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Final Integrated Development Plan 2019/2020 



PIXLEY ka SEME 


DISTRIKSMUNISIPALITEIT 


DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 


INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

(IDP) 

FINAL IDP 2019-2020 


MAY 


2019 


Culvert Road 
Private Bag XI012 
De Aar 
7000 

Tel: 053 631 0891 

Fax: 053 631 2529 

Email: Pixlev@telkomsa.net 










Final Integrated Development Plan 2019/2020 


Contents 


PIXLEY KASEME.1 

Foreword by the Executive Mayor .iv 

Acknowledgement from the Municipal Manager .v 

Executive Summary.1 

Municipal Powers and Functions.2 

District Municipal Area at a Glance.2 

Geographical Context.3 

Spatial Location.3 

Demographic Profile.6 

Municipal Area.6 

Economic Profile.7 

Employment Status.7 

Economic Sector Contributor.7 

Household Income.8 

Investment Typology.8 

IDP Development Strategy.9 

The IDP/Budget Process Plan.9 

Public Participation.9 

Intergovernmental Alignment.10 

Municipal Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT).11 

Municipal Comparative Synopsis.12 

Financial Summary.13 

Level of Reliance on Grants.13 

Employee Related Costs.13 

Finance Charges to Total Operating Expenditure.15 

Repairs and Maintenance.15 

Acid Test Ratio.16 

Long-Term Debt to Annual Income.17 

Chapter 1: IDP Process.18 

IDP Process.18 

Roles and Responsibilities.18 

Roles and Responsibilities - Internal.18 

Roles and Responsibilities - External.19 

Public Participation.19 

Legislative Requirements.19 

Public Participation Process.20 

Five Year Cycle of the IDP.20 

Annual Review of the IDP.20 

Mechanisms for Alignment.22 

National Linkages.22 

Chapter 2: Legal Requirements.27 

Chapter 3: Situational Analysis.29 

Spatial Analysis.29 

Geographical Context.30 

Environmental Context.32 

Biophysical Context.32 

Infrastructural Context.33 

Infrastructural Summary.33 


Page i 
























































Services and Backlogs.34 

Social Context.34 

Social Summary.34 

Demographics of the Municipality.35 

Education Levels.36 

Service Delivery Levels.36 

Health 37 

Social Grants.37 

Housing 37 

Economical Context.38 

Economic Summary.39 

GDP of the Municipality.40 

Investment Typology.40 

Strategic Context.41 

Strategic Summary.42 

Possible Opportunities.42 

Developmental Direction for Urban Areas.42 

The Organisation.43 

Council 43 

The Executive Mayoral Committee.44 

Executive management structure.44 

Departmental structure.44 

Municipal workforce.45 

Municipal administrative and institutional capacity.46 

Skills development.47 

Institutional performance.47 

Sectoral Plans.48 

3.10.1 Spatial Development Framework.48 

Integrated Waste Management Plan (IWMP).50 

Integrated Environmental Management Plan.50 

3.10.4 Human Settlement Plan.53 

Chapter 4: Development Strategies.65 

Strategic Vision of the Municipality.65 

National, Provincial and Municipality's Strategic Alignment.66 

Municipal Development Strategy per Function.67 

Executive and Council.67 

Finance and Administration.68 

Internal Audit.71 

Community and Social Services.72 

Health 73 

Planning and Development.74 

Other 77 

Chapter 5:5 Year Corporate Scorecard: Development and Service Delivery Priorities.78 

Chapter 6: Sectoral Contributions.89 

National Sector Projects.90 

Department of Water and Sanitation.90 

Department of Public Works (Expanded Public Works Programme).90 

Provincial Sector Projects.91 


Page ii 















































Department of Education.91 

Department of Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs: Human Settlement Grant 

Allocation 2018/19.97 

Department of Health.98 

Department of Rural Develoment and Land Reform.99 

Department of Water and Sanitation.100 

Chapter 7: Financial Plan.103 

Capital Budget.103 

7.2 Grants.105 

7.2.1 Allocations in terms of the Division of Revenue Bill (DORA).105 

7.2.2 Allocations in terms of the Provincial Gazette.105 

7.3 Financial Framework.103 

7.3.1 Operating Budget: Revenue and Expenditure.103 

7.3.2 Operating Budget: Revenue by Department and Division.103 

7.3.3 Operating Budget: Expenditure by Department and Division.104 

Chapter 8: Performance Management.107 

Performance Management System.107 

Legislative requirements.107 

Performance Management Framework.108 

Organisational Performance Management Linked to Individual Performance Management.108 

Corporate Performance.109 

Individual Performance: Senior Managers.109 

Performance Reporting.110 

MEC Comments from the IDP Engagement conducted on the 22 - 26 May 2017.110 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS.111 


Page iii 




























Foreword by the Executive Mayor 


The Integrated Development Plan of the Pixley ka Seme District 
Municipality covers the five year period 2017 - 2022. We are on the 
fourth generation of the democratic elected councilors since the first 
local government election in December 2000. This is the second IDP 
review of our 2017 - 2022 five year IDP. We were mandated by our 
respective constituencies to ensure a better life for all. A mandate we 
gladly accept and commit ourselves to throughout our term of office. 
This IDP process has presented us with an opportunity to set out 
objectives and development strategies to be achieved in a five year period. 

This IDP review is premised on stakeholder engagement with the communities, business, government, NGO’s, 
political parties and etc. all the above stakeholders were involved during the drafting of this IDP through internal and 
external processes. The IDP review will offer and present a real partnership in action through the implementation of 
the District Growth and Development Strategy and the Spatial Development Framework. 

Both unemployment and inequality remains a challenge within our region, our programmes and commitment will 
promote local economic empowerment and development through working with communities, private sector and labour. 
Job creation and sustainable livelihoods will be the centre of district programmes as a whole. We present this Plan as 
a clear strategy based on local needs. It is very essential to mention that the implementation of this plan requires an 
accelerated pace of intergovernmental action and alignment to ensures that all developmental players play their part. 

On behalf of the Council, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the role players who have contributed in 
various ways to this IDP review (2019/2020). I have no doubt that through this IDP, we will improve Pixley ka Seme 
District Municipality administratively and financially. 

Allow me therefore to say these two words: “though our beginning is small, yet our latter end will increase abundantly”- 
Job 8:7 and “In all our ways let us acknowledge Him, and He shall direct our paths”- Proverbs 3:6. 

I thank you, Enkosi, Baie Dankie 

CLL M. KIBI 
EXECUTIVE MAYOR 



Pageiv 









Acknowledgement from the Municipal Manager 


In terms of Section 34 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems 
Act, 2000 (Act 32 of 2000) each municipality is required to develop a 
five year Integrated Development Plan (IDP) and review it annually to 
assess its performance against measurable targets and respond to the 
demands of the changing circumstances. 

Through our public participation programmes, the communities of 
Pixley ka Seme District Municipality have reaffirmed their needs, 
which include but not limited to the following: water, employment, 
health and educational facilities, SMME empowerment and support, 
sports and recreational facilities and etc. Some of the identified needs do not fall within the functions of the District 
Municipality, but the communities tend not to differentiate between Local, District, Provincial and National Government 
functions. To ensure that needs of local communities are met, this therefore demands that the District Municipality 
planning are better coordinated/ integrated with Local, Provincial and National Government. The IDP should be seen 
as a central tool for three spheres of Government in achieving the aim of accelerated service delivery to our 
communities. This IDP is aligned with the National Development Plan 2030 vision, and it is therefore a stepping stone 
towards advancing the goals of the National Development Plan. 

When Council adopts the final IDP in May 2019, the council together with management will translate it into effective 
service delivery for all. The reviewed IDP will be a plan that guides the actions and allocations of resources within the 
District Municipality. 

Once again, I would like to acknowledge all the officials, communities and Councillors involved in preparation this IDP 
review. A special word of acknowledgement goes to the Executive Mayor, Executive Mayoral Committee and Council 
for the commitment to the IDP process. 

Thank You 



MR RE PIETERSE 
MUNICIPALITY MANAGER 


Page v 








Executive Summary 


Pixley ka Seme District Municipality’s Integrated Development Plan (IDP) provides the framework to guide the 
Municipality’s planning and budgeting over the course of a set legislative time frame. It is an instrument for making the 
Municipality more strategic, inclusive, responsive and performance driven. The IDP is therefore the main strategic 
planning instrument which guides and informs all planning, budgeting and development undertaken by the Municipality 
in its municipal area. 

The Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is guided by the vision of the Municipality: 


“Developed and Sustainable District for Future Generations” 


To achieve the vision, the Municipality has committed to the mission statement: 


Mission 


a Supporting our local municipalities to create a home for all in our towns, settlements and rural areas to render 
dedicated services; 

» Providing political and administrative leadership and direction in the development planning process; 
a Promoting economic growth that is shared across and within communities; 

a Promoting and enhancing integrated development planning in the operations of our municipalities; and 
a Aligning development initiatives in the district to the National Development Plan. 

Our Strategic objectives to address the vision will be: 


Strategic Objectives 


a Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice. 

« To provide an independent and objective internal audit assurance and consulting service to add value and to 
improve the administrative operations of all the municipalities in the district through an approach that is systematic 
and disciplined. 

a Promote economic growth in the district. 

« To provide a professional, people centered human resources and administrative service to citizens, staff and 
Council. 

» Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with legislative requirements to achieve a 
favourable audit outcome. 

« To provide disaster management services to the citizens. 

as To provide municipal health services to improve the quality of life of the citizens. 

w Guide local municipalities in the development of their IDP's and in spatial development. 

« Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery. 


Page 1 










Municipal Powers and Functions 


The table below indicates the functions which the Municipality is responsible. It also gives an indication if the 
Municipality has sufficient capacity to fulfil these functions: 


Functions 

Responsible-for- 

Function^ 

Yes/Non 

Sufficient-Capacity-in- 
terms-of-resources^] 

Yes/Non 

Air-Pollutionn 

Yesn 

Non 

Building-Regulationsn 

Yesn 

Yesn 

Disaster-Managementn 

Yesn 

Non 

Local-Tourismn 

Yesn 

Non 

Municipal-Health-Servicesn 

Yesn 

Non 

Control-of-Public-Nuisancesn 

Yesn 

Non 


District Municipal Area at a Glance 


Total-municipal-arean 

io 3 - 4 io-km J n 

Demographics-(Census-20ii)n 

Populationn 1 186-3520 

Householdso 49-1930 


Select ed-statisticsn 

Population-growth-rate-(%)- 
(2001—201l)n 

1,12%-(2001-201l)o 

Population- 

density(persons/km ! )n 

1,8-0 

Matric-pass-rate-20i6n 

82.2%-(Northem-Cape)n 

Proportion-of-households- 

earning-less-than-R48oo-per- 

annum-in-20im 

14X0 

Access-to-basic-services,-2 

016—minimum-service-leveln 


Watero 45.1X0 

Sanitationn 72.6%° 

Electricityo 89.8%° 

Refuse-removaln 74.2X0 

Education n 

Matric-(Aged-20-+)n 

24*0%n 

Higher-educationn 

5 - 4 %o 

Economyn 

Labour-Market-in-2011 n 

GDPR-Northem-Cape-in-20im 

2.2%o 

Unemployment-raten 

28.3X0 

GDPR-South-Africa-in-20im 

3 - 5 %n 

Youth-unemployment-rate- 

(ages-i5-to-34)n 

35 - 4 *° 

Largest-sectors-(using-the-relative-size-of-the-provincial-economy-by-industry)n 

Finance-and-business-servicesn 

Miningn 

Govemment-serviceso 

Wholesale,-retail-and-motor- 
tradej-catering-and- 
accommodationo 

ii.6%d 

26.7X0 

12.8%d 

9.9X0 

Health-in-the-Northern-Cape-(20o6-data) 

Health-care-facilities- 

(hospitals/dinics-/hospice)n 

toDMtfeaJien-rate^n 

H IV-prevalence-raten 

Teenage-pregnancies—delivery- 
rate-to-women-U/i8%o 

420 

4,8%d 

9,6X0 

22%-(Northern-Cape)o 


Serious-crimesn 


Serious-crimesn 


Driving-under-the- 
influence-of-alcohol- 
or-drugsn 


Drug-related-crimeo 


Residential- 

burglaries^ 


Murdersn 


Sexual-offencesn 


8888n 


117 D 


86on 


107° 


356 ° 


Page 2 




























































Geographical Context 


Spatial Location 

The jurisdiction of the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality (as a category C Municipality) covers an area of 103 
410km z , which is also 27,7% of the total area that constitutes the Northern Cape province. 

This district municipal area is the eastern-most district Municipality within the Northern Cape, and borders on the 
Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Free State provinces. The map below indicates the location of the Municipality in 
the province: 



There are 8 category B municipalities within the municipal are, viz. Emthanjeni, Kareeberg, Renosterberg, Siyancuma, 
Siyathemba, Thembelihle, Ubuntu and Umsobomvu. The following main towns in these category B municipalities 
represent an even spread throughout the district as central places and agricultural service centers: Douglas, Prieska, 
Carnarvon, Victoria West, Colesberg, Flopetown and De Aar. De Aar is the ‘largest’ of these towns. The closest major 
city to these towns is Bloemfontein in the Free State province. 

Emthanjeni Municipality: comprising of the three towns De Aar, Britstown and Hanover. De Aar is the second most 
important railway junction in the country. When the railway line was built from Cape Town to Kimberley, the 
administration bought a large portion of the farm, De Aar, meaning coincidentally “artery", after underground water 
supply, envisaged as large life-giving veins of water. 


Page 3 






























Kareeberg Municipality: This Municipality comprises of three towns, that is, Carnarvon, Van Wyksvlei and Vosburg. 
The municipal area is the heart of the Karoo and the predominant economic activity is livestock farming. The 
possibilities of having Kilometre Array Telescope befit the landscape of the Municipality that is characterised by clear 
skies and less pollution. This Municipality is an entry point to the Western Cape Province from the Northern parts of 
the country. 

Renosterberg Municipality: The Municipality is located on the banks of the Orange River. The Municipality was 
formed through the amalgamation of three towns, that is, Petrusville, Vanderkloof and Phillipstown. 

The Municipality covers approximately 553 000 ha of land and forms about 5% of the total area of the district. 

Siyancuma Municipality: This Municipality hosts the confluence of the Vaal and the Orange River. It comprises in the 
main of three towns, that is, Campbell, Douglas and Griekwastad and has densely populated rural settlement called 
Smitchdrift. The municipal area is richly endowed with precious and semi-precious stones, that is, diamonds and 
tiger’s eye. Beneficiation of tiger’s eye is on the high impact project identified in the District Growth and Development 
Strategy. The Municipality has a great tourism potential. 

Siyathemba Municipality: This Municipality is located on the banks of the Orange River and boosts with massive and 
high scale irrigation farming, the river not only adds agricultural value to the Municipality but also boosts massive 
tourism and economic potential. The Municipality comprises of three towns, that is, Marydale, Prieska and 
Niekerkshoop. The Municipality has massive potential for mining activities of both precious and semi-precious stones. 
The Municipality also has the Alkantpan testing area where international and national ammunition testing is done. 

Thembelihle Municipality: This Municipality is also located on the banks of the Orange River. The Municipality was 
formed through the amalgamation of three towns, that is, Hopetown, Strydenburg and Orania. The outcome of the 
dispute regarding Orania has not yet been decided upon and the uncertainty still exists as to where Orania is 
demarcated. N12 cuts through this municipal area and is a major boost to the economies of Hopetown and 
Strydenburg. 

