panel. The settings are described next. 



Pop-up menu 



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Pop-up menu 



-tm^ -.t-H :+ J| -— l- 



Country Telecom Settings 

The Country Telecom Settings display the current country and the number of rings possible for 
auto-answer. You cannot edit these fields. 

Auto-answer incoming calls 

When "Auto-answer incoming calls" is selected, and at least one communications program is set to 
auto-answer, the modem software automatically answers incoming calls after the number of rings 
specified in the ring number field. Calls are answered according to priorities described in "Call 
Management," later in this section. 

The checkbox and ring number field override the auto-answer setting of any communications program 
that uses the modem software. If you want to receive calls in any of your communications programs, 
make sure that this checkbox is selected and the number of rings specified. 

If you want to prevent your modem from answering incoming calls, click to remove the X from the 
checkbox. If you do this, the modem will not answer calls even if a communications program is set to 
auto-answer. 



Note: If your modem shares a line with your telephone, and you want to make sure that the modem 
does not answer your incoming calls before you do, you can either deselect the "Auto-answer incoming 
calls" checkbox or set the number of rings to a high value. 

Call Saver mode 

Call Saver mode lets you save money on connection charges when you retrieve voice messages from a 
remote location. If there are new messages and Call Saver mode is selected, the modem answers your 
call at the number of rings set in the Call Saver ring number field. If there aren't any new messages, the 
modem does not answer after the Call Saver ring number setting. You still have time to hang up before 
the modem answers your call. 

To operate correctly, Call Saver mode requires that the value in the Call Saver ring number field be at 
least two rings less than the value in the auto-answer ring number field. For example, you can set auto- 
answer to five rings and Call Saver to two rings. If your voice mail does not respond by the third ring, 
then you know that there are no new messages. 

Ring Sound 

From the Ring Sound pop-up menu, you can choose the sound that your computer plays when you 
receive an incoming call. You can also install and use your own sounds. 

For more information on installing additional sounds, open the Guide (GS) menu and choose Mac OS 
Guide when the Finder is active. 

Progress sounds 

You can monitor the sounds of a fax in progress by choosing one of the settings in the Progress sounds 
pop-up menu: 

■ Use application settings: Lets you control the speaker volume from your communications software 
(and from the Sound control panel) 

■ Tu r n off: Turns the speaker off for applications that use the modem 

■ Keep on u nti I ca r ri er : Leaves the speaker on until a connection is established 



Connecting 

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75 



Call management 

When a call comes in, your modem tries to identify the type of call it is by detecting calling tones. The 
modem then checks to see which programs are set to auto-answer and connects the incoming call to 
the appropriate program. This is known as incoming call management. 

While the modem is on, it answers calls automatically according to the following rules: 

■ The modem only answers if 'Auto-answer incoming calls" is selected in the control panel. 

■ The modem only answers if at least one program is set to auto-answer. 

■ If several different programs are set to auto-answer, the modem uses calling tone detection to 
identify the type of call, then sends it to the corresponding program. 

Since not all calling devices use calling tones, some calls cannot be identified. To enable the modem to 
answer unidentified calls— when calling tone detection is unsuccessful— use the "Transfer incoming 
calls" buttons to choose the type of application program— Fax, Voice, or Data— you want to answer 
unidentified calls. If you expect to receive both voice and data calls, ask your callers to send a data 
calling tone when calling your machine. 

Make sure the fax, voice, or data program you designate to handle unidentified calls is set to auto- 
answer. 

Ignore dial tone when dialing 

When the "Ignore dial tone when dialing" checkbox is selected, the modem dials even though a dial 
tone cannot be detected. (This feature is sometimes called "blind dialing.") It is a useful feature for 
locations with a PBX system, such as hotels, where the modem may have difficulty recognizing the 
PBXdial tone. 



Checking the modem's status 



To check the modem's status, choose Modem Status from the pop-up menu. The modem's Status 
panel shows the modem's current state, type of connection, and call progress as well as information 
about outgoing data calls, including connection speed, error control, and data compression. 



2 




Dm"4#«*w few 2tHC 



.Pop-up menu 

.Graphical displayof call progressand modem status 
.Messages concerningtype of call and modem status 

. Information aboutthecall 



Connecting 

Your Computer to 

a Telephone Line 

77 



Chapter Five 



Connecting to the Internet or an Online Service 



This chapter discusses how you use your Macintosh to connect to the fastest growing organization on 
Earth: the online community. This community gathers in private places provided by subscriber-only 
services and in the public space called the Internet. With a modem and the right software, you have 
a couple of options for reaching these meeting places. Once you arrive you can exchange e-mail 
messages, browse the World Wide Web, gather information on topics of interest to you, participate in 
discussion groups, download software, and use many other services. This chapter provides some 
explanations and instructions to help you connect. 

About the Internet and its language 

The Internet, or "Net" as it's sometimes called, is a loosely knit federation of computer networks that 
"speak" the same language. The language in this case is a communications standard known as the 
Internet Protocol, or IP. 

No one individual or company owns the Internet, and the individual computers and the networks of 
computers knitted into it are located all over the world. Originally created for military purposes, the 
Internet developed dramatically as universities began using it to share information and data. It has now 
become an expansive resource for millions of users around the world, catering to virtually every 
imaginable interest. 



Chapter 
Five 

78 



You may come upon the term TCP/IP, or Transmission Control Protocol. TCP/IP is the series of 
protocols used for sending data across the Internet. Sending a message across the Internet involves a 
three-step process. First, a network computer breaks up the data that make up the message into 
several smaller data packages, each of which conforms to a strict set of guidelines. These guidelines are 
called TCP. Once the computer has properly prepared the packages, it sends them out for delivery. The 
packets' addresses, directions on how to deliver them, and other routing specifications are dictated by 
the other set of guidelines mentioned earlier, Internet Protocol (IP). Because of the Internet's 
complexity, the packages may not travel together, even though they are bound for the same address, 
and may even arrive at different times. Using TCP, the computer at the receiving end unscrambles the 
packets and sorts the data to recreate the original message. 



Using your modem to connect to an Internet service provider 
or an online service 

Once you have physically connected your modem to a phone line, you have several choices to make 
before you can get to the Internet. First, you must connect to and open an account with an electronic 
service provider. Providers fall generally into two categories: Internet service providers (ISP) and online 
services. Each has its distinct qualities; both charge a fee for your account. Your Macintosh comes with 
the Apple Internet Connection Kit (AICK), which helps you connect with an ISP. Your Macintosh may 
also come with America Online (AOL), an online service available in some regions. 



Connecting 
to the Internet 
or an Online 
Service 

79 



Connecting with the Apple Internet Connection Kit 

The facilities of an Internet service provider let you use your computer to get onto the Internet. 
Although some ISPs offer other services, Internet access is their main business. Once you connect with 
an ISP, you have unlimited access to the Internet because your connection with the ISP actually turns 
your computer into a part of the network itself. 

All the software you need to connect with an ISP is included with your computer in the Apple Internet 
Connection Kit (AICK). This software package helps you select and set up an account with one of 
several ISPs and helps you set up your Internet connection software. AICK also contains several other 
software utilities designed for the Internet. For more information and instructions, see the Apple 
Internet Connection Kit: Getting Started manual, which you'll find in the Apple Extras folder on the 
computer's hard disk (as an electronic document), or in the box with your computer. 

Connecting with America Online (not available in all regions) 

Unlike ISPs, online services provide additional services for their members alone. An online service may 
offer e-mail, updated news, sports scores, stock price updates, special chat groups, and other services 
as well as a connection to the Internet. Some, like AOL, also offer their own software for use on the 
Internet. Online services work differently from ISPs in that they filter and funnel some of the data 
before you receive it and do not make your computer an actual part of the Internet. This allows such 
services to tailor the Internet access they provide their members. For example, Internet sites deemed 
not suitable for children can be placed off limits. You might consider this in deciding whether to select 
an online service or an ISP. 

If AOL is available in your region, you may want to use it if you have never used an online service or the 
Internet before. For more information about AOL, see its folder on your hard disk or on the CD that 
came with your computer. After you start AOL, refer to AOL's onscreen help for assistance on 
establishing an account with AOL. 

Note: In regions where AOL service is not available, the AOL software is not provided on your 
computer's hard disk or CD. 



What the connection software does 



Once you have selected a service that will get you to the Internet, you must establish a phone link with 
the service and configure your modem so that it can "speak" with the service's computers. Like the 
TCP/IP language spoken among computers on the Internet, your modem communicates with the 
service's computers in an industry-standard language, called Point-to-Point Protocol, or PPP. The data 
sent by your computer in PPP is converted by the service's computers into TCP/IP and then is sent out 
over the Internet. When data arrives from the Internet, the translation process occurs in reverse. 

When you use AICK, the Internet Dialer program establishes and configures the PPP connection 
between your modem and the chosen ISP. A similar piece of software sets up the connection when you 
use AOL. See the instructions that come with AICK and AOL for more information. 



What you can do on the Internet 

The complexity of the Internet makes it possible to communicate across it in a variety of ways, 
including exchanging e-mail, teleconferencing, and retrieving files. Both AICK and AOL provide you 
with software required for some of these forms of communication. (For more information, refer to the 
manuals and online help for AICK and AOL.) 



Connecting 
to the Internet 
or an Online 
Service 

81 



Browse the World Wide Web 

The World Wide Web (also known as the V\feb) is the fastest growing part of the Internet. You 
view information on the Web by using software called a V\feb browser. You can view color images, 
animation, and video, and even hear sound. The "documents" that you view on the Web are known 
as Web pages, a collection of which is called a Web site. Web pages and sites contain links to other pages 
and sites. When you click a word or image that has been designated as a link, your browser 
automatically displays the contents of the linked page. Below is a portion of the "home page" of the 
Apple Computer Web site. 







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Welcome to Apple 















E-mail 

You use electronic mail, or e-mail, to exchange information in much the same way that you use paper 
mail, except that e-mail is faster and more convenient. It is as easy to send a message to a single 
recipient as it is to send the same message to many recipients. You can also attach entire electronic 
files to e-mail. 



Newsgroups 



You can participate in "newsgroups'-worldwide public discussion groups for debating issues and for 
exchanging information. You can subscribe to a newsgroup for almost any topic imaginable, and you 
can read, respond to, and create your own messages, usually referred to as articles. Most newsgroups 
are unmoderated, which means that you can post your articles directly to the newsgroup. Other 
newsgroups are moderated, which means someone screens the articles and posts only those deemed 
appropriate for the newsgroup. 

FTP 

You can use File Transfer Protocol (FTP) software to transfer files to or from other computers on the 
Internet. Many specialized computers known as servers provide Internet users with files through FTP. 
FTP software comes in handy when you want to download (copy to your computer) software or 
software updates over the Internet. 

Telnet 

With Telnet software you can log onto other computers so that you can use their programs and data as 
if those items were on your own hard disk. Many libraries, for instance, have electronic (online) card 
catalogs that you can access by using Telnet software. There are a variety of other specialized databases 
that you can access through Telnet. 



Connecting 
to the Internet 
or an Online 
Service 

83 



Chapter Six 



Connecting Your Computer to a Network 



\our Macintosh has a built-in LocalTalk networking port. LocalTalk is the name for a system of cables 
and connectors that connect your computer to printers, other computers, and other devices on a 
LocalTalk network. 

If you purchased and installed an Ethernet card in your computer, you also have an Ethernet port for 
connecting to an Ethernet network. 

This chapter describes how to connect and configure your computer on a LocalTalk or Ethernet 
network. If you do not plan to connect your computer to a LocalTalk or Ethernet network, you can skip 
this chapter. 

A LocalTalk or Ethernet port lets you connect your computer to a local a rea network. A local area 
network consists of two or more computers, printers, file servers, and other devices connected by 
network cables. This is different from a wide area network, such as the Internet, where computers use 
modems to communicate with one another over the telephone lines. 

A local area network allows you and the other people connected to it to share information and 
resources such as printers and modems. Your network may also provide services such as access to 
information databases and electronic mail. 



Chapter 
Six 

84 



Where to find more information 



After you study the information in this manual, you'll want to consult other sources that give more 
details about your specific situation: 

If your computer is already on a network 

Refer to Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (21) menu at the top-right corner of your screen. 
Mac OS Guide contains information about printing on a networked printer, accessing information on 
file servers, and sharing files on your computer with other users. 

Ask your network administrator for information about network software that may be available, such as 
Internet access and electronic mail. 

If you want to connect to an Ethernet network 

You can have an Apple Ethernet CS II card installed by an Apple-authorized service provider or you can 
install it yourself. Before you purchase a card, be sure to find out what type of connector your Ethernet 
network requires— twisted pair (lOBase-T), AAUI, or thin coaxial. 

You can also have an expansion card installed that lets you connect to a Token Ring or ISDN network. 
If you want to set up a new network 

If your location does not currently have a network and you are interested in setting one up, you may 
want to use a book on Macintosh networking to help you select and plan a network that is appropriate 
for your organization. Many books about setting up a network are available at computer bookstores. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

85 



Connecting to a LocalTalk network 

If your network uses standard LocalTalk cables, the Apple LocalTalk Locking Connector Kit DIN-8, 
available from your Apple-authorized dealer, contains the components you need to connect your 
Macintosh to an existing LocalTalk network. If your network uses standard telephone cables for your 
network wiring, obtain an Apple LocalTalk RJ-11 Connector instead. 

Apple LocalTalk Apple LocalTalk RJ-11 Connector 

Locking Connector Kit DIN-8 



Note: At your location, there may be a network administrator who is responsible for network 
maintenance and upkeep. If so, ask your network administrator to help connect your computer 
to the network. 





Standard telephone cable 



To connect your Macintosh to a LocalTalk network, do the following: 

1 Shut down your Macintosh. 

2 Remove the port cover plate from the back of the computer by squeezing it between your fingers and 
swinging it away from the computer. 

Set the cover plate aside. (The cover plate is made up of two sections that can be easily separated and 
reassembled if needed.) 



Attach the LocalTalk adapter to the printer port (marked with the icon) located behind the cover 
plate you removed, and press the cable into the cable guides. Then attach a network cable between the 
LocalTalk adapter connected to your computer and the last LocalTalk adapter on your existing network. 

Use the LocalTalk cable that comes with the Apple LocalTalk Locking Connector Kit DIN-8. Or, if you 
are using the Apple LocalTalk RJ-11 Connector, use a standard telephone cable with RJ-11 connectors. 




Printer port 
Cable guide 



Your LocalTalk adapter 

Last LocalTalk adapter 
on the existing network 



LocalTalk cable 

(or a telephonecableifyou'reusingan Apple LocalTalk RJ-11 connector) 



Chapter 
Six 

88 



4 Put the port cover plate back on. 




Next, see "Setting Up Your Network Connection" later in this chapter for information on configuring 
your LocalTalk connection. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

89 



Connecting to an Ethernet network 

If you have installed an Apple Ethernet card in your Macintosh, follow the instructions in this section to 
connect to an Ethernet network. 

At your location, there may be a network administrator who is responsible for network maintenance 
and upkeep. If so, ask your network administrator to help connect your computer to the network. 

▲ Warning To avoid damaging your equipment, do not connect cables to the back of your computer 
when the computer is on. ▲ 

Identifying the Ethernet port on your computer 

There are three types of Apple Ethernet cards: 

■ Apple Ethernet CS II Twisted Pair 

■ Apple Ethernet CS II Thin Coax 

■ Apple Ethernet CS II AAUI 

If you have an Ethernet card from a manufacturer other than Apple, refer to the manual that came with 
the card for instructions on making connections to the card. 



Chapter 
Six 

90 



Each type of card provides a different type of Ethernet port. You should have the type of card that 
provides the correct port for the Ethernet network you're connecting to. Depending on the type of 
card you have installed, you'll find one of these ports (in some cases, with a status light) on the back of 
your computer: 



L ®j Thin coaxial Ethernet port (10Base-2) 

o Status light (lights up when there'sa good network connection) 



-Twisted-pair Ethernet port (lOBase-T) 



o — Status light (lights up when there'sa good network connection) 



-AAUl Ethernet port 



Ethernet ports are usually marked with an Ethernet (<•••>) icon. 

Note: If the port isn't right for the network you're connecting to, you need to use an adapter cable (if 
possible) or switch to a different type of card that provides the correct port. 

Follow the appropriate instructions in this section for connecting to your type of Ethernet network. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

91 



Connecting to a twisted-pair Ethernet network 

To follow these instructions, you need a twisted-pair cable with an RJ-45 connector. The RJ-45 
connector plugs into a wall plate that is connected to the lOBase-T network. 

1 Shut down your computer. 

2 Plug one end of a twisted-pair cable into the RJ-45 (lOBase-T) Ethernet port on your computer. 

Just as when you plug in a standard telephone cable, you hear a click when you plug in the 
twisted-pair cable. 

3 Plug the other end of the twisted-pair cable into an RJ-45 outlet that is connected to a twisted-pair 
Ethernet network. 



Ethernet port (twisted-pair) 




Chapter 
Six 

92 



4 Start up the computer. 

Next, see "Setting Up Your Network Connection" later in this chapter for information on configuring 
your network connection. 

Connecting to a thin coaxial Ethernet network 

important Connecting your computer to this kind of network will temporarily disrupt services to 
other users. To minimize the disruption, alert your network administrator before continuing these 
instructions. 

To follow these instructions, you need a thin coaxial cable and the T-connector that came with your 
card. If you are adding your computer to the end of a network, you'll also need a thin coaxial Ethernet 
terminator. 

1 Shut down your computer. 

2 Attach one end of your thin coaxial cable to the T-connector that came with your card. 
Don't attach the T-connector to your computer yet. 

3 On the computer closest to your computer, detach the network cable (or terminator) from its 
T-connector. 

This disrupts network service for other users. 

Note: You can add a computer anywhere on the network. 

4 Attach the free end of your thin coaxial cable to the T-connector on the other computer. 

5 If you are adding your computer somewhere in the middle of the network, attach the unattached 
network cable to your T-connector. Otherwise, attach a terminator to your T-connector. 

This restores network services for other users. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

93 



6 Attach your T-connector to the port on your card. 

It may help to use two hands. With one hand, push the T-connector into the port. While still holding 
the T-connector, use the fingers on your other hand to twist and lock the connector into place. 

Pull the T-connector to test whether it is locked securely onto the port. 




7 Start up your computer. 

Next, see "Setting Up Your Network Connection" later in this chapter for information on configuring 
your network connection. 



Chapter 
Six 



Connecting to other types of Ethernet network 

The Apple Ethernet AUI Adapter is a universal adapter that lets you connect your computer to less- 
common types of industry-standard Ethernet media such as thick coaxial or fiber-optic cable. The 
adapter connects both to the port on an Apple AAUI Ethernet card and to an electrical socket. 

You also need an Ethernet transceiver for the type of cable your network uses. The transceiver must 
have a standard AUI port on it. 

To connect your computer to your Ethernet transceiver and the Apple Ethernet AUI Adapter, follow 
these instructions: 

1 Shut down your computer. 

2 Connect the Ethernet transceiver to the network following the instructions that came with the 
transceiver. 

3 Plug the transceiver cable from the Ethernet transceiver into the AUI port on the Apple Ethernet AUI 
Adapter. 

4 Plug the adapter's power cord into an electrical power outlet. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

95 



5 Plug the connector on the Apple Ethernet AUI Adapter into the AAUI Ethernet port on your computer. 




6 Start up your computer. 

See the next section, "Setting Up Your Network Connection" for information on configuring your 
network connection. 



Chapter 
Six 

96 



Setting up your network connection 



After you physically connect your computer to a LocalTalk or Ethernet network, you need to open 
the AppleTalk control panel, the TCP/IP control panel, or both, and specify the type of connection 
you want. 

You use the AppleTalk control panel to set up your connection to an AppleTalk network. AppleTalk is 
networking software that provides a protocol (a standard set of rules) by which networks can function; 
it's built into all Macintosh computers. AppleTalk controls communications over a network so that 
messages are transmitted accurately and don't interfere with one another. 

To communicate over a LocalTalk or Ethernet network, AppleTalk must be turned on. 

You use the TCP/IP control panel to set up your connection to the Internet and to a TCP/IP network. 
TCP/IP stands for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, a standard system for connections 
between computers of different types. 

You may need additional information about the network to which your computer is connected, or 
about the service through which your computer is connected to the Internet. To get this information, 
you may need to contact your network administrator or your Internet service provider. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

97 



Setting up your AppleTalk network connection 



To set up your AppleTalk network connection, you must specify the port you use to connect your 
computer to the network. 

Larger networks use zones to create logical groupings of computers, printers, servers, and other 
network devices. For example, a network might have a zone for each floor in a multistory office 
building. If your network has more than one zone, you can choose the zone in which your computer is 
located. The zone you choose should be the zone that is automatically selected in the Chooser (for 
example, when you select a network printer) and the zone in which other network users can find your 
computer if you turn on file sharing. 

To set up your AppleTalk network connection, follow these instructions: 
Choose Control Panels from the Apple (#) menu. 
Double-click the AppleTalk icon to open it. 
The AppleTalk control panel opens. 







— .r- rw 




1 



"Connect via" pop-up menu 



3 Use the "Connect via" pop-up menu (if it's available) to choose the port through which your computer 
is connected to the network. 

If you want to connect to a LocalTalk network, choose the port to which you attached your LocalTalk 
adapter (in most cases, the printer port). If you want to connect to an Ethernet network, choose 
Ethernet. 

If you have installed an expansion card that supplies an additional port, the port will appear 
automatically in the "Connect via" pop-up menu. 

Note: If you don't see a pop-up menu in the AppleTalk control panel, this setting has been locked. 
Contact your network administrator for assistance. (If you don't have a network administrator, you 
can use the Administration user mode to unlock this setting. For more information about user modes, 
click the G8 button in the AppleTalk control panel.) 

4 Use the "Current zone" pop-up menu (if it's available) to choose the zone you want. 

If you don't see a pop-up menu here, this setting has been locked or no zones have been set up. 
(If your network has a network administrator, that person sets up zones. Some networks don't 
need zones.) 

5 Click the close box to close the AppleTalk control panel. 

If you have made changes in the control panel, an alert box asks if you want to save them. If you have 
changed the port you are connecting through, an alert box also tells you that the change will interrupt 
AppleTalk services temporarily. This means that your network services such as printing and electronic 
mail may be temporarily unavailable, and you may have to choose a printer and reconnect to your 
e-mail service again after saving changes. 

6 To save your changes, click the Save button. 

Your changes take effect immediately; you do not have to restart your computer. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

99 



Getting more information about the AppleTalk control panel 

Mac OS Guide contains information about additional capabilities available in the AppleTalk control 
panel, such as 

■ using configurations to save different AppleTalk settings and switch among them as desired— for 
example, if you use your computer with more than one network 

■ using the User Mode command to change the availability of settings in the AppleTalk control panel 

■ turning AppleTalk off when you are not using an AppleTalk network, to save RAM in your computer 

For more information about these capabilities, click the G8 button in the AppleTalk control panel. 
Configuring your TCP/IP network connection 

This section pertains to computers that are on a local area network that uses the AppleTalk network 
protocol, such as a LocalTalk or Ethernet network. The instructions in this section explain how to use 
the TCP/IP control panel to set up your computer for connecting to the Internet (or other network that 
uses TCP/IP standards). 

Note: If you wish to connect to the Internet but your computer is not on a local area network, you 
need the Apple Internet Connection Kit or an online service such as America Online. See Chapter 5 for 
more information. 

What is TCP/IP? 

TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) is a standard set of rules (or protocol) for 
making connections among different types of computers. TCP/IP protocol can be used with many 
different types of network hardware and connectors, including LocalTalk, Ethernet, and Internet 
connections. If you don't know whether your network uses TCP/IP, contact your network administrator. 

To set up your TCP/IP network connection, you must specify the port you use to connect your 
computer to the network. TCP/IP networks also require information about your computer's network 
address. You must enter that information in the control panel, or specify a server on which the 
information can be found. 



Before you begin 



To use a TCP/IP network, your computer must have an IP (Internet Protocol) address, and it often must 
have a subnet mask number. Your network address and subnet mask number identify your computer's 
location on the network. This information can be entered manually or obtained automatically from a 
server. Before you set up your TCP/IP network connection, obtain your IP address and subnet mask 
number from your Internet service provider or network administrator. If these can be obtained 
automatically from a server, find out whether the server is a "BootP," "RARP," "DHCP," or "MacIP" server. 

BootP stands for Boot Protocol. A BootP server can automatically provide all the TCP/IP setup 
information you need. 

RARP stands for Reverse Address Resolution Protocol. A RARP server can provide the IP address for 
your computer, but you must provide the rest of the information manually. 

DHCP stands for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A DHCP server can automatically provide all 
the TCP/IP setup information you need. 

Mad P stands for Macintosh Internet Protocol. MacIP is both a type of server and a protocol for sending 
Internet-type packets of information over an AppleTalk network. A MacIP server can provide all the 
TCP/IP setup information you need, but you need to specify the zone where the MacIP server is located. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

101 



Setting up 

To set up your TCP/IP network connection, follow these instructions: 

Choose Control Panels from the Apple (#) menu. 

The Control Panels window opens. 

Double-click the TCP/IP icon to open it. 

The TCP/IP control panel for Apple computers opens. 



L 



Depending on your choices in the pop-up menus, your control panel may look different from this. 



Chapter 
Six 

102 



3 Use the "Connect via" pop-up menu to choose the port through which your computer is connected to 
the network. 



If you want to connect through a LocalTalk network, choose the port to which you attached your 
LocalTalk adapter (in most cases, the printer port). If you want to connect through an Ethernet 
network, choose Ethernet. 

Note: If you don't see the "Connect via" pop-up menu here or other settings described in this section, 
they may have been locked. Contact your network administrator for assistance. (If you don't have a 
network administrator, you can use the Administration user mode to unlock this setting. For more 
information about user modes, click the ® button in the TCP/IP control panel.) 

4 Use the Configure pop-up menu to choose a configuration method. 

If you are on an Ethernet network, the pop-up menu looks like this: 



Configure : 



• Manually 


K 


Using BootP Server 
Using DHCP Server 
Using RARP Server 





If you are on a LocalTalk network, the pop-up menu looks like this: 

What you do next depends on whether you are configuring your network manually or automatically. 

5 If you are configuring your network connection manually, type the information provided by your 
network administrator or Internet service provider into the appropriate boxes and then go on to 
step 7. 

You must specify an IP address. You may also need to enter a subnet mask number, router address, and 
other information. 



Connecting 
Your Computer 
to a Network 

103 



6 If you are configuring your network connection automatically, the information appears partially or 
entirely in the control panel. Do one of the following: 

■ If you are using a BootP server or DHCP server, go on to step 7. The server usually provides all the 
configuration information needed by TCP/IP. If the server doesn't provide the information, consult 
the person who maintains the server. 

■ If you are using a RARP server, you may need to type additional information provided by your 
network administrator or Internet service provider into the appropriate boxes. If so, enter the 
information now. 

■ If you are using a MacIP server, click Select Zone. In the dialog box that appears, choose the zone 
that contains the MacIP server you want to use and then click OK. 

7 Click the close box to close the TCP/IP control panel. 

If you have made configuration changes, an alert box asks if you want to save changes. If you have 
changed the port, an alert box also tells you that the change will interrupt any connections to TCP/IP 
services. For example, you may have to quit and reopen a Web browser or e-mail service after saving 
changes to the TCP/IP control panel. 

8 To save your changes, click the Save button. 

Your changes take effect immediately; you do not have to restart your computer. 
Getting more information about the TCP/IP control panel 

Mac OS Guide contains information about additional capabilities available in the TCP/IP control panel, 
such as the following: 

■ using configurations to save different AppleTalk settings and switch among them as desired— for 
example, if you use your computer with more than one network 

■ using the User Mode command to change the availability of settings in the AppleTalk control panel 

■ turning AppleTalk off when you are not using an AppleTalk network, to save RAM in your computer 

For more information about these capabilities, click the ® button in the TCP/IP control panel. 



Chapter 
Six 

104 



Multimedia 



Chapter Seven 

Sound 108 



Chapter Eight 

Video 126 



Chapter Seven 



Sound 



There are several ways that you can enjoy your computer's special sound system: you can play music 
on audio CDs in the CD-ROM drive, listen to sounds from multimedia files, tune into FM radio stations 
with the built-in FM tuner, or connect any sound source to the computer's sound input port and play 
the sounds through the computer's sound system. 

This chapter explains how to 

■ play an audio or multimedia CD in the CD-ROM drive 

■ attach an FM antenna and tune in FM radio 

■ connect audio equipment, such as a tape player or headphones, and set up your equipment to 
record sound 

■ use the computer's built-in microphone 

■ adjust settings for the sound system 

Sound settings related to working with video equipment and watching TV on your computer are 
covered in Chapter 8, "Video." 



Chapter 
Seven 

108 



Playing an audio or multimedia CD 

You can play sounds from a standard audio CD or a multimedia CD-ROM disc through the computer's 
sound system. Follow these instructions: 

1 Open the CD-ROM drive door by pressing the Stop/Eject button. 

The door opens automatically when you press the button. Never pry or pull the door open. If the 
door doesn't open when you press the button, see "Problems With CD-ROM Discs and Drives" in 
Chapter 12. 




CD-ROM Stop/Eject button 



Sound 
109 



2 



Press the center of the disc onto the CD-ROM drive's spindle, label side out. 



Center the disk in the drive, handling the disc by its edges, then press on the center of the disc 
(near the hole) to be sure that the disc is firmly in place. 




Chapter 
Seven 

110 



3 Close the CD-ROM drive door. 

Make sure the door is completely closed on both the left and right side. 



What you do next depends on the type of CD you're playing: 

■ If the disc is an audio CD, open the Apple (fk) menu and choose AppleCD Audio Player. For help 
while using the AppleCD Audio Player, open the Guide (G8) menu and choose AppleCD Audio 
Player Guide, or turn on balloons. 

You can also use the buttons on the computer next to the CD-ROM drive to play CDs and change 
tracks. 

■ If the disc is a multimedia CD, refer to the information that came with the CD, or information on 
the CD itself, for help while using it. 




next track button 
Play/Pause button 
previoustrack button 



You may need to adjust the sound volume or change the settings in the Monitors & Sound control 
panel. For instructions, see 'Adjusting the Sound Settings," later in this chapter. 



Turning off "autoplay" 

Your computer may be set to play an audio CD automatically as soon as you put it in the CD-ROM 
drive. If you don't want a CD to play automatically, follow these steps: 

Open the Apple (fk) menu and choose Control Panels. 

Open the QuickTime Settings control panel 

Click to remove the X from the Autoplay checkbox. 

Listening to FM radio 

Your computer comes with the Apple TV/FM Radio System card preinstalled. This card lets you tune in 
FM radio signals and play them through the computer's speakers. 

Connecting an FM antenna 

Before you can tune in FM radio stations, you must attach the FM antenna that came with the 
computer. Follow these instructions: 

1 Shut down the computer. 



Sound 
113 



Attach the FM antenna to the FM port— the port on the right, marked by the icon. 

Depending on the type of antenna that came with your computer, you may have to either push 
screw the connector into the FM port. 





Attach the FM antenna to the 
FM tuner port. TheFM tuner 
portismarked with thera icon. 



Unfold the FM antenna and position it high for the best reception. 

Attach the antenna to a wall in the position that gives the clearest reception. Use tape, thumbtacks 
pushpins (through the middle of the plastic strips or the white plastic ends). 




Restart the computer. 



Tuning in a station 

Be sure you have attached the FM antenna to your computer, following the steps in the previous 
section. To begin listening follow these instructions: 

Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Apple FM Radio. 

You may hear only static until you tune in a clear station. 

You use Apple FM Radio to select stations and make other changes. For help while using Apple FM 
Radio, open the Guide (G8) menu and choose Apple FM Radio Guide or choose Show Balloons. 

You may need to adjust the sound volume or change the settings in the Monitors & Sound control 
panel. For instructions, see 'Adjusting the Sound Settings" later in this chapter. 

If you do not hear the radio right away, see the section "Problems Listening to the Radio," in 
Chapter 12. 



Connecting audio equipment 

Your computer can record stereo sound from a sound input device— also called a sound source— such 
as an extra microphone, a tape deck, or an audio CD player. Your computer can also play audio CDs in 
its internal CD-ROM drive. The term SOU nd input device means a device whose sound goes into your 
computer for you to record or process in various ways. 

You attach sound input devices to the sound input port on the back of your computer. The port is 
marked with an icon of a microphone (#). 

Your computer comes with a built-in sound system, but you can attach an additional sound output 
device, such as a set of amplified speakers or a set of headphones. 