Ubuntu Municipality: The Municipality comprises of three towns that is Victoria West, Loxton and Richmond. The 
N12 and N1 pass through this Municipality and have a great tourism potential. The preliminary study in the district’s 
Mining Strategy highlights that the Municipality is endowed with uranium deposits. 

Umsobomvu Municipality: This Municipality comprises of three towns, that is, Colesberg, Norvalspond and 
Noupoort. N1 and N9 traverse trough the Municipality. It shares borders with other municipalities in the Eastern Cape 
and Free State Provinces. In the district this Municipality is among the municipalities that hold massive tourism 
potential. 

Two of the abovementioned towns, viz. Prieska and Carnarvon have in recent years changed character from small 
rural towns to potentially regional hubs as a result of investments in renewable energy generation and the Square 
Kilometre Array radio telescope project, respectively. The maps below indicates the municipal area divided into local 
municipalities with their regional location and main towns: 


Page 4 



Pixley ka Seme DM: Municipal areas 


Northern Cape Province 


Pixley ka Seme DM 


8 local municipalities 


Legend 
Northern Cape 

Provinces 
Pixley ka Seme DM 
Municipal areas 


Dais Surveyor-General Dept of Rural 
Development & Land Reform. 
Municipal Demarcation Board 


Date - February 2017 


Prepared by: 
a&flh — ..'.Assoa 

M Rode 

_ 



Page 5 





























































Demographic Profile 

The table below indicates both an increase in the population size and the number of households between 2001 and 
2011, but a decrease in the average household size over the same period. The increase in the population size from 
2001 to 2011 was preceded by a period with a negative growth rate, i.e. fewer persons in the municipal area in 2001 
than in 1996 — hence, the negative growth rate. Note that, together, the Black-African and Coloured groupings 
constitute more than 90% of the total population. 


Indicate™ 

2001 D 

201m 

Populations 

166-5470 

186-3510 

Population-growth-rateo 

-i,27%-(i996-200i)s 

1,12%-(2001—201l)o 

Households^ 

41-707° 

49-193° 

People-per-householdo 

3,9° 

3,8° 

Gender-breakdowns 

Malesn 

79-927-(48.6%)n 

92-o68-(49 l 4%)o 

Femalesn 

84-687-(5 i. 4 %)b 

92-284<5°«fe*)° 

Age-breakdownn 

0—140 

32,6%s 

3i,6%o 

15—64s 

6i,5%s 

62,4 %q 

Race-Compositions 

65+n 

5,9*° 

6,i%o 

Black-Africann 

27,2%s 

31,5%° 

£fiiajuc§d° 

62,2%s 

59,2%° 

Whites 

10,4%s 

8,i%o 


Asians 

0,1% 0 

0,6%o 


Municipal Area 

As mentioned above, the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality area consists of 8 local municipalities, where Ubuntu 
Municipality being the largest area and Emthanjeni Municipality having the highest population. The table below 
provides the km 2 area and total population per local Municipality: 


Local-Municipality b 

Area-(km 2 )a 

Populations 

Householdso 

&atkaoieai° 

13-472° 

42-3560 

10 * 457 O 

Kareebergo 

17*7020 

11-6730 

3*222o 


5-527° 

10-9780 

2-995° 

§os«aja)a.° 

16-753° 

37-0760 

9-578° 

§ixdihsmba° 

14-725° 

21*5910 

5-8310 

Ihgo 3 belibk° 

8-0230 

15 * 701 O 

4-140O 

Ubuntuo 

20-3890 

18-6010 

5-1290 


6-8190 

28-3760 

7-8410 

Totals 

103-410n 

186-3520 

49193s 


Source:'Stat/stics-SA'20ii-Censusn 


Page 6 












































Economic Profile 


The economy in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area is characterised by the following: 

« High levels of poverty and low levels of education; 

as It is a small to medium-town sub-region with a low level of development despite the strategic location in terms of 
the national transport corridors; 

as Sparsely populated towns with a number of larger towns serving as “agricultural service centres”; spread evenly 
throughout the district as central places; 
as High rate of unemployment, poverty and social grant dependence; 

as Prone to significant environmental changes owing to long-term structural changes (such as climate change, 

energy crises and other shifts); 

as Geographic similarity in economic sectors, growth factors and settlement patterns; 
as Economies of scale not easily achieved owing to the relatively small size of towns; 

« A diverse road network with national, trunk, main and divisional roads of varying quality; 

« Potential and impact of renewable energy resource generation; and 

« Potential and impact of radio telescope initiatives, e.g. Square Kilometre Array radio telescope project. 

Employment Status 

The employment status of the available workforce/economically active group in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area is 
listed in the table below. It indicates that the overall results with regard to the employment status of the workforce / 
potential economically active group in the municipal area have improved from the 2001 figure of 63,1% employed and 
36,9% unemployed. In 2011, the number of unemployed individuals was almost 8% below what it was in 2001. 
However, any unemployment rate, irrespective of how large, has serious repercussions for the ability of the residents 
to pay for their daily needs and for municipal services. Owing to the high numbers of unemployed persons, other main 
sources of income are pension/welfare payments: 


Employment status 

2001 

% 2001 

2011 

% 2011 

Employed 

36 921 

63,1% 

43 664 

71,7% 

Unemployed 

21 632 

36,9% 

17 203 

28,3% 

Not economically active 

101 886 

42,5% 

116 201 

47,6% 

Source: Statistics SA 2001 and 2011 Census 


Economic Sector Contributor 


The economic activities in the Northern Cape Province are dominated by mining, agriculture, manufacturing and 
construction, contributing to the provincial GDP, i.e. 22%, 7%, 3% and 2% respectively. Note that the Northern Cape 
only contributed about a share of 2% to the national GDP in 2014 and which contribution fluctuated around that mark 
since 2004. Between 2011 and 2014, the annual growth in the agriculture and mining sectors was about 4,2% and 
5,2%, respectively. 

The economic activities in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area are dominated by agriculture, social and personal 
services, financial services, tourism and transport and lately, retail and construction activities emanating from the 
establishment of the Square Kilometre Array project. 

The table below includes four economic sectors in the province (seen from a municipal perspective) that have 
comparative advantages in relation to the South African economy (in descending order): 


Page 7 














Description 

Targeted performance within Pixley ka Seme District 
Municipality 

Mining 

High priority 

Agriculture 

High priority 

Manufacturing 

High priority 

Wholesale, retail and motor trade; catering and 
accommodation 

High priority 


In this context, it is important to note the impact the establishment of the Square Kilometre Array project in the western 
segment of the municipal area, already had and will continue to have on the economic and socio-economic elements 
of the area and its population. 


Household Income 

The monthly household income of all the households residing in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area is listed in the 
table below. Almost 11 % of all households within the municipal area have no income, whilst another 3,4% of 
households earn between RO and R4800 per annum. In the context of housing delivery, these people as well as 
another 50% of all households will be beneficiaries of the ‘give-away’ housing programmes, i.e. the RDP and BNG 
programmes with ownership as the tenure type, and the CRU programme with rental as tenure type. In total, almost 
61% of all households in the municipal area will qualify for these housing options owing to a monthly household 
income of less than R3500. Another segment of the population, viz. 24,8% earns below ‘R15 000’ per month, and for 
this group it would not possible to qualify for a (commercial) home loan. These people would then rely of housing 
subsidies (to gain ownership of a house) or social housing (to rent a dwelling). 

It is accepted that, on average, South African households have an annual income of R138 168, viz. a monthly income 
of R11 514. Hence, more than 90% of the households living in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area have a monthly 
income below the average for a South African household. 

Investment Typology 

In a 2011 research study called “Development Potential of Urban Settlements in the Northern Cape” by Van der 
Merwe, I.J., and Zietsman, H.L. regarding the (public) investment potential of municipalities and settlements in the 
Northern Cape, a set of indicators was developed and used to determine the development/growth potential and 
human needs at two functional levels, i.e. municipal and town/settlement. 

By combining the findings on the development/growth potential and human needs, the preferred type of (public) 
investment was identified to stimulate economic growth and social advancement. In this regard, the classification of 
the appropriate investment category for the category B municipalities within the Pixley ka Seme district was as follows: 
low to medium development potential and low to high human need. This implies an investment strategy to stimulate 
infrastructure and social and human capital as best return on investment in these three forms of ‘development capital’. 


Page 8 










IDP Development Strategy 


The IDP is the overarching strategic tool that guides and informs the planning and development, and decisions taken 
regarding planning, management and development within the Municipality. It is the primary strategic plan that 
documents the critical development needs of the municipal area (external) and organisation (internal). The IDP 
process can be summarized as follows: 


r 

National 

Provincial 

■ 

L 

Strategies 

«■ 

Service ^ 
Delivery 


ill 

Responsibilities^ 


Council 

Strategy 


Socio / 
Economic 
Community I 
Stakeholder 
needs 

Strategic 

Risks 


Resources 
/ Capacity 

Service Delivery 
Status Quo 


Sector 




The IDP/Budget Process Plan 

Section 28 of the Municipal Systems Act (MSA), 2000 (Act 32 of 2000), requires that each Municipal Council adopts a 
process plan that would guide the planning, drafting, adoption and review of the IDP. The process plan should have 
clear and established mechanisms, procedures and process to ensure proper consultation with the communities. It 
should indicate clearly how the IDP process will work, who will be responsible for what, time frames and milestones 
will be set and a budget will be aligned to the programme. 

The 2019/2020 IDP Process Plan and District Framework were adopted by Council in August 2018 This process 
plan include the following: 

• Programme specifying the timeframes for the different planning steps; 

• Structures that will manage the process; and 

• Mechanisms, processes and procedures for consultation and participation of local communities, organs of 
state and other role players in the IDP review and budget formulation processes. 

Public Participation 

In order to achieve effective inclusion within the process of developing the IDP and budget, the Municipality utilises the 
following mechanisms as required in terms of Chapter 4 of the MSA: 

• Roadshows 

• Advertisements 

• Newsletters 


Page 9 











A meeting was held on 14 th February 2019 in Niekerkshoop. The Municipality could therefore capture the challenges 
faced by the community to have a better understanding of the realities associated with each area (socio-economically 
and geographically). The table below indicates the detail of inputs that were given by the community: 


Description 


Sustainable jobs through creation of projects. 

Road between Prieska and Niekerkshoop needs to be upgraded 
Need for serviced sites 

Need for skill development programme to capacitate the youth in Oder for them to be employed at the mines 

Illegal dumping of waste 

Some toilet structures doors are broken, request Municipality to investigate and repair 
No sanitation available in the informal settlement area 

Municipal vehicles in Niekerkshoop have to assist in Prieska and Niekerkshoop, but when Niekerkshoop vehicles are 
out of order, other towns do not want to assist them - request better cooperation between towns. 

Established disability day care centre 


Request that mines invest in Niekerkshoop as part of their social contribution 



Intergovernmental Alignment 


The fourth generation IDP 2017-2022 was developed as part of the continuous cycle of planning, implementation and 
monitoring. 

In essence, the process consists out of a situational analysis whereby existing data and annual reports were used as 
a base to understand the current status of both the Municipality and the environment in which it functions. Based on 
the analysis of the current situation, the vision was translated into appropriate Strategic Objectives and Key 
Performance Indicators within the ambit of functions of the Municipality and the available funding to achieve the 
objectives. 

The Strategic Objectives identified have also been aligned with the framework of national and provincial plans, with 


Page 10 

















particular consideration being given as detailed in Chapter 1 (paragraph 1.6). 

Programmes and projects of national and provincial sectoral departments have been included in Chapter 6. 

Municipal Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) 


Council and the senior managers held a strategic planning session on 27 and 28 September 2016. The table below 
provides detail on the broad SWOT identified: 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

Competent and qualified staff 

Not being able to get back money from local municipalities for 
Shared Services rendered 

Manage to operate within a small budget 

Grant dependent institution 

Stability - Political and Administration interface 

Limited technical skills 

Infrastructure to render an effective shared service 

% Representation of salaries to the budget 

Commitment of officials 

Retention of qualified and specialized skills 

Ability to give support to local municipalities 

Limited funding 


Opportunities 

Threats 

Solar and wind farms 

Future role of district municipalities 

Additional functions 

Limited funding 

Project management unit 

SKA - Land expropriation 

Eco Tourism 

Grant dependent institution 

Private funding 

Climate changes 

Revitalisation of railways 

Unemployment & poverty 

Position of being strategically situated (National Roads) 

Limited economic drivers 


Page 11 

























Municipal Comparative Synopsis 


The table below provides a comparison on the status of the Municipality in 2015/16 compare to 2016/17: 


Function 

Issue 

Status - 2015/16 

Status-2016/17 

Executive and council 

Council composition 

11 representative councillors 
and 7 proportional 
representation (PR) 
councillors 

11 representative councilors 
and 8 proportional 
representation (PR) 
councillors 

Number of meetings held 

6 

4 (as at 31 March 2017) 


MM appointed 

Yes 

Yes 


CFO appointed 

Yes 

Yes 


Staff establishment 

101 

113 


Vacancy rate organisational 
structure (incl. frozen) 

21.8% 

22.12% 


Critical vacancies on senior 
management level 

3 

0 


Filled positions 

79 

84 

Finance and administration - 
Human Resources 

Salary % of total budget 

55.63% 

56.55% 

Salary % of operating budget 

55.63%% 

56.55% 


Skills Development Plan 

Yes 

Yes 


Employment Equity Plan 

Yes 

Yes 


Occupational Health and 
Safety Plan 

Yes 

Yes 


Approved organogram 

Yes 

Yes 


Total outstanding debtors 

1 807 911 

1 735 504 (as at 31 March 
2017) 


Outstanding debtors older 
than 90 days 

1 251 250 

1 391 125 (as at 31 March 
2017) 


Source of finance % -own 

10.2% 

21.7% 


Source of finance% -grants 

89.8% 

78.3% 


Source of finance% -other 

0% 

0% 


Annual financial statements 

Yes 

Will be completed at 31 
August 2017 

Finance and administration - 
Finance 

GRAP compliant statements 

Yes 

Yes 

Audit opinion 

Unqualified with matters of 
emphasis 

Will only receive in December 
2017 


Long Term Financial 
Plan/Strategy 

Yes 

Yes 


% of OPEX spend on 
infrastructure maintenance 

0.005% 

0.003% 


% of capital budget compared 
to the total budget 

2.02% 

1.36% 


% of capital budget spend on 
new infrastructure 

100% 

100% 


By-laws 

None 

None 

Finance and administration - 
Administration 

Delegations 

Yes 

Yes 

Communication Strategy 

Yes 

Yes 


Service delivery standards/ 
Customer Care Strategy 

No 

No 


Page 12 







































Function 

Issue 

Status - 2015/16 

Status-2016/17 


Annual report tabled and 
adopted 

Yes 

Has to be tabled only in 
January 2018 


Approved SDF 

Yes 

Yes 

Planning and development 

Approved Performance 
Management Framework 

Yes 

Yes 


Approved Local Economic 
Development Strategy 

Yes 

Yes 

Housing 

Approved Human Settlement 
Plan/ Strategy 

Yes 

Yes 

Environmental Protection 

Approved Environmental 
Management Plan 

Yes 

Yes 

Public Safety 

Approved Disaster 
Management Plan 

Yes 

Yes 

Internal Audit 

Status 

Yes 

Yes 

Audit committees 

Yes 

Yes 


Financial Summary 


Level of Reliance on Grants 

The table below indicates that the Municipality is mostly reliant on grants as a district municipality, the main one being 
the Equitable Share allocation from the National Government. Very limited revenue raising capacity exists, which is 
mainly the contributions made by local municipalities for Shared Services rendered by the Municipality: 



Actual-^ 

Budget 

Budget^] 

Budget 

Budget^] 

Detailsn 

2015/16^ 

2016/17H 

2017/18^ 

2018/ig^l 

20ig/20l] 


Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Government-grants-and-subsidieS'r£CQ£nis.eda 

45’5 1 9'539° 

41’397-OOOn 

47°8oo-oooo 

52°8g2-oooo 

54°855-oooo 

Total-revenuen 

50-663-2gin 

52-878-3220 

52°305-oioo 

57°458-253° 

59 ° 58 g-i 58 o 

Ration 

8g.8%n 

78 - 3 %n 

gi.4%n 

g2.i%n 

g2.i%n 



Employee Related Costs 

The percentage personnel expenditure is essential in the budgeting process as it reflects on current and future 
efficiency. The table below indicates the total expenditure attributable to personnel costs and that the Municipality is 
currently above the national norm of between 35 to 40% and it will increase to almost 70% over the next 3 years which 
is concerning: 


Page 13 









































Actual-j| 

Budget^ 

Budget^ 

Budget^ 

Budget^] 

Detailsn 

2015/16 

2016/17H 

2017/18 n 

2018/19H 

2019/20H 


Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Employee-related- 

costa 

28 ° 3 i 5 - 405 n 

28°259-OOOa 

29 ° 210 - 483 a 

30 ° 67 i-- 009 n 

32°204-558o 

Total-expenditurea 

50 °o 69 - 493 a 

51°274-OOOa 

51°826-711a 

50 ° 637 - 897 a 

53 °012-3l8a 

Ration 

56 . 6 %h 

55 . 1 %H 

56-4%h 

6o.6%n 

6o-7%h 

Normn 



35 %-to- 40 %n 





Page 14 






























Finance Charges to Total Operating Expenditure 

Finance charges is any fee representing the cost of credit or the cost of borrowing. The table below indicates that the 
Municipality does not have notable outstanding long term debt and is way below the national norm of 5%: 



Repairs and Maintenance 

The Municipality is not responsible for the delivery of basic municipal services and therefore the table below indicates 
the total expenditure that is attributable to repairs and maintenance: 



Actual-^! 

Budget^ 

Budget^] 

Budget^ 

Budget^] 

Detailsn 

2015/16 

2016/17^ 

2017/18^ 

2018/19II 

2019/20II 


Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Rn 

Repairs-and- 

maintenancen 

241-0670 

155'OOOn 

i°833-oooo 

853-6500 

896-3330 

Total-expenditureo 

50 °o 69 ' 493 o 

5 i° 274 -oooo 

5i°826-7iio 

50 ° 637 - 897 o 

53 °oi 2 - 3 i 8 d 

Ration 

0-5%n 

0.3XH 

3-6%h 

i-7%n 

i-7%n 

Normn 



10%H 




Page 15 
































Repairs and Maintenance 



Acid Test Ratio 

A measure of the Municipality’s ability to meet its short-term obligations using its most liquid assets. A higher ratio 
indicates greater financial health. The table below indicates that the Municipality is currently experiencing financial 
difficulties to meet its short-term obligations with short-term liquid assets, but that the ration will improve over the next 
three years: 



Page 16 








































Long-Term Debt to Annual Income 

The table below indicates the Municipality’s long term debt as a % of annual income and that it is still within the 
national norm of 30%: 



As mentioned above, the Municipality is mostly dependent on grants and is currently experiencing financial difficulties 
to sufficiently fund all their activities. Grants are diminishing and only the Equitable Share grant from the National 
Government is certain. Shared Services are rendered to local municipalities to share capacity within the district, but 
the financial contribution for these services remains a challenge. To remain financially sustainable, the Municipality will 
focus in the next 5 year mainly on core functions as allocated in terms of the Constitution and the core roles as 
indicated in various pieces of legislation. 


Page 17 


























Chapter 1 : IDP Process 


IDP Process 


The table below indicates the various phases in the development, monitoring and reporting of the IDP: 


IDP Planning Process 


Jut Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Ape May Jun 
Preparation Phase (Analysis) 


Assessment of the implementation of the 2016-2017 IDP Projects 


Identify the limitation and shortcomings of the 2016-2017 IDP 


Undertake an assessment of the implementation of aZ Sector 
Plans and Integrated Programs 


Submit the District IDP Process plan to Council for adoption 


Prepare and present for discussion a draft IDP Process Plan to 
the District IDP Steering Committee 


Identity all updated and available information from statistics SA 
and other stakeholders 


Identify and discuss aZ analysis completed (Engagement 
Session) 



Consultation Phase (Strategy) 


Identify all sector plans and Integrated be 

reviewed 













Facilitate and^g^ji^,!ucal municipalities IDP Rep Forum 
workshop to discuss priority issues 













Undertake strategic planning workshop for the Municipality 



_ 











Consultation Process (Projects) 


Undertake consultation with Sector Departments 






zz 



n 




Formulate IDP Projects for 2017-2022 financial years 






□ 







Convene District IDP Steering Committee meeting to discuss 
potential funded IDP projects for 2017-2022 financial years 









E 




Convene District IDP Rep Forum meeting to discuss potential 
funded IDP projects for 2017-2022 financial years 













Integration Phase 


Prepare and {^iJ^K^dratt IDP 









Present the draft District IDP to the IDP Steering Committee 









Present the draft District IDP to the IDP Rep Forum Committee 











Approval Phase 


Present draft IDP to Council for adoption 









1 


Submit the draft IDP to the MEC fur assessment 









z 

Advertise draft IDP in the Local newspaper for scrutiny and 
comments 









Incorporate all the comments received 









Present the final IDP to Council for approval 











Submit the final IDP to the MEC for 











Submit copies of approved IDP to Provincial Sector 
Departments.^ji^^J^and other stakeholders 











Publish the approved IDP on the website of the Municipality 












Roles and Responsibilities 


Roles and Responsibilities - Internal 

The roles and responsibilities of internal role-players in the compilation of the IDP are indicated in the table below: 


Role Player 

Roles and Responsibilities 

Council 

♦ Consider and adopt the process plan 

♦ To ensure that is a link between the IDP, the Performance Management System (PMS), and the 
budget 

♦ Approving and adopting the IDP 

Council’s Executive 
Committee 

♦ Monitoring the implementation of the IDP 

♦ Involved in decision making processes 


Page 18 



































































































































Role Player 


Roles and Responsibilities 


IDP Manager 


Championing the Integrated Development Planning process 

Day-to-day management of the planning process in terms of time, resources and people, and ensuring 

Involvement of all relevant role players, especially officials, Making sure timeframes are being adhered 

to, Planning process is horizontally and vertically aligned and complies with National and Provincial 

requirements, Conditions for participation are provided and outcomes are being documented 

Chairing the Steering Committee 

Prepare IDP Review Process Plan 

Ensure that all relevant actors are appropriately involved 

Ensure appropriate mechanisms and procedures for public consultation and participation are applied 
Ensure the sector planning requirements are satisfied 

Adjust the IDP in accordance with the MEC for Local Government proposals, if any 


Roles and Responsibilities - External 

The roles and responsibilities of external role-players in the compilation of the IDP are indicated in the table below: 


Role Player 

Roles and Responsibilities 

IDP Representative 
Forum 

♦ Represent the interests of their constituents in the IDP process 

♦ Monitoring the performance of the planning and implementation process 

♦ Provide an organisational mechanism for discussion, negotiation and decision making between the 
stakeholders 

♦ Ensure communication between all stakeholder representatives 

Sector Departments 

♦ Contribute relevant information on the Provincial Sector Departments plans, programme budgets, 
objectives, strategies and projects in a concise and accessible manner 

♦ Contribute sector expertise and technical knowledge to the formulation of municipal strategies and 
projects 

Community 

♦ Communities play an active part throughout the review process of the Integrated Development Plan 
because their needs are crucial; and as a local municipal we need to provide effective and efficient 
service delivery to the communities 

Parastatals and 
NGO’s 

♦ Provides support and contribute relevant information on the IDP plans, programmes, budgets, 
objectives, strategies and projects in concise and accessible manner 

♦ Contribute effectively in workshops and in compilation of the Integrated Development Plans 

Department of Co¬ 
operative 

Governance & 
Traditional Affairs 

♦ Provides co-ordination for Municipalities 

♦ Ensure vertical alignment between the District and local planning 

♦ Facilitation of vertical alignment of IDP’s with other sphere if government and sector departments 

♦ Ensure horizontal alignment of the IDP’s of the municipalities in the District Municipal area 

♦ To co-ordinate events for joint workshops with Local Municipalities, Provincial and National role-players 
and other relevant specialists 

♦ To evaluate the overall process 


Public Participation 


Legislative Requirements 

In giving effect to Section 16 of the MSA, the municipal manager must ensure that for this purpose - 

The Municipality encourages and creates conditions for the local community to participate in the affairs of the 
Municipality, including in - 

« The preparation, implementation and review of its integrated development plan; 

» The establishment, implementation and review of its performance management plan; 

« Consideration of draft by-laws; 

« The monitoring and review of its performance, including the outcome and impact of such performance; 

« The preparation of its budget; and 

» Strategic decisions relating to the provisioning of municipal services. 

The Municipality employs sufficient staff members, other than councillors, who may help in informing and educating 
the local community about the affairs of the Municipality, particularly in the areas referred to in Section 16(1 )(a), taking 


Page 19 

















into account special needs, as defined in Section 17(2) of the Systems Act. 

That all staff members, including councillors, are trained in the basic knowledge of the areas referred to in Section 16 
of the MSA. 

The municipal manager may establish a working group consisting of councillors and previously trained staff members 
to administer the training of new staff and councillors under Section 16 of the MSA. 

Public Participation Process 

The IDP Public Participation process is championed by the Office of the Executive Mayor and presentations was 
made on 14 February in Niekerkshoop (Siyathemba Municipality). Posters, flyers and loud speakers were used to 
mobilise the community. The presentations focused on successes and challenges and afforded the community an 
opportunity to provide input, comment and ask questions. 

Five Year Cycle of the IDP 

The first generation IDP’s dealt with the period 2002-2007, the second generation IDP’s with the period 2007-2012, 
the third generation IDP’s with the period 2012-2017 and municipalities entered the fourth five year IDP cycle with 
the municipal elections in August 2016. The new council that was constituted after the elections immediately started 
preparing a new five year IDP. This fourth generation IDP will be effective from 1 July 2017 up to 30 June 2022. 

Municipalities are encouraged and supported by both national and provincial government to develop realistic and 
credible IDP’s that not only comply with relevant legislation but also - 

» are owned by local leadership, municipal management and community as the single strategic plan to direct 
resources within the Municipality; 

» are driven by the management team and systems within the Municipality with implementation regularly 
monitored during the year through the performance management system; 

» contain a long term development strategy that can guide investment across the municipal area; 

« provide an investment plan for national, provincial and local government and non-governmental stakeholders to 
enhance and enable joint planning and resource alignment to improve service delivery to all stakeholders; and 
» include local area plans to localise the strategy and implementation of the IDP. 

Annual Review of the IDP 

In terms of the MSA, Section 34, a Municipality is required to review its IDP annually. Annual reviews allow the 
Municipality to expand upon or refine plans and strategies, to include additional issues and to ensure that these plans 
and strategies inform institutional and financial planning. 

The IDP has to be reviewed annually. The review process serves as an institutional learning process where 
stakeholders can meet to discuss the successes and frustrations of the past year. It is not designed to interfere with 
the long-term strategic orientation of the Municipality to accommodate new whims and additional demands. It remains 
a strategic process of ensuring the institution remains in touch with their intentions and the environment within which 
it functions. 

Although the implementation of the IDP is monitored through the performance management system, an annual 
process is required to check the relevance of the strategic plan within a dynamic environment. 

The IDP has to be reviewed annually in order to - 


Page 20 




» ensure its relevance as the Municipality’s strategic plan; 

» inform other components of the Municipal business process including institutional and financial planning and 
budgeting; and 

» inform the inter-governmental planning and budget cycle. 

The purpose of a review is to - 

« reflect and report on progress made with respect to the five year strategy (and key outcomes) in the IDP; 

» make adjustments to the strategy in the 5 year IDP because of changing internal and external 

circumstances that impact on the appropriateness of the IDP; 
as determine annual targets and activities for the next financial year in line with the five year strategy; and 
« inform the Municipality’s financial and institutional planning and most importantly, the drafting of the annual 
budget. 


Page 21 


Mechanisms for Alignment 


National Linkages 
National Key Performance Areas 


The table below indicates the National Key Performance Areas: 


KPA 

Description 

Basic Service Delivery (BSD) 

Water, sanitation, refuse removal, roads, storm water, public 
transport, electricity, land and housing 

Municipal Transformation and Institutional Development (MTID) 

Organisational transformation to match IDP requirements, 
internal policies dealing with national priorities, general 
management practices and training 

Municipal Financial Viability and Management (MFVM) 

Financial policies, budget management, assets and liability 
control, and supporting strategies to fund priorities 

Local Economic Development (LED) 

LED, food security, social infrastructure, health, environment, 
education and skills development 

Good Governance and Public Participation (GGPP) 

Public relations, marketing and communication, empowering 
wards, public participation structures and mechanisms, and 
service ethics (Batho Pele) 


National Development Plan (NDP) 

The President of SA appointed a National Planning Commission in May 2010 to draft a vision and plan for the 
country. On 9 June 2011 the Commission released a diagnostic document and elements of a vision statement. On 11 
November 2011 the vision statement and the plan was released for consideration. The Commission consulted widely 
on the draft plan. The National Development Plan was handed to President Zuma in August 2012 and was adopted by 
Cabinet in September 2012. 

The plan focuses on the critical capabilities needed to transform the economy and society. In particular, South Africa 
must find ways to urgently reduce alarming levels of youth unemployment and to provide young people with broader 
opportunities. 

Given the complexity of national development, the plan sets out six interlinked priorities: 

» Uniting all South Africans around a common programme to achieve prosperity and equity. 

« Promoting active citizenry to strengthen development, democracy and accountability. 

« Bringing about faster economic growth, higher investment and greater labour absorption. 

» Focusing on key capabilities of people and the state. 

» Building a capable and developmental state. 

« Encouraging strong leadership throughout society to work together to solve problems. 

The plan in brief 
By 2030: 

» Eliminate income poverty - Reduce the proportion of households with a monthly income below R419 per person 
(in 2009 prices) from 39% to zero. 

« Reduce inequality - The Gini coefficient should fall from 0.69 to 0.6. 


Page 22 













Enabling milestones 

» Increase employment from 13 million in 2010 to 24 million in 2030. 

» Raise per capita income from R50 000 in 2010 to R120 000 by 2030.□ Increase the share of national income of 

the bottom 40% from 6% to 10%. 

« Establish a competitive base of infrastructure, human resources and regulatory frameworks. 

» Ensure that skilled, technical, professional and managerial posts better reflect the country's racial, gender and 
disability makeup. 

« Broaden ownership of assets to historically disadvantaged groups. 

« Increase the quality of education so that all children have at least two years of preschool education and all children 
in grade 3 can read and write. 

» Provide affordable access to quality health care while promoting health and wellbeing. 

» Establish effective, safe and affordable public transport. 

» Produce sufficient energy to support industry at competitive prices, ensuring access for poor households, while 
reducing carbon emissions per unit of power by about one-third. 

» Ensure that all South Africans have access to clean running water in their homes. 

» Make high-speed broadband internet universally available at competitive prices. 

» Realise a food trade surplus, with one-third produced by small-scale farmers or households. 

» Ensure household food and nutrition security. 

» Entrench a social security system covering all working people, with social protection for the poor and other groups 
in need, such as children and people with disabilities. 