Sound output devices can be attached to either of the sound output ports. Both ports are marked with 
an icon of headphones (O). 




Sound 
117 



You need a cable with one of the 3.5-mm audio connectors shown below to connect equipment to 
your computer's sound input port. You need a cable with a stereo miniplug to connect speakers or 
other equipment to the sound output port. 




Stereo miniplug Extended miniplug 

The stereo miniplug is the smaller of the two and is found most often on stereo equipment. The 
extended miniplug, which is slightly longer and comes with voice quality external microphones (such 
as the Apple PlainTalk Microphone), works only in your computer's sound input port (#). 

To connect most audio equipment, follow the steps below. If you are connecting a VCR or a camcorder 
and its microphone, see Chapter 8. 

1 Check to see what type of connector your equipment's cable has. 

If your equipment's cable has a stereo miniplug or extended miniplug like the ones pictured above, go 
on to step 2. 

If your equipment has two cables with left and right RCA-type connectors, attach the equipment to the 
stereo audio adapter cable that came with your computer. 




Stereo audio adapter cable 



2 Place the audio equipment near the computer. 



Chapter 
Seven 

118 



3 Attach cables to the audio equipment following the instructions that came with the equipment. 
Some equipment (such as most headphones) comes with cables already attached. 

4 If your audio equipment is a sound input device such as a tape deck or an audio CD player, attach its 
cables to the sound input port, and then go on to step 6. 



5 



If your audio equipment is a sound output device such as headphones or amplified speakers, attach its 
cables to one of the sound output ports. 




6 Turn on the audio equipment. 

Follow the instructions that came with your equipment. 

You may need to adjust the speaker volume or change the settings in the Monitors & Sound control 
panel. For instructions, see "Adjusting the Sound Settings," later in this chapter. 



Chapter 
Seven 

120 



Using the built-in microphone 



Your computer comes with a built-in microphone for recording live sounds. The microphone is highly 
sensitive. Once you've turned it on (which you do with a sound-recording application program), it can 
pick up sounds within a range of several feet. For instructions on selecting the microphone as the 
sound source for recording, see "Adjusting the Sound Settings," later in this chapter. 




Built-in microphone 
(behind speaker grille) 



▲ Warning Do not stick any small objects into the built-in microphone. Doing so may damage your 
equipment. ▲ 



Sound 
121 



Adjusting the sound settings 



After you begin playing music, multimedia, or other sounds through your computer's sound system, 
you may want to adjust the sound system volume or the bass unit's level. Before you can record sound, 
you may need to specify which device you want as your sound source. 

Adjusting the speakers 

To adjust the volume for the sound system, press the volume control button shown in the illustration. 
(You can also use the volume buttons on the remote control that came with your computer.) This 
changes the volume of the speakers on either side of the screen as well as the bass unit volume. 



Volume control button 



Adjusting the level of the bass unit 



The bass unit sound level is preset at the factory to be appropriate for most conditions. However, if you 
place the bass unit near a corner, you may want to turn down the bass unit level. If you place the bass 
unit away from all walls or up off the floor, you may want to turn up the level. 

To adjust the bass unit level, use the control that's in the well underneath the bass unit. (If you turn the 
level all the way down, you won't hear any bass.) 




Bass unit sound level control 



Once the bass unit level is set, the overall sound system volume is adjusted using the volume button on 
the front panel or the remote control. 



Sound 
123 



Specifying a sound source for recording 

You use the Monitors & Sound control panel to specify a sound source for recording. Follow these 
instructions: 

1 Open the Apple (#) menu in the upper-left corner of your screen, and choose Control Panels. 

2 Double-click the Monitors & Sound control panel to open it. 

The next page shows an example of the Monitors & Sound control panel. The control panel may look 
slightly different on your computer. 

3 Click the Sound icon at the top of the Monitors & Sound control panel. 



Chapter 
Seven 

124 



Choose the sound input device you want to use from the Sound Input pop-up menu. 

■ To use the computer's microphone, choose Internal Microphone. 

■ To use a device connected to the sound input (#) port, choose External Microphone (even if the 
device is not a microphone). 

■ To use the FM antenna, choose CD/TV/Video. 




For more instructions, click the Guide ((B) button in the upper-right corner of the control panel. 



Chapter Eight 



Video 



^four computer comes equipped with an S-video input port and a built-in TV tuner that lets the 
computer receive and display video from a TV cable or antenna, a video cassette recorder (VCR), 
a laserdisc player, a camcorder, or other video equipment. 

This chapter explains how to 

■ connect a camcorder or other equipment to your computer 

■ play a video recording and display video on the computer's screen and capture video images 

■ attach a TV cable or antenna and tune in TV stations 

Connecting video input equipment 

You can connect video equipment to the S-video port on your computer so you can view video, 
capture video images, and hear the sound from the video equipment through the computer's 
speakers. 



Chapter 
Eight 

126 



Your Macintosh works with either of two standard video formats: 



■ S-video, which is a high-quality video format used by many video cameras, some VCRs, and most 
televisions. Equipment that uses the S-video format has an S-video connector, which can be plugged 
directly into the computer's S-video input port: 



S-video connector 

Note: The S-video input port works with both seven-pin and four-pin S-video connectors. 

■ Composite video, which is used by most VCRs and laserdisc players. Equipment that uses the 
composite format has an RCA-type connector, which can be plugged into the composite video to S- 
video adapter cable that came with your computer. The adapter cable then plugs into the 
computer's S-video port. 




RCA-type connector 

RCA plug S-video plug 

The instructions that follow are for connecting any video input equipment although they use a stereo 
VCR and a camcorder as examples. 




Video 



127 



Preparing your equipment and assembling cables 

Make sure that the video equipment you want to connect has either an RCA-type video port or an 
S-video port. 

Place the equipment near the Macintosh. 

Make sure you have the cable you need to connect the equipment to the Macintosh. The cable you 
need depends on what kind of port your equipment has. 

■ If your equipment has an RCA-type video port, you'll need the composite video to S-video adapter 
cable that came with your computer. 

RCA plug S-video plug 

■ If your equipment has an S-video port, you'll need a cable with S-video connectors at each end. If 
your equipment didn't come with this type of cable, you can purchase one at an electronics store. 



S-video plug 



S-video plug 



Assemble the audio cables you need to connect the equipment to the Macintosh. 

■ If your equipment has left and right Audio Out ports that accept RCA-type connectors, you'll need 
the stereo audio adapter cable that came with your computer. 

= i=q=- 
Stereo miniplug 

■ If your equipment has a single monaural Audio Out port that accepts an RCA-type connector, you'll 
need the mono audio adapter cable that came with your computer. 

^nzp^ — cej^ 
RCA plug Stereo miniplug 

■ If your equipment has an Audio Out port that accepts a stereo miniplug, you'll need a cable with 
miniplugs at both ends. If your equipment didn't come with this type of cable, you can purchase one 
at an electronics store. 




Stereo miniplug 



Stereo miniplug 



Remove the port cover plate from the back of the computer by squeezing it between your fingers and 
swinging it away from the computer. 

Set the cover plate aside. (The cover plate is made up of two sections that can be easily separated and 
reassembled if needed.) 



^Port cover plate 



The port cover plate covers the ports for connecting a modem, keyboard, printer, and video equipment 
(such as a video cassette recorder or camcorder). 



Chapter 
Eight 

130 



Connecting the equipment to the computer 

Attach one end of the video cable to the Video Out port on the video equipment. 
Follow the directions that came with the VCR or camcorder. 

Plug the other end of the video cable (or adapter cable) into the S-video input port on the 
computer. 

If the connector doesn't slide easily into the port, check the pin alignment and try again. Don't use 
force, which could damage the computer or cable. 




Video input port 



S-video cable or 

composite video to S-video adapter cable 



important The S-video connector is a round plug with several small metal pins, which resembles 
other Macintosh connectors, such as those for a printer, modem, mouse, or keyboard. Don't confuse 
the connectors; they're not interchangeable. 



3 Plug one end of the audio cable (or adapter cable) into the Audio Out port on the video equipment. 

If the video equipment has left and right Audio Out ports for RCA-type connectors, plug in both the 
connectors of the stereo audio adapter cable. 

4 Plug the miniplug connector on the audio cable (or adapter cable) into the sound input (#) port 
behind the port cover plate you removed. 

The computer has two ports marked with a (#). For audio input associated with video, be sure to use 
the one that had been covered by the port cover plate you removed. 




Chapter 
Eight 

132 



5 



Replace the port cover plate. 




The following illustrations show S-video connections and composite video connections for both a VCR 
and a camcorder. Your finished connections should look something like one of the illustrations on the 
following pages. 



Video 
133 



Connection for input from a VCR (composite connection) 



_3£ 



/ 



fSvideo input port 



'Audio input port for video 

Composite video Video Audio Outports 

toSvideo Outpprt (I eft and right) 
adapter 

cable vcr\ 



Stereo audio adapter cable 
Connection for input from a camcorder (composite connection) 



f Svideo input port 



$ Audio input port for video 



Video Out port 

Composite video 

toSvideo 
adapter cable 




Audio Out ports (left and right) 

'nan 




Stereo audio adapter cable 



Chapter 
Eight 

134 



Connection for input from a VCR (S-video connection) 



f Svideo input port 



' Audio input port for video 



SvideoOut Audio Out ports 
port (left and right) 



^ Svideo 
cable 

/ 



VCR 



3^) O ^ 



Stereo audio adapter cable 
Connection for input from a camcorder (S-video connection) 



3£ 



/ 




f Svideo in put port 



'Audio input port for video 
S-video Out port Audio Out ports (left and right) 



Svideo cable 

/ 




Stereo audio adapter cable 



Working with video on your computer 

After you connect a VCR, camcorder, or other video equipment to your computer, you can begin 
working with it. 

1 Turn on the video equipment, following the instructions that came with the equipment. 

2 Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Apple Video Player. 

3 Use Apple Video Player to play video and adjust settings from the video equipment. 

For help while using Apple Video Player, open the Guide (GB) menu and choose Apple Video Player 
Guide, or choose Show Balloons. 

Note: The remote control has a TV/Mac button that lets you switch between Apple Video Player's 
video window and computer programs. 

Watching TV 

Your computer comes with an Apple TV/FM tuner card pre-installed. This card lets you watch TV on the 
computer's screen. 

Connecting to an antenna or cable service 

To tune in TV stations, you must attach a cable from a TV antenna or a cable TV service. Follow these 
instructions: 

1 Shut down the computer. 

2 Before you attach the cable, make sure it has an F-type coaxial cable connector. 




F-type coaxial cable connectors 



Chapter 
Eight 

136 



3 



Connect the TV port on the left, marked by the □ icon, to a cable from a TV antenna or a cable 
TV service. 




Video 
137 



Tuning in a station 

Be sure you have attached the cable to your computer, following the steps in the previous section. 
To begin watching TV, follow these instructions: 

1 Turn on the computer. 

2 Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Apple Video Player. 

3 Use Apple Video Player to customize your settings and begin watching TV. 

For help while using Apple Video Player, open the Guide (GB) menu and choose Apple Video Player 
Guide, or choose Show Balloons. 

Note: The remote control has a TV/Mac button that lets you switch between Apple Video Player's 
video window and computer programs. 



Chapter 
Eight 

138 



Part Four 



Expanding Your Computer's Capabilities 



Chapter Nine 

Connecting Additional Equipment 142 

Chapter Ten 

Installing Expansion Cards 
and Memory 158 



Chapter Nine 



Connecting Additional Equipment 



\ou can expand your computer system by connecting equipment to it. 

This chapter describes how to connect the following types of devices: 

■ external SCSI devices, such as a hard disk and a cartridge drive 

■ a printer 

■ additional ADB input devices, such as a mouse, trackball, or graphics tablet 

■ security equipment to protect your Macintosh 

The illustrations on the next few pages show where equipment should be connected 
to your Macintosh. 



Chapter 
Nine 

142 



The following chapters contain information on connecting other equipment: 

Chapter 5: network connections 

Chapter 7: audio equipment 

Chapter 8: video equipment 

Cha pter 10: internal drives and memory upgrades 

important Turn off the computer before connecting a SCSI or ADB device. Each device you add 
needs to be compatible with your computer. For more information, consult an Apple-authorized dealer, 
the manufacturer of the equipment you add, or Appendix D, "Technical Information," at the end of 
this manual. 



Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 

143 



Your computer's components and front panel controls 



Built-in microphone 
(behind speaker grille! 

■ft Brightness control button 

□ TV channel 
selection button 

<))) Volume control 

i Mute button 

TV/Mac button 

Remote control 
infrared sensor 

O Headphonejack 

Power on light 




Flat panel display 
CD-ROM drive 
4\ CD-ROM Stop/Eject button 
xCD next track button 
!!► CD Play/Pause button 
▼ CD previoustrack button 
Stereo speakers 

El^ Keyboard 

■Trackpad 
•Trackpad button 



-*6'- Brightness control button 

Controls the screen's backlighting to let you brighten or dim the screen. 



□ TV and FM channel selection button 

Lets you change channels when you're watching TV on the computer. 





Volume control button 




Controls the speaker volume. 




TV/Mac button 




Switches between displaying a video window (for watching TV programs or video recordings) 




or an application program's window in front. 


i 


Mute button 




Turns the volume off temporarily. 




Remote control infrared sensor 




Receives signals from the remote control. 


O 


Headphone jack 




Connects your Macintosh to stereo headphones. 


z !!► ▼ 


CD next track, Play/Pause, and previous track buttons 




Controls music and multimedia CDs in your CD-ROM drive. 



Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 

145 



Your computer's ports and power button 




Chapter 
Nine 

146 



FM radio port 

Connects your Macintosh to an FM radio antenna. 



□ 


TV tuner port 




Connects your Macintosh to a TV cable service or antenna. 




SCSI port 




Connects your Macintosh to SCSI equipment such as external hard disk drives and scanners. 




Sound output port 




Connects your Macintosh to headphones, externally powered (amplified) speakers, or other audio 




output equipment. 


* 


Sound input port 




Connects your Macintosh to audio input equipment. 




External modem port 




Connects your Macintosh to a GeoPort Telecom Adapter, external modem, LocalTalk network, 




or printer. 


JE. 


Printer port 




Connects your Macintosh to a printer, GeoPort Telecom Adapter, external modem, or LocalTalk 




network. 


5- 


Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port 




Connects your Macintosh to an input device, such as a keyboard or a trackball. 


IN 


Video input port 




Connects your Macintosh to a VCR, laserdisc player, camcorder, or other video equipment. 


* 


Audio input port for video 




Connects your Macintosh to equipment for recording video and sound together. 


• 


Security lock port 




Lets you attach a locking cable to your computer. 



Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 

147 



Connecting external SCSI devices 



Your computer has a port for connecting devices that use the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI, 
pronounced "skuh-zee"). SCSI is a standard method for connecting disk and cartridge drives, CD-ROM 
drives, scanners, and other devices. The SCSI port permits high-speed communication between the 
computer and the device. 

The SCSI icon appears above the port on the computer's back panel. 



You can connect SCSI devices to the SCSI port in a chain-like fashion. The first device in the chain 
plugs into the SCSI port, the second device plugs into the first device, and so on. 

You can attach up to six SCSI devices in the chain. Each device on the SCSI chain must have a unique 
ID number. 




Before you connect a SCSI device 



Before you connect a SCSI device to your Macintosh, be sure to complete the tasks explained in 
this section. 

important This section contains general instructions for attaching SCSI devices to your computer. 
Be sure also to follow the specific instructions that came with your external hard disk drive or other 
SCSI device when connecting the device to your Macintosh. The specific instructions that came with 
the device tell how to change a device's ID number and attach a SCSI cable or terminator to it. 

Make sure each device has a unique ID number 

Each external SCSI device connected to your computer must have its own, unique ID number from 
to 6. (Do not assign SCSI ID number 3, because it is already taken by the built-in CD-ROM drive.) The 
SCSI ID number helps the computer keep track of the devices and sort out conflicts when more than 
one device in the SCSI chain is communicating with the computer simultaneously. 

The SCSI devices can be in any physical order in the chain; it is not necessary to arrange them in 
numerical order. 

See the instructions that came with each SCSI device for information on checking and setting its SCSI 
ID number. 

important If you use two or more devices attached to the same SCSI interface with the same ID 
number, your computer will not start up properly, your equipment could malfunction, and you could 
lose data as a result. 



Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 

149 



Make sure you use the right type and length of cable 

To attach a SCSI device to your computer or to another device in the chain, always use SCSI cables that 
are double-shielded, such as Apple SCSI cables. Never use printer-type RS-232 cables (commonly used 
with DOS and Windows computers). Poor quality SCSI cables are often the cause of SCSI problems. 

Avoid mixing brands and types of SCSI cables. 

If the device is the first or only one you're connecting, use a SCSI system cable to connect it to the 
computer's SCSI port: 




If the device is not the first one, use a SCSI peripheral interface cable to connect it to the last device in 
the chain: 




SCSI peripheral interface cable 



important The total length of the cables in a SCSI chain should not exceed 6 meters (about 20 feet). 
For best results, use SCSI cables manufactured by Apple Computer. 

Keep the cables between SCSI devices as short as possible. Cables 18 to 24 inches long are best. 
PowerBook computers and some SCSI devices (particularly scanners) may not be able to work with 
cables longer than 24 inches. 



Terminate the SCSI chain properly 

To ensure accurate transmission of information, a terminator must be present at each end of a SCSI 
chain. There is already a built-in terminator at the beginning of the chain. Therefore, you only need to 
make sure that the last device in the chain has a terminator. 

important In almost all cases, only the first and last devices in the SCSI chain should be terminated 
(with the exceptions noted below). Make sure that no external SCSI device but the last one has a 
terminator. 

To terminate the last device in the chain: 

■ Use a device that has a built-in terminator as the last device in the chain. 

If you wish to attach two or more SCSI devices that have built-in terminators, an Apple-authorized 
service provider can remove the extra built-in terminators. 

■ If the device at the end of the SCSI chain does not have a built-in terminator, attach an external 
terminator. You can attach or remove external terminators yourself. (Do not use a black terminator; 
the black terminators are for Macintosh life computers and certain LaserWriter printers only.) 
Terminators are available at Apple-authorized dealers. 



External SCSI terminator \J 

ExceptionstO the "first and last" rule: If the SCSI chain is 18 inches or shorter, the terminator on the 
last device is not needed. If the total cable length in the chain is greater than 10 feet, the chain may 
need a third terminator at the 10-foot point. Do not add the third terminator unless you are 
experiencing a SCSI problem, and check all other possible causes of the problem before adding the 
third terminator. (See the information on troubleshooting SCSI problems in Part V of this manual.) 




Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 



151 



Connecting a SCSI device 



After you read "Before You Connect a SCSI Device" earlier in this chapter, follow the instructions 
below. Use these general instructions in conjunction with the more specific instructions that came with 
your SCSI device. 

1 Shut down your Macintosh. 

2 Make sure the SCSI device is switched off. 

▲ Warning Do not connect or disconnect any device while the device or your Macintosh is turned on. 
Doing so could damage the device, your computer, or both. Do not attach or remove a terminator 
while the computer or any device is turned on. ▲ 

3 Use a SCSI cable to connect the device either to the computer's SCSI port or to the last SCSI device 
already in the chain. 

Use the thumbscrews and metal clips on the connectors to maintain a tight, reliable connection. Do 
not overtighten the thumbscrews. 

If you have not already done so, make sure that the SCSI chain is properly terminated, as explained 
earlier in this chapter. 

4 Turn on all devices in your SCSI chain. 

important Always turn on all external SCSI devices connected to your Macintosh before turning on 
the computer itself. Otherwise, your computer won't be able to recognize that the SCSI devices are 
connected to it and your computer may not be able to start up. 

5 If necessary, install device drivers (software that makes a device work with your computer). 

Drivers needed for a SCSI device usually come on a floppy disk with the device. (If no drivers came 
with the device, contact the device manufacturer.) 

Note: If you experience problems after connecting a SCSI device, see the troubleshooting information 
in Part V for possible solutions. 



Chapter 
Nine 

152 



Connecting a printer 

Normally, you attach the cable that came with your printer to the printer port, but you can attach it to 
your modem port if you already have a printer attached to your printer port. 

Follow the instructions that came with your printer as well as the instructions here when connecting 
the printer to your computer. 

The printer port is located in the area under the port cover plate. 

1 Remove the port cover plate from the back of the computer by squeezing it between your fingers and 
swinging it away from the computer. 

Set the cover plate aside. (The cover plate is made up of two sections that can be easily separated and 
reassembled if needed.) 



The port cover plate covers the ports for the modem (or GeoPort Telecom Adapter), keyboard, printer, 
and video equipment. 




Port cover plate 



Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 



153 



2 



Plug the printer's cable into the computer's printer port. 




See the manual that came with your printer for more detailed information and instructions on setting 
up and using the printer. Although your computer comes with most Apple printer software (called 
pri nter drivers) already installed, you may need to install software from disks that came with your 
printer. 

You need to specify in the Chooser which port you used to connect your printer and choose the 
printer you want to use (even if you have only one printer). 

For instructions on choosing a printer (including specifying the port to which it's connected), open the 
Guide (®) menu and choose Mac OS Guide, click the Guide's Index button, and select "printing" from 
the list of terms. 



Chapter 
Nine 

154 



Put the port cover plate back in place. 




Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 

155 



Connecting an ADB input device 

Your computer has an Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port, which connects the keyboard and trackpad to 
your computer. You can add other input devices, such as a mouse, numeric keypad, bar-code reader, 
graphics tablet, or joystick. 

You can plug an additional ADB device into the extra ADB port on the keyboard. You can also connect 
up to three ADB devices in a chain to a single ADB port. The exact number of devices possible in a 
chain depends on how much power the devices require. 

important The total power used by all ADB devices connected to your computer must not exceed 
500 milliamperes (mA). Before attaching another ADB device, check Appendix D, "Technical 
Information," and the information that came with the ADB device for power requirements. 

Shut down the computer. 

Attaching or removing an ADB device while the computer is turned on could damage the ADB device 
or your computer. 

Plug the additional ADB device into the extra ADB port on the keyboard. 
The ADB port is marked with the 5* icon. 




Start up the computer. 



Securing your computer 



To deter theft of your computer, keyboard, and other equipment attached to ports under the port 
cover plate, you can purchase a locking cable and attach it to your computer. The back of the computer 
has a built-in security lock port. 




Follow the instructions supplied with the locking cable to secure it to your computer. When you install 
the locking cable, make sure the port cover plate is on. 



Connecting 
Additional 
Equipment 

157 



Chapter Ten 



Installing Expansion Cards and Memory 



This chapter provides information about expansion cards and memory, and explains how to 
install both. 

Installing an expansion card or memory involves three procedures (detailed steps for each are 
provided later in this chapter): 

■ opening the computer 

■ inserting the card or memory module into a specific slot 

■ closing the computer 



Chapter 
Ten 

158 



▲ Warning Although instructions for installing memory and expansion cards are provided in this 
manual, Apple Computer recommends that you have an Apple-certified technician install them. 
Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to 
contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for service. If you install these items yourself, 
you risk damaging your equipment, and this damage is not covered by the limited warranty on your 
computer. 

Besides the area under the back cover, the computer does not have user-serviceable parts. Do not 
attempt to service any parts inside the computer, other than the areas covered in this chapter. If you 
do so, you may reduce the computer's performance or damage the computer. Such damage is not 
covered by the limited warranty on your computer. 

For information on any warranty question, consult the service and support information that came with 
your computer for information on contacting Apple or an Apple-authorized service provider for 
assistance. ▲ 



Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

159 



About expansion cards 



You can install printed circuit boards (called cards) for video and graphics applications, networking 
and communications, additional processing power, or other purposes. The cards fit into connectors in 
expansion slots inside the computer. 

Your computer has two expansion slots. One is designed for a 7 inch long PCI expansion card. The 
other is designed for the Apple Ethernet CS II Card or other networking or modem card. 

Install only expansion cards that come with Macintosh drivers and are compliant with the PCI 2.0 
standard. NuBus™ cards cannot be used in these expansion slots. 

Expansion card power requirements 

The combined power consumption of expansion cards must not exceed the limits specified for your 
computer model. If you have more than one expansion card installed, check the information that 
came with your cards to make sure that their power consumption is within the limits specified in 
Appendix D, "Technical Information." 

▲ Warning To avoid damaging your computer and expansion card, do not attempt to install any 
expansion card without first checking the documentation for that card. If the documentation specifies 
that an Apple-certified technician must install the card (usually because the installation requires special 
training or tools), consult the service and support information that came with your computer for 
instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider for assistance. If you attempt to 
install the card yourself, any damage you may cause to the computer or card will not be covered by 
the limited warranty on your computer. If the card is not an Apple-labeled product, check with an 
Apple-authorized dealer or service provider to see if you can install it yourself. A 



Chapter 
Ten 

160 



About memory 

You can add memory— dynamic random-access memory (DRAM)— to your computer in packages called 
Dual Inline Memory Modules, or DIMMs. 

The following illustration shows the locations of memory and expansion card slots in your computer. 




Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

161 



DRAM configurations 

You can increase your computer's DRAM up to 128 MB. The main logic board has two DIMM slots 
where you can install DIMMs that meet these specifications: 

■ 8, 16, 32, or 64 MB (32 MB of DRAM is already installed in either a single 32 MB DIMM or two 
16MB DIMMs) 

■ 64-bit wide, 168-pin 

■ 60-nanosecond (ns) RAM access time or faster (If you install DIMMs with different speeds, they will 
all operate at the speed of the slowest DIMM installed.) 

■ 2K refresh rate 

■ extended data output (EDO) or fast-paged mode (if a fast-paged mode DIMM is mixed with another 
type, the combined memory may not operate at fast-paged mode timing) 

important The Single Inline Memory Modules (SIMMs) from older Macintosh computers are not 
compatible with your computer and should not be used. DIMMs that require a 4K refresh rate should 
not be used. 

To increase DRAM to the maximum of 128 MB, take out the two 16 MB DIMMs or single 32 MB DIMM 
that came with the computer, and install two 64 MB DIMMs. 

VRAM configurations 

Your computer comes with 2 MB of VRAM already installed. 
Cache configurations 

Your computer comes with a 50-megahertz (MHz) High Performance Module (256K level 2 cache) 
already installed. 



Opening the computer 

Follow these instructions to open the back of your computer before you install an expansion card 
or memory. 

1 If your computer is turned on, turn it off by choosing Shut Down from the Special menu. 

2 Unplug the power cord (attached to the bass unit) from the wall outlet. 




3 If the computer cover is locked shut, unlock it by removing the security cable or padlock from the 
cover latch. 

Do not remove the computer cover yet. 



Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

163 



Carefully lay the computer on a flat, cushioned table surface with the back cover facing up. 

Make sure that the table is clear of all objects. Lay some padding material down to cushion the speaker 
fabric on the front of the computer. 

Remove the back cover as shown in the next two illustrations. 




Push the two latches in as 
shown to unlock the back cover. 



Lift up on the back 
cover to remove it. 





6 Set the cover aside. 

If you are installing an expansion card, you won't be putting the original back cover on again; you'll use 
the expansion cover instead. Store the original back cover in a plastic bag to protect its metal shielding. 
(If you are going to install an expansion card, you can store the original back cover in the bag from the 
expansion cover.) 



Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

165 



What you do next depends on what you're adding to your computer. 

■ If you are installing a PCI expansion card, go to "Installing a PCI Expansion Card," next. 

■ If you are installing a communication card, go to "Installing a Communication Card," later in 
this chapter. 

If you are installing two cards, install the PCI card first, then install the communication card. 

■ If you are installing memory, go to "Installing Memory (DRAM)" later in this chapter. 

Installing a PCI expansion card 

This section contains general instructions on installing a PCI expansion card in your computer. 

Before you start, be sure to follow the instructions in "Opening the Computer," earlier in this chapter. 
Then follow these instructions: 

1 Assemble the parts you'll need (shown here). 




Expansion back cover 



PCI card 





PCI card adapter 



Expansion panel 



Chapter 
Ten 



166 



Touch the metal fan frame inside the computer to discharge static electricity from your body 
Always do this before you touch any parts, or install any components, inside the computer. 



If your computer has a communication card, remove it and the expansion panel as shown in the 
illustration. 

Set the card and expansion panel aside until you are ready to reinstall them. You can leave the 
communication card adapter in place. 

If your computer does not have a communication card, skip this step. 



4 Remove the PCI card from its static-proof bag. 

Hold the card by its edges to avoid touching any of the components on the card. 




5 Attach the PCI card adapter to the PCI card. 




Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

169 



6 Remove the screw at the top of the expansion panel and then lift out the metal port cover. 




■Remove the screw. 
Metal port cover 



7 If you will be installing a communication card after you install the PCI card, press to remove the plastic 
insert covering the port opening on the expansion panel. 

If you are not going to install a communication card, skip this step. 




Chapter 
Ten 

170 



8 Attach the expansion panel to the PCI card by sliding the card fence into the same slot the metal port 
cover was in, then reinserting the screw you removed in step 6. 




Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

171 



Insert the PCI card with its attachments into the computer's PCI slot, pressing down firmly until all 
parts are fully inserted. 

■ Don't rock the card side-to-side; instead, press the card's connectors straight into the slot. (Rocking 
the card can damage the PCI slot.) 

■ Press firmly but don't force the card. If you meet a lot of resistance, pull the card out and try again. 

■ To see if the card is properly connected, pull it gently. If it resists and stays in place, it's connected. 
(Make sure you don't pull the card so much that you accidentally disconnect it.) 



10 If your card includes a DAV connector and ribbon cable, plug the cable into the card and the 
computer's DAV socket. (If two cables are supplied, use the longer cable.) 

Video editing cards and some ISDN cards have DAV connectors. 

Note: If your card does not include a DAV connector and cable, skip this step. 




What you do next depends on whether or not you have additional items to install: 

■ If you are installing a communication card, or reinstalling a card you removed at the beginning of 
these instructions, proceed to "Installing a Communication Card." 

■ If you are installing memory, proceed to "Installing Memory (DRAM)." 

Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

173 



■ If you are finished installing items in your computer, skip ahead to "Closing the Computer" later in 



After you close the computer, see the manual that came with your PCI card for more instructions. 
Installing a communication card 

This section contains instructions for installing a communication card, such as an Apple Ethernet CS II 
card, in your computer's communication card expansion slot. 

important If you're installing the Apple Ethernet CS II Thin Coax Card, a T-connector is connected 
to your card. Before you install the card, twist the T-connector to unlock it from your card and set it 
aside. Save the T-connector; you'll need it to connect to your network. 

Assemble the parts you'll need (shown here). 



this chapter. 




Expansion back cover 




Communication card 





Communication card adapter 



Expansion panel 



Before you start, be sure to follow the instructions in "Opening the Computer," earlier in this chapter. 
Then follow these instructions: 

2 Press to remove the plastic insert covering the port opening on the expansion panel. 

If you have a PCI card already installed in your computer, the expansion panel is attached to the PCI 
card inside the computer. Remove the PCI card and expansion panel, then press to remove the plastic 
insert shown in the illustration below. Reinstall the PCI card and continue with these instructions. (For 
help re-installing the PCI card, see step 9 under "Installing a PCI Expansion Card," earlier in this 
chapter.) 




Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

175 



Touch the metal fan frame inside the computer to discharge static electricity from your body 
Always do this before you touch any parts, or install any components, inside the computer. 



4 Attach the expansion panel to the computer. 



If you have a PCI card installed in your computer, you can skip this step because the expansion panel is 
already attached to the computer. 




Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

177 



5 Plug the communication card adapter into the computer's communication card expansion slot. 




6 Remove the communication card from its static-proof bag. 

Hold the card by its edges to avoid touching any of the components on the card. 




Chapter 
Ten 

178 



7 Align the end of the communication card with the expansion panel. 




be su r e tha t the hook en ga ges the expa n si on pa n el . 



Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

179 



Rotate the communication card into place, pressing it firmly into the communication card adapter. 




If you are installing memory, proceed to the next section. If you are finished installing items in your 
computer, skip ahead to "Closing the Computer," later in this chapter. 



Installing memory (DRAM) 

This section explains how to install additional memory (DRAM) in your computer. 

Before you start, be sure to follow the instructions in "Opening the Computer," earlier in this chapter. 
Then follow these instructions: 

1 Touch the metal fan frame inside the computer to discharge static electricity from your body. 

Always do this before you touch any parts, or install any components, inside the computer. 




Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

181 



2 If you need to remove one or more existing DIMMs to make room for new ones, remove them now. 

Hold the DIMM along its side edges, and press down on the ejector as shown. The DIMM will be 
released from its slot. Pull the DIMM straight up and out of the slot. 

important Do not touch the DIMM's connectors. Handle the DIMM by the edges only. 