« Realise a developmental, capable and ethical state that treats citizens with dignity. 

as Ensure that all people live safely, with an independent and fair criminal justice system. 

as Broaden social cohesion and unity while redressing the inequities of the past. 

as Play a leading role in continental development, economic integration and human rights. 

Critical actions 

as A social compact to reduce poverty and inequality, and raise employment and investment. 

« A strategy to address poverty and its impacts by broadening access to employment, strengthening the social 
wage, improving public transport and raising rural incomes. 

as Steps by the state to professionalise the public service, strengthen accountability, improve coordination and 
prosecute corruption. 

as Boost private investment in labour-intensive areas, competitiveness and exports, with adjustments to lower the 
risk of hiring younger workers. 

as An education accountability chain, with lines of responsibility from state to classroom. 

as Phase in national health insurance, with a focus on upgrading public health facilities, producing more health 
professionals and reducing the relative cost of private health care. 

as Public infrastructure investment at 10% of gross domestic product (GDP), financed through tariffs, public- 
private partnerships, taxes and loans and focused on transport, energy and water. 

» Interventions to ensure environmental sustainability and resilience to future shocks. 

» New spatial norms and standards - densifying cities, improving transport, locating jobs where people live, 
upgrading informal settlements and fixing housing market gaps. 

« Reduce crime by strengthening criminal justice and improving community environments. 


Page 23 


Summary of objectives 

The table below indicates the objectives and actions under each chapter that impact on local government and to which 
the Municipality can contribute where possible: 


Chapter 

Outcome 

Objectives impacting on local government and to which can be 

contributed 

3 

Economy and 
employment 

Public employment programmes should reach 1 million by 2015 and 2 
million people by 2030 



The proportion of people with access to the electricity grid should rise to at 
least 90% by 2030, with non-grid options available for the rest. 

4 

Economic infrastructure 

Ensure that all people have access to clean, potable water and that there is 
enough water for agriculture and industry, recognising the trade-offs in the 

use of water. 



Reduce water demand in urban areas to 15% below the business-as-usual 

scenario by 2030. 



Competitively priced and widely available broadband 

5 

Environmental 
sustainability and 

Absolute reductions in the total volume of waste disposed to landfill each 

year. 


resilience 

At least 20 000MW of renewable energy should be contracted by 2030 

6 

Inclusive rural economy 

No direct impact 

7 

South Africa in the 
region and the world 

No direct impact 



Strong and efficient spatial planning system, well integrated across the 
spheres of government 

8 

Transforming human 
settlements 

Upgrade all informal settlements on suitable, well located land by 2030 


More people living closer to their places of work 



More jobs in or close to dense, urban townships 

9 

Improving education, 
training and innovation 

Make early childhood development a top priority among the measures to 
improve the quality of education and long-term prospects of future 
generations. 

10 

Health care for all 

No direct impact 

11 

Social protection 

Ensure progressively and through multiple avenues that no one lives below 
a defined minimum social floor. 

All children should enjoy services and benefits aimed at facilitating access 
to nutrition, health care, education, social care and safety. 

12 

Building safer 
communities 

No specific objective 



Staff at all levels has the authority, experience, competence and support 
they need to do their jobs. 

13 

Building a capable and 
developmental state 

Relations between national, provincial and local government are improved 
through a more proactive approach to managing the intergovernmental 

system. 

14 

Fighting corruption 

A corruption-free society, a high adherence to ethics throughout society and 
a government that is accountable to its people. 

15 

Nation building and 
social cohesion 

Our vision is a society where opportunity is not determined by race or 
birthright; where citizens accept that they have both rights and 
responsibilities. Most critically, we seek a united, prosperous, non-racial, 
non-sexist and democratic South Africa. 


Back-to-Basics 


Page 24 





























The Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) introduced the Back to Basics approach at 
the Presidential Local Government Summit on 18 September 2014. In presenting the approach the Minister also 
pronounced the national plan of action to roll-out the programme with the aim of addressing challenges facing 
municipalities in a sustainable manner. This approach was adopted at the summit as the framework for the 
implementation of targeted measures towards improving the functioning of municipalities and sustainable provision of 
services to the citizens. 

After the summit the National COGTA stated with the task of preparing for the implementation of the approach in each 
of the nine provinces. These preparations have culminated in the development of the back to basics conceptual 
framework and the operationalization plan that provides the foundation for the onward implementation of the 
approach. 

At the most basic level National Government will expect municipalities to: 

» Put people and their concerns first and ensure constant contact with communities through effective public 
participation platforms. The basic measures to be monitored include: 

• Regular ward report backs by councillors 

• Clear engagement platforms with civil society 

• Transparent, responsive and accountable 

• Regular feedback on petitions and complaints 

• The regularity of community satisfaction surveys carried out. 

» Create conditions for decent living by consistently delivering municipal services to the right quality and 
standard. This includes planning for and delivery of infrastructure and amenities, maintenance and upkeep, 
including the budgeting to do this. Ensure no failures in services and where there are, restore with urgency. 
Municipalities are expected to perform the following basic activities, and the performance indicators will 
measure the ability of our municipalities to do so: 

• Develop fundable consolidated infrastructure plans. 

. Ensure Infrastructure development maintenance (7% OPEX) and reduce losses. 

• Ensure the provision of free basic services and the maintenance of indigent register 

• National and Provincial Rapid Response and technical teams will be established and strengthened 
and service delivery interruptions will be monitored at a national level. 

» Be well governed and demonstrating good governance and administration - cutting wastage, spending public 
funds prudently, hiring competent staff, ensuring transparency and accountability. Municipalities will be constantly 
monitored and evaluated on the following basics: 

• Clear delineation of roles and responsibilities 

• Functional structures. 

• Transparency, accountability and community engagement 

• Proper system of delegation to ensure functional administration 
. The existence and efficiency of anti-corruption measures. 

• The extent to which there is compliance with legislation and the enforcement of by laws. 

• The rate of service delivery protests and approaches to address them. 

» Ensure sound financial management and accounting, and prudently manage resources so as to sustainably 
deliver services and bring development to communities. Performance against the following basic indicators will be 


Page 25 




constantly assessed: 

• Proper record keeping and production of annual financial statements. 

• Credit control, internal controls and increased revenue base 

• Wasteful expenditure including monitoring overtime kept to a minimum. 

• Functional Supply Chain Management structures with appropriate oversight 

• The number disclaimers in the last three - five years. 

• Whether the budgets are cash backed. 

Build and maintain sound institutional and administrative capabilities, administered and managed by 
dedicated and skilled personnel at all levels. The basic requirements to be monitored include: 

• Competent and capable people and performance management. 

• Functional delegations. 

• Regular interactions between management and organised labour. 

• Shared scarce skills services at district level. 

• Realistic organograms aligned to municipal development strategy. 

. Implementable human resources development and management programmes. 


Page 26 




Chapter 2: Legal Requirements 


Municipalities function within an extensive legislative and policy framework that provides prescripts and guidelines for 
municipal actions according to constitutional obligations. In this regard, all municipalities must align their budget and 
programmes with national developmental and institutional policy directives that are mainly being guided by the 
constitution. 

The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa outlines the type of local government needed. Sections 152 and 
153 of the Constitution describe the following objectives of local government: 

» To ensure the sustainable provision of services; 

« To provide democratic and accountable government for all communities; 

« To promote social and economic development; 

» To promote a safe and healthy environment; 

» To give priority to the basic needs of communities, and 

» To encourage involvement of communities and community organisations in matters of local government. 

The Constitution supersedes all legislative frameworks and the following legislation has been developed to guide 
municipalities as to its mandate, function and mechanisms to implement its constitutional mandate: 

a) The MSA requires municipalities to develop Integrated Development Plans that will guide the direction and 
content of potential development within the relevant council's area of jurisdiction, and must be reviewed annually. 
In addition the Act also stipulates the IDP process and the components of the IDP. 

b) The Local Government: Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations (2001) sets out the 
minimum requirements for an Integrated Development Plan. Regulation 2(1) states that the Municipality's IDP 
must at least identify: 

« The institutional framework, which must include an organogram required for the implementation of the Integrated 
Development Plan; 

» Any investment initiatives in the Municipality; 

» Any development initiatives in the Municipality, including infrastructure, physical, social and institutional 
development; 

« All known projects, plans and programmes to be implemented within the Municipality by any organ of the state, 
and 

» The key performance indicators set by the Municipality. 

Regulation 2(3) Local Government: Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations (2001) sets 
out matters/issues that must be reflected in the financial plan that must form part of the integrated development plan. 

Section 21(2) of the Municipal Finance Management Act (Act 56 of 2003) (MFMA) states that, when preparing the 
annual budget, the Mayor of a Municipality must: 

« Take into account the Municipality's Integrated Development Plan. 

as Take all reasonable steps to ensure that the Municipality revises the integrated development plan in terms of 
section 34 of the MSA, taking into account realistic revenue and expenditure projections for future years, 
as Take into account the national budget, the relevant provincial budget, the national government's fiscal and 
macroeconomic policy, the annual Division of Revenue Act and any agreements reached in the Budget Forum. 


Page 27 




Consult with the relevant authorities. 


The drafting, implementation and review of the IDP on an annual basis is mandatory for all municipalities in terms of 
the relevant legislation, and it is therefore important to briefly outline this legal framework. 

The Integrated Development Plan, adopted by the Council of the Municipality, is the key strategic planning tool for the 


35(1) (a)”... the principal strategic planning instrument which guides and informs all planning, development and all 
decisions with regard to planning, management and development in the Municipality”; 

(b) “binds the Municipality in the executive authority... ” 

Municipality. It is described in the Municipal Systems Act (MSA) as: 


Page 28 



Chapter 3: Situational Analysis 


This chapter includes details of the current status of the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality in order to identify the 
current position and what needs to be addressed to turn the existing position around. 

Spatial Analysis 

The Pixley ka Seme District Municipality has a Spatial Development Framework (SDF) however the SDF needs to be 
reiwed to be SPLUMA complaint. The SDF was prepared in 2013, and include bioregional planning approach and 
makes reference to the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act. The SDF does not include recent private 
project investments, recent changes to the municipal boundaries within the district, In this regard, we refer only to the 
following vision as advocated in the district Spatial Development Framework: “We, Pixley ka Seme District 
Municipality, commit ourselves to be a developmental Municipality where the quality of life of all people in the district 
will be improved.” 

Specific reference is made to the requirement in terms of Section 20(2) of the Spatial Planning and Land Use 
Management Act, 2013 (Act 16 of 2013) (SPLUMA) that an SDF must be prepared and approved as part of the 
Municipality’s Integrated Development Plan (IDP) and in accordance with the Local Government Municipal Systems 
Act, 2000 (Act 32 of 2000) (MSA). 

The contents of an SDF are listed in Sections 20 and 21 of SPLUMA, 1 whereas the procedural and content 
requirements regarding the drafting, amendment and adoption of the IDP, are specified in the MSA. In this regard, the 
new set of planning legislation does confirm this process as the same process to be used for the drafting, amendment 
and adoption of the SDF. This also means that the specifications in Section 34 regarding the annual review by a 
Municipality of its Integrated Development Plan, apply to the municipal spatial development framework. When 
considering this specification, it is important to note the different timelines in the respective planning and 
implementation horizons, i.e. 5 years for the IDP and up to 20 years in the SDF. 

It must be noted that there was a Spatial Development Framework prepared for the jurisdiction area of the provincial 
government. In the interests of brevity, the following section includes only a summary of key spatial elements of the 
Northern Cape SDF - elements that have relevance to urban and rural development in the Pixley ka Seme District 
Municipality. 

The provincial SDF (2012), as a spatial land-use directive, provides the preferred approach to spatial planning and the 
use and development of land throughout the Northern Cape. This approach is based on bioregional planning and 
management principles, which basically considers the cultural, social and economic functions as uniquely 
interdependent within a developmental state agenda. In this regard, a matrix of sustainable land-use zones is provided 
in an effort to ensure close relationships between these functions. Furthermore, the SDF put forward the following 
vision as first presented in the provincial Growth and Development Strategy: building a prosperous , sustainable 
growing provincial economy to eradicate poverty and improve social development. 


1 Also see the SDF Guidelines, September 2014, as commissioned by the national Department of Rural Development and Land Reform. 


Page 29 






It is stated in the provincial SDF that it serves as an integrated spatial and policy framework within which the 
imperatives of institutional integration, integrated development planning and cooperative governance can be achieved. 
What does this mean with regard to the use and development of land? Basically, it means the introduction of specific 
ways to consider and measure the use and development of land by all stakeholders. For example, spatial planning 
categories are introduced as well as ‘Areas of Co-operation’ according to bioregional borders which are not 
necessarily aligned with administrative boundaries. In this regard, the southern-most areas of the Ubuntu and 
Umsobomvu municipalities fall within such an area of co-operation. The Nothern Cape Provincial Government is 
currently busy with the review of the Provincial Spatial Development Framework (SDF) together with the Provincial 
Development Plan. 

Geographical Context 

The jurisdiction of the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality (as a as a category C Municipality) covers an area of 103 
410km 2 , which is also 27,7% of the total area that constitutes the Northern Cape province. 

This district municipal area is the eastern-most district Municipality within the Northern Cape, and borders on the 
Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Free State provinces. There are 8 category B municipalities within the as a 
category C Municipality, viz. Emthanjeni, Kareeberg, Renosterberg, Siyancuma, Siyathemba, Thembelihle, Ubuntu 
and Umsobomvu. The following main towns in these category B municipalities represent an even spread throughout 
the district as central places and agricultural service centers: Douglas, Prieska, Carnarvon, Victoria West, Colesberg, 
Flopetown and De Aar. De Aar is the ‘largest’ of these towns. The closest major city to these towns is Bloemfontein in 
the Free State province. 

The municipal area is ‘landlocked’ and located in the middle of South Africa. In this regard, a number of national 
roads, viz. N1, N9, N10 and the N12 crisscross the district linking the northern part of South Africa with the southern 
part. Kimberley, the administrative ‘capital’ of the Northern Cape is located to the north of the area and ‘reachable’ by 
travelling through the Northern Cape and/or the Free State province. The high quality national road and rail network 
makes the area easily accessible and together with the district’s geo-political location between Cape Town, 
Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Pretoria, must be used as a catalyst in drawing people to the centre of South Africa. 

The table below lists some key points as summary of the geographic context within which integrated development 
planning for the Municipality is performed. 


Page 30 



GeographioSummaryn 


Province-nameo 

Northern-Capeo 

District-namen 

Pixley-ka-Semeo 

Local-municipal-nameso 

6mJJjaoi^-Kareeberg,-agosutfetb^-§iYani«m 

Ubuntu-and-yjoj^eajyyp 

Main-town so 

Douglas, -^ig^-Carnarvon, -Victoria-West, -£ala5bgjg,-Hopetown-and-De-Aaro 

Location-of-main-townso 

Evenly-spread-of-main-towns-as-central-places-and-agricultural-service-centerso 

Major-transport-routeso 

Ni,-Ng,-Nio-and-Ni2o 

Extent-ofthe-municipal-area-(km 3 )o 

i03-4io-km ! o 

Nearest-major-city-and-distance-between-major- 

town/city-in-the-Municipalityo 

Bloemfontein;-about-20o-kilometers-in-a-north-easterly-directiono 

Closest-harbour-and-main-airoort-to-the- 

Municipalityo 

Bloemfonteinn 

Region-specific-agglomeration-advantageso 

Road-and-rail-transport-networksn 

Municipal-boundary:-Most-northerly-point:o 

28°26 'o 8.88"-S-22°27'53.29 "-Eo 

Municipal-boundary:-Most-easterly-point:a 

30°48'ii.95"-S-23°32'46.33"-Eo 

Municipal-boundary:-Most-southerly-point:o 

31°57 , 51.5i"-S-23°05’i2.84"-Eo 

Municipal-boundary:-Most-westerly-point:o 

30 o i8'56.44"-S-2i°04'i6.56"-Eo 


Page 31 





























Environmental Context 


The table below includes detailed descriptions of each of the 8 category B municipalities within the as a category C 
Municipality. These administrative areas are to a large extent homogeneous in geographic aspects but also 
considering other aspects such as environmental, economic, socio-economic, infrastructure and service delivery: 


Environmental-Summaryn 

Main-environmental-regions-in-the-Municipalityn 

Grassland-and-Nama-Karoo-biome:-Approximately- 25 o-million-years-ago-the-Karoo- 
was-an-inland-lake-fringed-by-cycads-and-roamed-by-mammalian-reptiles.-Today,-it-is- 
a-geological-wonderland-with-fossilised-prints-of-dinosaurs-and-other-fossils.-lt-is- 
one-of-the-largest-wool-and-mutton-producing-regions-in-South-Africa.il 

List-of-government-owned-nature-reserves □ 

DD.orokJo.Qf-Nature-Reserve-fiiq-kmh-on-the-south-eastem-banks-of-the- 

yaDdSkklS^' Dam k&S3lfaDtgia- Nature - Reserve -( 8l 'km J );-iyjaJ4ala;National-Parkn 

Biosphere-areaso 

Nonen 

Main-rivers-within-the-Municipalityn 

Orange-River-that-flows-in-the-northern-segment-of-the-municipal-area;-Vaal-River;- 

Modder-River;-gjg£Rivero 

Heritage-sites-within-the-Municipalityn 

There-are-a-number-of-places-with-significant-heritage-value-(i.e.-provincial-heritage- 
sites-and-public-monuments)c 

Status-of-the-Environmental-Management-Plano 

ln-placea 


Biophysical Context 


In this section, insight is gained into the environmental context, and in particular into the biophysical elements thereof, 
within which integrated development planning must occur, through a high-level summary of the key elements. The 
municipal area can be considered as a homogeneous environmental area, i.e. limited mix of species in ecosystem. 
The area is a micro bioregion covered by plains, hills and lowlands with a moderate climate. Note the two ‘lungs’ 
stretching as Critical Biodiversity Areas from the west (in an east-west orientation) into the western segment of the 
municipal area. The table below provides a summary of the Municipality’s biophysical context: 


Biophysical-contextn 

List-of-major-river-streamsn 

Orange-Rivern 

Main-agricultural-land-uses-within-the- 

Municipalitya 

Livestock-production-(e.g.-horse-breeding),-cultivation-of-maize-and-lu.cerpe. n 

(Possible)-demand-for-development-that-will- 

influence-the-transformation-of-land-usen 

SKA,-Renewable-energyn 

Existing-pressure-from-land-use-impacts-on- 

biodiversity-D 

Renewable-energy,-livestock-grazing-management-and-veldt-managementn 

Current-threats-on-alien-flora-specifies-and- 

mitigation-processes-in-placen 

Grassland-and-Nama-Karoo-biomen 

List-of-fauna-species-within-the-municipal-arean 

Varietv-of-eame-sDecies.-e.g.-Soringbok-and-Elandi-Riverine-Rabbit-fBuaQlflgus: 

(WBtiSiiteuQ a 

Any-coastal-areas-within-the-Municipalityn 

a 

o 

z 

Average-rainfall-for-the-municipal-areao 

200 — 400 -mm-per-annumo 

Minimum-and-maximum-average-temperature- 

for-both-winter-and-summer-months-in-the- 

Municipality^ 

Summer-average— 24 °-and-Winter-average—i 4 °n 


Page 32 
































Infrastructural Context 


Infrastructural Summary 

In this section, insight is gained into the infrastructural context within which integrated development planning must 
occur, through a high-level summary of the respective infrastructure components that ‘serve’ the communities. All the 
municipalities in the district face a significant human settlement challenge. In this regard, the effective and sustainable 
use and development of land is subject to the availability, standard and quality of the service infrastructure. For 
example, houses cannot be built where water, electricity, sewerage and other municipal services are not available. 
Also, perpetuating the structure of the Apartheid town by building free or subsidized housing on relatively cheap 
peripherally located land, will reduce the capital cost per opportunity for government in the short term, but in the longer 
term, external costs to the beneficiaries, especially travelling costs and time, would reduce this benefit and place an 
extra burden on the beneficiaries’ income streams and lifestyle. The table below provides a summary of the 
Municipality’s infrastructure: 


Infrastructural-summaryH 

Major-service-backlog-areas-within-the- 

municipal-areas 

Electricity,-sanitation-and-water-services;-housings 

Service-areas-where-there-are-a-lack-of- 

maintenance-according-to-the-priority-needsn 

Sanitation-and-water-infra structures 

Status-of-Master-Planss 

See-paragraph-3-iin 

Current-condition-of-roads-within-the- 

Municipalityo 

Tarred-roads—good;-gravel-roads--poorn 

Current-public-transport-services-provided-in- 

the-Municipality-according-to-modes-used-oftens 

Minibus/taxi,-bus-and-trainn 

Current-status-of-the-airports 

Carnarvon-airport-being-upgradedn 

Areas-threatened-by-poor-storm-water- 

management-(areas-prone-to-flooding- 

according-to-priority)o 

All-urban-areasn 

Major-development-projects-of-significance-in- 

the-Municipality-that-have-an-effect-on-the- 

existing-service-delivery-situations 

Housing-deliveryn 

Major-developments-restricted-due-to-a-lack-of- 

bulk-services-in-the-Municipalityn 

Housing-deliveryn 

Condition-of-electrical-service-provision- 

(reliability,-major-substations-and-intemal- 

infrastructure^ 

Goods 


Page 33 

















Services and Backlogs 


The table above reflects a challenge to provide the basic services to all households residing within the municipal area: 


Local municipality 

Electricity (for 
lighting) 

Services (and remaining backlogs 

Water (Piped (tap) Sewerage (Flush toilet 

water inside (connected to 

dwelling/institution) sewerage system)) 

Roads 

Housing (Formal 
housing 

(brick/concrete block 
structure) 

Emthanjeni 

92,6% (7,4%) 

59,8% (40,2%) 

79,6% (20,4%) 


95,4% (4,6% 

Kareeberg 

73,6% (26,4%) 

41,5% (58,5%) 

55,8% (44,4%) 


89,6% (10,4%) 

Renosterberg 

88,1% (11,9%) 

53,4% (46,6%) 

71,7% (28,3%) 

Tarred roads: 

94,7% (5,3%) 

Siyancuma 

82,2% (17,8%) 

41,4% (58,6%) 

53,4% (46,6%) 

good 

73,0% (27%) 

Siyathemba 

86,2% (13,8%) 

43,1% (58,9%) 

64,9% (35,i%) 

Gravel roads: 

88,6% (11,4%) 

Thembelihle 

75,2% (24,8%) 

33,5% (66,5%) 

60,0% (40,0%) 

poor 

77,5% (22,5%) 

Ubuntu 

84,8% (15,2%) 

49,2% (50,8%) 

64,3% (35,7%) 


87,6% (12.4%) 

Umsobomvu 

86,7% (13,3%) 

45,1% (54,9%) 

68,7% (31,3%) 


82,3% 07,7%) 

Total 

85,1% 

47,0% 

65,7% 

n/a 

86,3% 


Social Context 

In this section, insight is gained into the social context within which integrated development planning must occur, 
through a high-level summary of the key socio-economic and demographic aspects of the communities. 

Social Summary 

It is evident from the information in the table below that the mobility of individuals is restricted by the absence of a 
public transport system and long distances between towns. This situation is a huge stumbling block in the 
development of human and social capital owing to limited access to information and opportunities: 


Page 34 




























Social context 


Population size of the Municipality 

186 352 

Education levels (% of community that has 
passed Grade 12) 

82,2% (Northern Cape - 2016) 

Number of primary schools in the municipal 
area 

74 

Secondary schools within the municipal area 

17 

Tertiary institutions within the municipal 
area 

- 

Employment rates within the municipal area 

71,7% 

Unemployment rates within the municipal 
area 

28,3% 

Income levels (typical income within the 
municipal area) 

90% of households below average of a South African household 

% of people living in poverty (2011) 

44 - 7 % 

HIV and Aids (population segment that is 

HIV positive - %, average annual growth in 

HIV 

9 , 6 % 

Major travelling modes for the municipal 
community (by priority usage) 

Foot, Car as a passenger, Car as a driver, Minibus/taxi, Bus, Bicycle, 

Train 

Transportation needs to serve the public 
transport sector 

Reliable and cheap short and long distance travel modes 

Public transport areas of need and mode 
type that could link development corridors 
or development areas 

Bus 


Demographics of the Municipality 

The demographics of the municipal area are indicated in the table below. If one ignores, the very high growth rate 
from a zero base, of the Asian population in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area, the Black-African grouping 
experienced the highest growth rate between 2001 and 2011, followed by the Coloured population. 

It is important to note the composition of the population with specific reference to the Black-African and Coloured 
groupings. In this regard, the Black-African grouping was 27,2% of the total population in 2001 and about 31,5% in 
2011. The Coloured grouping comprised 62,2% of the total population in 2001 which decreased to 59,2% in 2011. 
Together, these groupings comprised about 90% of the population in 2001 and 2011: 


Indicators 

Black-African 

2001 2011 

Colored 

2001 2011 

White 

2001 2011 

Asian 

2001 2011 

Total 

2001 2011 

Population size 

44852 

58 614 

102 413 

11257 

17158 

15 064 

192 

1046 

166 547 

186 351 

Proportional share 
of total population 

27,2% 

31,5% 

62,2% 

59,2% 

10,4% 

8,1% 

0,1% 

0,6% 

100% 

100% 

Population growth 
rate 

- 

30,7% 

- 

7,7% 

- 

-12,2% 

- 

444,8% 

- 

13,2% 

Number of 











households by 

12 454 

16373 

22 260 

25 960 

5905 

6 114 

39 

257 

40 658 

49193 

population group 












The table below indicates that the Emthanjeni Municipality has the highest number of inhabitants of all the category B 
municipalities in the district and the largest town, viz. De Aar is located within the municipal area. All the municipalities 


Page 35 




































except Siyancuma Municipality and Thembelihle Municipality, had a positive population growth rate between 2001 and 
2011, i.e. the population increased in numbers: 


Local Mun 

Population 

2001 

HHs 2001 

% Population 
in DM 2001 

Population 

2011 

% Population 
in DM 2011 

HHs 20i< 

% 

Households 

in DM 2011 

Emthanjeni 

35785 

8 706 

21,4% 

42 356 

22,7% 

10 457 

21,3% 

Kareeberg 

9 488 

2 401 

5,6% 

11673 

6 , 3 % 

3222 

6 , 5 % 

Renosterberg 

9 070 

2448 

5 , 4 % 

10 978 

5 , 9 % 

2 995 

6,1% 

Siyancuma 

39 275 

10 091 

23,5% 

37 076 

19 , 9 % 

9 578 

19,5% 

Siyathemba 

18 445 

4455 

11% 

21 591 

11,6% 

5831 

11,9% 

Thembelihle 

14467 

3596 

8,6% 

15 701 

8 , 4 % 

4 140 

8 , 4 % 

Ubuntu 

16375 

4163 

9.8% 

18 601 

10,0% 

5129 

10,4% 

Umsobomvu 

23 636 

5891 

14,1% 

28376 

15,2% 

7841 

15,9% 

Total 

166 547 

41707 

100% 

186 351 

100% 

49193 

100% 


The growth rate of the population in the municipal area depends largely on the availability of economic opportunities to 
especially young adults. A stagnating economy will result in the outflow of work seekers with a resulting impact on the 
households and society at large. 


Category 

2001-2006 

2001 -2011 

Rate 

Rate 

Percentage growth per annum 

- 1,27 

1,12 


It is argued that the population growth rate will not be higher than 2% over the next 5-year period, viz. till 2021. It is 
believed that some of the residents will actually seek employment opportunities in the Carnarvon area, as a result of 
the Square Kilometer Array telescope development project in the western segment of the district and that if appointed, 
their income and spending patterns will be very different to what they are now. 

Education Levels 

The table below indicates that there is a vast improvement in the number of pupils in the municipal area, or 
conversely, there is a significant decrease in the number of persons with no schooling. The biggest change in the 
education levels occurred with the increase in the number of pupils with Grade 12 qualification compared to the 
number in 2001: 


Persons 

2001 

2011 

% change 

No schooling 

32 537 

18 065 

-44,5% 

Some primary school 

52701 

54518 

3,4% 

Complete primary 

11822 

11997 

1,5% 

Secondary 

32 616 

47992 

47,1% 

Grade 12 

12557 

23 603 

88,0% 

Higher 

5239 

6 562 

25,3% 


Service Delivery Levels 

Regarding service provision in the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality, there has been an improvement in the 
provision of electricity for lighting from 2001 to 2011 (75,1% of households in 2001 vs 85,1% in 2011). The proportion 


Page 36 



































of households with flush toilets connected to the sewerage system has also greatly improved from 45,4% in 2001 to 
65,7% in 2011. The provision of piped water inside dwellings has also increased from 32,8% in 2001 to 47% in 2011, 
as well as the provision of refuse removal to households. The service delivery levels in the municipal area are 
indicated in the table below: 


Service (% share of 
households) 

2001 

2011 

% change 

Electricity 

75,1% 

85,1% 

10,0% 

Flush toilets 

45 , 4 % 

65,7% 

20,3% 

Water (piped water) 

32,8% 

47,0% 

14,2% 

Refuse removal (at least once 
a week) 

67,8% 

72,6% 

4 , 8 % 


Health 


Although the number of people that make use of the health services and infrastructure increased, the number of these 
facilities did not increase apart from the addition of a hospital. It is estimated that a threshold population of about 
40 000 can be served by a primary health clinic, showing that the communities are well served in this respect. It is 
estimated that a small to medium sized clinic could serve about 5 000 persons. Note that the primary health care 
(PHC) per capita spending by national health district in 2014/2015, was the highest in the Pixley ka Seme district, viz. 
R1208. 


The health care levels in the municipal area are indicated in the table below: 



Type of facility 

Number 

Fixed facility clinics 

27 

Mobile clinics 

5 

Hospital 

8 

District hospital 

1 


Social Grants 


The table below includes the numbers of social grants by type per province as at 31 January 2017: 


Region 

Grant type 

OAG 

WVG 

DG 

GIA 

CDG 

FCG 

CSG 

Total 

EC 

546,755 

30 

181,781 

20,283 

22,268 

97.735 

1,871,026 

2,739,878 

FS 

192.732 

1 

74,815 

3,834 

7,757 

30,027 

673.885 

983,051 

GP 

543,209 

57 

112,035 

5,225 

18,221 

47,691 

1,766,210 

2,492,648 

KZN 

660,046 

25 

246,034 

51,663 

39,850 

89.280 

2.790.034 

3,876.934 

LP 

449.810 

8 

94.737 

35,532 

14,828 

42,832 

1,770,979 

2,408.726 

MP 

239,970 

4 

76,580 

9,534 

10,844 

29,220 

1,062,112 

1,428,264 

NC 

83,503 

5 

51,857 

8,548 

5,956 

12.352 

301,992 

464,213 

NW 

246.358 

3 

77,907 

9,194 

9,954 

32.378 

826,611 

1,202,405 

WC 

320,901 

52 

154,056 

15,702 

14,146 

29,618 

976,595 

1,511,070 

Total 

3.283.286 

185 

1,069.802 

159,515 

143,824 

411,133 

12,039,444 

17,107,189 


Source: SO OPEN system NB The total include grant in aid 


OAG: Old Age Grant; WVG: War Veteran’s Grant; DG: Disability Grant; GIA: Grant in Aid; CDG: Care Dependency Grant; FCG: Foster 

Child Grant; CSG: Child Support Grant 


Housing 

One can discern from the table below that the percentage of households living in formal housing (brick or concrete 


Page 37 









































block structures) increased by 1,9% between 2001 and 2011, while the proportion of households occupying informal 
structures decreased by 2,4% over the same period. Almost 86,3% of households resided in formal structures in 2011: 


Dwellings (% share of 
households) 

2001 

2011 

% change 

Formal dwellings 

84,7% 

86,3% 

1,9% 

Informal dwellings 

15,3% 

12,9% 

- 2 , 4 % 


The table below lists the number of households living in informal settlements in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area: 


Number of households in informal settlements 

% of households in municipal area that live in informal 
settlements 

1 524 

3,7% 


The fact that not a lot of people resides in informal dwellings is further evidenced by the decrease in numbers from 
2001 to 2007. 