Chapter 
Ten 

182 



3 Place the DRAM DIMMs in the DRAM slots as pictured. 

The DIMM fits into the slot only one way. Align the notches in the DIMM with the small ribs inside the 
slot. With the ejector in the open position (as shown), push down on the DIMM until it snaps into 
place. The ejector closes automatically. 

important Do not touch the DIMM's connectors. Handle the DIMM by the edges only. 



DRAM DIMM (Your DIMM'sshapeand components may vary.) 
Connectors \ Notches DRAM slot (1 of 2) 



Closing the computer 

There are two back covers for your computer: 

■ the original back cover, which you should replace if you installed additional memory only 
(no expansion cards) 

■ the expansion cover, which you should use if you installed any expansion cards 
Follow the instructions for attaching the appropriate back cover. 

Closing the computer using the original back cover 

Align the original back cover with the top edge of the computer. 



Fit the top edge of the cover into 
the top edge of the computer. 



2 Snap the original back cover into place. 




3 Lift up the computer so that it sits upright. 

You are now finished with the installation. You may plug in the power cord you disconnected, turn on 
the computer, and start using the equipment you installed. If you see a "sad Macintosh" icon when you 
start up your computer after adding memory, shut down and turn off the computer and check to see if 
the memory you added is properly installed and firmly seated in the DIMM slots. 

▲ Warning Never turn on your computer unless all of its internal and external parts are in place. 
Operating the computer when it is open or missing parts can be dangerous, and can damage your 
computer. ▲ 

Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

185 



Closing the computer using the expansion cover 

Align the expansion cover with the top edge of the computer. 



Fit the top edge of the expa n si on cover 
into the top edge of the computer. 



2 Snap the expansion cover into place. 




3 Lift up the computer so that it sits upright. 

You are now finished with the installation. You may plug in the power cord you disconnected, turn on 
the computer, and start using the equipment you installed. If you see a "sad Macintosh" icon when you 
start up your computer after adding memory, shut down and turn off the computer and check to see if 
the memory you added is properly installed and firmly seated in the DIMM slots. 

▲ Warning Never turn on your computer unless all of its internal and external parts are in place. 
Operating the computer when it is open or missing parts can be dangerous, and can damage your 
computer. ▲ 

Installing 
Expansion 
Cards and 
Memory 

187 



Part Five 



Troubleshooting 



Chapter Eleven 

Start Here If Trouble Occurs 190 

Chapter Twelve 

Solutions to Common Problems 194 

Chapter Thirteen 

Techniques for Diagnosing 
and Solving Problems 244 



Chapter Eleven 



Start Here If Trouble Occurs 



\our computer came with a booklet that describes the service and support options that are available 
from Apple. It contains phone numbers you can call if you have trouble with your computer and also 
describes many other ways of obtaining support information from online services, the Internet, and 
automated fax services. 

Before you contact Apple for help with your computer, however, follow the advice in this chapter and 
Chapter 12. Only call Apple if nothing in this manual helps. If you know the problem is with an 
application program not published by Apple, call the application's publisher. 

You'll find you can solve many problems with your computer on your own by following the general 
troubleshooting methods in this chapter, or the specific troubleshooting methods in Chapter 12, 
"Solutions to Common Problems," and Chapter 13, "Techniques for Diagnosing and Solving Problems." 

Step 1 : Gather as much information as you can 

When you see an error message, you don't have to take action immediately. The message stays on the 
screen until you click the OK (or Restart) button or turn off the computer. 

■ Make a note of exactly what you were doing when the problem occurred. Write down the message 
on the screen and its ID number (if any). 

■ List the programs you were using and the names of any items you know have been added to the 
System Folder since the system software was installed. This information will help a service person 
diagnose the problem, if you need to call later. 



Chapter 
Eleven 

190 



■ Check the screen for any clues. Is a menu selected? What programs and document icons are open? 
Note anything else that seems relevant. 

■ If you were typing text and were not able to save it before the problem occurred, write down the 
parts of the text still visible on the screen so that some of your work will be easy to replace. 

■ Ask other Macintosh users about the problem you're having; they may have a solution for it. 
Step 2: Restart your computer 

Often you can eliminate a problem simply by restarting your computer, thereby clearing the 
computer's memory. 

To restart your Macintosh when you are having trouble, try the following steps: 

1 If you can, save any open documents before restarting. 

If your system is frozen and does not respond to anything you do, or if you have a "bomb" message on 
the screen, saving may not be possible. You can try pressing 3€-Option-Esc to quit the program in use 
when the problem occurred; if this works, you can then save the documents open in other programs 
before restarting. 

Note: Restart the computer immediately after you save your documents. Quitting a program using 
3€-Option-Esc may leave corrupted data in the computer's memory, and this corrupted data is erased 
when you restart. Use this key combination to force a program to quit only when you can't choose Quit 
from the File menu. 

2 If you can, choose Restart from the Special menu or from the dialog box that's on screen. 

Dialog boxes contain messages from the computer. If something goes wrong, a message may appear on 
the screen asking you to restart. 

3 If you can't choose Restart, press the Power key (marked with a O) on the keyboard. 
Click Restart in the dialog box that appears. 

4 If the Power key (0) doesn't work, try it again while you hold down the 3€ and Control keys. 

This key combination restarts the computer. (Only use this key combination when you can't choose 
Restart from the Special menu or restart the computer using the Power key.) 

Start Here 
If Trouble 
Occurs 

191 



5 If your computer still doesn't restart, press the power button on the back of the computer to turn it off, 
wait at least 10 seconds, and turn it on again by pressing the Power key (<l) on the keyboard. 

If you suspect that the problem is with other equipment, such as a printer or an external hard disk 
that's attached to your computer, shut down the computer, turn off the other equipment for 
10 seconds or longer, then turn it on again and restart your computer. 

Step 3: Check onscreen help, if you can 

Mac OS Guide contains some troubleshooting information that is not included in this user's manual. 
If you are able to start up your computer properly, choose Mac OS Guide from the Guide (GS) menu; 
click the Guide's Topics button, and choose Troubleshooting from the list. 

Step 4: Go to the next chapter, "Solutions to Common Problems" 

If none of the tips here help, you can probably find a solution for your particular problem in the next 
chapter, "Solutions to Common Problems." 

If you suspect the problem may be with a program not published by Apple, contact the program's 
publisher. 

Step 5: Use Apple System Profiler 

Apple System Profiler is a small program, called a Utility, that lets you quickly view different types of 
information about your computer to help you and the Apple Assistance Center solve problems with 
your computer. 

Opening Apple System Profiler 

If you are able to start up your computer properly, choose Apple System Profiler from the Apple (fk) 
menu to open the utility. 

When you open Apple System Profiler, a System Overview window appears. 



Chapter 
Eleven 

192 



Getting information about different hardware and software 

To display information about hardware and software used by your computer, open the Select menu and 
choose one of the following commands: 

■ System Overvi ew: for general information about your computer, including what type of processor 
it's using, how much memory is installed, and what version of Mac OS is installed. 

■ Vol U me I nfor ma ti on : for information about disks and disk partitions that your computer can 
access. 

■ Device Information: for information about equipment, such as CD-ROM drives and scanners, 
connected to your computer. 

■ Control Panel Information: for a list of control panels installed on your computer. You can view all 
control panels, only non-Apple control panels, or only Apple control panels. You can also tell 
whether a control panel is currently turned on ("enabled"). 

■ Extension Information: for a list of system software extensions installed on your computer. You can 
view all extensions, only non-Apple extensions, or only Apple extensions. You can also tell whether 
an extension is currently turned on. 

■ System Folder Information: for a list of System Folders on your startup disk. Having more than one 
System Folder can cause problems. If you see more than one System Folder in the list, the extra one 
might be responsible for the problem you're having. 

Getting help 

To find out what the different items in the Apple System Profiler window mean, click the Balloon Help 
(G8) button in the upper-right corner of the window. Then use the trackpad to place the pointer on the 
item you want to know about. 



Start Here 
If Trouble 
Occurs 

193 



Chapter Twelve 



Solutions to Common Problems 



This chapter contains descriptions of specific problems you might experience with your computer 
and suggestions for solving the problems. If you haven't already tried the general troubleshooting tips 
in Chapter 11, do that first. Then return to this chapter. 

Only call Apple if nothing in this manual helps. If you know the problem is with a program not 
published by Apple, call the program's publisher. 

If you need repair service, consult the service and support information that came with your computer 
for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 

▲ Warning If you have a problem with your computer and nothing presented in this manual solves it, 
consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to 
contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. If you attempt to repair the 
computer yourself, any damage you may cause will not be covered by the limited warranty. Consult the 
service and support information that came with your computer for information on contacting an 
Apple-authorized dealer or service provider for additional information about this or any other warranty 
question. ▲ 



Chapter 
Twelve 

194 



Problems turning on or starting up your computer 

The computer is turned on but the screen is dark. 

One of the following is probably the cause: 

■ You have a screen saver program that darkens the screen when the computer has not been used for 
a certain period of time. 

Press a key or move the pointer to turn off the screen saver. (Screen saver programs interfere with 
the computer's power conservation feature, so you may want to remove the screen saver or keep it 
turned off.) 

■ Your computer has gone to sleep due to inactivity. "Wake it up" by pressing the Power key (marked 
with a O) on the keyboard. 

■ The screen's brightness control (#) is not adjusted properly. 
Check the screen's brightness control and turn it up if necessary. 

■ There is something wrong with the power supply to the computer. Turn the bass unit over and 
check the recessed well on the underside. You should see a green status light. If the green status 
light is not on, try plugging the computer into a different outlet. 

Make sure that the flow of air around the bass unit is not blocked. 
The computer makes an unusual sound at startup. 

■ If you hear four tones, try starting up the computer from the system software CD-ROM disc. For 
instructions, see "Starting Up From the System Software CD-ROM Disc" in Chapter 13. If the hard 
disk icon appears, you can probably repair the hard disk using the instructions in "Testing Your Hard 
Disk" in Chapter 13. If the computer does not start up, or if the hard disk icon does not appear, the 
hard disk may need professional repair. Contact an Apple-authorized service provider or call for 
assistance (see the service and support information that came with your computer). 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

195 



■ There may be a problem with the information stored in the area called parameter RAM (PRAM) or 
nonvolatile video RAM (NVRAM). Reset the NVRAM and the PRAM (also called "zapping the PRAM"). 

When you reset the PRAM and NVRAM, the settings on most of your computer's control panels 
revert to their defaults (original, standard settings). You may want to check the settings in your 
control panels for memory, networking, and monitors, and any aspect of your work that seems 
affected after you reset PRAM and NVRAM. 

Follow these steps to reset the PRAM and NVRAM: 

1 Shut down your computer by pressing the Power key (O) and then clicking Shut Down. 

2 Make sure the Caps Lock key is not engaged. 

3 Position the fingers of your left hand on these keys: Command (§€), Option, and R. Locate the 
P key, so you can find it quickly for step 4. 

4 Press the Power key (<l) to turn on your computer. Immediately after you hear the startup 
sound, press and hold down the Command (§€), Option, R, and P keys simultaneously. 

5 When you hear the startup sound twice, release the keys. Then immediately press and hold 
down the Shift key to start up with extensions turned off. Release the Shift key when you see the 
message "Extensions off" in the "Welcome to Macintosh" box. 

If you don't see the "Extensions off" message, wait until startup is complete, then press and hold 
down the Shift key while you choose Restart from the Special menu. Continue to hold down the 
Shift key until the message appears. 

6 If the computer shuts itself off, press the Power (<) key to turn it back on. 

7 Open the System Folder, then open the Preferences folder. 

8 Drag the Display Preferences icon to the Trash. 

9 Restart the computer without holding down the Shift key. 

The computer starts up with extensions turned on again. 

10 If you had specified special settings in any control panels, open those control panels to respecify 
the settings you want. 



When you start up the computer, you see a message about the system software. 

■ The system software on the startup disk you're using may be incomplete or damaged or may be the 
wrong version. Make sure you're using the correct disk as a startup disk. 

■ If you're sure you're using the correct startup disk, you may need to reinstall system software. See 
"Installing System Software" in Chapter 13. 

When you start up, a disk icon with a blinking question mark appears in the middle 
of the screen and stays there for longer than 15 seconds. 

TaT 

This icon indicates that your Macintosh cannot find the system software it needs to start up. One of the 
following is probably the cause: 

■ Your computer may be having a problem recognizing external SCSI (Small Computer System 
Interface) equipment, such as hard disks and scanners that you may have connected. 

Shut down your computer, turn off all external SCSI equipment, and disconnect the first SCSI device 
in the chain from your computer's SCSI port (marked with the ❖ icon). Then restart the computer. 
If the computer starts up after you disconnect your SCSI equipment, refer both to the manuals that 
came with the equipment and Chapter 9, "Connecting Additional Equipment," which has 
information on the proper way to connect SCSI equipment and assign SCSI ID numbers. 

If you have a printer connected to your computer's SCSI port, make sure your printer is connected 
properly. Most printers connect to the printer port, not the SCSI port. Check the manuals that came 
with your printer for information on how to connect it properly. 

■ System software is not installed on the startup hard disk, the system software is damaged, or the 
hard disk is not working properly. 

Follow the instructions in "Testing Your Hard Disk," in Chapter 13, to test your startup hard disk and 
repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn't help, reinstall system software on your startup hard 
disk. For detailed instructions, see "Installing System Software," also in Chapter 13. 



Solutions 
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Problems 

197 



A disk icon with an X appears in the middle of the screen and a floppy disk is ejected 
from the disk drive. 



Ear 



This icon indicates that the floppy disk you tried to start up from is not a startup disk. (When you turn 
on your computer, it looks first in the floppy disk drive for a disk containing system software. If the disk 
in the drive does not contain system software, the computer ejects the disk and looks on its internal 
hard disk for system software.) 

Wait a few seconds. The computer should start up from its internal hard disk. Make sure you insert 
floppy disks only after the computer has begun starting up. 

A "sad Macintosh" icon appears and the computer won't start up. 



y. y. 



This icon indicates that your Macintosh cannot start up because of a problem with the system software 
or the computer hardware. 

Eject any floppy disks by turning off the computer and then holding down the trackpad button while 
you turn the computer on again. Try starting up with the system software CD-ROM disc. Do this by 
inserting the CD-ROM disc into the CD-ROM drive and holding down the C key while you restart 
the computer. (For detailed steps, see "Starting Up From the System Software CD-ROM Disc" in 
Chapter 13.) If the "sad Macintosh" icon appears again, consult the service and support information 
that came with your computer for information on contacting Apple or an Apple-authorized service 
provider for assistance. 



The computer freezes (nothing moves on the screen) after the "happy Macintosh" icon 
appears but before the message "Welcome to Macintosh" appears. 

To determine the problem, shut down the computer and disconnect all attached equipment. Then try 
starting up the computer again. 

■ If the problem occurs with no equipment attached to the computer, the hard disk may be damaged. 
Follow the instructions in "Testing Your Hard Disk" in Chapter 13. 

■ If the computer restarts normally without any equipment attached, shut the computer down again 
and reattach the first piece of equipment; then restart the computer again. Do the same thing with 
each additional piece of equipment until you find the piece that is causing the problem. Have that 
piece repaired. 

The computer freezes in the middle of displaying icons for system extensions at the 
bottom of your screen. 

Check first for problems with your extensions. Shut down the computer and try starting up the 
computer while holding down the Shift key until you see the message "Extensions off" in the 
"Welcome to Macintosh" box. 

■ If the computer starts up when your extensions are off, two or more of your extensions may be in 
conflict with each other. Turn to "Checking Your System Extensions" in Chapter 13. 

■ If the computer still freezes during startup, your System Folder may be damaged. Follow the 
instructions in "Performing a Clean Installation of System Software" in the "Installing System 
Software" section in Chapter 13. 

If you can't start up even if you hold down the Shift key to turn off all extensions, check for problems 
with your equipment. Shut down the computer and disconnect all attached equipment. Then try 
starting up the computer again. 

■ If the problem occurs with no equipment attached to the computer, the hard disk may be damaged. 
Follow the instructions in "Testing Your Hard Disk" in Chapter 13. 

■ If the computer restarts normally without any equipment attached, shut the computer down again 
and reattach the first piece of equipment; then restart the computer again. Do the same thing with 
each additional piece of equipment until you find the piece that is causing the problem. Have that 
piece repaired. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 



199 



The hard disk icon does not appear on the desktop. 

If you don't see a hard disk icon on the desktop, try the following: 

■ Use the Drive Setup program to make the disk available. Drive Setup is on the system software 
CD-ROM disc. For instructions on using Drive Setup, follow the instructions in "Testing for Damage 
on Your Hard Disk" in Chapter 13. 

■ If the hard disk is internal, shut down your computer and wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it 
on again. 

■ If the hard disk is external, shut down your computer and wait at least 10 seconds. Make sure that 
the hard disk is turned on and that its cable is connected firmly; then restart the computer. 

■ Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment connected to your computer (anything connected to 
the SCSI port [❖]). Each SCSI device must have its own unique ID number. For information on 
setting SCSI ID numbers, see the manuals that came with your SCSI equipment, as well as 
"Connecting External SCSI Devices" in Chapter 9. 

■ If the hard disk is your startup disk, follow the instructions in "Testing Your Hard Disk," in Chapter 
13, to test your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn't help, reinstall 
system software on your startup hard disk. For detailed instructions, see "Installing System 
Software" in Chapter 13. 

Your computer starts up and you see large folder-shaped areas containing labeled 
pictorial buttons, instead of the usual Macintosh desktop. 

■ Your computer may have started up from a CD-ROM disc containing At Ease, an alternative to the 
Macintosh desktop. You need to have the Macintosh desktop on your screen before you can use any 
of the instructions in this manual. 

To return to the Macintosh desktop, choose Shut Down from the Special menu. After your 
computer has shut down, restart it and then immediately press the Stop/Eject button of your 
CD-ROM drive to open the drive door. Remove the CD-ROM disc and gently close the door. Your 
computer finishes starting up. 

Note: To avoid having the computer start up from a CD-ROM disc, remember to remove any disc in 
the drive before you shut down your computer. 



Your computer won't restart, and there may or may not be a CD-ROM disc in the 
CD-ROM drive. 

■ Your computer may be trying to start up from a CD-ROM disc. Press the Stop/Eject button of your 
CD-ROM drive to open the door, and remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the door, then restart your 
computer. 

■ If the computer freezes, you can try to "force" the application you're using to quit by simultaneously 
pressing the keys Command (§€), Option, and Esc on your keyboard. Then click Force Quit in the 
dialog box that appears. (Note: Unsaved changes in your current documents will be lost.) 
Immediately save all open documents, quit all other open applications, and restart the computer. 

■ If the problem recurs, reset the parameter RAM. (See "The Computer Makes an Unusual Sound at 
Startup," earlier in this section.) 

Every time the computer starts up, it rebuilds the desktop. 

■ There may be a folder on your hard disk that has the same name as a file the computer uses to keep 
track of information on your disks. Manually search for a folder named "Desktop" or "Desktop file." 
If you find one, rename it. Then restart the computer. (Do not use the Find File feature to search for 
the desktop file. It may find it but you may not be able to access it.) 

When the computer starts up, no icons appear in the windows, and the pointer 
alternates between an arrow and a wristwatch, or an empty flashing box appears. 

■ There is a problem with the display of windows. Restart the computer, holding down the Option key 
until the desktop icons appear. (When the desktop appears, all windows will be closed.) 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

201 



Problems with application programs, documents, and memory 

You can't start an application program; you see a message that not enough memory 
is available. 



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All the memory in your Macintosh is in use by other application programs, system software, and system 
resources. 

■ Quit other open applications to free up memory, then open the application you want to use. 

■ Follow these steps to allocate more memory to the application: 

1 Choose About This Macintosh from the Apple (fk) menu. Take note of the number in the Largest 
Unused Block section. This number tells you how much memory is available to 

open applications. 

2 Quit the application if it's open, select its icon, and choose Get Info from the File menu. Take 
note of the numbers in the Minimum Size and Preferred Size boxes. 

3 If the number in the Minimum Size box is larger than the largest unused block, not enough 
memory is available to use this application. To free memory, quit open applications or restart 
the computer. You can also type a smaller number in the Minimum Size box if you want to open 
the application using less memory. But some applications don't work well if you assign them 
less memory. 

4 If the number in the Preferred Size box is smaller than the largest unused block, you may need 
to assign more memory to the application. (An application may need more memory if you are 
working with complex documents.) Type a larger number in the Preferred Size box. 



■ Use the Memory control panel to reduce the size of the disk cache, remove or reduce the size of 
your RAM disk, or turn on virtual memory. For more information, see Mac OS Guide, available in the 
Guide (C8) menu. 

Note: If you have both virtual memory and a RAM disk turned on in the Memory control panel, 
don't set both of them at or near their maximum values. Doing so can result in unpredictable or 
reduced performance by your computer. (RAM disk uses random-access memory, or RAM, as if it 
were a hard disk.) 

■ Turn off system extensions that you don't need. For more information, see the topic on system 
extensions in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (®) menu. 

■ If you have installed system software additions from the Apple Extras folder such as QuickTime 
Conferencing or PlainTalk, you may want to remove them if you are not using them. (This software 
can decrease the amount of RAM available for use by application programs.) To remove a system 
software addition, locate and run the Installer for the software, and use its Custom Remove option 
to remove it. 

■ If you frequently want to open more applications than memory allows, you may want to install more 
random-access memory (RAM). See Chapter 10, "Installing Expansion Cards and Memory." 

The computer "freezes." (Nothing moves on the screen.) 

■ Your computer may be trying to complete a task, but it's taking so long that it seems that the screen 
is frozen. If you need to do something else instead, try simultaneously pressing the Command (§€) 
key and the period key (.) to cancel the task the computer is working on. 

■ There may be a temporary software problem that can be fixed by restarting your computer. Follow 
the instructions in "Step 2: Restart Your Computer" in Chapter 11, "Start Here If Trouble Occurs." 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

203 



The computer freezes repeatedly, a dialog box with a bomb appears, or a dialog box 
indicates that a software application program has quit unexpectedly. 



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The application program needs more memory, or there is a software problem. 

■ Write down what you were doing when the message appeared, and write down the text of the 
message. This information may help a technical support representative diagnose your problem if 
you later need to contact Apple or the manufacturer of the application program. 

About the codes i n error messages: The number codes in error messages are used in software 
development. Sometimes they can help a technician narrow down the source of a problem. However, 
the codes are usually too general or technical in nature to help you diagnose a problem yourself. 

■ Restart your Macintosh. (For detailed steps, see Chapter 11, "Start Here If Trouble Occurs.") Most 
software problems are temporary, and restarting usually corrects the problem. 

■ Check for multiple System Folders on your startup disk, using the Find File command in the 
Apple (#) menu. Throw away extra System Folders (ones without an icon on them). The System 
Folder that your computer is using has a small computer icon on it. 




System Folder 




Use the application's Info window to give it more memory. (Select the application's icon and choose 
Get Info from the File menu.) For more information on increasing an application's memory, see the 
topic on memory in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (GB) menu. 

If the problem occurs when you are trying to print, there may not be enough memory for printing. 
Quit other open applications to free up memory. 

If the bomb only occurs in one application, try reinstalling the application from the original disks. If 
reinstalling doesn't solve the problem, contact the manufacturer of the application to see if the 
application contains software errors or "bugs" and if it is compatible with the version of system 
software you're using. 

Sometimes incompatible system extensions or control panels can cause system software problems. 
Restart while holding down the Shift key; this temporarily turns off all system extensions. 

If your computer works normally after you do this, use the Extensions Manager control panel (in the 
Control Panels folder available through the Apple [fk] menu) to turn on extensions and control 
panels one at a time. Restart after you turn on each extension. This procedure should identify 
incompatible extensions and control panels. (If you just added new software to your computer, its 
system extension is the most probable cause of the problem.) For detailed instructions, see the 
information about managing system extensions in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (GB) menu. 

If your computer performs better when a particular extension or control panel is turned off, contact 
the software's manufacturer for information or an upgrade. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

205 



The computer exhibits odd behavior, such as many unexplained messages. 

■ Check for multiple System Folders on your startup disk, using the Find File command in the 
Apple (#) menu. Throw away extra System Folders (ones without an icon on them). The System 
Folder that your computer is using has a small computer icon on it. 




System Folder 

■ Check for viruses on all your disks, using a virus-detection program. Eliminate any viruses the 
program finds. 

If a problem recurs when you are using a particular application, try the following: 

■ Consult the documentation that came with the application to make sure you are using it correctly. 

■ Check for multiple copies of the application on your hard disk. If you have more than one copy, 
select each one and choose Get Info from the File menu to check the application's version number. 
Keep one copy of the latest version and throw away all other copies. 

■ Reinstall the application from a known good source such as the application's original disks. 

■ Increase the application's memory. Quit the application, select its icon, choose Get Info from the 
File menu, and type a larger number in the Preferred Size box. 

■ Contact the manufacturer of the application or the place where you bought it to find out whether 
the application contains software errors or "bugs" and whether an upgrade is available. 

■ Check that the application is compatible with the version of system software that you are using. (See 
the application's documentation, or contact the manufacturer of the application or the place where 
you bought it.) 

■ Make sure your control panels and system extensions (especially any that you recently added) are 
compatible with your applications. See "Checking Your System Extensions" in Chapter 13. 



An application program won't open. 

■ The application program may already be open. Check the Application menu to see which 
applications are running. 

■ There may not be enough memory available to open the application. Quit any applications you're 
not using and try again. If that doesn't work, try restarting the computer. 

■ If the application is on a floppy disk, make sure the disk is unlocked. (You unlock a disk by sliding 
the tab at the corner of the disk so that it covers the hole.) 

■ The application may be damaged, or it may not be compatible with PowerPC technology. Check to 
make sure the software is PowerPC compatible, and install it from a known good source (such as the 
application's original disks). 

■ Check that the application is compatible with the version of system software that you are using. (See 
the application's documentation, or contact the manufacturer of the application or the place where 
you bought it.) 

You can't open a document, or you see a message that an application program can't 
be found. 

The document may have been created with an application that is not on your hard disk, or with a 
different version of the application. 

■ Try starting an application that you think might be able to open the document. Then choose Open 
from the application's File menu to open the document. For more information, see the 
documentation that came with the application. 

■ Purchase and install the correct software to use the document, or find out if the creator of the 
document can convert it to a form that one of your applications can use. 

■ Rebuild your desktop. For instructions, see "Rebuilding Your Desktop" in Chapter 13. 

■ Don't try to open the files in your System Folder. Most of the files in your System Folder are used by 
your computer for internal purposes and are not intended to be opened. 

■ If the document is from a DOS or Windows computer, read the next section. 



Solutions 
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Problems 

207 



You experience problems using a document from a DOS or Windows computer. 

If you can't open a DOS document using a Macintosh application, try the following: 

■ Open the document from within the application by choosing Open in the application's File menu. 

■ Use the PC Exchange control panel to specify which Macintosh application will open the document. 
(To find PC Exchange, choose Control Panels in the Apple [6] menu.) 

If a DOS document is displayed incorrectly, or you see strange codes or characters in the document, 
try one of the following: 

■ Your application program may have special procedures for opening and saving documents with 
different file formats. See the information that came with your application, or call the application's 
publisher. 

■ Try opening the document in another application. 

Note: Some characters that can be displayed on the Macintosh are not accurately displayed on DOS 
computers. 

For information about working with DOS or Windows documents on your Macintosh, see Mac OS 
Guide, available in the Guide (G8) menu. 

A file can't be thrown away. 

■ The file may be locked. Select the file's icon, choose Get Info from the File menu, and click the 
Locked checkbox to remove the X. You can delete locked files that are in the Trash by holding down 
the Option key while you choose Empty Trash from the Special menu. 

■ An application program may be using the file. Close the file or quit the application. 

■ If the file is on a floppy disk, the disk may be locked. Unlock the disk by sliding the tab so that it 
covers the hole at the corner of the disk. 

■ The file may be in a shared folder that can't be changed. You can throw away the file by turning off 
file sharing temporarily (click Stop in the Sharing Setup control panel). Or you can select the shared 
folder, choose Sharing from the File menu, and click the box labeled either "Can't be moved, 
renamed, or deleted" or "Same as enclosing folder" to remove the X. 



You see a message that your application program can't be opened because a file 
can't be found. 

Macintosh applications designed specifically for the PowerPC microprocessor (also called "native" 
applications) use special files called "shared libraries." Any necessary shared libraries should be 
installed automatically when you install these special Macintosh applications. 

Follow the directions that came with your application to reinstall it. If the shared library is still missing, 
contact the software application's manufacturer for assistance. 

You experience problems using an older Macintosh application. 

Some older Macintosh applications are not completely compatible with Macintosh computers that have 
the PowerPC microprocessor. 

■ Open the Memory control panel (in the Control Panels folder available from the Apple [fk] menu) 
and turn off Modern Memory Manager. 

■ If that doesn't work, contact the application's publisher to see if an upgrade is available. 
A window has disappeared. 

■ Another open window may be covering the one you're looking for. Move, resize, close, or hide 
windows until you see the one you want. 

■ The application the window is associated with may be hidden. Choose Show All from the 
Application menu and then click the window you want, or choose the application from the 
Application menu. 

■ Look to see if just the window's title bar is showing. If it is, double- or triple-click on the title bar. If 
the window still doesn't open, double- or triple-click again while holding down the 3€, Option, or 
Control key (try each combination of keys and clicking). 

Note: This problem occurs because a control panel called WindowShade is set to shrink windows 
so just the title bar is showing or expand them to their original size. To adjust the WindowShade 
settings, open the WindowShade control panel. (To find WindowShade, choose Control Panels in 
the Apple [A] menu.) 



Solutions 
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Problems 

209 



Problems with icons 



Some icons look different from usual. 

■ There may be a problem with the information that the computer uses to keep track of files. To fix 
this problem, you need to rebuild the desktop. For instructions, see "Rebuilding Your Desktop" in 
Chapter 13. 

■ You may be using a file-compression program to save space on your hard disk. Some compression 
programs change the appearance of icons. 

An icon is blinking in the menu bar. 

■ An application needs attention. Press the blinking icon to open the Application menu, then choose 
the application whose icon is blinking (it may have a diamond by its name). Respond to any 
messages on the screen. If it's not clear what you should do, consult the documentation that came 
with the application. 

Problems with CD-ROM discs and drives 

A CD-ROM disc icon does not appear on the screen. 

■ If you reinstalled the CD-ROM software, make sure to restart your computer afterward. 

■ Make sure that the Apple CD-ROM extension is turned on in the Extensions Manager control panel. 
(To find the Extensions Manager control panel, choose Control Panels in the Apple [fk] menu.) 
Then restart your computer. 



The computer keeps asking you to reinsert a CD-ROM disc after you've ejected it. 



T^rnr, Please insert the disk: 
?Zr Software CD-ROM 



■ An application program or document from the CD-ROM disc is still open and is "looking for" the 
disc. Reinsert the CD-ROM disc and close the documents or quit the application programs that are 
open on the disc. (Open the Application menu in the upper-right corner of your screen and make 
sure that the Finder is the only application listed. If not, select one of the other application 
programs and then choose Quit from the File menu. Do this for any other applications listed in the 
Application menu.) Then eject the CD-ROM disc by selecting its icon and choosing Put Away from 
the File menu or by dragging the CD-ROM disc's icon to the Trash. 

■ You may not have properly ejected the CD-ROM disc. To eject the disc properly, reinsert it, select 
the CD-ROM disc icon, and choose Put Away from the File menu. (You can also drag the CD-ROM 
disc's icon to the Trash.) If you eject a CD-ROM disc by choosing Eject Disk from the Special menu, 
the computer keeps its memory of the CD-ROM disc and asks you to reinsert it so you can use it. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

211 



Your computer starts up and you see large folder-shaped areas, containing labeled 
pictorial buttons, instead of the usual Macintosh desktop. 

■ Your computer may have started up from a CD-ROM disc containing At Ease, an alternative to the 
Macintosh desktop. You need to have the Macintosh desktop on your screen before you can use any 
of the software installation instructions in this manual. 

To return to the Macintosh desktop, choose Shut Down from the Special menu. After your 
computer has shut down, start it up again and then immediately press the Stop/Eject button of your 
CD-ROM drive to open the drive door. Remove the CD-ROM disc and gently close the door. Your 
computer finishes starting up. 

Note: To avoid having the computer start up from a CD-ROM disc, remember to remove any disc 
from the drive before you shut down your computer. 