Safety and Security 


Crime Category 

2009 

2010 

2011 

2012 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

Murder 

87 

91 

83 

98 

110 

127 

91 

95 

90 

88 

Sexual Offences 

301 

293 

329 

309 

357 

299 

268 

316 

248 

267 

Attempted murder 

104 

125 

107 

70 

98 

128 

101 

137 

103 

73 

Assault with the intent to inflict grievo 

1632 

1669 

1761 

1747 

1780 

1875 

1806 

1891 

1719 

1537 

Common assault 

925 

914 

915 

982 

946 

978 

951 

953 

947 

880 

Common robbery 

98 

95 

121 

77 

110 

99 

87 

133 

150 

137 

Robbery with aggravating circumstant 

37 

48 

51 

65 

78 

95 

81 

117 

116 

139 

Burglary at non-residential premises 

313 

360 

360 

334 

434 

392 

399 

396 

475 

397 

Burglary at residential premises 

727 

856 

734 

639 

931 

747 

797 

793 

906 

978 

Theft of motor vehicle and motorcycle 

20 

29 

24 

47 

50 

34 

40 

32 

28 

27 

Theft out of or from motor vehicle 

144 

121 

136 

162 

254 

238 

241 

196 

214 

247 

Stock-theft 

537 

637 

571 

542 

637 

455 

511 

540 

605 

657 

Drug-related crime 

490 

450 

480 

537 

654 

899 

767 

823 

867 

1017 

Driving under the influence of alcohol < 

136 

140 

126 

104 

112 

85 

85 

112 

111 

83 

All theft not mentioned elsewhere 

935 

945 

850 

806 

796 

810 

883 

835 

912 

964 

Shoplifting 

205 

182 

137 

152 

138 

121 

177 

194 

211 

167 

Public violence 

5 

4 

6 

7 

19 

11 

3 

0 

0 

0 

Neglect and ill-treatment of children 

36 

31 

20 

18 

21 

13 

16 

0 

0 

0 


Statistics revealed that 7 of the 18 crimes has increased 

> Sexual Offences - 8% 

> Robbery with aggravating circumstances - 20% 

> Burglary at residential premises - 8% 

> Theft out of or from motor vehicle - 15% 

> Stock-theft - 9% 

> Drug related crimes - 17% 

> All theft not mentioned elsewhere - 6% 

> Murder - 5% 

> Attempted murder - 8% 

> Assault with the intent to inflict bodily harm -3% 


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> Common assault -1% 

> Common robbery - 21% 

> Robbery with aggravating circumstances - 96% 

> Burglary at non-residential premises - 14% 

> Burglary at residential premises - 9% 

> Theft out of or from motor vehicle - 39% 

> Drug related crimes - 67% 

> All theft not mentioned elsewhere - 2% 

> Shoplifting - 7% 

Economical Context 

Economic Summary 

In a provincial context, the Northern Cape (and Limpopo) recorded the lowest real annual economic growth rate (of 
2,2% each) of the nine provinces in South Africa in 2011. Furthermore, did the Northern Cape posted an average 
economic growth rate of 2,4 per cent over the period 2001 till 2011, whereas the South African economy recorded an 
average growth rate of 4,0 per cent. In this regard, the Northern Cape Province contributed just more than 2 % of the 
total value of the South African economy. The two economic sectors with the most significant contributions were 
agriculture and mining (6,1 and 6,8%, respectively). This value contribution by mining amounts to almost 26,7% of the 
provincial economy, while the size of the contributions by agriculture is 6% and that of personal services, 8,1%. 


The table below provides an economic summary of the Municipality’s area: 


Economic summary 

Percentage economically active within the Municipality 

21,6% 

Percentage not economically active within the Municipality 

78,4% 

Percentage employed within the Municipality 

71,7% 

Percentage unemployed within the Municipality 

28,3% 

Two major economic sectors within the Municipality and the 
percentage of income within the sector (GDP) 

Agriculture, Social and Personal Services 

Existing initiatives to address unemployment within the 
Municipality 

Government-driven work opportunities 

Possible competitive advantages for the Municipality 

Transport infrastructure, Central location of municipal area; 
SKA project; Favorable conditions for renewable energy 
generation 

Investment initiatives and incentives 

Government-driven work opportunities 


The economy in the Pixley ka Seme municipal area is characterised by the following: 

» High levels of poverty and low levels of education. 

« It is a small-town sub-region with a low level of development despite the strategic location in terms of the national 
transport corridors 

« Sparsely populated towns with a number of larger towns serving as “agricultural service centres”; spread evenly 
throughout the district as central places 
» High rate of unemployment, poverty and social grant dependence 


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» Prone to significant environmental changes owing to long-term structural changes (such as climate change, 
energy crises and other shifts) 

» Geographic similarity in economic sectors, growth factors and settlement patterns 
» Economies of scale not easily achieved owing to the relatively small size of towns 
» A diverse road network with national, trunk, main and divisional roads of varying quality, and 
» Potential and impact of in renewable energy resource generation. 

The establishment of the Square Kilometre Array project in the western segment of the municipal area is the most 
significant investment of any kind in recent years. In this regard, it is important for all stakeholders to ensure that the 
‘other’ sources of local or regional livelihoods, e.g. agriculture, are not undermined. However, since the introduction of 
the project the following elements of the local economy has benefited significantly: road infrastructure, local job 
opportunities created (mainly Black Economic Empowerment driven), purchasing of local supplies and services, e.g. in 
the hospitality industry and the property market through higher demand and the construction of new houses. Another 
key aspect of beneficiation is the introduction of improved high speed broadband connection for previously 
unconnected communities. 

It is important to note that Carnarvon in the Kareeberg municipal area is seen as the main geographic hub of 
investment in terms of the SKA project. In this regard, and seen in the broader regional context, it is an imperative for 
all three tiers of government to become involved in the monitoring and evaluating of change in, inter alia, the socio¬ 
economic status of the directly and indirectly affected communities. For example, to monitor the implementation and 
results of the human capital development programmes. 

The challenge is also to optimise, share and sustain these collateral benefits to the local and regional economy and by 
implication, to the local communities. For example, the financial sustainability of mainly the Kareeberg Municipality will 
impact on the standard and availability of certain services and infrastructure and proper land use management will 
result in a socio-political approach to sharing the tourism-related opportunities. 

GDP of the Municipality 

The Pixley ka Seme District Municipality is a relatively small economy, making up about 10% of Gross Domestic 
Product in the Northern Cape Province. GDP growth rates average at below 3% per annum. The economy is 
predominantly primary sector focused with manufacturing and tourism also contributing to the district economy. In the 
coming years, the sector contributions will fluctuate with the contributions by the social and personal services sector 
(including tourism) and the agriculture sector expected to increase and decrease respectively. This is owing to a very 
low growth rate in certain sectors but a sharp increase in the others, mainly as a result of, as mentioned, the 
investment in renewable energy generation and the SKA project. 

Investment Typology 

In a 2011 research study called “Development Potential of Urban Settlements in the Northern Cape” by Van der 
Merwe, I.J., and Zietsman, H.L. regarding the investment potential of municipalities and settlements in the Northern 
Cape, a set of indicators was developed and used to determine the development/growth potential and human needs 
at two functional levels, i.e. municipal and settlement. In the following section we only refer to the respective 
municipalities as functional level. 

The indicators were grouped as follows with the components of each grouping in brackets: 

» Resource index (natural and human resources), 

» Infrastructure index (transportation, communication and institutional services), and 


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» Economic index (economic sectors, commercial services, market and accessibility potential and property market). 

The table below include the findings of the study regarding the development potential combined with the human need 
factor for the eight category B municipalities within the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality. 


Category B municipality 

Development index 

Investment potential 


Resource 

Medium 

Emthanjeni 

Infrastructure 

High 


Economic 

Medium 


Resource 

Low 

Kareeberg 

Infrastructure 

Low 


Economic 

Low 


Resource 

Low 

Renosterberg 

Infrastructure 

Medium 


Economic 

Low 


Resource 

Medium 

Siyancuma 

Infrastructure 

Low 


Economic 

Medium 


Resource 

Low 

Siyathemba 

Infrastructure 

Medium 


Economic 

Low 


Resource 

Medium 

Thembelihle 

Infrastructure 

Low 


Economic 

Medium 


Resource 

Low 

Ubuntu 

Infrastructure 

Medium 


Economic 

Medium 


Resource 

High 

Umsobomvu 

Infrastructure 

Medium 


Economic 

Medium 


By combining the findings on the development/growth potential and human needs, the preferred type of (public) 
investment was identified to stimulate economic growth and social advancement. In this regard, the classification of 
the appropriate investment category for the category B municipalities within the Pixley ka Seme district was as follows: 
low to high development potential and human need. This implies a diverse investment strategy to stimulate 
infrastructure and social and human capital as best return on investment in these three forms of ‘development capital’. 

Strategic Context 

The following section includes a summary of the strategic nature of local resources and the use thereof, as a 
competitive advantage of the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality. 


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Strategic Summary 

In the table above, the strategic nature of the local resources is described as beneficial to serve as the catalyst for 
investment: 


Strategic summary 

Location in terms of major transport nodes (nationally and district 
wide) 

Excellent, for example, Colesberg is a convergence point of three 
national roads and De Aar the second biggest convergence point 
of rail in South Africa 

Major tourism and development corridors within the municipality 
and how these corridors are being explored for further 
development 

Of a number of potential corridors in the Northern Cape, only two 
of these corridors, viz. the solar and the Ni corridors, have been 
identified to stretch into the municipal area 

Existing contribution to the GDP of the Province 

About 10% 

What has been done to create an enabling environment for 
investors within the Municipality 

An approach to the use and development of land and 
infrastructure that supports development initiatives 

What is being done to utilize the existing natural resources within 
the Municipality to attract investment 

Nature conservation as an off-set for the loss of agricultural land 
and farming activities in the western segment of the district 


Possible Opportunities 

The following possible opportunities could be utilised: 


Corridor/niche/action 

Economic sector 

Area 

Optimising the strategic location regarding the national transport 
corridors 

Transport 

Municipal area 

Expanding the ‘reach’ of the SKA project 

(Cross-cutting) 

Municipal area 

Understanding the impact of significant environmental changes 
owing to long-term structural changes (such as climate change, 
energy crises and other shifts) 

(Cross-cutting) 

Municipal area 

Expanding the economy of scale of larger towns 

(Cross-cutting) 

Prieska, Carnarvon, Colesberg 
and De Aar 

Keeping the diverse road network in a good condition 

Transport 

Municipal area 

Allowing investment in renewable energy resource generation 

Construction; Electricity 

Municipal area 


Developmental Direction for Urban Areas 

All the towns within the district is typical Karoo towns which consists of a (in some cases, small) middle class 
(including black and/or coloured government officials) and a few emerging entrepreneurs, with the majority of the 
remaining population depending on government grants. The towns are further characterised by the following: 

» Spatial fragmentation and racial segregation, 

« Weak property markets owing to low demand (note the change in demand for specifically houses and land in 
Carnarvon), 

» Low urban dwelling densities but high population densities in certain urban areas, 

» Forming of higher activity nodes next to development corridors, 

« Environmental degradation, 

» Inadequate public transport leading to high pedestrian volumes, 

» Weak local economic multipliers and high levels of “leakage” for services to other towns/cities (however, a 
noticeable “inter-leakage” from other towns in the district to Carnarvon), and 
» Skilled workers relocating to towns with development potential. 


Page 42 






















The table below lists the investment opportunities and possible disenfranchisement in the district. 


Category B municipality 

Investment opportunity(ies) 

Disenfranchisement 

Kareeberg 

Transportation (e.g. airport at Carnarvon); nature 
conservation and eco-tourism; retail; property 
market; broadband connection; business services; 
construction 

Commercial agriculture; seasonal work 
opportunities; social capital (of farmers) 

Ubuntu 

Transportation (e.g. airport at Carnarvon); nature 
conservation and eco-tourism; retail; property 
market; broadband connection; business services; 
construction 

Commercial agriculture; seasonal work 
opportunities; social capital (of farmers) 

Siyathemba 

Renewable energy 



The Organisation 
Council 

The Council of Pixley ka Seme District Municipality comprises of 19 elected councillors, made up from 11 
representative councillors and 8 proportional representatives (PR) councillors elected based on the proportionality of 
votes cast for the respective parties. The table below categorises the councillors within their specific political parties: 


Name of Councillor 

Capacity 

Political Party 

Representing or 
Proportional 

MT Kibi 

Executive Mayor 

ANC 

Proportional 

NL Hermans 

Speaker 

ANC 

Proportional 

UR Itumeleng 

Member Mayoral Committee 

ANC 

Proportional 

AT Sintu 

Member Mayoral Committee 

ANC 

Proportional 

GL Nkumbi 

Member Mayoral Committee 

ANC 

Proportional 

J Grobbelaar 

Chairperson MPAC 

DA 

Proportional 

H Marais 

Councillor 

DA 

Proportional 

MA Matebus 

Councillor 

EFF 

Proportional 

L Billie 

Councillor 

ANC 

Representative 

J Hoffman 

Councillor 

DA 

Representative 

JEJ Hoorn 

Councillor 

ANC 

Representative 

ME Bitterbos 

Councillor 

ANC 

Representative 

JH George 

Councillor 

ANC 

Representative 

LC van Niekerk 

Councillor 

DA 

Representative 

JT Yawa 

Councillor 

ANC 

Representative 

S Swartling 

Councillor 

ANC 

Representative 

JH Vorster 

Councillor 

DA 

Representative 

E Humphries 

Councillor 

ANC 

Representative 

NJ Batties 

Councillor 

DA 

Representative 


Page 43 




































The Executive Mayoral Committee 

The Council has and Executive Mayor and Executive Councillors consisting of the Deputy Executive Mayor, the 
Speaker and three full-time Councillors who each hold a direct portfolio as assigned by the Executive Mayor. The 
portfolios assigned to the members of the Executive Mayoral Committee are as follows: 


Name of Member 

Capacity 

UR Itumeleng 

Chairperson Corporate Services Committee 

AT Sintu 

Chairperson Infrastructure, Development, Housing and 

Planning 

GL Nkumbi 

Chairperson Finance Committee 


The portfolio committees’ primary responsibility is to exercise oversight over the executive arm of the Municipality’s 
governance structure. These committees monitor the delivery and outputs of the executive and may request 
directorates to account for the outputs of their functions. Executive Councillors account for executive decisions and 
operations performed within the general policy framework agreed to by Council and although the portfolio committees 
play an oversight role, they have limited decision-making powers. The committees are responsible for submitting their 
reports to the Mayoral Committee. 