The door of your CD-ROM drive won't open. 

If a CD-ROM disc icon appearson your screen: 

■ Drag the disc icon to the Trash, or select it and choose Put Away from the File menu. (Note: You 
won't lose information on the CD-ROM disc by dragging its icon to the Trash. Don't select the disc 
icon and then choose Eject Disk from the Special menu.) 

If the AppleCD Audio Player is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu or click the Eject button in 
the AppleCD Audio Player window. 

If you see a message that a disc can't be put away because it is being shared, turn off file sharing in 
the Sharing Setup control panel in the Apple (fk) menu, then try again to put away the disc. 

If no CD-ROM disc icon appearson your screen: 

■ Restart your computer. Immediately after the startup sound, press the Stop/Eject button of your 
CD-ROM drive to open the door. 



■ If the door doesn't open, do the following: Locate the small pinhole on the left side of the 

computer, insert the end of a large straightened paper clip firmly and horizontally into the pinhole, 
and push gently until the door is released. Do not force the door open; wait until the paper clip has 
released it to be sure you don't break the door. 




If neither of these suggestions works, your CD-ROM drive may be damaged. Consult the service and 
support information that came with your computer for information on contacting an Apple-authorized 
service provider or Apple for further assistance. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

213 



Your computer won't restart, and there may or may not be a CD-ROM disc in the 
CD-ROM drive. 

■ Your computer may be trying to start up from a CD-ROM disc. Press the Stop/Eject button of your 
CD-ROM drive to open the door, and remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the door, then restart your 
computer. 

Your CD-ROM disc is vibrating in the CD-ROM drive. 

■ Some CD-ROM disc labels have artwork that is noticeably thicker on one side than the other and 
can cause the disc's weight to be slightly off-center. This uneven distribution of weight coupled with 
the high rotation speed of your CD-ROM drive can occasionally cause some discs to wobble in the 
drive and make your computer vibrate. The vibration doesn't damage the CD-ROM disc or the 
computer. If you can feel or hear that the CD-ROM disc is vibrating in the computer, you don't need 
to do anything special; continue to use the CD-ROM disc as you normally would. 

Note: If you use a CD-ROM disc with a removable label, you can remove the label before inserting 
the disc to see if that will prevent vibration. 

You insert a CD-ROM disc, but its icon doesn't appear on the Macintosh desktop. 

■ Make sure that the disc label is facing out and the disc is centered and pressed firmly into the drive. 

■ Make sure the door is closed all the way. 

■ Try restarting your computer. 

■ Make sure that the Apple CD-ROM extension is turned on in the Extensions Manager control panel. 
(To find the Extensions Manager, choose Control Panels in the Apple [A] menu.) Then restart your 
computer. 

■ Try starting your computer from the system software CD-ROM disc that came with your computer; 
insert the CD and restart while holding down the C key. (For detailed steps, see "Starting Up From 
the System Software CD-ROM Disc" in Chapter 13.) If the hard disk icon appears on the desktop but 
the CD-ROM disc icon doesn't appear, then there may be a hardware problem with your CD-ROM 
drive. If the CD-ROM disc icon appears above the hard disk icon, reinstall your CD-ROM software. 
The easiest way to do this is by reinstalling your system software, following the instructions in 
"Installing System Software" in Chapter 13. 



Your computer displays the message "This is not a Macintosh disk: Do you want to 
initialize it?" when you insert a CD-ROM disc in the CD-ROM drive. 

■ Make sure that the Foreign File Access extension is installed and turned on in the Extensions 
Manager control panel. (To find the Extensions Manager, choose Control Panels in the Apple [fk] 
menu.) Then restart your computer. 

■ The disc may use a format that the Macintosh cannot recognize. Ask the disc's manufacturer for a 
disc that a Macintosh can recognize. 

Your computer ejects a CD-ROM disc without giving you any error message. 

■ Make sure the disc is centered and firmly in place, and the disc label is facing out. 

■ The disc may need to be cleaned. (See "Handling CD-ROM Discs" in the section "Handling Your 
Computer Equipment" in Appendix A.) If there are visible scratches on the shiny side of the disc, 
you may be able to remove them with a CD-ROM disc polishing kit (available from an audio CD 
dealer). If the scratches can't be removed, you need to replace the disc. 

■ The disc may be damaged. Try another disc in the drive, and try the original disc in another drive. 
If the original drive reads other discs or if the original disc also doesn't work in another drive, the 
disc is probably damaged. You need to replace it. 

You can't open a document on a CD-ROM disc. 

■ Try starting an application that you think might be able to open the document. Then choose Open 
from the application's File menu to open the document. 

■ Read the manual that came with your CD-ROM disc. Some discs come with software that you need to 
install before using the disc. 

You can't save changes you make to information on a CD-ROM disc. 

■ A CD-ROM disc is a read-only medium. This means that information can be read (retrieved) from it, 
but not written (stored) on it. You can save the changed information on a hard disk or floppy disk. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

215 



Problems using ISO 9660 or High Sierra discs 

You cannot access files on a CD-ROM disc that uses the ISO 9660 or High Sierra 
format. 

■ Discs in the ISO 9660 and High Sierra disc formats have version numbers attached to filenames. 
Some application programs need these version numbers in order to work with files. To make the 
version numbers available to applications on your computer, follow these instructions. 

Drag the CD-ROM disc icon to the Trash. When the door opens, hold down the Option key and 
push the door closed. Continue to hold down the Option key until you see the disc's icon on the 
desktop. The application you are using should now be able to locate filenames on that CD-ROM 
disc. 

■ Make sure that Foreign File Access, ISO 9660 File Access, and High Sierra File Access files are 
present in the Extensions folder in the System Folder on your hard disk. If these files are not 
present, reinstall your CD-ROM software. The easiest way to do this is by reinstalling your system 
software, following the instructions in "Installing System Software" in Chapter 13. 

Problems playing audio CDs 

You don't hear any sound when you play an audio CD or an audio track on a CD-ROM 
disc using the AppleCD Audio Player. 

■ If you have headphones or speakers connected to the computer, make sure they are firmly 
connected. Make sure the volume control on your headphones or speakers is not turned down 
too low. 

■ If you do not have headphones or speakers connected to the computer, make sure that nothing else 
is plugged into the computer's sound output port (O). 

■ If you are using a CD-ROM disc over a network, you won't be able to hear the audio portion. 

■ Make sure the volume is turned up in the AppleCD Audio Player. With the application open, drag 
the volume control slider up, use the volume controls on your computer, or press the Up Arrow key 
on your keyboard. 

■ The CD may have been paused. Click the Play/Pause button in the AppleCD Audio Player once 
or twice. 



While playing an audio track on a CD-ROM disc that combines audio tracks and data, 
you double-click the disc icon and the audio track stops playing. 

■ Some CD-ROM discs include tracks in the music CD format (like the tracks on regular music CDs) 
and other data. On such discs, you can't open data files and listen to audio tracks at the same time. 

You are unable to record sound from an audio CD. 

■ You may need to reset the sound options in the Monitors & Sound control panel. Refer to the 
information on sound in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (HI) menu. 

Problems using Photo CDs 

You insert a Photo CD disc, but its icon doesn't appear on the desktop. 

■ Reinstall the CD-ROM and QuickTime software. The easiest way to do this is by reinstalling your 
system software, following the instructions in "Installing System Software" in Chapter 13. 

Your computer does not display color icons for individual images on a Photo CD. 

■ Your computer may be low on memory. To view color icons, restart your computer and then reopen 
the Photos folder. See Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (®) menu, for more information on 
managing memory. 

After you open an image file on a Photo CD, the image is scrambled, colors are 
displayed incorrectly, or no image appears in the window. 

■ The application you are using may not be designed to work with large (high-resolution) image files. 
You can open the image with another application or you can assign more memory to the 
application. See Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (GB) menu, for more information on 
managing memory. 

After you open an image on a Photo CD, your system "freezes" and does not respond 
to any input, or you have a "bomb" message on your screen. 

■ Restart your Macintosh. (Instructions for restarting your computer are in Chapter 11, "Start Here 
If Trouble Occurs.") The application you are using may not be designed to work with large 
(high-resolution) image files. You can open the image with another application or you can assign 
more memory to the current application. See Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (GS) menu, for 
more information on managing memory. 



Solutions 
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217 



Problems with floppy disks and floppy disk drives 

You can't eject a floppy disk. 

If you can't eject a floppy disk in the usual way, by selecting the disk's icon and choosing Put Away from 
the Special menu or by dragging the disk's icon to the Trash, try the following in order: 

■ Hold down the 3€ and Shift keys and press the number 1 key on your keyboard. 

■ Shut down the computer. If the disk isn't ejected, hold down the button on your trackpad or other 
pointing device while you turn the computer on again. 

■ Locate the small hole near the disk drive's opening, and carefully insert the end of a large 
straightened paper clip into it. Push gently until the disk is ejected. Do not use excessive force. 




Chapter 
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218 



If none of these solutions works, take the computer or disk drive to your Apple-authorized service 
provider to have the disk removed. 

You can't save or copy files onto a floppy disk. 

■ The disk may be locked. Unlock it by sliding the tab at the corner of the disk so that it covers the 
hole. 

■ The disk may be full. Throw away items on the disk that you no longer need, or save the files on a 
different disk. 

■ The disk may be damaged. Test it with Disk First Aid, following the instructions in "Repairing a 
Damaged Hard Disk or Floppy Disk" in Chapter 13. 

■ The disk drive may be damaged. To see if this is the problem, try saving or copying files onto 
another floppy disk. If you are still unsuccessful, the drive may need professional repair. Consult the 
service and support information that came with your computer for information on contacting an 
Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for further assistance. 

After inserting a floppy disk, you see the message, "This is not a Macintosh disk: 
Do you want to initialize it?" or "This disk is damaged: Do you want to initialize it?" 

■ The floppy disk may be new and may not be initialized. If you're sure the disk has never been used, 
click Yes. 

▲ Warning Clicking Yes erases all data that may be on the disk. Therefore, only click Yes if you're 
sure the disk contains no important data. If you're not sure, click No. ▲ 

■ The disk may have been formatted for use on DOS/Windows systems, or some other kind of 
computer. If so, see the tips that follow. 

■ Click No in the dialog box asking you if you want to initialize the disk. 

■ Make sure the PC Exchange control panel is available. (To find PC Exchange, choose Control 
Panels in the Apple [#] menu.) Also, make sure PC Exchange is turned on in the Extensions 
Manager control panel. For more information about Extensions Manager, see the information 
about managing extensions in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (®) menu. 



Solutions 
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219 



■ When formatting floppy disks on a DOS computer for use in a Macintosh, you need to format 
standard double-sided disks as 720K disks and high-density disks as 1440K disks. Double-sided 
disks formatted in 1440K format and high-density disks formatted in 720K format may not 
work in a Macintosh. 

If you think a floppy disk formatted on a DOS computer might have a format that doesn't 
work in a Macintosh, use a DOS computer to copy the contents of the disk onto a properly 
formatted disk. 

The floppy disk may be too warm or too cold to be read. A cold disk will warm up after a few 
minutes in a warm room. You can cool an overly warm disk by placing it in a shady, cool place. 

The disk drive may be damaged. To see if this is the problem, click No to eject the disk; then insert 
the disk into another drive, if you have one. If you still see the message, the floppy disk may be 
damaged. If the disk icon appears on the desktop when the disk is in another drive, one of the 
drives may be damaged. 

Sometimes a drive can be damaged because its heads are out of alignment. You can still insert a disk 
into such a drive and copy information onto the disk. However, when you try to use the disk in a 
different drive the different drive can't read (find and display information from) the disk. Try the 
disk in three or four drives. If more than one drive can't read the disk, it is likely that the drive that 
copied information onto the disk is damaged. If only one drive can't read the disk, then that drive is 
probably the damaged one. 

If none of these suggestions works, the floppy disk is probably damaged. First use a disk recovery 
program to copy the data from your damaged disk onto a good disk. For instructions, see the 
documentation that came with the disk recovery program. Then, use Disk First Aid to repair the 
damaged floppy disk, following the instructions in Chapter 13, "Techniques for Diagnosing and 
Solving Problems." 



The computer keeps asking you to reinsert a floppy disk after you've ejected it. 

■ An application program or document from the floppy disk is still open and is "looking for" the disk. 
Reinsert the disk and close the documents or quit the application programs that are open on the 
disk. (Go the Application menu in the upper-right corner of your screen and make sure that the 
Finder is the only application listed. If not, select one of the other application programs and then 
choose Quit from the File menu. Do this for any other applications listed in the Application menu.) 
Then eject the floppy disk by selecting its icon and choosing Put Away from the File menu. 

■ You may not have properly ejected the floppy disk. To eject the disk properly, reinsert it, select the 
floppy disk icon, and choose Put Away from the File menu. If you eject a floppy disk by choosing 
Eject Disk from the Special menu, the computer keeps the floppy disk in its memory and asks you 
to reinsert it. 

Problems with hard disks 

The computer won't start up from the internal hard disk, or the hard disk icon doesn't 
appear on the desktop. 

■ There may be a temporary software problem. Turn off the computer, wait at least 10 seconds, and 
then turn it on again. 

■ There may be a problem with your startup disk or with its system software. See "Testing Your Hard 
Disk" in Chapter 13. 

The computer is using the wrong disk as a startup disk. 

■ Open the Startup Disk control panel and make sure the correct disk is selected. Then restart the 
computer. (To find the Startup Disk, choose Control Panels in the Apple [6] menu.) 

■ If you're trying to start up from an external hard disk, your computer may be having a problem 
recognizing the disk, which is a SCSI device. Refer to both the manual that came with the hard disk 
and Chapter 9, "Connecting Additional Equipment," which has information on the proper way to 
connect SCSI equipment and assign SCSI ID numbers. 

■ There may be a problem with the information stored in the area called pa ra meter RAM (PRAM ) . 
Reset the PRAM by following the instructions in "The Computer Makes an Unusual Sound at 
Startup," earlier in this chapter. 

Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 



221 



Problems with the trackpad or keyboard 

The pointer (k) doesn't move when you move your finger on the trackpad. 

One of the following situations is probably the cause. 

■ The trackpad or keyboard is not connected properly. 

Turn off the computer by pressing the Power key (<l) and then press the Return key to choose 
Shut Down. If that doesn't work, press the power button on the back of the computer. With the 
computer off, check that the trackpad and keyboard cables are connected properly. Then start 
up the computer again. 

important Do not connect or disconnect the trackpad while the computer is turned on. You may 
damage your computer. 

■ Signals from the trackpad are not reaching the computer, either because the trackpad needs cleaning 
or because there is something wrong with it. 

Clean the trackpad according to the instructions in Appendix A, "Health, Safety, and Maintenance 
Tips." 

If you have a mouse or other pointing device, turn the computer off and then try connecting and 
using the alternative pointing device. If the alternative device works, there is probably something 
wrong with the trackpad. Consult the service and support information that came with your 
computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for 
assistance. 

■ There is a software problem. Try the following: 

Press 3€-Option-Esc to quit the application program in use when the problem occurred. If this 
works, you can save the documents open in other applications before restarting. 

Restart your Macintosh. For instructions, see Chapter 11, "Start Here If Trouble Occurs." 

■ Follow the suggestions in the problems related to the computer "freezing," earlier in this chapter. 



The pointer (k) sticks or jumps when you use the trackpad. 

■ Make sure to use only one finger and that your finger is dry 

Typing on the keyboard produces nothing on the screen. 

One of the following is probably the cause: 

■ You haven't selected any text or set the insertion point (I). 

Make sure the application you want to type in is the active application. Then place the pointer (V) in 
the active window and click to set an insertion point (I) or drag to select text (if you want to replace 
the text with your typing). 

■ If the computer beeps every time you press a key, Easy Access is probably turned on. 

Use the Extensions Manager control panel in the Control Panels folder in the Apple (#) menu to 
turn off Easy Access. For more information about Extensions Manager, see the information about 
managing extensions in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (O) menu. 

■ The keyboard is not connected properly. 

Turn off the computer by pressing the power button on the back of the computer. With the 
computer off, check that the keyboard cable is connected properly at both ends. 

■ Some system software features are turned on that affect the way the keyboard works. 

Open Easy Access from the control panels listed under the Apple (#) menu and turn off Sticky 
Keys, Slow Keys, and Mouse Keys. 



Solutions 
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Problems 

223 



■ There is a software problem. 

Restart your Macintosh. For instructions, see Chapter 11, "Start Here If Trouble Occurs." 

Check the startup disk and application program you were using when the problem occurred. To 
check that the applications and the system extensions you're using are compatible with the system 
software, restart while holding down the Shift key; this temporarily turns off all system extensions. 
If your computer works normally after you do this, use the Extensions Manager control panel to 
turn on extensions and control panels one at a time. Restart after you turn on each extension. This 
procedure should identify incompatible extensions and control panels that may be causing the 
problem. (If you just added new software to your computer, its system extension is the most 
probable cause of the problem.) For detailed instructions, see "Checking Your System Extensions" 
in Chapter 13. 

If the problem recurs, you may need to reinstall system software. See "Installing System Software" 
in Chapter 13. 

■ The keyboard is damaged. 

If you have access to another keyboard, try using it instead. (Turn the computer off before 
connecting it.) If the new keyboard works, there is probably something wrong with the one you 
replaced. 

If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came 
with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple 
for assistance. 



Problems with your computer's speed and performance 



Your computer's performance decreases. 

■ If you notice a decrease in your computer's speed and general performance after you install a 
control panel or system extension, it may be because the software is not compatible with either 
Macintosh computers built with the PowerPC microprocessor or with other system extensions. 

To find out if a system extension or control panel is the problem, follow the instructions in the 
section "Checking Your System Extensions" in Chapter 13. 

■ Use the Memory control panel to turn off virtual memory. (To find the Memory control panel, 
choose Control Panels in the Apple [fk] menu.) For more information on virtual memory, see the 
information about memory in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (G8) menu. 

Note: If you turn on both virtual memory and RAM disk in the Memory control panel, don't set 
both of them at or near their maximum values. Doing so can result in unpredictable or reduced 
performance by your computer. (RAM disk uses random-access memory, or RAM, as if it were a hard 
disk.) 

■ If you still do not notice an improvement, you may want to reinstall system software on your startup 
hard disk. See "Installing System Software" in Chapter 13 for instructions. 

■ If you typically use several application programs at the same time, your computer's performance will 
increase if you install more random-access memory (RAM). See Chapter 10, "Installing Expansion 
Cards and Memory." 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

225 



Your computer isn't performing as fast as you'd like. 

If, after trying the tips in the previous section, your computer still isn't performing as fast as you'd like, 
try these suggestions. Each one will make only a small difference in your computer's speed, but if you 
try them all, you'll notice the improvement. 

■ Open the Memory control panel in the Control Panels folder in the Apple (#) menu; then make 
these changes: 

■ In the Disk Cache section, increase the Cache Size. 

■ In the Modern Memory Manager section, click On. 

■ In the Virtual Memory section, click Off if you haven't already done so. 

■ Open the Keyboard control panel in the Control Panels folder; then make these changes: 

■ Set the Key Repeat Rate to Fast. 

■ Set the Delay Until Repeat to Short. 

■ Turn off Menu Blinking. Open the General Controls control panel in the Control Panels folder; then 
click Off in the Menu Blinking section. 

■ If you don't need to see thousands or millions of colors on the screen, reduce the color depth. 
Open the Monitors & Sound control panel in the Control Panels folder; then click 256 in the Color 
Depth section. 

■ Increase the speed of trackpad tracking. Open the Trackpad control panel in the Control Panels 
folder; then set Tracking Speed to Fast. 

■ Make sure your computer is not calculating folder sizes. Open the Views control panel in the 
Control Panels folder; in the List Views section, make sure the checkbox next to "Calculate folder 
sizes" is not checked. 

■ If your computer is not connected to a network, turn off AppleTalk. Open the Chooser in the 
Apple (fk) menu; in the AppleTalk section, click Inactive. 



Your screen displays a right-angle bracket prompt (>) instead of the regular 
Macintosh desktop. 

Your computer has tried to launch a "debugging" application, but could not find one on your hard disk. 
Debugging applications are programs that software developers use to locate and fix problems in 
computer code. If you do not have a debugging application installed, your screen displays a right-angle 
bracket prompt (>). To return to the desktop, press G and then press Return. 

Your computer's clock begins to keep time inaccurately X 

If your clock begins to keep time inaccurately, have an Apple-authorized service provider replace the 
battery. The service provider will dispose of the battery according to the local environmental 
guidelines. Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions 
on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 

▲ Warning Do not attempt to replace the clock battery yourself. If your clock begins to lose accuracy, 
have an Apple-authorized service provider replace the battery. The service provider will dispose of the 
battery according to the local environmental guidelines. A 

The computer makes unusual sounds. 

■ An application may need your attention. If an icon is blinking in the menu bar, open the menu, 
choose the application whose icon is blinking (it may have a diamond by its name), and take the 
necessary action. 

■ Open the Easy Access control panel (if it is installed on your computer) and check whether any 
features are turned on. 

■ Select a different system sound in the Monitors & Sound control panel. 

■ If the sounds are regular or melodic, they may be caused by interference from electrical equipment. 
Move the computer farther away from any such equipment. 

■ Make sure that the covers on the speaker grilles (to the left and right of the screen) are fastened. 

See also "The Computer Makes an Unusual Sound at Startup" in the section "Problems Turning On or 
Starting Up Your Computer," earlier in this chapter. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

227 



Problems with error messages 

When trying to open or move a font file, you see an error message. 

■ The font may be in use by an application. Try quitting any open applications. 

■ The font file may be damaged. To remove damaged font files, follow these steps: 

1 Drag the Fonts folder out of the System Folder. 

2 Restart the computer. 

3 Open the Fonts folder that you dragged out and drag undamaged fonts to the System Folder 
icon. Click OK in the dialog box. 

4 Throw away the old Fonts folder. 

5 For the font that was damaged, reinstall the undamaged font from the original font disk. 

You see an error message that doesn't make sense, such as an error with 
a number code. 

■ The number codes in error messages are used in software development. Sometimes they can help a 
technician narrow down the source of a problem. However, the codes are usually too general or 
technical in nature to help you diagnose a problem yourself. 

When you see an error message, write it down exactly, in case you need to speak with a technical 
support representative. 

Problems with your printer 

The following suggestions should work for all printers. (Note: Also refer to the manual that came with 
your specific printer.) 

■ Make sure that the printer driver for your printer is turned on in the Extensions Manager control 
panel in the Control Panels folder in the Apple (#) menu. To find out the name of the printer 
driver— for example, LaserWriter— refer to the documentation that came with your printer. 



■ Check your printer settings in the Chooser (in the Apple [A] menu), making sure you have selected 
the correct printer. If you are using a printer that is shared by other computer users (a printer on a 
local network), make sure that AppleTalk (in the lower-right corner of the Chooser) is active. If you 
are using your own printer (a serial printer connected to your computer), make sure that AppleTalk 
is inactive. 

■ Turn off the computer and printer and check the printer cable connections. 

■ If none of these suggestions solves the problem, you may need to reinstall the printer driver that 
came with your printer. Refer to the manual that came with your printer. (See the following 
important note.) 

Note: If you have an Apple printer, install the most recent driver available. 

Nothing happens, or an error message appears when you try to print. 

■ There may not be enough memory for printing. Try the following: 

■ Quit the application immediately after sending the Print command to free up memory for 
printing. 

■ Increase the amount of memory for the desktop printer icon; select it, choose Get Info from the 
File menu, and type a larger number in the Preferred Size box. 

■ Reduce the amount of memory the application uses. 

■ Make sure the printer is turned on. Some printers need to warm up for a few minutes after you turn 
them on. 

■ The printer may be out of paper or may need attention. Check the printer status lights and any 
messages on your screen. 

■ Open the desktop printer icon and check for status messages. 

■ Reinstall your printer software. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

229 



Problems with networks and file sharing 

If you are having problems using a network or file sharing, try the following before attempting further 
solutions: 

■ Make sure the network is working by opening the Chooser and checking for the shared disks and 
printers you usually use. 

■ Make sure that AppleTalk is turned on in the Chooser. 

■ Open the AppleTalk and TCP/IP control panels and make sure the settings are correct. For more 
information, see Chapter 6, "Connecting Your Computer to a Network." 

■ Make sure that all the network software is installed. The AppleTalk and TCP/IP control panels should 
be in the Control Panels folder, and the Network and AppleShare extensions should be in the 
Extensions folder. If you want to use file sharing, the Sharing Setup control panel should be in the 
Control Panels folder, and the File Sharing extension should be in the Extensions folder. If any of 
these items is missing, reinstall the system software according to the instructions in "Installing 
System Software" in Chapter 13. 

You can't select Ethernet in the AppleTalk or TCP/IP control panel, or it doesn't 
appear in the control panels. 

■ You must have an Ethernet card in the computer's communication card slot for Ethernet to appear 
in the AppleTalk and TCP/IP control panels. Make sure you have a card and that it has been properly 
installed. 

■ You can only select Ethernet when the network cable is connected properly. Shut down the 
computer and check the Ethernet connection. 

■ You can only select Ethernet when the network is functioning. If you suspect that the network is 
down, notify your network administrator. 

■ If you have an Apple Ethernet CS II Twisted Pair Card, the status light near the Ethernet port will 
light when a proper network connection is made. If the status light doesn't come on, the network is 
not responding. Check with your network administrator for help. 



The computer, printer, or other device you want to connect to doesn't appear 
in the Chooser. 

■ Make sure the computer or other device you're trying to connect to is turned on, functioning, and 
connected to the network. 

■ The device you want to connect to may be in a different AppleTalk zone. Look for the device in other 
zones listed in the Chooser. 

■ Make sure your network connection is set correctly. Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Control 
Panels, then open the AppleTalk control panel. Choose your network connection (usually LocalTalk 
or Ethernet). 

■ You can only select a networked device when the network is functioning. If you suspect that the 
network is down, notify your network administrator. 

■ Make sure file sharing is active on the computer you're trying to connect to. (That computer's 
Sharing Setup control panel should say that file sharing is on.) 

You connected to another computer, but the shared disk you want to use 
is not available. 

■ You may already be connected to the shared disk. Check for its icon on your desktop. 

■ You may not have the access privileges you need to use the shared disk. Ask the network 
administrator or the owner of the shared item to give you access. See file sharing in Mac OS Guide, 
available in the Guide (G8) menu, for information. 

You connected to another computer, but you can't see any files. 

■ Make sure that files are being shared on the other computer. The File Sharing Monitor control panel 
on that computer lists the items being shared. 

■ Make sure you have the access privileges you need to view the files. Ask the network administrator 
or the owner of the shared item to give you access. See file sharing in Mac OS Guide, available in the 
Guide (GS) menu, for information. 



Solutions 
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Problems 

231 



A message says that a disk can't be ejected because it's being shared. 

■ When you have file sharing turned on, you can't eject disks (other than floppy disks) that were 
connected to your computer when you started it up. You can eject the disk by turning off file 
sharing in the Sharing Setup control panel. After you've ejected the disk, you can turn file sharing 
back on. 

A message says that file sharing can't be turned on. 

■ Make sure AppleTalk is turned on in the Chooser. 

■ Make sure you have at least 1 MB of available space on your hard disk. 

■ Some disk-formatting programs don't work with file sharing. If you use such a program, contact the 
manufacturer of the program or the place where you bought it for compatibility information. 

■ There may be a problem with some of the information your computer uses to start up file sharing. 
Follow these steps in order until the problem is solved: 

1 Open the Sharing Setup control panel and enter new information in the Owner section. Then try 
again to turn on file sharing. 

2 Remove the File Sharing folder from the Preferences folder (inside the System Folder). Then 
restart the computer and try to turn on file sharing. 

3 Reset the PRAM by following the instructions in "The Computer Makes an Unusual Sound at 
Startup," earlier in this chapter. Afterward, make sure to select the correct network type in the 
AppleTalk control panel. 

4 Remove the Users & Groups data file from the Preferences folder (inside the System Folder). 
Restart the computer. 

5 Reinstall system software. 



A message says that an item can't be shared. 

■ Make sure you have at least 1 MB of space available on your hard disk. 

■ Some removable storage devices can't be shared. Check the manufacturer of the device or the place 
where you bought it for more information. 

■ Some disk-formatting programs don't work with file sharing. If you use such a program, check with 
the manufacturer of the program or the place where you bought it. 

The file sharing section doesn't appear in the Sharing Setup control panel. 

■ You may have turned off AppleTalk or file sharing using the Extensions Manager control panel. Turn 
them back on. 

■ If the file sharing and networking software is not in your System Folder, reinstall file sharing and 
networking software by reinstalling system software. For more information, see "Installing System 
Software" in Chapter 13. 

You can't open a shared disk or folder. 

■ You may not have the access privileges needed to use the disk or folder. Ask the network 
administrator or the owner of the shared item to give you access. 

■ Check with the owner of the item to make sure you are entering your name exactly as specified by 
the owner (including spaces and capitalization) and try again. 



Solutions 
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Problems using the microphone 



You can't record sound using an external microphone or the microphone built into 
your computer. 

■ If you're using an external microphone to record, make sure your sound input source is set to 
External Microphone. Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Control Panels, then open the 
Monitors & Sound control panel. Click the Sound icon and choose External Microphone from the 
Sound Input pop-up menu. 

■ If you're using your computer's built-in microphone to record, make sure your sound input source 
is set to Internal Microphone. Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Control Panels, then open the 
Monitors & Sound control panel. Click the Sound icon and choose Internal Microphone from the 
Sound Input pop-up menu. 

For additional help, see the information about sound in Mac OS Guide, available in the Guide (®) 
menu. 

Problems listening to the radio 

You can't find the Apple FM Radio application. 

If the Apple FM Radio application is not anywhere on your hard disk, you need to install it from your 
system software CD. See "Performing a Custom Installation" in Chapter 13. 

You don't hear anything when you open the Apple FM Radio application. 

■ Be sure your FM antenna is securely connected to the FM port and the antenna is raised high. See 
Chapter 7, "Sound." 

■ The radio sound doesn't work if Video or S-Video is selected in the Apple Video Player application 
(even if that application isn't currently open). Open the Apple Video Player application and choose 
Show Controls Window from the Windows menu. Click the video screen icon (the second button 
down on the left). Choose TV as your video source. You can then quit the Apple Video Player 
application. Now when you open the Apple FM Radio application, you should hear radio. 



■ Be sure the volume on your computer is turned up. To adjust the volume, use the volume button on 
the front of the computer, the volume button on the remote control, or the controls in the Monitors 
& Sound control panel. 

■ You may need to broaden the signal range or strength. Make sure the Apple FM Radio application is 
active. Open the Options menu, choose Signal Range or Signal Strength, and choose "DX" for Signal 
Range and "All Stations" or "All Except Weakest" for Signal Strength. 

The reception is poor. 

■ Adjust the FM antenna. Be sure it is securely connected to the port and raised high. 
The remote control doesn't work. 

■ Make sure the remote control has a battery, or try changing the remote control's battery. 

■ Try moving closer to your computer. If you are already very close to the computer, point the remote 
control directly at the remote control receiver on the front of the computer. 

■ The remote control won't work for any application if the Disable Remote Control option is selected 
in Apple Video Player. Open Apple Video Player and choose Preferences from the Setup menu. 
Deselect the Disable Remote Control option (click to remove the X in the checkbox). 

You can't switch to radio using the remote control, or quit the radio using the 
remote control. 

■ There isn't a way to turn the radio on or off using the remote control. 

When you click Seek or Auto Add, Apple FM Radio finds either too few or too 
many stations. 

■ If Apple FM Radio is finding too few clear stations, adjust the FM antenna while the radio is playing 
to see if some stations come in clearer. 

■ If Apple FM Radio is finding "fuzzy" stations when it scans or adds stations, you may need to narrow 
the signal range or strength. Make sure the Apple FM Radio application is active. Open the Options 
menu, choose Signal Range or Signal Strength, and choose another setting. See what that does to 
the Scan and Auto Add features. Experiment with different settings to see which setting eliminates 
the stations you want eliminated. 



Solutions 
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Problems 

235 



Problems watching TV or video 

If the Apple Video Player application is not anywhere on your hard disk, you need to install it from your 
system software CD. See "Performing a Custom Installation" in Chapter 13. 

The remote control doesn't work. 

■ Make sure the remote control has a battery, or try changing the remote control's battery. 

■ Try moving closer to your computer. If you are already very close to the computer, point the remote 
control directly at the remote control receiver on the front of the computer. 