Executive management structure 

The administration arm of Pixley ka Seme District Municipality is headed by the Municipal Manager, who has three 
Section 57 managers reporting directly to him. The Municipal Manager, as head of the administration, is responsible 
and accountable for tasks and functions as provided for in Section 55 of the MSA, other functions/tasks as provided 
for in legislation as well as functions delegated to him by the Executive Mayor and Council. 

Departmental structure 

Pixley ka Seme District Municipality has four departments and the functions of each can be summarised as follows: 


Departmental Functions 

Department Core Functions 

Office of the Executive Mayor 

♦ Communication 

♦ Community Liaison 

♦ Special Programmes 

Corporate Services 

♦ Municipal Health Services 

♦ Support Services 

♦ Human Resources 

♦ Performance Management Services 

♦ Disaster Management 

♦ Legal Services & Labour Division 

Infrastructure, Housing, Planning and Development 

♦ Infrastructure Development 

♦ LED 

♦ Housing 

♦ Spatial Planning 

Finance 

♦ Finance 

♦ Budget Control 

♦ Salaries 

♦ Asset Management 

♦ Supply Chain Management 

Internal Audit 

♦ Internal Audit 

♦ Internal Audit Shared Services 


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Municipal workforce 


Section 68(1) of the MSA states that a Municipality must develop its human resource capacity to a level that enables it 
to perform its functions and exercise its powers in an economical, effective, efficient and accountable way. The 
organisational structure should be revisited after the approval of the IDP and budget to ensure that the Municipality 
still delivers services in the most productive and sufficient manner. Pixley ka Seme District Municipality has a structure 
that was approved by Council on 30 May 2016, but is currently in the process of reviewing its organogram. The new 
staff establishment will be developed in line with normative human resource practices, taking cognisance of the 
transformation targets and requirements as stated in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act. The recruitment of 
employees is conducted in terms of the Municipality’s recruitment and selection policy. 

Based on the strategic and policy decisions made by Council, the senior management team develops service plans for 
integration with other sectors within the strategy for the Municipality. They must measure performance according to 
agreed indicators, analyse and report regularly. They inform decision-makers timeously of any risk to service delivery 
initiatives and conduct the review of service performance against plans before other reviews. The senior management 
team of Pixley ka Seme District Municipality is supported by a municipal workforce of 84 permanent and temporary 
employees, which is structured in the departments to implement the IDP strategic objectives. The following tables 
provide detail of the organisational structure, as well as posts filled and vacant: 




Posts in the Organisation 



Permanent Positions Filled 

Funded Vacancies 

Unfunded Vacancies 

Total 

84 

3 

22 

109 

Representation of Employees 

Employees categorised in 
terms of gender (permanent 
and temporary employees) 

Male 

43 


Female 

47 

90 

Employees categorised in 
terms of race (permanent and 
temporary employees) 

Coloured 

African 

Indian 

White 


22 

53 

0 

5 

90 

Total (permanent and temporary employees) 


90 


Workforce Profile 









Occupational Levels 

A 

Male 

C 1 

w 

A 

Female 

C 1 

w 

Total 

Senior Management 

2 

1 

O 

1 

O 

O 

0 

0 

4 

Managers 

3 

0 

0 

2 

0 

2 

0 

0 

7 

Professionally qualified and experienced specialist and mid¬ 
management 

2 

4 

O 

0 

9 

3 

0 

1 

19 

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior 
management, supervisors, foremen and superintendents 

5 

2 

O 

0 

4 

3 

0 

0 

14 

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision- making 

9 

5 

O 

1 

11 

7 

0 

0 

33 

Unskilled and defined decision-making 

2 

1 

O 

0 

3 

1 

0 

0 

7 


Non-permanent 


Total Permanent 


Grand Total 


23 '3 


24 15 


Z 


27 16 


29 V 



Page 45 









































Per Occupational Level 


Post level 

Filled 

Vacant 

Senior Management 

4 

1 

Managers 

7 

1 

Professionally qualified and experienced 
specialists and mid- management 

19 

4 

Skilled technical and academically qualified 
workers, junior management, supervisors, 
foremen and superintendents 

14 

8 

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision 
making 

33 

7 

Unskilled and defined decision making 

7 

1 

Total 

84 

22 


Municipal administrative and institutional capacity 

The Municipality has the following policies to support the workforce in delivering on the strategic objectives: 


Name of Policy 

Approved Policies 

Responsible Department 

Date Approved 

Recruitment and Selection Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Skills Development Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Career Pathing Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Study Assistance Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Staff Induction Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Bereavement Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Code of Conduct for Municipal Officials 

Corporate Services 

Local Government: Municipal Systems Act 

Dress Code Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Employee Health and Wellness Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Employment Equity Plan 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

HIV/Aids Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Human Resources Strategy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Placement Policy 

Corporate Services 

8 July 2002 

Performance Management Framework 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Promotion and Succession Planning Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Remuneration Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Rental Allowance Scheme Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Substance Abuse Policy 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Organisational Structure 

Corporate Services 

27 May 2016 

Task Job Evaluation Policy 

Corporate Services 

9 December 2016 


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Skills development 

The Workplace Skills Plan, which is submitted annually on the last day of April, reflects all the training done within the 
specified period, as well as all the staff trained within the specified year. This plan also sets out the prioritised training 
for the following financial year. Training is linked to the job description of each employee, which ensures that 
employees are registered for training which has a direct impact on the performance of their duties. Training is 
governed by the Skills Development Act, which is very prescriptive in the manner in which training must take place 
and the targets that must be adhered to, as well as the employment equity targets which should be reached. 

During 2015/16 the Municipality spent 0.90% of the operating budget on training. 

Institutional performance 

An institutional performance review provides critical information pertaining to the current status and critical service 
needs, highlights and challenges. The information can provide value insight for the management team and guidance 
to engage in a meaningful planning process to improve service delivery within the municipal area. The main highlights 
and challenges of the past IDP period are summarised in the tables below: 


Highlights 


♦ 2nd year of unqualified audit opinion with emphasis of matter 

♦ Decrease in the number of matters emphasized in the audit report 

♦ Stable administration, despite financial challenges 

♦ Prudent financial management 

♦ No litigation against the institution 

♦ Productive relationship with the local municipalities and sector departments 

♦ Active participation in district and provincial forums 

♦ Acquisition of additional fleet 

♦ Renovation of main-office building 

♦ Healthy relationship between Council and Senior Management 

♦ Rendering of shared services despite financial challenges and non-payment by certain local municipalities 

♦ MPAC seen as best practice in NC 

♦ Independent operations of the Audit Committee and Internal Audit 

♦ Maintenance of good labour relations 

♦ Prioritization of staff-empowerment and training 

♦ Application for financial assistance by Provincial Treasury in advanced stage 

♦ Decreased consulting fees in terms of AFS presentation 

♦ Timeous honoring of debt 

♦ No withholding of grants due to non-compliance 


Challenges 


♦ Grant dependency and related financial constraints 

♦ Reduction of functions of the district 

♦ Resignation of technically-qualified staff 

♦ Struggle to honor identified training-needs of staff 

♦ Failure to pay some service providers within 30 days 

♦ Spatial Development Framework (SDF) of the district Municipality needs to be reviewed - all SPLUMA applications needs to be 
aligned with the SDF 

♦ Shared services payments 

♦ IT infrastructure: Technology and software 

♦ Lack of Municipal Health Services By-Laws 

♦ Shortage of funding and staff to deliver core functions effectively 

♦ Directive from the National Health Department to move Municipal Health Services to Department of Health due to poor delivery 
of services 

♦ Absenteeism 

♦ Limited resources in internal audit to meet the needs of the local municipalities 

♦ Assessing, improving and monitoring the quality of the work performed by the IA function 


Page 47 













Sectoral Plans 


Apart from the legislative requirement to compile IDPs, there are national requirements that compel municipalities to 
formulate sector plans, which should form part of the IDPs. All these legislative requirements applicable to sector 
plans are aimed at ensuring that clear, workable and integrated plans are in place. The sole purpose is to achieve 
meaningful development and improvement of the living conditions of citizens. The municipality currently have the 
sector plans as listed below, but unfortunately some of them are outdated and were not reviewed in terms of new 
legislation and/or current realities. There are currently contextual gaps and inconsistencies between the Municipality's 
sector plans and present-day national and provincial directives (e.g. the National Development Plan and SPLUMA), 
owing to the respective timelines of drafting. The growth and development context in the district has also changed 
radically since 2013 (after it had been stagnant for decades) owing mainly to private and public investments in the 
area as a hub for renewable energy generation and astronomy, respectively. The outdated sector plans are not 
summarized in this IDP and the municipality will make provision to review and/or compile these sector plans in the 
next 5 years. Although some of these plans have been reviewed, most of the projects/actions as envisaged in these 
plans are unfunded and can only be implemented if external funding is received from other spheres of Government of 
the private Sector. 

» Disaster Management Plan: Approved in 2008 - Outdated 
« District Growth and Development Strategy: Approved in 2006 - Outdated 
» Local Economic Development Strategy: Approved in 2008 - Under review 

» Environmental Management Plan - Not in place, the letter requesting assistance was sent to the National 
Department of Environment and Nature Conservation. 

« Air Quality Management Plan - Not in Place 

» Spatial Development Framework (SDF): Approved in 2013 - partially compliance (needs to be reviewed to be 
SPLUMA colpaint), but see paragraph 3.10.1 for an executive summary 
« Integrated Waste Management Plan (IWMP) — See paragraph 3.10.2 for an executive summary 
« Integrated Environmental Management Plan — See paragraph 3.10.3 for an executive summary 
« Human Settlement Plan: Approved March 2017 - See paragraph 3.10.4 for an executive summary 
« Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment and Response Plan: November 2016: Still in draft - See Annexure A 
for an executive summary 

» Rural Development Plan: Approved March 2017 - See Annexure B for an executive summary 
» LED Component from DEaT - the deparment indicated that the LED component for Pixley ka Seme District has 
not been done yet and a request for assistance during 2018 /2019 financial year was sent. 

3.10.1 Spatial Development Framework 

Municipalities are required to compile Spatial Development Frameworks (SDFs) as core components of their IDPs as 
prescribed by the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act 32 of 2000). Each district municipality and 
the local municipalities within the area of the district municipality must align their SDFs in accordance with the 
framework of integrated development planning referred to in Section 27 of the Municipal Systems Act. 

The Role and Purpose of a District SDF 

The regulations (White Paper on Spatial Planning and Land Use Management, Draft Land Use Management Bill and 
Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations, 2001) do not distinguish between local and district 
municipalities’ SDFs and we can assume, therefore, that to avoid duplication the district municipality should focus on 
the broader spatial patterns and will contain the detail of the local municipalities. It will, however, contain a detail Land 


Page 48 



Use Management System (LUMS) for the district and furthermore aim to align the Spatial Development Frameworks 
of the different municipalities and give strategic direction in terms of investment in the region. 

The role of SDF is to: 

» guide spatial planning and land development in the Pixley ka Seme district area; 

» guide spatial planning and land development in the local municipalities of the district; and 

» guide spatial planning, land development and land use management in the Pixley ka Seme District within the 
framework of National and Provincial Spatial plans. 

The purpose of the document is: 

» To translate the SDF into a more detailed and geographically specific land use management tool. 

« To consolidate, update and review existing spatial planning and development management mechanisms. 

« To guide the preparation of more detailed local area plans, precinct plans and land use schemes. 
s» To provide a more concrete spatial and land use guideline policy for use by municipal and other infrastructure 
service providers in planning and delivering their services. 

» To provide direction and guidance to private sector and community investors with respect to the levels, locations, 
types and forms of investment that need to be made, and that will be supported by the District Municipality. 

The critical elements of the SDF is to: 

« Give effect to the principles contained in the National Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act of 2013 
(Act 16 of 2013) orSPLUMA; 

» Preferential and focus areas for certain types of land uses. 

» The location of projects identified as part of the integrated development planning process. 

« Reflect the spatial objectives and strategies contained in the IDP. 

» Indicate the desired direction of urban expansion and the most appropriate use of vacant land where appropriate 
and desirable. 

» A business plan for implementation of the spatial development framework. 

In a rural context the documents also deals specifically with: 
sb Natural resource management issues, 

SB Land rights and tenure arrangements, 

« Land capability, 

« Subdivision and consolidation of farms, and 
sb The protection of prime agricultural land. 

Following the district overview, the document also looked in more detail the spatial issues on local municipal level. 
For each local municipality, standards, norms and values for management of the environmental resources and 
features were listed and displayed on maps of the area. Areas of high-risk for development activities were also 
indicated on the maps, therefore providing a guideline for development within the local municipal areas. The main 
spatial and land issues of each town were then indicated on a spatial development guideline map. 

Finally the Spatial Development Framework of the district aim to focus on potential areas where development is most 
likely to occur. It therefore identifies development nodes and corridors which need to receive priority for future 
development as shown below. The Pixley ka Seme SDF will serve as a point of departure to inform the local SDFs. 


Page 49 


Integrated Waste Management Plan (IWMP) 

The district municipality compiled its Integrated Waste Management Plan for waste management in the various local 
municipalities under its jurisdiction. 

The compilation of the plan was done in terms of the national waste management strategy, the IDP process and the 
draft charter document for integrated waste management planning in South Africa. The draft process of compiling the 
plan consisted of two phases. The Status Quo for Phase 1 consisted of an assessment of the current status of waste 
collection systems and existing disposal sites, service delivery capacity and a needs analysis for each of these 
aspects. 

The second phase comprised of the compilation of the IWMP’s. The objectives and goals identified was included in 
this phase, with alternatives for obtaining these being considered and evaluated on a high level thereafter. Based on 
the preferred options selected for implementation, a programme was developed and cost estimates compiled. 

The waste management related issues that were addressed in the plan are: 

» Disposal Infrastructure 
» Waste Collection Infrastructure 
» Institutional Capacity and Human Resources 
» Financial Resources 

» Dissemination of Information / Communication 
» Management of Illegal Activities 
» Waste Minimisation 

Integrated Environmental Management Plan 

The Integrated Environmental Management Programme was compiled by the district municipality to ensure that land 
use decision making must be taken with adequate environmental resource information is available in other to ensure 
sustainable and appropriate environmental management to the benefit of its residents. 

The set goals of the plan include the following: 

« Ensure all environmental issues are appropriately addressed. 

» Minimize potential negative impact of all envisaged projects. 

» Ensure the integrated development planning process complies with environmental legislation. 

» Provide guidelines to investors in terms of environmental considerations. 

» Demonstrate municipalities commitment to the promotion of local biodiversity. 

» Identify development opportunities and threats to the environment. 

» Provide a framework for sustainable development. 


Page 50 


Environmental Management 

The goal of realizing integrated development is underpinned by development and resourcing strategies and ensuring 
environmental sustainability in development programmes. The programme will play a significant role in preservation 
of natural resources through the following intensions: 

» Clean and Greening Initiatives: In response to the poor state of rivers and wetlands in the area, the clean green 
initiative will seek to upgrade and clean water streams, rivers and the Wetlands Park. This is aimed at improving 
public health and safety and provide jobs, skills development and enhance tourism opportunities; 

« Rivers and water source management: Such interventions will seek to coordinate the fight against invasive 
alien flora. The intervention mainstreams HIV/AIDS, gender and youth empowerment. This encourages 
partnership with local communities, to whom it provides jobs, and government departments, state owned 
enterprises, conservation and environment advocacy groups, research foundations and private companies. 