■ The remote control won't work for any application if the Disable Remote Control option is selected 
in Apple Video Player. Open Apple Video Player and choose Preferences from the Setup menu. 
Deselect the Disable Remote Control option (click to remove the X in the checkbox). 

You can't switch to TV when you press the TV/Mac button on the remote control. 

■ You may not have selected TV as your video source. Make sure that Apple Video Player is active, 
then choose Show Controls Window from the Windows menu and click the TV Video Source 
button. 

The Power button on your remote control doesn't work. 

■ You may have left a dialog box open. Close any open dialog box, then try the Power button again. 
You see static or a blank screen when you try to watch TV or video. 

■ Be sure your video equipment is securely connected to the appropriate video input port and your 
equipment is turned on. 

■ Be sure your antenna or cable service is securely connected to the coaxial port on the back of the 
computer. 

■ You may have the wrong video source selected. Make sure that Apple Video Player is active, then go 
to the screen controls in the Controls window and click the appropriate Video Source button. 

■ Some static may result from poor reception over an antenna, or from problems with cable service. 
Review the instructions that came with your antenna or cable, or call the supplier for assistance. 



The image is too small or it's filled with odd colors. 

■ The video input standard is set incorrectly. Make sure that Apple Video Player is active, then choose 
Preferences from the Setup menu and select a different setting. 

You see a message that the built-in digitizer cannot display video in the current 
monitor setting. 

■ Reduce the number of colors or levels of gray your monitor displays, using the Monitors & Sound 
control panel or the Control Strip. 

The image is too white or too dark. 

■ Adjust the video screen controls. (Make sure that Apple Video Player is active, then choose Show 
Controls Window from the Windows menu and click the video screen icon.) 

■ If you have a VCR connected to your video input card, make sure you're not having a problem with 
the videotape or the VCR itself. (Connect the VCR back to your TV and play the tape to see if the 
image is still bad.) 

■ The voltage output of your video equipment may be too high or too low for the video input card. 
Therefore, your video equipment may be sending video signals that are too strong (causing a white 
picture) or too weak (causing a very dark picture) for the video input card. Try connecting different 
video equipment to the card. 

You have a dark or "rolling" picture. 

■ Adjust the video screen controls. Make sure that Apple Video Player is active, then choose Show 
Controls Window from the Windows menu and click the video screen icon.) 

■ If you have a VCR connected to your video input card, make sure you're not having a problem with 
the videotape or the VCR itself. (Connect the VCR back to your TV and play the tape to see if the 
image is still bad.) 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

237 



You don't hear the TV, or you hear the radio instead of the TV. 

■ Make sure you have quit the Apple FM Radio application. To do so, click the FM Radio window to 
make it active, then choose Quit from the File menu. (You can watch TV and listen to the radio at 
the same time, but the radio sound takes precedence.) 

■ Be sure the volume on your computer is turned up. To adjust the volume, use the volume button 
on the front of the computer, the volume button on the remote control, or the controls in the 
Monitors & Sound control panel. 

The sound is intermittent or clipped. 

■ Turn down the volume controls on your video equipment. They may be set too high for the video 
input card. 

■ The voltage output of your video equipment may be too high for the video input card. Therefore, 
your video equipment may be sending signals that are too strong for the video input card. Try 
connecting different video equipment to the card. 

The sound is full of static. 

■ Adjust the sound controls in the Controls window. (Choose Show Controls Window from the 
Windows menu and click the sound icon.) 

■ Turn up the volume controls on your video equipment. 

Unexpected things happen when you try to switch modes using a keyboard shortcut. 

■ If you can switch between TV and computer using the remote control, but have trouble switching 
using the keyboard, check the hot key by choosing Hot Key from the Apple Video Player Setup 
menu. Be sure the key combination is not used by one of your other applications. For instance, in 
most Macintosh applications 3€-P sends a document to the printer. On the desktop, 5€-N creates a 
new untitled folder. 

You have a cable service and you can't see any channels above channel 1 3 
(U.S. only). 

■ Some cable services use HRC cable frequencies instead of standard cable frequencies. If you can't 
receive channels above channel 13, choose Channel Setup from the Apple Video Player Setup menu 
and select HRC Cable from the Connection pop-up menu. 



You can't see the Names pop-up menu on the video window. 

■ (U.S. only) You may have the wrong signal source selected. Each signal source (antenna, or standard 
or HRC cable) has its own channel list and potential list of channel names. Make sure that Apple 
Video Player is active, then choose Channel Setup from the Apple Video Player Setup menu and 
make a different choice from the Connection pop-up menu. 

■ If you had to reset your password because you forgot it, any names you entered earlier for channels 
were erased. You need to enter the names you want again. 

You can't see the volume slider on the video window. 

■ The video window is too small or too large. Make sure that Apple Video Player is active, then change 
the size by making a choice from the Windows menu or by dragging the size box. 

Your password doesn't work, or you forgot your password. 

■ Open the Guide menu and choose Apple Video Player Guide, then follow the instructions on 
invalidating a forgotten password so that you can create another password. 

You can't see closed captions when watching a channel or a videotape that 
provides them. 

Note: Closed captions are available only in certain regions. 

■ The video window must be set to Normal Size or greater to see closed captions. Make sure that 
Apple Video Player is active, then change the size by making a choice from the Windows menu or by 
dragging the size box. 

■ Quit networking or printing applications if they are active. Closed captioning does not work well 
when networking or printing is active. 

■ To view a videotape with closed captions, you must connect your VCR to the TV tuner port, not to 
the video input port. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

239 



Problems using the modem 

If you are experiencing problems with your modem, try following the general troubleshooting 
procedures on this page. Also see the information that came with any communications applications 
you are using. 

Double-check your installation. 

1 Unplug and reconnect the telephone cord to ensure a good connection. Check all other connections. 

2 Open the Express Modem control panel and make sure that the modem is turned on. 

If the On button does not stay selected, or if the control panel does not appear, try reinstalling the 
Apple Telecom software. See "Performing a Custom Installation" in Chapter 13. 

Make sure your modem is communicating with the telephone line. 

1 Open the Monitors and Sound control panel and make sure that the volume is set above the 
lowest mark. 

Increasing volume lets you hear what's going on: there should be a dial tone when you open 
communications and you should hear the modem dialing telephone numbers. 

2 Try dialing your own telephone number. 

If you hear a busy signal, you are properly connected. 

3 If you do not hear a dial tone, test your telephone line by connecting a working telephone and cord to 
the line. 

Plug the telephone into a telephone jack to verify the dial tone. If there is none, the telephone line 
is the source of the problem. The telephone line may be a digital line, in which case the modem will 
not work. 



Chapter 
Twelve 

240 



4 If you hear a dial tone on your telephone but not through your modem, test your modem's telephone 
cord by connecting it to the telephone jack and to the telephone. 

If there is no dial tone, the telephone cord is the source of the problem. 

If you followed steps 1 through 4 and you still don't hear a dial tone, your modem may need to be 
repaired. Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for information 
on contacting an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for further assistance. 

▲ Warning If your modem needs repair, take it to an Apple-authorized service provider. Do not attempt 
to repair or reinstall modem hardware yourself. If you do, any damage you may cause to your 
equipment will not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer. See an Apple-authorized 
service provider for additional information about this or any other warranty question. ▲ 

Check to see if your software is properly installed. 

■ Check to see if the Apple Telecom software is properly installed by watching the bottom of your 
screen when you restart your computer. The Apple Fax and Express Modem icons should be 
animated: the paper should emerge from the fax machine on the Apple Fax icon and the buttons on 
the phone should be pressed on the Express Modem icon. 

■ Open the Express Modem control panel. If the Express Modem software is installed and a 
communications application is using the modem, the Modem button in the Express Modem control 
panel is set to On. 

After you follow the general troubleshooting procedures above, check the rest of this section for 
answers to specific questions. Also refer to the information that came with any communications 
applications you are using. 



Solutions 
to Common 
Problems 

241 



You can't connect to a remote fax reception location. 

■ Resend the fax. If telephone line quality is poor, you may need to send the fax several times. 

■ You may have trouble sending or receiving a fax at the same time you are transferring files across an 
AppleTalk network using File Sharing. In this case, do not transfer files while sending or receiving 
your fax. 

■ If fax transmission fails, you can choose to resend only the pages not already sent by selecting 
"Resend only pages not already sent" in the Modem preferences of Apple Fax Preferences. 

You aren't receiving incoming calls. 

■ Make sure that your communications application is set to auto-answer. 

For Apple Fax, make sure that Fax Answering is set to On. For Apple Phone, make sure that Voice 
Mail in Voice Mail view is set to On. (For more information about Apple Fax or Apple Phone, see 
Chapter 4, "Connecting Your Computer to a Telephone Line." Check the appropriate setting for 
auto-answer in your communications application or terminal emulator. 

■ Open the Express Modem control panel and make sure the 'Auto-answer incoming calls" checkbox 
is selected. 

Some of your Fax Documents do not appear in the Apple Fax list. 

■ Sent and received fax documents are different file types. If you put a received fax into the "Sent Fax 
Documents" folder, for example, it does not show up in the list. 

You see a message that there is not enough memory. 

■ Quit any applications that you are not currently using. 

■ Close any windows that you don't need open. 

■ Try turning off the modem in the Express Modem control panel. Turning off the modem frees up 
approximately 600K of memory. When an application like Apple Fax needs the modem, it will turn it 
on again automatically. 

Of course, you should not turn off the modem while it is in use. 



Chapter Thirteen 



Techniques for Diagnosing and Solving Problems 



This chapter provides detailed instructions on several techniques you will use to diagnose and fix 
problems involving system software and hard disks. You will learn how to check your system 
extensions, start up from your system software CD-ROM disc, test and repair disks, and reinstall system 
software. 

Checking your system extensions 

System extensions are files that add features to your system software. Some extensions are 
incompatible with one another, with certain programs, or with Macintosh computers built with the 
PowerPC microprocessor. To check whether an extension is causing problems, follow the instructions 
in this section. 

Step 1 : Verify the problem 

To verify that you have a compatibility problem, follow the steps below. 
1 Start up your computer while holding down the Space bar. 

Holding down the Space bar opens the Extensions Manager control panel during startup. 



Chapter 
Thirteen 

244 



2 Release the Space bar when the Extensions Manager control panel opens. 



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This turns off all extensions and control panels except those installed with Mac OS 7.6. 

4 Close the Extensions Manager to continue startup. 

5 When the computer is ready, try the same actions that caused the problem. 

If the problem no longer occurs, you probably have an extension or control panel that doesn't work 
with Mac OS 7.6. Continue with the steps in the next section. 

If the problem still occurs, try checking your hard disk for problems with the Disk First Aid utility. You 
can find Disk First Aid in the Utilities folder on the CD-ROM disc that contains system software. You 
should also check to make sure that your application programs are compatible with Mac OS 7.6. 
If the problem only occurs when using a certain program, that program is probably not compatible. 
Check with the program's manufacturer for information. 



Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
Problems 

245 



Step 2: Test individual extensions and control panels 

To test an individual extension or control panel for compatibility, follow the steps below. 

1 Start up your computer while holding down the Space bar. 

Holding down the Space bar opens the Extensions Manager control panel during startup. 

2 Release the Space bar when the Extensions Manager control panel opens. 

3 Turn on the item you want to test by clicking its name to put an X beside it. 

4 Close the Extensions Manager to continue startup. 

5 Try the same actions that caused the problem. 

If the problem does not occur again, then the item is probably compatible with Mac OS 7.6. 

If the problem occurs again, the item is probably incompatible. Open the Extensions Manager and click 
the item's name to remove the X. 

6 Repeat steps 1 through 5 for each item you want to test. 



Chapter 
Thirteen 

246 



Testing your hard disk 

If you see a message reporting that a disk is damaged or unreadable, you may need to repair the disk. 
Try these suggestions first 

If you can't start up from a hard disk or you don't see the hard disk icon on the desktop, try the 
following: 

■ If the hard disk is internal, shut down your Macintosh, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on 
again. 

■ If the hard disk is external, make sure that it is turned on and that its cable is connected firmly; then 
restart the Macintosh. 

■ If the hard disk is your startup disk, start up with a different startup disk. (See "Starting Up From the 
System Software CD-ROM Disc," later in this chapter.) 

If, after you start up from a different disk, your hard disk's icon appears on your desktop, reinstall 
system software on the hard disk. See "Installing System Software," later in this chapter. 

■ Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment (anything connected to the SCSI port [❖]) on your 
computer. For information on setting SCSI ID numbers and terminating a SCSI chain, see both the 
manuals that came with your SCSI equipment and Chapter 9, "Connecting Additional Equipment." 

■ If none of these suggestions solves the problem, test the disk by following the instructions in 
"Testing for Damage on Your Hard Disk," next. 



Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
Problems 

247 



Testing for damage on your hard disk 

You can test a hard disk for damage with the Drive Setup program, which is on the system software 
CD-ROM disc that came with your computer. 

1 Start up your computer from the system software CD-ROM disc that came with your computer. 
See "Starting Up From the System Software CD-ROM Disc," later in this chapter. 

2 Locate the Drive Setup icon and double-click it to open the Drive Setup program. 
Drive Setup is usually in the Utilities folder on the system software CD-ROM disc. 




Drive Setup 

3 In the list of drives, click the disk you want to test. 



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Chapter 
Thirteen 

248 



5 When a message tells you that the testing is complete, click Quit. 

If the test reveals a problem, you may be able to correct it by using Disk First Aid or another disk repair 
program (see the instructions in the next section) or you may need to reinitialize the disk (see 
"Initializing a Hard Disk," later in this chapter). Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for 
assistance if necessary. If you had a hard disk from another manufacturer installed after you bought 
your computer, use the software that came with the disk or contact the disk manufacturer to get the 
latest version of software. 

Repairing a damaged hard disk or floppy disk 

You can repair some types of disk damage by using the Disk First Aid program, which is on the system 
software CD-ROM disc that came with your computer. 

Start up your computer from the system software CD-ROM disc that came with your computer. 
See "Starting Up From the System Software CD-ROM Disc" later in this chapter. 
Locate the Disk First Aid icon and double-click it to open the Disk First Aid program. 
Disk First Aid is usually in the Utilities folder on the system software CD-ROM disc. 



Disk First Aid 



Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
Problems 

249 



Click the icon of the disk you want to test. 

Disk icons appear in a box at the top of the Disk First Aid window. 



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Click Repair to begin testing and repairing the disk. 

You can't repair the startup disk or the disk that contains the Disk First Aid program, but you can test 
these disks by clicking Verify. If the program reveals a problem with either of these disks, start up the 
computer from another disk so that you can repair the damaged disk. 

If you want to test and repair another disk, click its icon and then click Repair. 

When testing and repair are done, choose Quit from the File menu. 



If Disk First Aid cannot correct the problem 

■ Try repairing the disk again. Sometimes repeating the process corrects the problem. 

■ Use another disk repair or recovery program. Some disk repair programs let you recover 
information from a damaged disk. 

■ Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for help. 

■ If you can't repair the disk, you'll need to reinitialize it, which erases all the information on it. 
Before you reinitialize, be sure you recover all the information you can and back it up. Then 
erase (reinitialize) the disk. For instructions on reinitializing a floppy disk, see Mac OS Guide, 
available in the Guide (HI) menu. For instructions on reinitializing a hard disk, see "Initializing a 
Hard Disk," next. 

If reinitialization doesn't work, discard the damaged disk (if it's a floppy disk) or take it to your 
Apple-authorized service provider for repair (if it's a hard disk). Bring your system software 
CD-ROM disc with you to the service provider. 



Initializing a hard disk 

The hard disk inside your computer was initialized (formatted for use) at the factory, so you shouldn't 
need to initialize it. You need to initialize a hard disk only if one of the following is true: 

■ You purchase an uninitialized hard disk from another manufacturer. 

■ Your hard disk is damaged and can't be repaired with Disk First Aid. 

If a hard disk needs to be initialized, its icon does not appear on the desktop when you start up the 
computer using another disk. 

You initialize your internal hard disk using a program called Drive Setup, which is on the system 
software CD-ROM disc that came with your computer. 

Warning Initializing a disk erases any information that may be on it. Before you initialize a 
damaged disk, try to repair it as described in "Repairing a Damaged Hard Disk or Floppy Disk" 
earlier in this section. ▲ 

Start up your computer from the system software CD-ROM disc that came with your computer. 
See "Starting Up From the System Software CD-ROM Disc" later in this chapter. 
Locate the Drive Setup icon and double-click it to open the Drive Setup program. 
Drive Setup is usually in the Utilities folder on the system software CD-ROM disc. 




Drive Setup 



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4 Click Initialize to initialize the hard disk. 

5 Click Quit when you see a message reporting that initialization was successful. 

If a message reports that initialization failed, try again. If initialization fails a second time, take the disk 
to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair. 



Starting up from the system software CD-ROM disc 

To test, repair, or initialize a hard disk, or to install or remove system software on a hard disk, you 
need to start up your computer from another disk, such as the system software CD-ROM disc. 

The procedure for starting up from the CD-ROM disc varies depending on the condition of the system 
software on your hard disk. To find out which procedure to use, you must turn on your Macintosh. 

The steps that follow tell how to start up from a CD-ROM disc, depending on what you see on 
your screen. 



Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
Problems 

253 



If you see a blinking question mark on your screen 

The blinking question mark means that your Macintosh is unable to find usable system software on 
your hard disk. 

Tor 
p?~l 

1 Press the Stop/Eject button of your CD-ROM drive to open the CD-ROM door. 

2 Place the CD-ROM disc in the drive with the disc label facing out. 

3 Close the door. 

Your Macintosh recognizes the CD-ROM disc as a startup disk, and in a few seconds the Macintosh 
desktop appears. 

If you see the Macintosh desktop 

1 Press the Stop/Eject button of your CD-ROM drive to open the CD-ROM door. 

2 Place the CD-ROM disc in the drive with the disc label facing out. 

3 Close the door. 

4 Hold down the C key on your keyboard while you choose Restart from the Special menu. 
Continue to hold down the C key until you see the "Welcome to Macintosh" message. 



Chapter 
Thirteen 

254 



Installing system software 



Your Macintosh came with all the necessary system software installed on its internal hard disk, so you 
don't need to install system software on that disk unless you encounter software problems. 

When should you install system software? 

■ You have a new hard disk or a newly initialized hard disk that does not yet contain system software. 
Follow the instructions in "Performing a Normal ('Easy') Installation of System Software" later in 
this section. 

■ You want to upgrade to a more recent version of system software. Follow the instructions that came 
with your system software upgrade. 

What kind of installation should you do? 

There are three kinds of system software installation. 

■ A normal ("easy") installation automatically installs all the Mac OS system software appropriate for 
your model of Macintosh. 

■ A "clean" installation installs all the Mac OS system software appropriate for your model of 
Macintosh, just as in a normal installation, but it also includes a procedure for checking all the files 
in your System Folder for possible problems or conflicts. 

■ A custom installation lets you select a specific combination of system software files or install or 
update one or more specific files. 

important If you're having a problem with your system software, you may not need to reinstall 
system software. If you see an icon with a question mark in the middle of the screen when you try to 
start up your computer, follow the instructions in "Testing Your Hard Disk" earlier in this chapter to test 
your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn't help, follow the instructions 
in "Performing a Normal ('Easy') Installation of System Software," next, to reinstall system software on 
the hard disk. 



Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
Problems 

255 



Performing a normal ("easy") installation of system software 

Follow the steps in this section to do what is commonly called a normal ("easy") installation of 
system software. 

If you're installing system software on a hard disk for the first time, make sure that your hard disk 
has been initialized, a process that prepares the disk to store information. If you see the hard disk's 
icon on the desktop when you start up the computer, the disk has been initialized. If no disk icon 
appears when you start up, see "Initializing a Hard Disk," earlier in this chapter, for instructions. 

Note: It is not necessary to erase your hard disk before installing system software. If you do, however, 
you may need to reinstall certain items that were on your hard disk before you erased it, as described 
in step 14 of this procedure. 

To perform a normal installation, follow these steps: 

Start up your computer from the CD-ROM disc that contains system software. 

Do this by inserting the CD-ROM disc into the CD-ROM drive and holding down the C key while you 
restart the computer. For detailed steps, see "Starting Up From the System Software CD-ROM Disc," 
earlier in this chapter. 

Open the Install Mac OS program by double-clicking its icon. 




Install Mac™ OS 

You see the Installer's initial screen; then a screen appears describing the four steps in the installation 
process. 



3 Click the first button to read about the installation process, as well as compatibility and troubleshooting 
information. 



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Read the onscreen document that appears. When you're finished reading the document, choose Quit 
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Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
Problems 

257 



Click the second button in the main Install Mac OS screen to update your disk drivers. 



Hard disks with old drivers might cause problems after installing Mac OS 7.6. Your computer might not 
start up, or you might not see the hard disk icons on the desktop. To avoid these problems, it's a good 
idea to update your drivers. 



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After you click the second button, you first see a dialog box asking you to confirm that you can use the 
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Setup program. 

8 Click the third button to select the disk on which you want to install Mac OS 7.6. 





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Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
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259 



9 In the dialog box that appears, choose the disk on which you're going to install Mac OS 7.6. Then click 
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Chapter 
Thirteen 

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1 1 In the dialog box that appears, select the software you want to install. 
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The basic system includes system software, OpenDoc, and OpenDoc Essentials. You can also choose to 
install the software listed below. Recommended choices are preselected. 

■ QuickDraw 3D, to view and manipulate 3D images on your computer 

■ MacLinkPlus translators, to easily open documents created in applications you don't have, using 
appropriate applications you do have (including DOS and Windows documents). (These translators 
work with the Mac OS Easy Open control panel.) 

■ Apple Remote Access, to connect to a remote computer (such as your computer at work) using 
a modem 

■ Cyberdog, an application to access the Internet 

■ Open Transport PPP software, to connect to the Internet using a modem 

■ English text-to-speech software, to have your computer read text aloud 

■ QuickDraw GX, for enhanced printing and typographical capabilities 



Techniques 
for Diagnosing 



and Solving 
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261 



Installing a customized system: The Install Mac OS program installs the software recommended for 
your model of computer. You can use the Customize option to be more specific about which software 
to install. For instructions, see "Performing a Custom Installation," later in this chapter. 

12 Click Start to install the software you selected. 

The Install Mac OS program checks your destination disk for any problems and repairs them, if 
necessary. 

After your disk is tested, the software you selected is installed. 

13 When the installation is complete, restart your computer. 

If your computer does not start up properly, see "If the Installation Was Not Successful," next. 

14 If necessary, install or reinstall other software that may be missing from your startup disk. 

If you erased your hard disk prior to installing system software, certain system extensions or 
application programs that were originally on your hard disk may need to be reinstalled. Some 
additional extensions and programs are on the CD-ROM disc that contains system software. System 
extensions or application programs from other vendors can be reinstalled from their installation disks. 

If the installation was not successful 

If a message reports that installation was not successful, try installing again. (Follow the instructions on 
the screen.) 

If, after reinstalling system software by doing a normal installation, you still experience problems with 
your computer, follow the steps in the section for performing a "clean" installation of system software, 
later in this chapter. 



Chapter 
Thirteen 

262 



Performing a custom installation 

For most Macintosh users, the Easy Install procedure described earlier is appropriate because it 
automatically installs all the items you need. However, if you'd like to select a combination of system 
software files for your specific needs, you can customize your system software installation. You use 
custom installation to install or update one or more specific files, or to save space on your hard disk by 
installing only the files you want. 

You can also use the Customize option to add additional software or to install a System Folder that can 
be used on any computer model. 

■ You can be more specific about what software packages you install. You can also specify which 
components to install from the packages you choose. 

■ After installing a product, you can add extra components. For example, you can install additional 
printer drivers. 

■ You can create a "universal" system that works on all computers that can use Mac OS 7.6. 
To install customized system software, follow these steps: 

1 Follow the steps in the previous section through step 9 (choosing a disk for the installation). 

2 Click the fourth button on the main Install Mac OS screen. 
The following dialog box appears. 

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Techniques 
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Problems 

263 



Click Customize. 

The following screen appears. 

Note: Your screen may look slightly different from the picture below. 



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To use the easy installation process, 
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. Click to put an X in the box for each 
software product you wantto install. 
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.You usetheOptions button to perform 
a clean installation. For information, 
see "Performing a Clean Installation 
of System Software," later in thischapter. 



Select the software you want to install. 

In addition to the optional software described in the preceding section, you can be more specific about 
which portions of the default system to install. You can choose from the following additional options: 

■ Mac OS 7.6, the basic system software 

■ OpenDoc, to take advantage of a new kind of software technology. Only computers with PowerPC 
microprocessors can use OpenDoc. 

■ OpenDoc Essentials, a set of software "parts" to get you started using OpenDoc technology. 
To use OpenDoc Essentials, you also need to install OpenDoc. 

Note: Cyberdog software also requires OpenDoc. To install Cyberdog, you need to install OpenDoc. 



As you proceed in the custom installation process, you'll be able to determine exactly which 
components will be installed for the software you select. 

The Install Mac OS program will automatically check your destination disk for any problems and repair 
it, if necessary. If you don't want your disk to be checked, click the Options button. In the dialog box 
that appears, click the Check Destination Disk checkbox to remove the X. 



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5 Click Start. 

The Mac OS program opens the Installer for the first software product you selected. You'll use the 
Installer to specify which components you want to install. 



Techniques 
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265 



6 When you see the Installer's welcome screen, click Continue. 
The Easy Install dialog box appears. 



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If you want all the recommended components for this product, click Install. 

If you choose the Easy Install option, you can skip ahead to step 10. If you want to be more specific 
about which components to install, follow steps 7 through 10, below. 

7 Open the pop-up menu and choose Custom Install. 

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Chapter 
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The Custom Install dialog box appears, listing all available components for the first software product. 



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8 Scroll through the list of components and click the checkbox next to each component you want 
to install. 

You can see and select individual items within each component by clicking the arrow to the left of the 
component, then clicking the item you want to install. To get additional information about each 
component listed, click the box with the letter i in it to the right of the component. Files that support 
the components you choose may also be installed. 

9 Click Install. 

10 Follow the instructions that appear on the screen. 

1 1 Repeat steps 6 through 10 for all the software you selected. 

The Install Mac OS application automatically opens the Installer for the next selected software package 
on the list. 

12 After all the installations are completed, restart your computer to use your new software. 

The system software is installed and your computer is ready to use. Don't forget to eject the CD-ROM 
disc containing system software when you are finished. 



Techniques 
for Diagnosing 
and Solving 
Problems 



267 



Performing a clean installation of system software 

This section describes how to perform what is commonly called a "clean" installation of system 
software. A clean installation allows you to discover which item in your System Folder is causing a 
problem. A clean installation creates a brand new System Folder and saves everything in your original 
System Folder in a different location. You can then reinstall system extensions, control panels, and 
other special software one at a time from the old System Folder to the new System Folder. This 
procedure allows you to determine which item in the old System Folder was the source of the 
problem. 

Perform a clean installation if you can't determine what is damaged in your System Folder (especially 
if you think any special software, such as control panels, system extensions, or custom utilities, may 
be causing the problems you're experiencing). You should also perform a clean installation if you're 
still having problems with your computer after you've reinstalled system software by performing a 
normal installation. 



To perform a clean installation, follow these steps: 



1 Start up your computer from the CD-ROM disc that contains system software. 

Do this by inserting the CD-ROM disc into the CD-ROM drive and holding down the C key while you 
restart the computer. For detailed steps, see "Starting Up From the System Software CD-ROM Disc" 
earlier in this chapter. 

2 Follow steps 1 through 9 (choose a disk for the installation) under "Performing a Normal ('Easy') 
Installation of System Software," earlier in this chapter. 





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Techniques 
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269 



3 



Click the fourth button on the main Install Mac OS screen. 
The following screen appears. 



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Chapter 
Thirteen 

270 



6 Click Start. 



A new System Folder is installed on your hard disk. (The old System Folder is renamed Previous 
System Folder.) 

Reinstall extensions, control panels, and other startup items not installed with Mac OS 7.6 from their 
original disks, if possible. If you don't have the original disks, you can drag these items one at a time 
from the Previous System Folder to the new System Folder. Restart your computer after you reinstall 
each item, to make sure your software is compatible with Mac OS 7.6. 



Rebuilding your desktop 

A procedure known as "rebuilding the desktop" helps your Macintosh to keep accurate track of data on 
your startup disks. Even though rebuilding the desktop does not usually fix problems once they occur, 
it does prevent some types of problems. Therefore, it's a good idea to rebuild your desktop once a 
month or so. 

Before you rebuild the desktop, you'll need to turn off some extensions, which may interfere with the 
desktop-rebuilding process. You'll turn them back on later. 

To rebuild the desktop, follow these steps: 

1 Open the Apple (ft) menu and choose Control Panels. Then double-click the Extensions Manager 
control panel to open it. 

2 Open the Edit menu and choose All Off. 

This turns off all extensions. You'll notice that none of the items in the Extensions Manager's list 
is checked. 



Techniques 
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and Solving 
Problems 

271 



Turn on Mac OS Easy Open by clicking it in the list so that a checkmark appears beside it. 

You can find Mac OS Easy Open by scrolling down the list of extensions. Mac OS Easy Open appears 
under the heading "Control Panels." 



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Hold down the 3€ and Option keys until you see the dialog box that asks if you're sure you want to 
rebuild your desktop file. When the dialog box appears, you can release the keys. 



5 Click OK. 

If a message appears asking if you are sure you want to rebuild the desktop, click OK. 
The computer rebuilds the desktop. This can take several minutes. 

important Do not stop the desktop-rebuilding process. Doing so could damage your system files. 

6 Open the Apple (#) menu and choose Control Panels. Then double-click the Extensions Manager 
control panel to open it. 

7 From the Selected Set pop-up menu, choose "My Settings." 
This turns your original set of extensions back on. 



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Techniques 
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Problems 

273 



Part Six 



Appendixes 



Appendix A 

Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 276 

Appendix B 

Special Keys on Your Keyboard 292 

Appendix C 

Using the Remote Control 300 

Appendix D 

Technical Information 306 



Appendix A 



Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 



For your own safety and that of your equipment, follow all the instructions in this appendix. Keep 
these instructions available for reference by you and others. 

Health-related information about computer use 

Muscle soreness, eye fatigue, and other discomforts and injuries sometimes associated with using 
computers can occur from performing any number of activities. In fact, misuse of the same muscles 
during multiple activities can create a problem that might not otherwise exist. For example, if you 
engage in nonwork activities that involve repetitive stress on the wrist— such as bicycling— and also use 
your computer's keyboard improperly, you may increase your likelihood of developing wrist problems. 
Some individuals are at greater risk of developing these problems because of their health, physiology, 
lifestyle, and general exposure to stress. Work organization and conditions, such as workstation setup 
and lighting, also play a part in your overall health and comfort. Preventing health problems is a 
multifaceted task that requires careful attention to the way you use your body every hour of every day. 

The most common health effects associated with using a computer are musculoskeletal discomfort and 
eye fatigue. We'll discuss each area of concern. 



Appendix A 
276 



Musculoskeletal discomfort 



As with any activity that involves sitting for long periods of time, using a computer can make your 
muscles sore and stiff. To minimize these effects, set up your work environment carefully, using the 
guidelines that follow, and take frequent breaks to rest tired muscles. To make working with your 
computer more comfortable, allow enough space in your work area so that you can change position 
frequently and maintain a relaxed posture. 

Another type of musculoskeletal concern is repetitive stress injuries (RSIs), also known as cumulative 
trauma disorders (CTDs). These problems can occur when a certain muscle or tendon is repeatedly 
overused and forced into an unnatural position. The exact causes of RSIs are not totally understood, 
but in addition to awkward posture, such factors as the amount of repetition, the force used in the 
activity, the individual's physiology, workplace stress level, and lifestyle may affect the likelihood of 
experiencing an RSI. 

RSIs did not suddenly arise when computers were invented; tennis elbow and writer's cramp, for 
example, are two RSIs that have been with us for a long time. Although less common than other RSIs, 
one serious RSI discussed more often today is a wrist problem called carpal tunnel syndrome, which 
may be aggravated by improper use of computer keyboards. This nerve disorder results from excessive 
pressure on the median nerve as it passes through the wrist to the hand. 

This section offers advice on setting up your work area to enhance your comfort while you use your 
computer. Since the effects of repetitive movements associated with using a computer can be 
compounded by those of other work and leisure activities to produce or aggravate physical problems, 
proper use of your computer system must be considered as just one element of a healthy lifestyle. 

No one, of course, can guarantee that you won't have problems even when you follow the most expert 
advice on using computer equipment. You should always check with a qualified health specialist if 
muscle, joint, or eye problems occur. 



Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

277 



Eye fatigue 

Eye fatigue can occur whenever the eyes are focused on a nearby object for a long time. This problem 
occurs because the eye muscles must work harder to view an object that's closer than about 20 feet 
(about 6 meters). Improper lighting can hasten the development of eye fatigue. Although eye fatigue is 
annoying, there's no evidence that it leads to permanent damage. 

Whenever you're engaged in an activity that involves close-up work— such as reading a magazine, doing 
craft work, or using a computer— be sure to have sufficient glare-free lighting and give your eyes 
frequent rest breaks by looking up and focusing on distant objects. Remember to have your eyes 
examined regularly. 

To prevent discomfort and eye fatigue: 

■ Arrange your work space so that the furniture is properly adjusted for you and doesn't contribute to 
an awkward working posture. 

■ Take frequent short breaks to give your muscles and eyes a chance to rest. 
Arranging your office 

Here are some guidelines for adjusting the furniture in your office to accommodate your physical size 
and shape. 

■ An adjustable chair that provides firm, comfortable support is best. Adjust the height of the chair so 
your thighs are horizontal and your feet flat on the floor. 

The back of the chair should support your lower back (lumbar region). Follow the manufacturer's 
instructions for adjusting the backrest to fit your body properly. 

■ When you use the computer keyboard, your shoulders should be relaxed. Your upper arm and 
forearm should form an approximate right angle, with your wrist and hand in roughly a straight line. 

You may have to raise your chair so your forearms and hands are at the proper angle to the 
keyboard. If this makes it impossible to rest your feet flat on the floor, you can use a footrest with 
adjustable height and tilt to make up for any gap between the floor and your feet. Or you may lower 
the desktop to eliminate the need for a footrest. Another option is to use a desk with a keyboard 
tray that's lower than the regular work surface. 



■ If you have a mouse in addition to the trackpad, or if you have removed the trackpad from the 
keyboard, position the mouse or trackpad at the same height as your keyboard. Allow adequate 
space to use the mouse comfortably. 

■ Adjust the computer so the top of the screen is slightly below your eye level when you're sitting at 
the keyboard. (You may need to place something under it or raise your work surface.) The best 
distance from your eyes to the screen is up to you, although most people seem to prefer 18 to 28 
inches (45 to 70 cm). 

■ Position the screen to minimize glare and reflections on the screen from overhead lights and 
windows. The computer's stand lets you set the screen at the best angle for viewing, helping to 
reduce or eliminate glare from lighting sources you can't move. 

. N 45-70 cm (18-28 in.) 

V ^ 

Top of the screen at or slightly 
below eye level (You may need 
to adjust the height of your 
computer by placing something 
under itor by raisingyour 
work surface.) 



Screen positioned to avoid 
reflected glare 

Clearance under work surface 



Feet flat on the floor 



Shoulders relaxed 

Forearmsand hands 
in a straight line 

Forearms level 
or tilted up slightly 

Lower back supported 
Thighs horizontal 




Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

279 



Avoiding fatigue 

■ Change your seated position, stand up, or stretch whenever you start to feel tired. Frequent short 
breaks are helpful in reducing fatigue. 

■ Use a light touch when typing and using the trackpad or a mouse and keep your hands and fingers 
relaxed. 

■ Some computer users may develop discomfort in their hands, wrists, or arms after intensive work 
without breaks. If you begin to develop chronic pain or discomfort in your hands, wrists, or arms, 
consult a qualified health specialist. 

■ Allow adequate work space so that you can use your keyboard and other devices comfortably. Place 
papers or other items so you can view them easily while using your computer. A document stand 
may make reading papers more comfortable. 

■ Eye muscles must work harder to focus on nearby objects. Occasionally focus your eyes on a distant 
object, and blink often while you work. 

■ Clean your screen regularly. Keeping the screen clean helps reduce unwanted reflections. 



What about electromagnetic emissions? 

There has been recent public discussion of the possible health effects of prolonged exposure to 
extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic fields. Such fields are 
associated with electromagnetic sources such as television sets, electrical wiring, and some household 
appliances— as well as computer monitors. 

Apple has reviewed scientific reports and sought the counsel of government regulatory agencies and 
respected health organizations. Based on the prevailing evidence and opinions, Apple believes that the 
electric and magnetic fields produced by computer monitors do not pose a health risk. 

In response to those customers who wish to reduce their exposure to electromagnetic fields, Apple has 
lowered the emission levels of our products. We are also actively encouraging further scientific research 
so we can continue to promote the health and safety of our customers and employees. 



Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

281 



Safety instructions 

For your own safety and that of your equipment, always take the following precautions. 

Turn off the computer completely and disconnect the power plug (by pulling the plug, not the cord) if 
any of the following conditions exists: 

■ the power cord or plug becomes frayed or otherwise damaged 

■ you spill something into the case 

■ your computer is exposed to rain or any other excess moisture 

■ your computer has been dropped or the case has been otherwise damaged 

■ you suspect that your computer needs service or repair 

■ you want to clean the case (use only the recommended procedure described later in this chapter) 
Be sure that you always do the following: 

■ Read all the installation instructions carefully before you plug your computer into a wall socket. 

■ Keep these instructions handy for reference by you and others. 

■ Follow all instructions and warnings dealing with your system. 

■ Keep your computer away from sources of liquids, such as washbasins, bathtubs, shower stalls, and 
so on. 

■ Protect your computer from dampness or wet weather, such as rain, snow, and so on. 

▲ Warning Electrical equipment may be hazardous if misused. Operation of this product, or similar 
products, must always be supervised by an adult. Do not allow children access to the interior of any 
electrical product and do not permit them to handle any cables. A 



Appendix A 
282 



Handling your computer equipment 

Follow these guidelines for handling your computer and its components: 

■ When setting up your computer, place components on a sturdy, flat surface, and carefully follow all 
setup instructions. 

■ When connecting or disconnecting a cable, always hold the cable by its connector (the plug, not the 
cord). 

■ Turn off your computer and all its components before connecting or disconnecting any cables to 
add or remove any component. Failure to do so could seriously damage your equipment. 

■ Never force a connector into a port. If the connector and port do not join with reasonable ease, they 
probably don't match. Make sure that the connector matches the port and that you have positioned 
the connector correctly in relation to the port. 

■ Take care not to spill any food or liquid on the computer, the keyboard, or other components. If you 
do, turn your computer off immediately and unplug it before cleaning up the spill. Depending on 
what you spilled and how much of it got into your equipment, you may need to have your 
equipment serviced by an Apple-authorized service provider. 

■ Protect the computer and its components from direct sunlight and rain or other moisture. 

■ Keep all ventilation openings clear and unobstructed. Without proper air circulation, components 
can overheat, causing damage or unreliable operation. 

■ If there is interference on the screen or on a television or radio near your computer, move the 
affected equipment farther away. 

▲ Warning This equipment is intended to be electrically grounded. Your Macintosh is equipped with a 
three-wire grounding plug— a plug that has a third (grounding) pin. This plug will fit only a grounded 
AC outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact a licensed 
electrician to replace the outlet with a properly grounded outlet. Do not defeat the purpose of the 
grounding plug! ▲ 



Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

283 



Handling the keyboard 

Take care not to spill any liquid on the keyboard. If you do, turn off your computer immediately. 

■ If you spill liquid that is thin and clear, unplug the keyboard, turn it upside down to let the liquid 
drain out, and let it dry for 24 hours at room temperature. If, after you take these steps, the 
keyboard doesn't work, take it to an Apple-authorized service provider for repair. 

■ If you spill liquid that is greasy, sweet, or sticky, unplug the keyboard and take it to an 
Apple-authorized service provider for repair. 

Handling floppy disks 

Follow the procedures below for handling floppy disks. Do not put floppy disks near the bass unit. 

Store disks at Do not use a 

temperatures pencil or an 

between 50° F eraser on a disk 

and 125° F. or disk label. Keep disksdry. 




Keep disks a way 
from magnets. 



Avoid exposing 
disks to extremely 
hot temperatures. 



Handling CD-ROM discs 

Keep these important safety instructions in mind as you use CD-ROM discs: 

■ Hold a disc by the edges or by one edge and the center hole. Do not touch the disc surface. 

■ To clean discs, wipe the shiny surface with a soft damp cloth, working in straight lines from center to 
edge. Do not use any form of cleaning agent. 

■ To avoid damage to your discs, keep these points in mind: 




Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

285 



Other important safety instructions to keep in mind as you use your CD-ROM drive. 

■ Position your computer so that when the door opens, it doesn't bump into anything. 

■ Do not leave the door open. If dust gets on the lens of the CD-ROM drive, the drive may have 
problems reading your compact discs. 

■ Do not force the door open by hand. 

■ Do not wipe the lens with a paper towel or other abrasive surface. If you need to clean the lens, see 
an Apple-authorized service provider for a lens cleaner. 

■ Never transport your computer with a disc inside the CD-ROM drive. 

■ Keep your computer equipment away from any source of liquid (such as washbasins, bathtubs, 
and shower stalls). If you drink coffee or other beverages while you're at your computer, take care 
not to spill. 

■ Avoid exposing your equipment to damp or wet weather. If your system is near a window, be sure 
the window is closed in rainy weather. 

You should remove any CD-ROM disc in the CD-ROM drive before shutting down the computer. To 
eject a CD-ROM disc, select the CD-ROM disc icon and choose Put Away from the File menu. (You can 
also drag the CD-ROM disc's icon to the Trash.) 

Ejecting a floppy disk 

To eject a floppy disk, select the disk icon and choose Put Away from the File menu. (You can also drag 
the disk's icon to the Trash.) 



If you can't eject a floppy disk 

If you can't eject a floppy disk in the usual way, try the following in order: 

■ Hold down the 3§ and Shift keys and press the number 1 key at the upper left of your keyboard to 
eject a disk in the internal disk drive. 

■ Turn off the computer. If the disk isn't ejected, hold down the button on your trackpad or other 
pointing device while you turn the computer on again. 

■ Locate the small hole near the disk drive's opening, and carefully insert the end of a large 
straightened paper clip into it. Push gently until the disk is ejected. Do not use excessive force. 




If nothing works, take the computer to your Apple-authorized service provider to have the 
disk removed. 

Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

287 



Ejecting a CD-ROM disc 

To eject a CD-ROM disc, select the disc icon and choose Put Away from the File menu. You can also 
drag the disc's icon to the Trash. (Note: You won't lose information on the CD-ROM disc by dragging its 
icon to the Trash. Don't select the disc icon and then choose Eject Disk from the Special menu.) 

If you can't eject a CD-ROM disc 

If a CD-ROM disc icon appearson your screen: 

■ If the AppleCD Audio Player is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu or click the Eject button in 
the AppleCD Audio Player controller. 

■ If you see a message that a disc can't be put away because it is being shared, turn off file sharing in 
the Sharing Setup control panel in the Apple (fk) menu, then try again to put away the disc. 

If no CD-ROM disc icon appearson your screen: 

■ Restart your computer. Immediately after the startup sound, press the Stop/Eject button of your 
CD-ROM drive to open the door. 



■ If the door doesn't open, do the following: Locate the small pinhole on the left side of the 

computer, insert the end of a large straightened paper clip firmly and horizontally into the pinhole, 
and push gently until the door is released. Do not force the door open; wait until the paper clip has 
released it to be sure you don't break the door. 




If neither of these suggestions works, your CD-ROM drive may be damaged. Consult the service and 
support information that came with your computer for information on contacting an Apple-authorized 
service provider or Apple for further assistance. 



Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

289 



Power supply 



The power supply in your computer is a high-voltage component and should not be opened for any 
reason, even when the computer is off. If the power supply needs service, contact your Apple- 
authorized dealer or service provider. 

Cleaning your equipment 

Follow these general rules when cleaning the outside of your computer and its components: 

■ Use a damp, soft, lint-free cloth to clean the computer's exterior. Avoid getting moisture in any 
openings. 

■ Don't use aerosol sprays, solvents, or abrasives. 

Cleaning the computer case 

To clean the case, do the following: 

1 Turn off the computer completely and then disconnect the power plug. (Pull the plug, not the cord.) 

2 Wipe the surfaces lightly with a clean, soft cloth dampened with water. 

Cleaning the bass unit 

If the outside of the bass unit becomes dusty, wipe the surface lightly with a clean, soft cloth 
dampened with water. 

Cleaning the monitor 

To clean the screen, put household glass cleaner on a soft cloth and wipe the screen. Don't spray the 
cleaner directly on the screen, because the liquid might drip into the monitor or computer. 

Cleaning the trackpad 

Sometimes humidity or condensation may cause moisture to gather on the trackpad. If this happens, 
gently wipe the trackpad with a clean cloth before you use it. 

Appendix A 
290 



Cleaning and caring for the leather palmrests 

To keep the leather palmrests in top condition, do the following several times a year: 

■ Moisten a soft cloth in a mild soap solution and carefully apply this damp (not wet) cloth to the 
leather with light, circular movements until the leather is clean. Repeat using clean water. Let the 
leather dry completely. Do not use external sources of heat such as a hair dryer. 

■ After cleaning, apply a leather conditioner (available where genuine leather products are sold). Use 
a soft cloth and light, circular movements. Let the leather dry; then buff gently with a soft, dry cloth. 

To prevent damage to the leather: 

■ Do not use hot water, abrasive polishes, solvents, sprays, or soaps that contain abrasives. 

■ Do not use stiff brushes or a hard brushing action. 

■ Wipe wet patches caused by soft drinks, coffee, or tea immediately using absorbent material. If a 
stain is left, apply a leather stain remover and conditioner (work from the outside towards the 
center to avoid leaving a ring). Note: Stain treatment may change the original appearance of the 
leather. 

■ Avoid lengthy exposure to sun, which will dry, crack, and fade the leather. 



Health, Safety, and 
Maintenance Tips 

291 



Appendix B 



Special Keys on Your Keyboard 



\our computer keyboard contains certain special keys that typewriter keyboards don't have. Many of 
these keys allow you to give commands to the computer without using the trackpad. For example, in 
many application programs, pressing the 3€ (Command) key at the same time as the Q key lets you quit 
the program. 

Your keyboard looks like one of the illustrations on the next page. The illustrations, and the table that 
follows, explain the function of all the special keys. 



Appendix B 
292 



Escape key 



Function keys 



Delete key Power key 



Tab key- 
Caps Lock indicator- 
Caps Lock key- 
Shift key- 
Control key- 













-ill® 




J L 


z 










j[U1 


< 


j 








\@ 1 


i# 


IL 


jy 


L 


JU 


IL 


JU 


uu 


+ m) 








t J 


U 




JUl 


y 


LJl 


d 


Ul 




JU 


y 


y 


y 






~]capslock 






J 






U 


|/y J [ 




1/yJ ^ 


JUl 














L 




Jk 


JU 






J [4/ 


JU 


IU 


7 


J IsM 










\&L J 


{option 


J 


b 






jy 


y 













Option key & (Command) key Enter key Arrow keys Return key Shift key 
Escape key Function keys Delete key Return key Power key 



Tab key- 
Caps Lock indicator. 
Caps Lock key- 
Shift key- 
Control key- 



y k 



yy 




y 


£_J 


y 




y 


yj 


u 


5_J 


u 


y 


Ul 


<-3 


1- 


u 


by. 


y 


u 


y 








u 


u 


u 


y 



yuiu 



Option key ^(Command) key 



Enter key Arrow keys Shift key 



Special Keys 
on Your 
Keyboard 

293 



1 Special keys on your keyboard I 


Arrow keys 


Use to move the insertion point, as an alternative to using the pointer. In some programs, 
the arrow keys have other functions. 


Caps Lock key 


Use to capitalize a series of letters (numbers and symbols aren't affected). 


3€ (Command) key 

[|o #j] 


Use in combination with other keys as an alternative to choosing a menu command. 


Control key 


Use in combination with other keys to produce special characters or modify actions. 


Delete key 


Use to delete selected material, or the character to the left of the insertion point. 


Enter key 

y y 


In a dialog box, pressing Enter is the same as clicking the outlined button. In some programs, 
pressing this key confirms information you have provided. 


Escape key 


The function of this key depends on the program you're using. 



Appendix B 
294 



Special keys on your keyboard 



Function keys 

Some programs allow you to use the 12 function keys to give commands. You can assign 
commands or action sequences to function keys with special utility programs. 

Option key 

F~ jl IF \\ Use in combination with other keys to produce special characters or modify actions. 



Power key 

fi<Fj| Press to turn on the computer. Also press to shut down the computer on certain models. 



Return key 



Press to move the insertion point to the beginning of the next line. In a dialog box, pressing Return 
is the same as clicking the outlined button. 



Shift key 



Press to produce capital letters (or the upper character on the key) . 



Tab key 



Press to move the insertion point to the next stopping place (such as a tab stop or field in a dialog 
box or program). 



Note: There are two styles of keyboards. Both are shown in this table. 



Special Keys 
on Your 
Keyboard 

295 



Typing special characters and symbols 

You can type a variety of international and other special symbols and characters (including characters 
with diacritical marks, such as accents) by pressing combinations of keys. 

The Key Caps program, which is installed with your system software, shows you the characters 
produced when you type certain keys and key combinations in the fonts available on your computer. 
Choose Key Caps from the Apple (fk) menu, then choose the font from the Key Caps menu. 



GO iBjaioisj Elalors] * 1*1*1*1 *IiT*1 



I - I -HI j iaJU J I *]■ ! - I j 



TtTh 



rr 



i '/i i 

*J*IHn 



I 



C3D 



□ 






- 


3 


t- 


■J 




1 


■■ 


i. 




« 


? 


■! 




ii 




n 



.Characters appear 
here when you press 
keys on the keyboard 
or click them in 
the window. 



Characters available 
in the Chicago font 



To have Key Caps show more options for special characters, press each of these keys or key 
combinations: Option, Shift, Shift-Option, Shift-as, and Option-^. 




Characters available in the Chicago 
font when the Option key is pressed 



El 03 



n 1 1-3 El *M iJ Jhl H ill*! \\ a \ D \ D \ [° 
\ £lm\£\ j I e>J □ 1 .1 j| : |.-T-T ^ 




i- "j 

i 



ODD 

nun 



" 



iThe highlighted key represents the key held down 
on thekeyboard-in this case, the Option key. 



If you press the Option key, Key Caps outlines lightly the keys that you can use in combination with 
letter keys to type letters with accents or other diacritical marks. 

Note: If you see rectangles instead of diacritical marks on some of the pictures of keys in Key Caps, try 
pressing Option-^ to see the diacritical marks. However, use the Option key (not Option-^) in 
combination with the other keys to type letters with diacritical marks. 

If you press the Option key at the same time as a key for a specific diacritical mark and then release 
both keys, Key Caps outlines in bold the keys for letters that can be typed with that mark. (You'll see 
that most key combinations for diacritical marks can be used with the Space bar as well as letter keys- 
producing the mark without a letter.) 



Special Keys 
on Your 
Keyboard 

297 



The most common diacritical marks and how to create them are summarized next. 




Grave accent ( v ) 



Option-' , then type the character 



Acute accent ( ' ) 



Option-e, then type the character 



Circumflex ( ^ ) 



Option-i, then type the character 



Tilde (~) 



Option-n, then type the character 



Umlaut ( '* ) 



Option-u, then type the character 



The letter "c" with a cedilla (cj 



Option-c 



To type a letter or a space with a specific diacritical mark, press the Option key and the key for the 
mark simultaneously. Then type the letter that needs the mark. 

If you are having trouble getting a mark and letter to appear together, try again. Be sure to press the 
Option key before (or at the same time as) the key for the mark; then, after you release both keys, type 
the letter to be marked. 



Special key combinations 

If difficulties with your trackpad or computer don't allow you to use standard methods of quitting a 
program or restarting your computer, you can try using these special key combinations. 



To do this ... 


... press this key combination 


Force a program to quit 


3€-Option-Esc 


Force the computer to restart 


3€-Control-Power key 


Here are other key combinations you may find useful to use while starting up your computer. 


To do the following at startup... 


... press this key or key combination 


Start up the computer from a CD-ROM disc 


C key and the Power key 


Bypass the internal hard disk and start up the 
computer from a System Folder on another drive 


9€-Option-Shift-Delete and the Power key 


Turn off system extensions 


Shift key and the Power key 


Start the Extensions Manager 


Space bar and the Power key 



Special Keys 
on Your 
Keyboard 

299 



Appendix C 



Using the Remote Control 



Before using the remote control, install the batteries that are included in your package. 

You can use the remote control to 

■ turn the computer on and off 

■ switch easily between watching TV or video, and using other application programs 

■ control the sound of the radio or TV 

■ change TV channels or radio stations 

■ manipulate the size of the video window 

■ control the sound from an audio CD 

■ stop and eject a CD 

■ pause and continue play of an audio CD 

■ move to the next or previous track of an audio CD 



Appendix C 
300 



Controlling TV 



or video 



Turnsmuting 
on and off - 

Adjustsvolume - 

Switches video window - 
between current and 
largest size 



MUTE POWER 

-cd cd- 



VOLUME CHANNEL^ 

CD- -CD} 



-CD CD- 

DISPLAY TV/MAC 



STOP/EJECT 



CD CD CD 

REV PLAY/PAUSE FWD 



Turnsthe computer 
-on and off 

-Changes TV channels 

-Switches between the 
video window and 
computer programs 



Controlling the FM radio 



Turnsmuting 
on and off - 

Adjusts volume- 



MUTE POWER 

-cd cd- 



+ cd] 

VOLUME CHANNEL^ 

CD- -CD J 
cd CD 

DISPLAY TV/MAC 



STOP/EJECT 



□ CO CD 

REV PLAY/PAUSE FWD 



(3 



Turnsthe computer 
-on and off 

-Cycles among the six 
main preset stations 




While you hear the radio (whether or not the Apple FM Radio window is open), the remote controls 
for FM radio work. (You can't use the remote control to switch to the Apple FM Radio from another 
application program.) 

When you press the TV/Mac button while the radio is playing, Apple Video Player starts, but you won't 
hear the TV or video until you quit Apple FM Radio. 

If you are playing an audio CD, you hear the audio CD and the TV or FM radio sounds simultaneously. 



Controlling the CD-ROM 



drive 



Turnsmuting 
on and off - 

Adjusts volume- 



Stops/ejectsCD - 

Goesto previous- 
trackon audio CD 



MUTE POWER 

-a C3- 



DISPLAY TV/ MAC 



STOP/EJECT 



REV PLAY/PAUSE FWD 



6 



Turnsthe computer 
-on and off 



.Plays/pausesCD 

-Goesto next track 
on audio CD 




You use the remote control to control audio CDs in conjunction with the AppleCD Audio Player, 
available in the Apple (fk) menu. 



Using 

the Remote 
Control 

303 



Setting preferences for the remote control 

You can temporarily turn off the remote control or specify whether a confirmation box appears when 
the computer is turned off from the remote control's Power button. These two preferences are set 
using the Apple Video Player application program. 

To adjust these preferences, follow these steps: 

1 Open the Apple (fk) menu and choose Apple Video Player. 

2 Open the Setup menu in Apple Video Player, and choose Preferences. 

3 To turn off the remote control, click the Disable Remote Control checkbox to put an X in it. 
To turn the remote control back on, click to remove the X. 

4 To make a confirmation box appear when the remote control's Power button is used to turn off the 
computer, click the Confirm Power Off checkbox to put an X in it. 

If you don't want to see the confirmation box, click to remove the X. 

5 Click OK. 

The changes take effect immediately. 



Appendix C 
304 



Appendix D 



Technical Information 



Main unit 

Processor 

A PowerPC™ 603e processor with the following features: 

■ Processor speed: 250 megahertz (MHz) 

■ Built-in floating point unit (FPU) 

■ 50 MHz system bus 

■ 32 kilobytes (K) internal cache (16K data, 16K instructions) 
Memory 

The following come with your computer: 

■ 32 megabytes (MB) of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) installed in either a single 32 MB 
Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM) or two 16 MB DIMMs 

Each DIMM slot can accommodate a DIMM of up to 64 MB, for a maximum of 128 MB. DRAM 
DIMMs installed later should be 64-bit wide, 5 volt (V), 168-pin extended data output (EDO) or 
fast-paged mode DIMMs, with 60-nanosecond (ns) RAM access time or faster and a 2K refresh count. 
The Single Inline Memory Modules (SIMMs) from older Macintosh computers are not compatible 
with your computer and cannot be used. DIMMs that require a 4K refresh count and 3.3 V DIMMs 
also cannot be used. 



Appendix D 
306 



■ 2 MB of built-in video memory using synchronous graphic RAM (SGRAM) 

■ 4 MB of read-only memory (ROM) 

■ 50 MHz High Performance Module (256K level 2 cache) 

Internal storage devices 

The following storage devices were installed in your computer at the factory: 

■ Apple SuperDrive 1.4 MB high-density floppy disk drive 

■ 2 gigabyte (GB) Apple ATA (Advanced Technology Attachment) hard disk drive, also known as an 
Enhanced Integrated Device Electronics (IDE) hard disk drive 

■ a custom front-loading CD-ROM drive 

CD-ROM drive specifications 
Disc diameter 

■ 120 millimeters (mm) (4.7 inches) 

■ 80 mm (3.2 inches) 

Average access time 

■ Audio: 380 milliseconds (ms) for playing audio CDs 

■ Data: 200ms 

Data capacity 

■ 656 megabytes (MB), Mode 1 
. 748 MB, Mode 2 

Maximum playing time 

■ 74 minutes, 42 seconds 



Technical 
Information 

307 



Playback formats supported 

■ Audio CD 

■ CD-ROM (Modes 1 and 2) 

■ CD-ROM XA (Mode 2, Forms 1 and 2) 

■ CD-I (Mode 2, Forms 1 and 2) 

■ CD-I (Ready) 

■ CD-I (Bridge) 

■ Photo CD (Single session and multisession) 

■ Video CD 

■ CD-WO (write once) playback 
Laser 

■ Type: Semiconductor GaAlAs laser 

■ Vfevelength: 790 ± 25 nanometers 

■ Output power: 0.2 to 0.6 milliwatts 

■ Beam divergence: 55° 



Video System 
Flat panel display 

■ 12 . 1-inch diagonal, 800 x 600 active matrix with backlighting 

■ Color liquid crystal 

■ 256 or thousands of colors 

■ Color depth: 6 bits each R,G,B 

Video and graphics modes 

Your computer has the following video and graphic capabilities built into the logic board: 

■ ATI 3D RAGE II 64-bit graphics and multimedia accelerator chip 

■ 2 MB synchronous graphic RAM (SGRAM) 

■ Hardware acceleration of 2-dimensional (2D) QuickDraw graphics and video— accelerates tasks such 
as scrolling, text and graphic display, and screen redraw 

■ Hardware acceleration of video for full-screen, full-motion, TV-quality playback of QuickTime 
movies— accelerates and improves full-screen display of most QuickTime movies and enhances 
video capture when used with an optional video input card 

■ Hardware acceleration of 3-dimensional (3D) QuickDraw 3D rendering— accelerates QuickDraw 3D 
rendering up to 6 times faster than software-only rendering; provides real-time 3D shaded object 
manipulation, animation, and virtual world navigation; and enhances the realism of 3D interactive 
titles and games 

■ Hardware support for 3D features, including the following: 

■ 16-bit Z-buffer for hidden surface removal 

■ Six perspectively correct texture mapping functions 

■ Video textures and texture lighting 

■ Flat and Gouraud shading 

■ Alpha blending, transparency, and fog effects 

■ Support for QuickDraw 3D Rendering Acceleration Virtual Engine (RAVE) 



Technical 
Information 



309 



Graphics modes supported 

Your computer can display the graphics modes listed in the following table. 




640x480 



8 
16 



60 
60 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 



No 
Yes 



800x600 



8 
16 



60 
60 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 



No 

t 



* A color depth of 16 bits can display 32,768 colors; a color depth of 8 bits can display 256 colors, 
t Depends on the application window size. 



Video input 

The built-in video input card lets you view and record video from a video camera, VCR, or other video 
input equipment. The built-in Apple TV/FM Radio System or Apple TV System lets you record video 
from broadcast or cable television. 

■ I n put for mat: S-video; composite video through composite video to S-video adapter cable 

■ Transmission format: industry standard NTSC/PAL/SECAM 

■ Po I a r i ty: sync negative or sync positive depending on video mode 

■ Level : 0.6 volts peak-to-peak (Vpp) minimum to 1.5 Vpp maximum ("S" chroma level 
1.4 Vpp maximum) 

■ Svideo impedance: 75 ohms (£1) 

■ DC offset: ±0.1 volts (V) maximum 



Appendix D 



310 



Sound 

■ 16-bit stereo input and output supporting sample rates of 11.025, 22.05, and 44.1 kilohertz (kHz) 

■ Built-in Bose sound system including Bose bass unit 

■ Front panel push-button control for volume level and muting 

■ Front headphone jack 

■ Built-in omnidirectional electret type microphone 

■ Sound input and output ports on back of computer 

Input level to sound input port 

Note: The information in this section applies to the sound input port in the lower rear area of the 
computer's back panel, not to the video audio input port next to the S-video port in the area covered 
by the port cover plate. 

The sound input port (marked with the If icon) has two external sound input modes: low level and 



To select low or high level, open the Monitors & Sound control panel, click the Sound button, and 
choose External Microphone (for low level) or Line Level Input (for high level) in the Sound Output 
pop-up menu. 

Recording levels for various input sources 



high level. 




External microphone 



3-concl 



13 mVrms 



External microphone 



4-concl 



250 mVrms 



Line level input 



3-concl 



250 mVrms 



Technical 
Information 



311 



Sound input port input impedance 

■ > 3.5 kilohms (kfl) nominal, each channel 

Input level to video audio input port 

Note: The information in this section applies to the video audio input port next to the S-video port in 
the area covered by the port cover plate. 

The video audio input port (marked with the # icon, next to the S-video port marked with the V icon) 
has one external sound input mode. 

To select the video audio input port for sound input, open the Monitors & Sound control panel, click 
the Sound button, and choose TV/CD/Video in the Sound Output pop-up menu. Then open Apple 
Video Player, make sure that the Controls window is open, and click the S-Video button in the Video 
Source section. Set the volume slider in the S-video window to maximum volume. 

■ Video audio input connector line level for full-scale output level, with the S-video window's volume 
slider set at maximum in Apple Video Player: 0.1 Vrms 

■ Video audio input connector line level for full-scale recording level, with the S-video window's 
volume slider set at maximum in Apple Video Player: 90 mVrms 

■ Video audio input connector input impedance: 10 k£l nominal, each channel 

Voltage and impedance for sound output ports 

■ Front sound output connector output impedance: 32 £1 nominal, each channel 

■ Front sound output full-scale open circuit output voltage: lVrms 

■ Rear sound output connector output impedance: 32 £1 nominal, each channel 

■ Rear sound output full-scale open circuit output voltage: 1 Vrms 
Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and frequency response 

■ SNR: 75 decibels (dB) minimum, 80 dB typical (A-weighted, 2 Vpp output, 1 kHz, digital record and 
playback, sound input port to sound output port) 

■ Frequency response: 20 Hz-18 kHz (-3 dB relative to 1 kHz under the same conditions as the 
SNR measurement) 



Clock/calendar 



■ CMOS custom circuitry with long-life battery 

▲ Warning If the clock begins to keep time inaccurately, have an Apple-authorized dealer or service 
provider replace the battery. The service provider will dispose of the battery according to the local 
environmental guidelines. Do not attempt to replace the clock battery yourself. A 

Keyboard 

■ Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh custom keyboard 

■ Two ADB connectors; one for the trackpad and one for adding a second device if desired 
Trackpad 

■ Solid-state keyboard-mounted trackpad (ADB device); can be removed and repositioned 
Interfaces 

■ Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port supporting up to three ADB input devices (such as a trackball, 
keyboard, or mouse) daisy-chained through a serial bus; additional ADB port on back of keyboard 

■ One internal expansion slot supporting 6.88-inch 15-watt PCI (peripheral component interconnect) 
expansion cards. Install only expansion cards that come with Macintosh drivers and are compliant 
with the PCI 2.0 standard. NuBus™ cards cannot be used in this expansion slot. 

■ One internal expansion slot (comm slot II), supporting communication cards, such as an internal 
modem or Ethernet card 

■ One internal video expansion slot supporting a video input card using the NTSC, PAL, and SECAM 
formats (The video input card is already installed in this slot.) 

■ One TV tuner card that allows you to connect your computer to an external TV antenna or cable TV 
service and FM radio antenna (The Apple TV/FM Radio System card is already installed.) 

■ Two RS-232/RS-422 serial GeoPort-compatible ports for printers, modems, LocalTalk network, or 
other serial devices 



Technical 
Information 

313 



■ One external standard SCSI port for storage devices, scanners, printers, and other S CSI devices; 
supports up to six external devices 

■ One 3.5-mm sound output port for line-level devices, such as powered loudspeakers, on the back of 
the computer 

■ One 3.5-mm headphone jack on the front of the computer 

■ One 3.5-mm sound input port for stereo sound input 

■ One 3.5-mm sound input port for stereo sound related to video recording 

The two sound input ports support a standard stereo (miniplug-to-RCA) cable adapter for 
connecting stereo equipment to your computer. They do not support the Apple Omni microphone 
(the round microphone shipped with some earlier models of Macintosh) or the attenuated RCA 
adapter provided with some models of Macintosh. 

Note: Equipment attached to the sound input ports must generate line level output. 

■ S-video input port for VCR, camcorder, or other video input device; adapter for composite video 
input devices; supports NTSC, PAL, and SECAM video standards 

■ F-type connector for TV cable or antenna 

■ Connector for FM antenna 

■ Front panel buttons for volume and brightness 

■ Support for infrared remote control of audio CDs, and for muting sound, setting volume, changing 
TV or FM channels, adjusting the video window, and turning the computer on and off 

Environment 

■ Operating temperature: 10° C to 35° C (50° F to 95° F) 

■ Storage temperature: -40° C to 47° C (-40° F to 116.6° F) 

■ Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing 

■ Altitude: Works below 3048 m (10,000 ft.) 



Appendix D 
314 



Size and weight 



1 Weight 


Height 


Width 


Depth 1 


Main unit 








6 8 kg 


43.8 cm 


41.9 cm 


25.4 cm 


14.9 lbs. 


17.25 in. 


16.5 in. 


10.0 in. 


Bass unit 








4.8 kg 


27 cm 


21.1cm 


29.8 cm 


10.5 lbs. 


10.63 in. 


8.31 in. 


11.75 in. 


Keyboard 








.84 kg 


2.5 cm 


29.2 cm 


20.7 cm 


1.86 lbs. 


lin. 


11.5 in. 


8.13 in. 



Power 

AC line input 

■ Li ne voltage: 90-130 volts (V) or 180-264 V alternating current (AC), RMS single phase. The 
computer's voltage is configured manually using a control on the bass unit; this control is pre-set at 
the factory. 

■ Frequency: 47-63 Hz 

■ Power consu mpti on : 140 watts (W) maximum continuous input power. Typical AC power is 47 W 
for a 250 MHz computer with a 603e processor, 2 gigabyte (GB) hard disk, 28.8K bits per second 
(bps) modem, High Performance L2 Module, and a CD-ROM drive installed. 



Technical 
Information 



315 



DC power 

Maximum continuousoutput: 70 watts (W) 



Current type (V) 


Maximum current (A)* 


+ 5 


8.5t 


+ 5 (trickle) 


0.1 


+3.3 


5t 


+ 12 


2.3 


-12 


0.25 


* Total power output cannot exceed 98 W. 

f Not more than 10.7 A total combined current on + 5 V and + 3.3 V outputs. 


Sleep mode 




The AC power usage for a computer without PCI cards installed is less than 30 W in sleep mode. 


CD-ROM drive 




The following table shows typical power consumption for the internal CD-ROM drive. 


Power consumption (typical) 


+ 5VDC 


350 milliamperes (mA) 


+ 12VDC 


500 mA 



Power requirements for devices you can connect 
Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) 

■ Trackpad draws up to 10 mA 

■ Keyboard draws 25-80 mA (varies with keyboard model used) 

■ Maximum current available for all ADB devices and all serial devices: 500 mA 
Note: The ADB port can support up to three daisy-chained ADB devices. 
Audio and telecommunications devices 

The following table shows power allowances for external devices connected to input ports. 



1 Device 


Voltage 


Current 


Power 1 


Microphone 


+ 5V 


1mA 


5mW 


GeoPort Telecom Adapter & ADB devices 


+ 5V 


500 mA 


2.5W 


S-video input connector 


+ 12V 


250 mA 


3W 



Technical 
Information 

317 



Expansion cards 



Your computer can accommodate only 6.88-inch PCI expansion cards. If you add an expansion card to 
your computer, make sure the component's power requirements don't exceed the maximum power 
allowances allocated to it by the computer. Power allowances are presented in the following table. 



1 Device 


Voltage 


Current 


Power 1 


PCI expansion cards (15 watts)* 


+3.3V 


2A 


6.6 W 




+5V 


3A 


15 W 




-12 V 


500 mA 


6W 


Communication expansion cardt 


+5V 


500 mA 


2.5 W 




+ 12V 


100 mA 


1.2 W 



* Each PCI expansion card should not consume more than 15 watts of power total, 
t The communication card should not consume more than 2.5 watts of power total. 



Express Modem specifications 
AT command set 

■ Extended Hayes AT command set 
Data Communications Standards 

. 33600, 28800, 26400, 24000, 21600, 19200, 16800, 14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, 2400, 
4800 bps: ITUV.34 

. 14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, 4800 bps: ITU V.32 bis 

. 9600,4800 bps: ITU V.32 

■ 2400 bps: ITU V.22 bis 

■ 1200 bps: Bell 212A, ITU V.22 
. 1200/75 bps: ITUV.23 

. 75/1200 bps: ITUV.23 

■ 300 bps: ITUV.21 
. 300 bps: Bell 103 

Appendix D 
318 



Group 3 Fax Communication Standards 

■ 2400,4800 bps: ITUV.27ter 

■ 7200,9600 bps: ITUV.29 

. 12000,14400 bps: ITU V. 17 

Error control 

■ ITUV.42 

■ MNP Classes 2-4 

■ Fax Error Correction Mode (ECM): ITUT.30 

Data compression 

■ ITU V.42 bis (up to 4:1 compression) 

■ MNP Class 5 (up to 2:1 compression) 

Dialing capability 

■ Tone/pulse dialing 

■ Auto or manual dialing and answering 
Data transmission and format 

■ Full or half duplex operation 

■ Asynchronous or framed modes 

■ Character formats: 

■ 5, 6, 7, 8, data bits 

■ lor 2 stop bits 

■ Odd, even, or no parity 

Memory requirements 

■ The Express Modem software uses approximately 600K of system memory (DRAM) when the 
modem is turned on. 



Technical 
Information 

319 



Index 



> (ADB port) 17, 146, 147 
(brightness control) 28 

X (Command key) 293,294 
I (insertion point) 223 
H) (Mac OS Guide) 33 

finding answers to questions 34 

menu for 37 

using 33, 35 
< (Power key) 26,293,295 

turning off the computer 
with 38 

turning on computer with 30 

> (right-angle bracket 

prompt) 227 



AAUI Ethernet port 

connecting to network 95-96 

identifying 90-91 

location of 96 
AC line input 315 
active applications 46, 47 



ADB (Apple Desktop Bus) ports 
icon for 17 

location of 146, 147, 156 
technical information 
about 313 
ADB connectors 313 
ADB devices 
connecting 156 
power allowances for 317 
tips on connecting 143 
adjusting 

Apple Fax settings 65 
keyboard 23, 278, 280 
memory 203 
monitor 4-6, 279, 280 
size of video windows 239 
sound 122-125 
for bass unit 123 
for headphones 216 
for radio 234 
for speakers 122 
specifying source for 
recordings 124 



Adobe Acrobat Reader 37 
AICK (Apple Internet Connection 

Kit) 60,80 
allocating memory 202 
altitude 314 

America Online (AOL) 60, 80 
analog phone lines 57 
answering the phone 69 
Apple Address Book 61-63 

entering personal 
information 62 

icon for 61 

saving 63 

starting 61 
AppleCD Audio Player 

opening 112 

remote control for 303 

turning up volume 216 
Apple customer support 

hotline 34 
Apple Desktop Bus ports. 
See ADB ports 



Apple Ethernet AUI Adapter 95, 96 
Apple Ethernet CS II AAUI card 

90-91 
Apple Ethernet CS II 

Thin Coax card 
identifying 90-91 
unlocking T-connector 
from 174 
Apple Ethernet CS II Twisted 
Pair card 
identifying 90-91 
status light for 230 
Apple Extras folder 51 
Apple Fax 64-67 

adjusting settings for 65 
enabling incoming calls to 242 
entering personal information 
62 

monitoring progress of faxes 75 
Outgoing and Incoming views 
for 66 

preparing to receive faxes 
66-67 

problems with faxes 242 

selecting modem for 65 

starting 64 
Apple Fax dialog box 66 
Apple FM Radio command 
(Apple menu) 

common problems 
234-235, 238 

listening to 113-116 

tuning in stations 116 



Apple Internet Connection Kit 

(AICK) 60, 80 
Apple LocalTalk Locking Connector 

Kit DIN-8 86,88 
Apple LocalTalk RJ-11 Connector 

86, 88 
Apple Phone 67-72 

answering the phone 69 
icon for 68 
selecting views in 71 
specifying settings for 68-70 
starting 67 

turning voice mail on 72 
Apple Remote Access Client 

software 50, 261 
AppleScript software 50 
Apple System Profiler 192-193 
AppleTalk control panel 

further information about 100 
specifying ports with 98-99 
troubleshooting network 

connections on 230,231 
AppleTalk network 
setting up 98-100 
turning off for stand-alone 
systems 226 
Apple Telecom Guide 60 
Apple Telecom software 60 
Apple Address Book 61-63 
Apple Fax 64-67 
Apple Phone 67-72 
Express Modem software 
74-77 



Apple Video Player. See a I SO 
TV; video 
problems watching TV or video 
236-239 
enabling remote control 

with 236 
selecting HRC cable 
frequencies 238 
turning off radio 234, 
238, 302 
tuning in TV stations 138 
working with video on 
computer 136 
Apple World Wide Web site 36 
Application menu 
commands on 46 
hiding applications 46, 47 
applications 
active 46, 47 

allocating memory for 202, 

204-205, 207 
blinking icon on menu bar 210 
debugging 227 

included with computer 51-52 
installing 40 
opening 46 

problems with 202-209 

closing 201, 221 

won't open 207 
quitting 299 
switching, hiding, and 

showing 47 
tips for using 48 
using multiple 46-47 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



arranging your office 278-279 

Arrow keys 293,294 

arrow pointer 32 

At Ease 200,212 

attaching expansion panel 177 

audio 

connecting equipment for 

117-120 
connectors for 118 
power requirements for 317 
audio CDs. See also CD-ROM discs 
adjusting sound settings 216 
connecting audio equipment 

117-120 
FM radio and 302 
playing 109-112 
recording sound from 217 
technical information 308 
audio input port 134, 135, 

146, 147 
Audio Out ports 

connecting VCR or camcorder 

to computer 134, 135 
plugging video equipment 

into 132 
RCA-type connectors and 
cabling for 129 
Auto Add feature (Apple FM Radio 

application) 235 
Auto-answer incoming calls option 
(Express Modem 
dialog box) 
receiving faxes and 67 
setting up 74-75 
autoplay feature 113 
avoiding fatigue 280 



B 

back cover to computer 
unlocking 164 

using expansion cover 186-187 
using original 184-185 

backing up software 52 

bar-code reader 156 

bass unit 3 

adjusting sound settings 

for 123 
attaching to the computer 

8-12 
cleaning 290 
positioning 7 
problems turning on 28 
protecting floppy disks from 7 
setting voltage switch for 13 
size and weight of 315 
sound level control for 123 

batteries 2 

for remote control 235, 236 
replacing for computer clock 
227,313 

blind dialing feature 76 

blinking icons 
on menu bar 210 
question mark 

hard disk problems and 254 
solving problems and 
27, 197 

bomb message 
freezing up 204 
with Photo CD files 217 
restarting computer after 191 

BootP (Boot Protocol) servers 101 



brightness control (-ft) 
adjusting 28, 144 
problems with 195 
purpose of 145 

browsing the Web 82 



cable grooves 24 
cable guide 17, 19 
cables 

attaching bass unit 8-12 
audio adapter 

mono 2, 132 

stereo 3, 118, 132, 134 
for audio connections 118 
coaxial 

F-type 136 

for TV 137 
composite video to S-video 
adapter cable 3, 127, 
128, 131 
connected to bass unit 9 
connecting 90, 283 

to DAV connectors 173 
guides for 17, 19 
keyboard grooves for 24 
length of in SCSI chains 150 
LocalTalk 86, 88 
needed for video input 

128-129 
ribbon 173 
for SCSI devices 150 
stereo miniplug and 129 
S-video connector 127, 

128, 131 
unplugging ADB 23 



Index 
322 



cable TV service 

connecting to 136-137 
HRC cable frequencies 238 
cache configurations 162 
cache slot 161 
Call Saver mode 75 
camcorders 134 
canceling tasks 203 
Caps Lock key 293,294 
card fence for PCI card 171 
carpal tunnel syndrome 277, 280 
CD next track button 112, 144, 145 
CD Play/Pause button 112, 

144, 145 
CD previous track button 112, 
144, 145 

CD-ROM discs. See also audio CDs 
cleaning 215 
copying to hard disk 45 
ejecting and removing 44-45, 

211,212,288-289 
handling 285-286 
inserting 42-45 
installing applications from 52 
placing on spindle 43 
playing audio or multimedia 

109-112,216-217 
problems 210-215 

discs vibrating in drive 214 
playing audio CDs 216-217 
starting up computer from 
195, 200,214,253-254 
using ISO 9660 or High 

Sierra format 216 
using Photo CDs 217 



CD-ROM drive 144 
closing door to 44, 111 
device information about 193 
opening door to 42,109, 

212-213 
power requirements for 316 
problems with 210-215 
remote control buttons for 303 
safety instructions for 286 
SCSI ID number for 149,200 
spindle 43, 110 
technical information for 

307-308 
turning off autoplay 113 
CD-ROM Stop/Eject button 42, 

109, 144 
CDs. See CD-ROM discs 
checking status of modems 77 
Chooser 

checking printer settings in 229 
problems with networks and 

file sharing 230, 231, 232 
selecting printer and printer 
port 154 

cleaning 

CD-ROM discs 215 

equipment 290-291 

leather palmrests 291 
"clean" installation of system 

software 255, 268-271 

clock 

replacing battery for 227 
technical information 313 
closed caption viewing 239 



closing 

applications 221 
CD-ROM drive 44,111 
computer 184-187 
using expansion cover 

186-187 
using the original back cover 
184-185 
TCP/IP control panel 104 
color 

display specifications for 

monitor 309 
reducing depth on screen 226 
reducing number of for video 
play 237 
Command (S€) key 293, 294 
communication cards and adapter 

2, 168, 174, 178 
communication slot 161 
compatibility 

of DOS/Windows floppy disks 

219-220 
of ISDN equipment 58 
with older Macintosh 

applications 209 
of SIMMs 162 

testing extensions and control 
panels for 246 
composite video 
about 127 
connections 

for camcorder input 134 
for VCR input 134 
formats for 126-127 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



composite video to S-video adapter 
cable 3, 127, 128 

connecting to computer 131 

connecting with VCR or 
camcorder 134, 135 
computer and components 2-3. 
See also Twentieth 
Anniversary Macintosh 

cleaning computer case 290 

grounding 7, 15 

handling 283 

main unit technical information 

306-307 
performance speeds 225-227 
safety and maintenance for 282 
size and weight of 315 
computer speed 225-227 
Configure pop-up menu (TCP/IP 

control panel) 103 
configuring 

AppleTalk control panel 97, 

98-100, 230 
cache 162 

DRAM and VRAM 162 
TCP/IP control panel 102-104 
Confirm Power Off checkbox 

(Apple Video Player) 304 



connecting 142-157 
ADB input devices 156 
audio equipment 117-120 
components and front panel 

controls 144 
external SCSI devices 148-142 
the keyboard 17 
modems 

to online or Internet 

services 60 
to phone jacks 18-21 
pointing devices 222 
port locations and functions 

145-147 
printers 153-155 
SCSI devices 143, 152 
securing the computer 157 
video equipment to computer 

131-135 
connectors 

Apple LocalTalk RJ-11 86, 88 
attaching T-connector 93-94 
audio 118 

for communication cards 178 
DIMM 182, 183 
F-type coaxial 136 
for PCI cards 169 
plugging in bass unit 10 
RCA-type 127, 128, 129 
safety instructions for 283 
S-video connectors 127, 
128, 131 



Connect via pop-up menu 

(AppleTalk control panel) 
98, 99 

Connect via pop-up menu (TCP/IP 

control panel) 103 
Control key 293, 294 
Control Panel Information 

command (Apple System 

Profiler) 193 
control panels. See also specific 

control panels listed 

individually 
information about 193 
testing for compatibility 246 
Control Panels folder 230 
Country pop-up menu (Personal 

Info dialog box) 62 
Country Telecom Settings option 

(Express Modem dialog 

box) 74 
cumulative trauma disorders 

(CTDs) 277 
customer support hotline 34 
custom installation of system 

software 255, 263-267 
Custom Install dialog box 267 
Custom Software Installation 

dialog box 264 
Cyberdog software 50, 261, 264 



Index 
324 



D 

dampness. See moisture 
DAV connectors 161,173 
DAV socket 173 
DC power 316 
debugging applications 227 
Delete key 293, 294 
desktop 

hard disk icon not on 200, 

221,247 
rebuilding 201,210,271-273 
restarting from CD-ROM 254 
returning to 200,212,214 
Device Information command 
(Apple System 
Profiler) 193 
DHCP (Dynamic Host 

Configuration Protocol) 
servers 101 
diacritical marks 297, 298 
diagnosing problems. 

See troubleshooting 
dialing features 76 
DIMMs (Dual Inline Memory 
Modules) 161 
handling 182 
inserting in slots 183 
refresh rates for 162 
technical information for 306 
disabling remote control 235, 304 
discharging static electricity 167, 
176, 181 



Disk First Aid utility 
locating 245 
problems not corrected 

with 251 
repairing hard or floppy disks 
249-250 
display screen. See monitor 
documentation 
Apple Internet Connection Kit: 

Getting Started 80 
Apple Telecom Guide 60 
on networking 85 
Twentieth Anniversary 
Macintosh user's 
manual 34 
documents 

problems with 202-209 
unable to open CD-ROM disc 
215,216 
DOS documents 208 
DOS floppy disks 220 
DRAM 

for Twentieth Anniversary 
Macintosh 306-307 
and VRAM configurations 162 
DRAM DIMM slots 161, 182 
drivers 

printer 154, 228 
for SCSI devices 152 
updating hard disk 258-259 
Drive Setup dialog box 258 
Drive Setup utility 248, 252-253 
Dynamic Host Configuration 
Protocol (DHCP) 
servers 101 



E 

Easy Access 223 

"easy" installation of system 

software 255, 256-262 
Easy Install dialog box 266 
Eject Disk command (Special 

menu) 211 

ejecting 

CD-ROM discs 44-45,211,212, 

288-289 
disks and file sharing 232 
floppy disks 41,218-219,221, 

286-287 
ejector 182 

electromagnetic emissions 281 
ELF (extremely low frequency) 

fields 281 
e-mail 82, 99 
enabling 

incoming calls to Apple Fax 242 
remote control 235, 304 
English Text-To-Speech software 

50, 261 
Enter key 293,294 
environmental information 314 
equipment 

compatibility of ISDN 58 
connecting 

additional 142-157 
video equipment to 
computer 131-135 
handling 

computer and 

components 283 
keyboard 284 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



plugging in 7 

preparing for video input 
128-129 

safety tips for 282 

shared telecommunications 58 

unpacking 4-6 
ergonomics 278-290 
error messages 

for font files 228 

numbered 204, 228 

responding to 190-191 
Escape key 293, 294 
Ethernet icon 91 
Ethernet networks 90-96 

AAUI 95-96 

common network problems 

230-233 
connecting to 85 
identifying ports 84, 90-91 
thin coaxial 93-94 
twisted-pair 92-93 
Ethernet transceiver 96 
expansion back cover 2, 166 
expansion cards and memory 
modules 158-187 
about expansion cards 160 
about memory 161 
cache configurations 162 
closing the computer 184-187 
using expansion cover 

186-187 
using the original back cover 
184-185 
DRAM and VRAM 

configurations 162 



installation and warranty 

coverage 159 
installing 

communication cards 

174-180 
DRAM memory 181-183 
PCI expansion cards 

166-173 
opening the computer 

163-166 
power requirements for 

expansion cards 160 
removing communication cards 

and expansion panel 168 
technical information 

about 318 
expansion cover 186-187 
expansion panel 2, 166, 174 
attaching to computer 177 
removing 168 
removing screw from 170 
uncovering port opening 

on 175 
expansion slots 
location of 161 
technical information for 160 
Express Modem software 74-77 
auto-answer modem options 

and 74-75 
blind dialing feature 76 
Call Saver mode 75 
checking modem status 77 
incoming call management 76 
monitoring faxes in progress 75 
selecting Ring Sound 

options 75 



specifications for 315-319 
system memory required by 73 
troubleshooting problems 

with 241 
turning off modem 242 
extended miniplug 118 
Extension Information command 
(Apple System 
Profiler) 193 
extensions 

for CD-ROM disc 210 
checking 244-246 
computer freezes while 

displaying 199 
diagnosing and solving 

problems for 244-246 
for Foreign File Access 215 
opening Extensions Manager 

control panel 244 
testing compatibility of 

245, 246 
turning off 40, 199, 205,245, 

271, 299 
turning on 205 
Extensions Manager control panel 
opening 244 
starting 299 
turning on and off 
Easy Access 223 
extensions 40, 199, 205, 271 
Mac OS Easy Open 272 
printer drivers 228 
external SCSI terminator 151, 152 
extremely low frequency (ELF) 

fields 281 
eye fatigue 278, 280 



Index 
326 



F 

fan frame 167, 176,181 
fast-paged mode DIMMs 162 
fatigue 

avoiding 280 

eye 280 
Fax Answering button 66 
faxes. See Apple Fax 
file-compression programs 210 
files 

locked 208 

problems deleting 208 
reading PDF 37 
saving changes to 

CD-ROM 215 
shared libraries 209 
unable to save on floppy 
disk 219 
file sharing. See a I SO Sharing Setup 
control panel 
accessing shared disks 231 
ejecting 

CD-ROM and 212,288 
disks and 232 
problems with 208, 230-233 
sending and receiving faxes 

while 242 
shared libraries 209 
turning off 212 
Finder 

description of 49 
hiding and showing 47 
opening Mac OS Guide in 35 
flat panel display. See monitor 



floppy disk drives 

problems with 218-221 
technical information for 307 

floppy disks 
backing up 52 

formatting on DOS computer 
for Macintosh 220 

handling 7, 284 

initializing 219 

inserting 41 

problems 218-221 

ejecting 41,218-219,221 
recognizing formatted disks 

219-220 
unable to save files 219 

repairing 249-251 

unlocking 208 
FM antenna 3 

connecting 113-115 

connector for 314 

solving problems with 234-235 
FM channel selection button 145 
FM radio 

audio CDs and 302 

hearing while watching TV 238 

listening to 113-116 

remote control buttons for 302 

solving problems with 234-235 

tuning in 116 
FM tuner port 114, 146, 147 
folders 

Apple Extras 51 

calculating sizes of 226 

Control Panels 230 

problems sharing 233 
fonts 296-298 



food or liquid spills 

on keyboard 283, 284 

onpalmrests 291 
Foreign File Access extension 215 
formatting floppy disks 219, 220 
freezing up 

after "happy Macintosh" 
icon 199 

bomb messages and 191, 
204,217 

canceling tasks 203 

forcing application to quit 201 

with Photo CD files 217 

while displaying extensions 199 
frequency response 312 
front panel controls 144 
FTP software 83 
F-type coaxial cable connectors 

136,314 
function keys 293,294 



gathering information 190-191 
General Controls control 

panel 226 
General Setting pop-up menu 
(Express Modem 
control panel) 67 
GeoPort Telecom Adapter 3 
connecting modem to 

telephone jack 18-21 
power allowances for 317 
setting up 18-21 
specifications for 59 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



Getting Started with Apple Phone 
dialog box 68-70 

glare 279 

graphics mode 310 

graphics specifications 309-310 

graphics tablet 156 

grounding power cords 7, 15, 28 



handling 

CD-ROM discs 285 
communication cards 178 
computer equipment 283 
DIMMs (Dual Inline Memory 

Modules) 182 
electronic components 283 
floppy disks 284 
keyboard 284 
PCI cards 169 
hard disk 

copying CD-ROM discs to 45 
creating new System Folder 

268-271 
diagnosing and solving 
problems 221 
icon not on desktop 200, 

221,247 
initializing 251, 
252-253, 256 
preliminary tests for 247 
repairing 249-251 
sharing 233 
starting up 195 
testing for damage 248-249 
wrong startup disk 221 



technical information for 307 
updating drivers for 258-259 
verifying destination disk 265 
volume information about 193 

hard disk icon 

not on desktop 200,221,247 
selecting for testing and 
repair 250 

headphone jack 

location of 117, 144, 145 
technical information 
about 314 

headphones 

adjusting sound for 216 
icon for 117 

health tips 276-281 

arranging your office 278-279 
electromagnetic emissions 281 
eye fatigue 278 

musculoskeletal discomfort 277 
help. See Mac OS Guide ((B) 
Hide Balloons command (Guide 

menu) 36 
Hide Finder command 

(Application menu) 47 
hiding applications 47 
High Sierra disc format 216 
HRC cable frequencies 238 
"Huh?" button 35 
humidity. See moisture 



icons 
ADB 17 

Apple Address Book 61 
Apple Phone 68 
audio input port 134, 135 
blinking question mark 27, 

197,254 
CD-ROM disc not on screen 

210,212,214 
Drive Setup 248, 252 
Ethernet 91 

hard disk 200,221,247,250 
headphone 117 
Installer 52 
Install Mac OS 256 
line port 20 
Power key 26 

problems with 201,210,217 
"sad Macintosh" 185 
SCSI port 146, 147, 148 
sound input port 117, 146, 147 
sound output port 117, 

146, 147 
S-video input port 131 
System Folder 206 
telephone port 21 
Xdisk 198 
ID numbers 149, 200, 247 
Ignore dial tone when dialing 

option (Express Modem 
pop-up menu) 76 
incoming call management 76 
Incoming view (Apple Fax 
software) 66 



Index 
328 



Index button (Guide window) 

35, 37 
initializing 

floppy disks 219 
hard disks 251,252-253,256 
inserting floppy disks 41 
insertion point (I) 223 
installation and warranty 
coverage 159 
Installer 52 
installing 

applications 40 

inserting CD-ROM discs 

42-45 
over a network 46 
communication cards 174-180 
DRAM memory 181-183 
expansion cards 160 
modem software 241 
PCI expansion cards 166-173 
system software 

"clean" installation 255, 

268-271 
custom installation 255, 

263-267 
normal installation 255, 

256-262 
unsuccessful 

installations 262 
when to reinstall 197 
telephone jacks 18 
Install Mac OS program 256-262 
Integrated Services Digital 
Network (ISDN) 
telephone lines. See ISDN 
telephone lines 



interfaces 313-314 
interference 283 
international voltage settings 13 
Internet 78-83 

about protocols 78-79 
Apple Internet Connection 

Kit 80 
browsing the Web 82 
configuring TCP/IP connections 

100-104 
connecting with America 

Online 80 
connection software and PPP 

protocol 81 
e-mail 82 
features of 81 
FTP software and 83 
ISPs and online services 79 
newsgroups 83 
Telnet software and 83 
Internet Protocol (IP) 78 
Internet service providers (ISP) 

79, 80 
IP addresses 
obtaining 101 
specifying 103 
ISDN (Integrated Services Digital 
Network) telephone lines 
57-58 

connecting modems and 20 

connecting to 57 

setting up 58 
ISDN networks 85 
ISDN PCI expansion card 58 
ISDN terminal adapter 58 



ISO 9660 CD-ROM disc 

format 216 
ISP (Internet service providers) 

79, 80 

J,K 

joystick 156 
keyboard 3, 144 

adjusting feet of 23 

connecting 17 

connecting devices to 156 

ergonomic adjustments for 
278, 280 

food or liquid spills 283,284 

handling 284 

palmrest section 24 

problems with 28, 222-224 

size and weight of 315 

special keys on 292-299 

technical information for 313 

typing special characters and 
symbols 296-298 
Keyboard control panel 226 
keyboard shortcuts 

for answering calls 69 

problems switching between TV 
and computer 238 
Key Caps program (Apple menu) 

296-297 
key combinations 

for diacritical marks 297, 298 

at startup 299 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



LAN (local area networks) 84 
learning to use the computer 
30-38 

finding answers to questions 
34-37 

taking the Macintosh Tutorial 
30-33 

turning off the computer 38 
leather palmrests 24, 291 
lighting 278, 279 
line port icon 20 
local area networks (LAN) 84 
LocalTalk networks 86-89 

adapter for 86, 88 

cable for 86, 88 

ports for 84 
locating 

Disk First Aid utility 245 

Drive Setup utility 248 
locked files 208 
locking cable 157 
Look For button (Guide window) 
35,37 



M 

Macintosh desktop 31 
Macintosh Operating System. 

See Mac OS software 
Macintosh Tutorial 

selecting from menu 36-37 
starting 30-33 
stopping 33 
MacIP (Macintosh Internet 
Protocol) servers 
101, 104 
MacLinkPlus translator software 

50, 261 
Mac OS Easy Open 272 
Mac OS Guide ((B) 34, 37 
AppleTalk control panel 100 
finding 35 
finding answers to 
questions 34 
menu for 37 
network information 85 
TCP/IP control panel 104 
tips on virtual memory 48 
troubleshooting information 

in 192 
using 33, 35 
Mac OS software 49-50 
installing 256-262 
testing compatibility of 
extensions with 245 
magnetic fields 7,284 
maintenance. See safety and 
maintenance 



memory 

adjusting 203 

allocating for applications 50, 

202, 204-205 
for Apple Fax and modem 242 
for computer 306-307 
DRAM and VRAM configurations 

and 162 
for Express Modem software 

319 

for multiple applications 46 
performance decreases 

and 225 
for printing 229 
problems with 202-209,217 
required by Express Modem 

software 73 
virtual 48 
Memory control panel 
adjusting memory 

requirements with 203 
improving performance 

and 226 
turning off 

Modern Memory 
Manager 209 
virtual memory 225 
Menu Blinking 226 
metal port cover 170 
microphones 

extended miniplug and 118 
power allowances for 317 
problems using 234 
recording levels for 311 
using built-in 121, 144 



Index 
330 



Minimum Size box 202 
modem port 146, 147 
modems and modem connections 
56-77 

about 59 

analog 57 

Apple Address Book 61-63 
Apple Fax 64-67 
Apple Phone 67-72 
checking status of 77 
connecting 

to online or Internet 
services 60 

to phone jacks 18-21 
Express Modem software 
74-77 

auto-answer modem options 

and 74-75 
blind dialing feature 76 
Call Saver mode 75 
checking modem status 77 
incoming call 

management 76 
monitoring faxes in 

progress 75 
selecting Ring Sound 

options 75 
system memory 
requirements for 73 
GeoPort Telecom Adapter 
setting up 18-21 
specifications for 59 
ISDN lines and 57-58 
memory requirements for 242 
precautions for 21 



problems using 240-242 
selecting for Apple Fax 65 
shared telecommunications 

equipment 58 
turning on and off 73, 242 

Modern Memory Manager 209 

moisture 

relative humidity 314 
safety instructions for 282 
on trackpad 290 

monitor 144 
adjusting 4-6 
cleaning 290 

ergonomic adjustments for 280 
flat panel display 

specifications 309 
minimizing glare 279 
turning off screen saver 195 
Monitors & Sound control panel 
124-125 
problems using 

microphone 234 
recording sound from audio 
CDs 217 
mono audio adapter cable 2, 132 
mouse 

avoiding fatigue with 280 
connecting 156 
positioning 279 
Mouse Keys 223 
musculoskeletal discomfort 277 
mute button 

on computer 122, 144, 145 
on remote control 301, 
302, 303 



N 

Names pop-up menu 239 
navigation buttons 

(Guide window) 35 
networks 84-104. See also 

AppleTalk control panel; 
Ethernet networks; 
TCP/IP control panel 
AppleTalk 98-100, 226 
backing up floppy disks to 52 
configuring software 

AppleTalk control panel 97, 

98-100, 230 
TCP/IP control panel 97, 
100-104, 230 
Ethernet 90-96 

connecting AAUI 95-96 
connecting thin coaxial 

93-94 
connecting twisted-pair 
92-93 

identifying Ethernet ports 
90-91 

further information about 85 
LocalTalk 86-89 
ports for LocalTalk and 

Ethernet 84 
problems with 230-233 
shared telecommunications 
equipment and 58 

network zones 98 

newsgroups 83 

next track button 

on computer 112, 144, 145 
on remote control 303 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



nonvolatile video RAM 

(NVRAM) 196 
normal installation of system 

software 255, 256-262 
NuBus cards 160 
number codes in error 

messages 204 
numeric keypad 156 
NVRAM (nonvolatile video 

RAM) 196 



office arrangements 278-279 
online help. See Mac OS Guide (G8) 
online services 79 
onscreen help 192 
OpenDoc software 49, 264 
opening 

AppleCD Audio Player 112 

applications 46 

CD-ROM drive door 42, 109, 
212-213 

the computer 163-166 

Extensions Manager control 
panel 244 

TCP/IP control panel 102 

windows from title bar 209 
Open Transport PPP software 
50, 261 

operating environment 314 
operating temperature 314 
optional system software 50-51 



Option key 

keyboard location and function 

of 293, 295 
key combinations with 297 
Outgoing view (Apple Fax 
software) 66 

overview 

composite video 127 
expansion cards 160 
Internet protocols 78-79 
memory 161 
modems 59 
S-video 127 



palmrests 24, 291 
paper clips 

ejecting floppy disks with 

218-219, 287 
opening CD-ROM drive door 
with 213 
parameter RAM (PRAM) 196,201 
passwords 239 
PBX lines 20 

PC Exchange control panel 

formatted disks not 
recognized 219 

opening DOS or Windows 
documents with 208 
PC Exchange software 49 
PCI card 166, 169 
PCI card adapter 2, 166 

inserting in PCI slot 172 

inserting PCI card in 169 



PCI expansion cards 160 
DAV connector on 173 
expansion slots for 313 
inserting in PCI slot 172 

PDF files 37 

performance 225-227 

Personal Info dialog box 62 

Phone view (Apple Phone 
window) 71 

Photo CD discs 

problems using 217 
technical information 308 

pictorial buttons 200, 212 

plastic insert 170, 175 

playback formats 308 

play/pause buttons 

(remote control) 303 

plugging in 

bass unit connectors 10 

equipment 7 

the power cord 13-15 

pointing devices 222 

port cover plate 

removing 16, 87, 130, 153 
replacing 22, 89, 133, 155 

ports 

ADB 17, 146, 147, 156 
attaching LocalTalk adapter to 

printer 88 
audio input 134, 135, 146, 147 
Audio Out 129, 132, 134, 135 
connecting 283 
FM tuner 114,146, 147 
identifying Ethernet 90-91 
line 20 



Index 
332 



for LocalTalk and Ethernet 

networks 84 
locations and functions of 

145-147 
modem 19, 146, 147 
port cover plate and 16, 87 
printer 146, 147 
RJ-45 (lOBase-T) Ethernet 92 
RS-232/RS-422 serial 313 
SCSI 146, 147 
security lock 146, 157 
sound input 117,146, 147 
sound output 117, 146, 147 
specifying 98-99 
S-video input 127, 131, 

146, 147 
telephone 21 
TV tuner 137, 146, 147 
uncovering 175 
Power (<]) key 26, 293, 295 
restarting the computer with 

191-192 
turning off the computer 

with 38 
turning on computer with 30 
waking up computer with 195 
power button 146 
Power key and 38 
on remote control 301, 

302, 303 



power cords 3 

grounding computer with 7, 15 
plugging in 13-15 
safety tips for 282 
unplugging 163 
Power Macintosh applications 48 
power on light 144 
power outages 57 
PowerPC processor 306 
power requirements 
for ADB devices 156 
for expansion cards 160 
technical information about 
315-318 
AC line input 315 
ADB devices 317 
audio and 

telecommunications 
devices 317 
CD-ROM drive 316 
DC power 316 
expansion cards 318 
sleep mode 316 
power specifications 315-318 
power supply 290 
PPP (Point-to-Point) protocol 81 
PRAM (parameter RAM) 196,201 
precautions 

discharging static electricity 

167, 176, 181 
for installing telephone 

jacks 18 
for modems 21 
for unplugging cables 23 



Preferred Size box 202 
Previous System Folder 271 
previous track button 

(remote control) 303 
printer drivers 154,228 
printer port 146, 147 

attaching LocalTalk adapter 

to 88 

plugging printer cable into 154 
printers 153-155 

changing AppleTalk settings 
and 99 

connecting 153-155 

not in Chooser 231 

problems with 205, 228-229 
processor specifications 306 
Progress sounds pop-up menu 75 
Put Away command (File menu) 

ejecting CD-ROM discs 44, 211 

ejecting floppy disks 41, 
218-219,221,286 

Q 

QuickDraw 3D software 50, 

261, 309 
QuickDraw GX software 50, 261 
QuickTime software 49, 309 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



radio. See FM radio 
RAM disk 225 

RARP (Reverse Address Resolution 
Protocol) servers 
101, 104 
RCA-type connector 127 

cabling for Audio Out ports 129 
cabling for RCA-type video 
port 128 
Read Me file 37 

rebuilding the desktop 201, 210, 

271-273 
recording levels 311 
relative humidity 314 
remote control 3, 300-304 
buttons on 

for CD-ROM drive 303 
for FM radio 302 
for TV or video 301 
enabling and disabling 235, 304 
problems 

with radio 235 
with TV or video 236 
setting preferences for 304 
technical information 

about 314 
TV/Mac button on 138, 236 
uses for 200 
remote control infrared sensor 
144, 145 



removing 

CD-ROM discs 45 
communication cards and 

expansion panel 168 
metal port cover 170 
the port cover plate 16, 87, 

130, 153 

repairs 

for hard or floppy disks 

249-251 
locating authorized service 
providers 194 
repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) 277 
replacing 

battery for clock 227 
the port cover plate 22,89, 
133, 155 

repositioning the trackpad 23-25 
Restart command 

(Special menu) 191 
restarting the computer 
key combinations for 299 
rebuilding desktop and 

272-273 
when having problems 

191-192 
Return key 293, 295 
Reverse Address Resolution 

Protocol (RARP) servers 

101, 104 
ribbon cable 173 
right-angle bracket prompt 

(>) 227 
Ring Sound options 75 



RJ-45 (lOBase-T) Ethernet 

port 92 
router addresses 103 
RS-232/RS-422 serial ports 313 
RSIs (repetitive stress injuries) 277 



"sad Macintosh" icon 

checking memory installation 

and 185 
problems indicated with 198 
safety and maintenance 282-291. 
See a I SO static electricity 
for cleaning equipment 

290-291 
for computer and 

components 282 
ejecting 

CD-ROM discs 288-289 
floppy disks 41,218-219, 
221, 286-287 
handling 

CD-ROM discs 44-45,211, 

212,285-286 
computer equipment 283 
floppy disks 284 
the keyboard 284 
power supply 290 
saving 

Apple Address Book 63 
changes 

to CD-ROM files 215 

to TCP/IP control panel 104 



Index 
334 



Scan feature (Apple FM Radio 

application) 235 
screen. See monitor 
screen savers 195 
SCSI (Small Computer System 

Interface) 148 
SCSI chains 

ID numbers and 149,200 
length of cables in 150 
terminating 151 
SCSI devices 148-152 

blinking question mark and 

197,254 
cables for 150 
connecting 152 
icon for 148 
ID numbers for 149, 200 
not in Chooser 231 
terminating SCSI chains 151 
tips on connecting 143, 152 
unique ID numbers for 149, 
200, 247 
SCSI peripheral interface 
cable 150 

SCSI port 
defined 147 
illustrations of 146, 148 
technical information for 314 

SCSI system cable 150 

security lock port 146, 157 

Select Destination Disk 
dialog box 260 

servers 101 



setting 

the insertion point 223 
remote control 

preferences 304 
voltage switch for bass unit 13 
setting up 2-29 
bass unit 

attaching to computer 8-12 
positioning 7 
connecting modems to phone 

jacks 18-21 
illustrations of components 
2-3 

ISDN telephone lines 58 
keyboard 

adjusting 23 

connecting 17 
plugging in 

equipment 7 

the power cord 13-15 
port cover plate 

removing 16, 87, 130, 153 

replacing 22, 89, 133, 155 
repositioning the trackpad 
23-25 

turning on the computer 
26-28 

unpacking the equipment 4-6 
SGRAM (synchronous graphic 

RAM) 307, 309 
shared disks 231 
shared libraries 209 
shared telecommunications 

equipment 58 



Sharing Setup control panel 212 
ejecting disks and file 

sharing 232 
missing file sharing section 

on 233 

Shift key 

keyboard location and function 

of 293, 295 
key combinations with 297 
Show All command 

(Application menu) 47 
Show Balloons command 

(Guide menu) 36 
showing applications 47 
Shut Down command 

(Special menu) 163 
shutting down the computer 38 
signal source 

narrowing range or strength 

of 235 
selecting 239 
signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) 312 
sleep mode 316 
Slow Keys 223 

SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) 312 
software 40-52 

additions to system 50-51 
Apple Telecom 60 
application programs 51-52 
backing up 52 
configuring 

AppleTalk control panel 97, 

98-100 
TCP/IP control panel 97, 
100-104 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



for connecting to ISPs 80 
FTP 83 

inserting CD-ROM discs 42-45 
installing 

application programs 40 

over a network 46 
Internet connection 81 
Mac OS 49-50 
odd behavior of 206 
opening application 
programs 46 
selecting for installation 26 
Telnet 83 

tips for using applications 48 
using floppy disks 41 
won't open 207 
working with multiple 
applications 46-47 
Software Installation dialog box 

261, 263, 270 
sound 108-125 

adjusting sound settings 
122-125 
for audio CDs 216 
for bass unit 123 
for speakers 122 
specifying sound sources for 
recordings 124 
of computer at startup 

195-196, 227 
connecting audio equipment 
117-120 



difficulties with video or TV 238 
listening to FM radio 113-116 
playing an audio or multimedia 

CD 109-112 
technical information about 

311-312 
tuning in FM stations 116 
turning off CD autoplay 113 
using the built-in 

microphone 121 
sound input device 117 
Sound Input pop-up menu 
(Monitors & Sound 
control panel) 125 
sound input port 

location and purpose of 117, 

146, 147 
technical information 
about 314 
sound output port 
input level to 311 
location and purpose of 117, 

146, 147 
technical information 

about 314 
voltage and impedance for 312 
sound source 117 
speakers 122 

special key combinations 299 
specifications. See technical 
information 



speeds 

access rates for DIMMs 162 

of Apple Fax 64 

computer performance 
225-227 

of GeoPort Telecom Adapter 59 

processor 306 
starting 

Apple Address Book 61 

Apple Fax 64 

Apple Phone 67 
startup 

from CD-ROM disc 253-254 
selecting hard disk for 221 
unusual sounds at 195-196 
useful key combinations at 299 
static electricity See also safety 

and maintenance 
communication cards and 178 
DIMMs and 182 
discharging 167, 176, 181 
handling electronic 

components 283 
PCI cards and 169 
status lights 

for Apple Ethernet CS II Twisted 

Pair card 230 
for bass unit and computer 28 
for Ethernet connections 91 
stereo audio adapter cable 
connecting with VCR or 

camcorder 134, 135 
illustrations of 3, 118, 132 



Index 
336 



stereo miniplug 

cabling for Audio Out 
port with 129 

illustration of 118 
stereo speakers 144 
Sticky Keys 223 
stop/eject button 

(remote control) 303 
storage temperature 314 
subnet mask number 

obtaining 101 

specifying 103 
S-video 

about 127 

connections for camcorder 

and VCR 135 
connector cables for 127, 

128, 131 
technical information for 310 
video format for 126-127 
S-video input connector 317 
S-video input port 
connecting to 127 
icon for 131 
location and purpose of 

146, 147 
technical information 
about 314 
S-video out port 135 
switching 

applications 47 
between TV and computer 
238, 301 
symbols 296-298 



synchronous graphic RAM 

(SGRAM) 307, 309 
system bus 306 

system extensions. See extensions 
System Folder 

"clean" installations and 

268-271 
deleting extra 48, 204 
icon for current 206 
information about 193 
starting with key 

combination 299 
System Folder Information 

command (Apple System 
Profiler) 193 
System Overview command (Apple 

System Profiler) 193 
system software 

Disk First Aid utility 245 
optional 50-51, 261 
preinstalled 49-50 
problems with 197 
reinstalling 50 

"sad Macintosh" icon and 198 
starting up from CD-ROM disc 
253-254 



T 

Tab key 293, 295 
T-connector 
attaching 93-94 
installing communication cards 

and 174 
for thin coaxial Ethernet 

connections 94 
TCP/IP (Transmission Control 

Protocol/Internet 

Protocol) 79, 100 
TCP/IP control panel 97, 100-104 
closing and saving changes 

to 104 
configuring 102-104 
further information about 104 
obtaining IP address and subnet 

mask number 101 
opening 102 
troubleshooting settings 

on 230 

technical information 306-319 
CD-ROM drive specifications 

307-308 
clock 313 
environment 314 
Express Modem specifications 

315-318 
keyboard 313 
main unit 306-307 
power 315-318 
size and weight 315 
sound 311-312 
for trackpad 313 
video system 309-310 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



telecommunication devices 317 
Telecom Status dialog box 61 
telephone connections 
analog 57 

answering phone with 
computer 69 

auto-answer modem options 
and 74-75 

cable for LocalTalk networks St 

ISDN lines 57-58 

modems and 59 

sending faxes and 242 

troubleshooting modem 

problems and 240-241 

wiring precautions for 18,21 
telephone cord 3, 18 
telephone jacks 

analog connections for 
modems 20 

connecting modems to 18-21 

precautions for installing 18 
telephone port 21 
Telephone Tool pop-up menu 68 
television. See TV 
Telnet software 83 
terminating SCSI chains 151 
testing 

for damage on hard disk 
248-249 

system extensions and control 
panels 246 
thin coaxial Ethernet networks 

connecting to 93-94 

identifying ports 90-91 



3D support 309 
tips 

on connecting cables 90 

for using applications 48 
title bar 35 

opening windows from 209 
Token Ring networks 85 
Topics button (Guide window) 

35, 37 
trackpad 3, 144 

avoiding fatigue with 280 

cleaning 290 

increasing tracking for 226 
moving the arrow pointer 32 
positioning 279 
problems with 222-223 
repositioning the 23-25 
technical information for 313 
trackpad button 32, 144 
troubleshooting 194-242, 
244-273 
with applications, documents, 
and memory 202-209 
for CD-ROM discs and drives 
210-215 
Photo CDs 217 
playing audio CDs 216-217 
startup from system 

software 253-254 
using ISO 9660 or High 
Sierra discs 216 
checking system extensions 
244-246 



computer speed and 

performance 225-227 
error messages and 228 
floppy disk drives 218-221, 287 

repairing 249-251 
floppy disks 218-221,287 
FM radio 234-235 
hard disks 221 

initializing 251, 
252-253, 256 

preliminary tests for 247 

repairing 249-251 

testing for damage 248-249 
icons 210 

installing system software 255 
"clean" installation 268-271 
custom installation 263-267 
normal installation 256-262 
microphone 234 
networks and file sharing 

230-233 
printers 228-229 
problems turning on computer 

28, 185, 195-201 
rebuilding the desktop 

271-273 
with trackpads or keyboards 

222-224 
turning on the computer 28, 

195-201 
using modems 240-242 
watching TV or video 236-239 



Index 
338 



where to begin 190-193 
checking onscreen help 192 
gathering information 

190- 191 
restarting the computer 

191- 192 

using Apple System Profiler 

192- 193 

tuning in 

FM stations 116 
TV stations 138 
turning off 
AppleTalk 226 
autoplay for CD-ROM 

drive 113 
the computer 27, 38 
extensions 40, 199, 205 
file sharing 212 
Menu Blinking 226 
modem 73,242 
Modern Memory Manager 209 
screen savers 195 
Sticky Keys, Slow Keys, and 

Mouse Keys 223 
virtual memory 225 
virus protection 40 
turning on 
the computer 

problems 28, 195-201 
from system software 
CD-ROM disc 195 
when open 185 
extensions 205 
file sharing 232 



Foreign File Access 

extension 215 
Mac OS Easy Open 272 
modem 73,242 
printer drivers 228 
SCSI devices 152 
voice mail 72 
TV 136-138. See a I so Apple 
Video Player 
connecting to antenna or cable 

service 136-137 
problems watching 236-239 
blank screen 236 
closed caption 239 
hearing radio instead 

of TV 238 
poor image or rolling 
picture 237 
remote control buttons for 301 
tuning in a station 138 
TV channel selection button 144, 

145, 301 
TV/Mac button 144, 145,302 
TV tuner card 313 
TV tuner port 137, 146, 147 
Twentieth Anniversary 

Macintosh 3. See a I SO 
computer and 
components 
answering the phone with 69 
attaching bass unit to 8-12 
components and front panel 

controls 144 
connecting video equipment to 
131-135 



grounding with power cords 
7, 15 

illustrations of components 
2-3 

locking cable for 157 
maintenance tips 290-291 
not in Chooser 231 
plugging in 7 

remote control power button 

for 301,302,303 
switching between video and 

computer programs 138 
technical information about 

306-319 
turning off 27, 38 
turning on 26-28 
unpacking and adjusting 4-6 
working with video on 136 
Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh 

user's manual 34 
twisted-pair Ethernet network 
connecting to 92-93 
identifying port 90-91 
typing special characters and 

symbols 296-298 

U 

uncovering port opening on 

expansion panel 175 
unpacking the equipment 4-6 
unsuccessful installations 262 
updating hard disk drivers 

258-259 
user's manual 34 



Can't Find It? 
See also Mac OS 
Guide's onscreen 
index. Open the 
Guide (O) menu 
and choose 
Mac OS Guide, 
then click the 
Index button. 



VCR 

connecting to computer 134 
troubleshooting video input 
from 237 
very low frequency (VLF) 

fields 281 
vibrating CD-ROM discs 214 
video 126-138. See a I SO Apple 
Video Player 
connecting equipment to 
computer 131-135 
equipment and cabling needed 

for 128-129 
problems watching 236-239 
adjusting size of video 

windows 239 
blank screen 236 
closed caption 239 
poor image or rolling 
picture 237 
reducing number of colors 
for 237 

remote control buttons for 301 
S-video and composite video 

formats 126-127 
S-video connections for 

input from VCR or 

camcorder 135 
technical information for 

309-310 



watching TV 136-138 
connecting to antenna or 
cable service 136-137 
tuning in a station 138 
working with on computer 136 
video audio input port 312 
video CD discs 308 
video expansion slot 313 
video input port 127, 131, 146, 147 
Video Out port 134 
views 

selecting in Apple Fax 66 
selecting in Apple Phone 71 

Views control panel 226 

virtual memory 48, 225 

virus and virus protection 40, 206 

VLF (very low frequency) 
fields 281 

voice mail 72 

Voice Mail view (Apple Phone 

window) 71 
voltage and impedance, for sound 

output 312 
voltage switch (bass unit) 13 
volume control button 

on computer 122, 144, 145 
on remote control 301, 

302,303 
Volume Information command 

(Apple System 

Profiler) 193 



W 

waking up computer 195 
warranty coverage 159, 194 
Web sites 

Apple 36 

browsing 82 
weight of computer 315 
Welcome Tour 31 
wide area networks (WAN) 84 
windows 

adjusting size of video 239 

Disk First Aid 250 

hiding and showing 46, 47 

moving and shrinking 35 

problems with 201, 209 
Windows documents 208 
WindowShade control panel 209 

X, Y 

X disk icon 198 



zapping the PRAM 196, 201 
zones 98 
zoom box 35 



Index 
340 



.. . Macintosh 
twentiej^ niversary 



User's Manual 



Contents 



Communications regulation information viii 
Laser information x 

Preface xii 

ParFI: GettinqStartecT 

1 Setting Up 2 

Unpacking the equipment 4 
Postioning the bass unit 7 
Plugging in your equipment 7 
Removing the port cover plate 16 
Connecting the keyboard 17 
Connecting your modem to a telephone jack 18 
Replacing the port cover plate 22 
Adjusting the keyboard (optional) 23 
Repositioning the trackpad (optional) 23 
Turning the computer on 26 
Problems turning your computer on? 28 
What's next? 28 

Contents 

ii 



2 Learning to Use Your Computer 30 

Learning the basics 30 

After you take the tutorial 33 

Where to find answers 34 

Four simple tips for using Guide effectively 35 

Turning the computer off 38 

3 Using Software 40 

Installing application programs 40 

Installing applications over a network 46 

Opening an application program and its documents 46 

Working with several applications at a time 46 

Five tips for using application programs effectively 48 

About the software included with your computer 49 

Backing up your files 52 

Rartll: CommunicatingWith Other Computers 

4 Connecting Your Computer to a Telephone Line 56 

Types of equipment 57 

About your computer's modem 59 

Adjusting the modem 73 

5 Connecting to the Internet or an Online Service 78 

About the Internet and its language 78 

Using your modem to connect to an Internet service provider or an online service 79 
What you can do on the Internet 81 



Contents 

iii 



6 Connecting Your Computer to a Network 84 

Where to find more information 85 
Connecting to a LocalTalk network 86 
Connecting to an Ethernet network 90 
Setting up your network connection 97 

Rartlll: Multimedia" 

7 Sound 108 

Playing an audio or multimedia CD 109 
Listening to FM radio 113 
Connecting audio equipment 1 17 
Using the built-in microphone 121 
Adjusting the sound settings 122 

8 Video 126 

Connecting video input equipment 127 
Watching TV 136 

PartIV: ExpandingYour Conriputer'sCapabilTti^ 

9 Connecting Additional Equipment 142 

Your computer's components and front panel controls 144 
Your computer's ports and power button 146 
Connecting external SCSI devices 148 
Connecting a printer 153 
Connecting an ADB input device 156 
Securing your computer 157 



Contents 

iv 



10 Installing Expansion Cards and Memory 158 

About expansion cards 160 
About memory 161 
Opening the computer 163 
Installing a PCI expansion card 166 
Installing a communication card 174 
Installing memory (DRAM) 181 
Closing the computer 184 

Pa rtV: Troubleshooting 

11 Start Here If Trouble Occurs 190 

Step 1: Gather as much information as you can 190 

Step 2: Restart your computer 191 

Step 3: Check onscreen help, if you can 192 

Step 4: Go to the next chapter, "Solutions to Common Problems" 192 

Step 5: Use Apple System Profiler 192 

12 Solutions to Common Problems 194 

Problems turning on or starting up your computer 195 

Problems with application programs, documents, and memory 202 

Problems with icons 210 

Problems with CD-ROM discs and drives 210 

Problems with floppy disks and floppy disk drives 218 

Problems with hard disks 22 1 

Problems with the trackpad or keyboard 222 

Problems with your computer's speed and performance 225 



Problems with error messages 228 
Problems with your printer 228 
Problems with networks and file sharing 230 
Problems using the microphone 234 
Problems listening to the radio 234 
Problems watching TV or video 236 
Problems using the modem 240 

13 Techniques for Diagnosing and Solving Problems 244 

Checking your system extensions 244 
Testing your hard disk 247 
Repairing a damaged hard disk or floppy disk 249 
Initializing a hard disk 252 

Starting up from the system software CD-ROM disc 253 
Installing system software 255 
Rebuilding your desktop 271 



Contents 

vi 



Part VI: Appendixes 

A Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 276 

Health-related information about computer use 276 
Safety instructions 282 
Handling your computer equipment 283 
Cleaning your equipment 290 

B Special Keys on Your Keyboard 292 

Typing special characters and symbols 296 
Special key combinations 299 

C Using the Remote Control 300 

Controlling TV or video 301 

Controlling the FM radio 302 

Controlling the CD-ROM drive 303 

Setting preferences for the remote control 304 

D Technical Information 306 

Main unit 306 

Index 320 



Contents 

vii 



Communications regulation information 

The following FCC information applies only to Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh computers sold in Canada, Japan, and the United States. 
FCC declaration of conformity 

This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause 
harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired 
operation. See instructions if interference to radio or television reception is suspected. 

Telephone Consumer Protection Act 

The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful for any person to use a computer or other electronic device to send 
any message via a telephone fax machine unless such message clearly contains in a margin at the top or bottom of each transmitted page, 
or on the first page of the transmission, the date and time it was sent and an identification of the business or other entity, or individual 
sending the message, and the telephone number of the sending machine of such business, entity, or individual. For instructions for 
providing this information with each fax you send, refer to the user's manual that came with your software. 

Radio and television interference 

The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used properly— 
that is, in strict accordance with Apple's instructions— it may cause interference with radio and television reception. 

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in 
Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential 
installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. 

You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably 
caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices. 

If your computer system does cause interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of 
the following measures: 

■ Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops. 

■ Move the computer to one side or the other of the television or radio. 

■ Move the computer farther away from the television or radio. 

■ Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the computer and the 
television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.) 

If necessary, consult an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple. See the service and support information that came with your Apple 
product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television technician for additional suggestions. 

Important Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Computer, Inc., could void the FCC Certification and 
negate your authority to operate the product. 

This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of Apple peripheral devices and Apple shielded 
cables and connectors between system components. It is important that you use Apple peripheral devices and shielded cables and 
connectors between system components to reduce the possibility of causing interference to radios, television sets, and other electronic 
devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral devices and the proper shielded cables and connectors through an Apple-authorized dealer. For 
non-Apple peripheral devices, contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance. 

Responsible party: Robert Steinfeld, Apple Computer, Inc., 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, CA 95014-2084, 408-974-2618. 

Communications 
Regulation 
Information 



viii 



Industry Canada statement 

This Class B device meets all requirements of the Canadian interference-causing equipment regulations. 

Cet appareil numerique de la Class B respecte toutes les exigences du Reglement sur le materiel brouilleur du Canada. 

VCCI Class 2 statement 

Information you need in the United States 

The GeoPort Telecom Adapter and the GeoPort Internal Modem comply with Part 68 of the FCC rules. On the back of this equipment is a 
label that contains, among other information, the FCC registration number and ringer equivalence number (REN). 
If requested, provide this information to your telephone company. 

■ Ringer equivalence number (REN): 0.8B 

The REN is useful for determining the number of devices you may connect to your telephone line and still have all devices ring when 
your telephone number is called. In most, but not all, areas the sum of the RENs of all devices connected to one line should not exceed 
five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices you may connect to your line, as determined by the REN, you should contact your 
local telephone company to determine the maximum REN for your calling area. 

■ Telephone jack type: USOC,Rj-ll 

An FCC-compliant telephone cord and modular plug are provided with this equipment. This equipment is designed to be connected 
to the telephone network or premises wiring using a compatible modular jack that complies with Part 68 rules. See the installation 
instructions for details. 

Telephone line problems 

If your telephone doesn't work, there may be a problem with your telephone line. Disconnect the modem to see if the problem goes 
away. If it doesn't, report the problem either to your local telephone company or to your company's telecommunications people. 

If disconnecting the modem eliminates the problem, the modem itself may need service. See the service and support information that 
came with your Apple product for instructions on how to contact Apple or an Apple-authorized service provider for assistance. 

If you do not disconnect your modem when it is adversely affecting the telephone line, the telephone company has the right to 
disconnect your service temporarily until you correct the problem. The telephone company will notify you as soon as possible. Also, you 
will be informed of your right to file a complaint with the FCC. 

The telephone company may make changes to its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that could affect the operation of your 
equipment. If this happens, the telephone company will provide advance notice in order for you to make the necessary modifications to 
maintain uninterrupted service. 

The GeoPort Telecom Adapter and the GeoPort Internal Modem will not work with party lines, cannot be connected to a coin-operated 
telephone, and may not work with a private branch exchange (PBX). 



Communications 

Regulation 

Information 

ix 



Information you need in Canada 

The Canadian Department of Communications (DOC) label identifies certified equipment. This certification means that the equipment 
meets certain telecommunications network protective, operational, and safety requirements. The Department does not guarantee the 
equipment will operate to a user's satisfaction. 

Before installing this equipment, make sure that you are permitted to connect to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. 
Be sure you use an acceptable method of connection to install the equipment. In some cases, you may extend the company's internal 
wiring for single-line individual service by means of a certified telephone extension cord. Be aware, however, that compliance with these 
conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some situations. 

Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any 
equipment malfunctions or repairs or alterations that you make to this equipment may cause the telecommunications company to 
request that you disconnect the equipment. 

In Canada, contact Appleat: 

7495 Birchmount Road, Markham, Ontario 
L3R5G2, 800-263-3394 

Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines, and internal 
metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas. 

Warning Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric inspection 
authority or electrician. 

■ Load number: 15 

The load number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the percentage of the total load to be connected to the telephone 
loop that is used by the device, to prevent overloading. The termination of a loop may consist of any combination of devices, subject 
only to the requirement that the sum of the load numbers of all devices does not exceed 100. 

■ Telephone jack type: CA-ll 
Laser information 

Warning Making adjustments or performing procedures other than those specified in your equipment's manual may result in 
hazardous exposure. 

Warning Do not attempt to disassemble the cabinet containing the laser. The laser beam used in this product is harmful to the eyes. 
The use of optical instruments, such as magnifying lenses, with this product increases the potential hazard to your eyes. For your safety, 
have this equipment serviced only by an Apple-authorized service provider. 

If you have an internal Apple CD-ROM drive in your computer, your computer is a Class 1 laser product. The Class 1 label, located in a 
user-accessible area, indicates that the drive meets minimum safety requirements. A service warning label is located in a service-accessible 
area. The labels on your product may differ slightly from the ones shown here. 




Class 1 label Service warning label 



• Apple Computer, Inc. 

© 1997 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. 

Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the written consent of Apple. Your rights to the 
software are governed by the accompanying software license agreement. 

The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Use of the "keyboard" Apple logo 
(Option-Shift-K) for commercial purposes without the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair 
competition in violation of federal and state laws. 

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical 
errors. 

Apple Computer, Inc. 
1 Infinite Loop 
Cupertino, CA 95014-2084 
408-996-1010 
http://www.apple.com 

Apple, the Apple logo, AppleScript, AppleShare, Apple SuperDrive, AppleTalk, AppleVision, Chicago, EtherTalk, GeoPort, HyperCard, 
LaserWriter, LocalTalk, Mac, Macintosh, OpenDoc, Performa, PowerBook, Power Macintosh, PowerTalk, QuickDraw, QuickTake, and 
QuickTime are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. 

AppleCD, At Ease, Balloon Help, Cyberdog, Disk First Aid, Extensions Manager, Finder, Foreign File Access, and Macintosh PC Exchange 
are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Acrobat, Adobe, and PostScript are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated or its subsidiaries and may be registered in certain 
jurisdictions. 

Helvetica and Spartan are registered trademarks of Linotype-Hell AG and/or its subsidiaries. 
NuBus is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 

PowerPC and the PowerPC logo are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation, used under license therefrom. 

Other company and product names mentioned herein are trademarks of their respective companies. Mention of third-party products is 
for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with 
regard to the performance or use of these products. 

Simultaneously published in the United States and Canada. 



Preface 



Dear Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh customer, 



For twenty years, Apple design engineers have been building bridges between what people 
dream about and the amazing new technologies that can take them beyond those dreams. 

It's our magnificent obsession. 

It's about working and playing and listening and learning and creating and communicating— 
sometimes all at the same time. 

It's about the delight of doing things faster and better and easier. 

It's about the joy of holding and handling and using things that are well made. 

It's about turning your back on conventional wisdom and finding new ways. 

Now, it's about celebrating the last twenty years, and heralding the next twenty. 

It's about the most wonderful thing we've ever built. 

It's the Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh. 



Sincerely, 




Dr. Gil Amelio 

CEO Apple Computer, Inc. 



Where to find answers 

When you havequestionsabout using 
your Macintosh, there a re several 
places you can look for answers. 




Macintosh 
user's manual 

Use this book to help you 
set up your computer and 
learn about it, or to find 
solutionsto problems. 




Apple Guide 

If you need help or experience a 
problem whi le usi ng the computer, 
open theGuide (O) menu and 
choose Mac OSGuide. The Guide 
menu isthemain source for 
information whileyou areusing 
the computer. 





Other manuals 

For answersto questionsabout 
other equipment or about 
application programsyou have 
purchased, see the manuals 
that came with the equipment 
or programs. 



Apple's customer 
support hotline 

If you can't find an answer in 
any of the materials provided, 
call the customer support 
hotline. (The phone number 
for the hotline is in the service 
and support information that 
came with your computer.) 



Preface 

xiii