» Fire prevention and management intervention: NC is viewed as a fire-prone ecosystem. The intervention 
focuses on fire prevention and management. The programme’s underlying motivation is poverty relief and skills 
development which are designed to build self-esteem and help beneficiaries to fulfil their true potential. 

Community-based forest management 

The intervention aims to promote the sustainable use of woodlands and their products for the benefit of both wildfire 
and people. Its objectives are to promote the use of locally produced woodland products, support development of 
sustainable wood based businesses and educate for sustainable use of woodlands. 

Land care: 

The land care initiative will lay the foundation of community involvement and wider participation in conservation of 
natural resources (soil, water and vegetation). It will further provide basis for developing links with civil society 
representatives, uneverities, etc. it is a community-based programme supported by both the public and private sector 
through series of partnerships. 

The programme’s value-add would focus on: 

« Environmental impact assessment towards infrastructure development in the area. 

« Development of Environmental Management Plans. 

* Implementation of environmental conservation programmes. 

Social Infrastructure Development 

The concept realizes the centrality of infrastructure in supporting socio-economic development and its contribution as 
a vehicle for poverty eradication. The programme will facilitate and support the provisioning of both public-mandated 
and community-mandated social infrastructure. This comprises social infrastructure delivered with additional social 
outcomes, for line departments at the request of the Executive Authority and where the client is the community/CBOs 
with strategic partners. The value adds from the programme encompasses the following: 

» Programme planning, management and implementation. 

« Coordination of integrated development initiatives. 


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Local Government & Community Development Facilitation 

Service delivery is the cornerstone for the human settlement and community development. Institutional capacity 
building, stakeholder mobilization and coordination form the most critical part towards municipal service delivery. In 
partnership with municipalities, the programme will yield synergies in the following areas: 

» Local government institutional capacity building. 

« Development planning. 

« Programme management. 

The programme will implement the Local Area Planning (LAP) as a participatory planning approach that empowers the 
community to participate meaningfully in development. Local community plans reflect local assets, resources and 
priority needs. The plans serves as a tool for resource and stakeholder mobilization, and create conductive 
environment for integration of various government programmes and assisting municipalities and communities to 
access the available programmes and funding. In order to achieve this, the programme will bring the following 
competencies: 

» Community mobilization and empowerment to take ownership of local and sustainable development. 

» Community conflict resolution. 

» Meaningful community participation in local development strategies. 

Key Issues and Threats 
» Land degradation 

Land use in the Pixley ka Seme currently consists of sheep farming, some ostrich farming, game farming (that is 
currently on the increase), as well as crops farming that include Lucerne, onions, garlic etc. Mining and development 
activities are likely to expand in the future. 

One of the major threats to biodiversity in the Pixley ka Seme is the long-term overgrazing by small livestock. This 
vast and open, seme arid rangeland covers a large part of South Africa and is impressively adapted to its climatic 
extremes. Evidence of degradation in these parts of the Pixley ka Seme is clearly visible, mainly as a result of 
environmental (low and erratic rainfall) and anthropogenic factors (poor management practices). 

The degradation is characterized by large bare and denuded areas and it seems these areas will not recover by 
natural succession processes alone. Some sort of active intervention has therefore inevitably become necessary in 
order to avoid aridification and possibly also desertification. 

Only 5% terrestrial ecosystems in South Africa are critically endangered, while 44% of river ecosystems are critically 
endangered. These river courses together with the riparian zones have an important biodiversity function as well as 
an economic value in the Pixley ka Seme region. These denser structures of vegetation are high in productivity and 
are extremely important refuges for many animal species. The riparian zones are also very important to stock farmers 
as it provides grazing, especially during dryer seasons. 

The flagship species for this habitat is the Riverine Rabbit (Bunolagus monticularis), which is Critically Endangered. 
Today the population size is estimated to be just a view hundred animals. At present, none of the Riverine Rabbit 
habitat is protected within a provincial nature reserve or national park and the species only occurs on private farmland. 
In response to the rapidly declining populations, landowners in the Pixley ka Seme region have established Riverin 
Rabbit conservancies covering an area of approximately 350 000 ha of private farmland. 

» Unrehabilitated Asbestos Mines 


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In the Northern Cape asbestos is still perceived as an important issue because of the many unrehabilitated mine 
dumps that still have the potential to pollute the environment, and therefore cause asbestosis or mesothelioma. The 
public still has access to some of these dumps, and some individuals recover the asbestos for resale as there is 
apparently still a market for it. In Prieska about 5 new cases (out of a population of about 15 000) of mesothelioma 
are diagnosed annually although the mines in the area have been closed since 1979. 

» Need for Urban Renewal of Apartheid-Era Townships 

National Routes (or the main route through a town) was used in the previous regime to severe the townships from the 
white suburbs. There is a great lack of integration still today in many of the Pixley ka Seme towns. Additional to this, 
some areas still have bucket system toilets or French drains, which prove a risk for the ground water source of the 
towns. Refuse and Landfill sites close to these areas also prove a human health risk. Lack of storm water systems 
means the occasional rain storms causes heavy erosion and flash floods. Most of these areas also do not have trees 
and open space and therefore the quality of life is perceived as low. 

Key Solutions 
» Funding 

Although some funding such as MIG is available to the municipalities and departments, it is crucial to source more 
funding to speed up the progress of sustainable development for human settlements in the district. Training is also 
required to improve the business plans which are being put forward to large funding agencies. Identification of 
specific projects are crucial. 

» Participation and Communication 

In an area with little resources and people, co-operative governance and community participation in projects are 
crucial. As local municipalities does not have much capacity, they are largely dependent upon the district municipality 
and State departments. These relationships must be built and strengthened. 

» Training and Education 

Municipal and government officials can benefit enormously from training in their respective fields, and specifically 
regarding the environment. Environmental Awareness Training to land owners (farmers) and communities also 
become crucial for the sustainable management of the land. 

Strategies / Initiatives / Projects 

as Environmental Education of Farmers and Communities 

as Compliance and Enforcement of Illegal Water Uses 

» Conservation Mapping and Initiatives 

as Environmentally Responsible Development 

as Urban Renewal Programmes 

3.10.4 Human Settlement Plan 

Background: 

According to Section 9(1) of the National Housing Act (No. 107 of 1997), it is stipulated that each municipality has to, 
as part of the municipality’s procedure of Integrated Development Planning (IDP) put in place all reasonable and 
required steps in ensuring that the residents within its area of jurisdiction have access to adequate housing on a 
progressive basis. This can be attained by: 


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» Setting housing delivery goals 

» Identifying suitable land for housing development and planning; and 
» Facilitating, initiating and co- coordinating housing development in its area of jurisdiction. 

This all-inclusive Municipal Human Settlement Sector Plan (MHSP) for Pixley ka Seme is founded on the contents of 
Sustainable Human Settlement Resource Book 2008, Northern Cape Strategy and Programme for the Upgrading of 
Informal Settlements and the National Housing Code of 2009. The contents, though, have been modified as to make 
provision for the local conditions prevailing within the Northern Cape Province, Pixley ka Seme District Municipality 
and its constituent local municipalities. 

The comprehensive MHSP is divided into the following phases: 

« Phase 1: Policy, Legislation, Functions, Roles and Developmental Considerations 

as Phase 2 Data Analysis 

as Phase 3 Housing Strategy Formulation 

ss Phase 4: Housing Implementation Plan 

as Phase 5: IDP Integration 

as Phase 6: Formulation of Performance Indicators 

as Phase 7: Human Settlements Sector Plan Approval 

The IDP integration of the MSHP is enclosed in a shortened Housing chapter for every constituent local municipality’s 
MHSP and the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality. The Pixley ka Seme District Municipality MHSP comprises of an 
all-inclusive report for district and local municipality’s. 

Capacity building at the Local Municipalities is a big challenge, with the main social problems that include poverty, 
illiteracy and unemployment the Local Municipalities. This all means that the District Municipality has to do a lot of 
work on their behalf. The distances between settlements make it difficult for the District Municipality to be effective and 
efficient. 

The District has been accredited at level 1 and 2 according to the National Accreditation Framework and does housing 
functions for Local Municipalities at this level. 

In reviewing the Municipal Human Settlements Sector Plan for the District Municipality, the current requirements of 
Municipal Human Settlements Plan Guidelines of the National Department has been followed and aligned with: 

» The provisions of the National Housing code, 2009 Part 3 Volume 3: Integrated Development Plans. 

» Section 25 & 26 of the Municipal systems Act 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000), whereby all Municipalities are required to 
compile Integrated Development Plans (IDPs). 

as The Housing Act, 1997 (Act No. 107 if 1997) (“the Housing Act”) states in Section 9 (1) (f) that “Every Municipality 
must, as part of the Municipality’s process of integrated development planning, take all reasonable and necessary 
steps within the framework of National and Provincial housing legislation and policy to initiate, plan, co-ordinate, 
facilitate, promote and enable appropriate housing development in its area of jurisdiction”. 


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Objectives of the plan: 

The objectives of the District MHSP are aligned with the District SDF and the SDFs of the Local Municipalities and 
include the following: 

» To ensure that human settlements planning reflects a broad range of community level needs and concerns and is 
based on as credible data as possible; 

* To fast track availability and affordability of appropriately situated land for housing development 
» To remove administrative blockages that prevent speedy housing development 
» To ensure consumer education/understanding in all housing developments 

« Utilizing housing as an instrument for the development of suitable settlements, in support of social structuring 
as To improve financial capacity to undertake housing development projects/programmes 
as To enhance coherency in development and planning 

» To align the municipality’s plans with national and provincial human settlements plans and priorities and to inform 
provincial multi-year and annual performance plans and budgets; 
as To undertake human settlements planning as part of a broader, integrated and proactive urban management 
strategy of the municipality; 

as To provide detailed human settlements project plans within a clear implementation and funding strategy; 
as To analyze an institutional structure and unpack clear roles and responsibilities of relevant stakeholders critical to 
achieving integrated human settlements planning; 
as Integrating social, economic, institutional and physical aspects of land development; 
as Integrating land development in rural and urban areas; 

as Promoting availability of residential and employment opportunities in close proximity to each other; 
as Optimising the use of existing resources 

as To provide a clear monitoring and evaluation framework for the human settlements function; 
as To assess risk pertaining to housing delivery; and 

as To investigate the Municipality’s plans for infrastructure services that will compliment housing development 
as To analyse Municipal communication plan in relation to housing delivery 

Structure of the MHSP: 

The MHSP is organized into the following main sections: 

A: The first section: is contextual and it unpacks the legislative and policy context for human settlements. It also 
deals with the particular planning parameters of the municipality and how alignment of planning occurs. This section 
assesses the housing demand for the local Municipalities within PkS district. It contextualizes Human Settlements 
Delivery within the District. This Section has included a brief description of alignment with various levels of 
government planning processes, consultation process followed and assessment of Housing Demand 

B: The second section: Deals with the strategic response of the Municipality to the context in the first section. It 
outlines the municipality’s vision and objectives for Human Settlement delivery and the strategies for achievement of 
such. This includes the District Municipal vision, objectives, strategies, informal settlements & backyarders plan, 
housing subsidy instruments to be accessed, projects & available funds. 

C: The third section: This section as required by Municipal Human Settlements Sector Plan guidelines is only 
applicable to municipalities that have received Level 1 or 2 Accreditation in order to ensure compliance with Section 9 
of the National Housing Act, whereby the MEC is required to approve projects in an instance where the municipality 


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acts as the developer. 

D: The fourth section: provides detailed project plans from Local Municipalities and addresses operational 
governance and financial management issues. It detailed project planning and therefore includes projects plans, 
access to land, procurement process, risk assessment, communication plan, performance monitoring, budget 
allocations and costing and their cash flow 

Section 1: Contextualizing Human Settlements Delivery within the Municipality: 

Legislative and Policy Environment 

The National Government has provided enabling policies and legislation through which municipalities at different 
levels should ensure equitable access to various types of housing in varying and peculiar environment. It is important 
therefore for PKSDM to translate this into tangible results on the ground, taking into account the realities as they exist 
within this District Municipality. The Municipality will therefore have to contextualize the delivery of housing as it 
pertains to PKS area of jurisdiction 

This section comprises of legal context for housing provision in South Africa. The section considers relevant legislation 
and policy from the national, provincial and local contexts and how they guide housing delivery and are applicable in 
Pixley ka Seme District Municipality. 

In developing this MHSP the District is informed by and aligned to the relevant legislative and policy imperatives, 
namely: 

Accessing housing demand 

The following sub-section of the integrated MHSP describes and quantifies the demand for housing under each local 
municipality. The quantity of housing demand takes into consideration the housing backlog figures and population 
growth. The demand for housing is classified under different categories. The following tables indicate these categories 
and the backlogs in each local municipality: 


Page 56 


Municipality 


Town 

Houses 


De Aar 

1582 

Sroxhasisoi 

Hanover 

682 


Siitetewa 

253 


Total 


2 5'7 


Carnarvon 

35 ° 

Kareeberg 

Vani&fclXtei 

90 


ilssbyjg 

65 


Total 


505 

Thembelihle 

Hopetown 

1 202 

Strydenburg 

351 


Total 


1553 


Marydale 

607 

Siyathemba 

Prieska 

1 524 


Niekerkshoop 

401 


Total 


2 532 


Petrusville 

182 

Renosterberg 

Phillipstown 

105 


Vanderkloof 

50 

Total 

337 


Victoria - West 

182 

Ubuntu 

Richmond 

468 


Loxton 

181 


Total 


831 


Campbel 

448 

Siyancuma 

Douglas 

2578 


Griekwastad 

457 


Total 


3483 


Colesberg 

1946 

Umsobomvu 

Norvalspont 

125 


Noupoort 

251 


Total 


2 322 

District Total 


14 080 


The total housing backlog for the District, excluding Emthanjeni is 11 563. 

All local municipalities are composed of various residential components varying from formal housing units to informal 
dwelling units as indicated in the table above. Within the District, 82, 8% of households live in formal housing, 10,8% 
in informal housing and only 2% in traditional houses. Households in the whole PKSDM is about 49 193 in respect to 
the Census 2011, where the average household size is about 3.70, female headed households is about 36.90%, 
formal dwellings at 86.30% and the housing owned is at 52.00% according to the IDP of 2016. 

The programmes mentioned in the tables in this section are founded on the nature and focus of each programme. Its 
application within the study area depends on negotiation and choice of all stakeholders involved in housing 
development. The same applies to the selection of the quantum of subsidies to be allocated to each of the listed 
settlements. 

The backlog or housing need would be at 14 262 in 2020 if no housing opportunities are given to Pixley Ka Seme DM. 
This figure excludes Emthanjeni LM’s housing need. Pixley Ka Seme DM must commission a feasibility study to have 
a more scientific research done on the different housing typologies needed per town and/or per ward. 


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Housing backlog 




ISUP/IRPD 

FLISP 

CRU 

1 0131 

Kareeberg 

3»5 

40 

80 

305 

Thembelihle 

1 443 

90 

20 

1553 

Siyathemba 

2 380 

120 

32 

2532 

Siyancuma 

3 233 

210 

40 

3483 

Ubuntu 

1345 

40 

10 

1395 

Renosterberg 

297 

3 ° 

10 

337 

Umsobomvu 

2143 

150 

30 

2323 


Total 



12128 


Informal Settlements and Backyarders’ Plan: 

The Northern Cape Strategy and Programme for the Upgrading of Informal Settlements of July 2014 states: 

“The Northern Cape Department of Human Settlements embarked on a process to develop a Strategy and 
Programme for the Upgrading of Informal Settlements in the Northern Cape. 

This Strategy must: 

« GUIDE the upgrading of informal settlements in the Province. 

~ ENHANCE Housing Sector Planning Processes and promote sector alignment. 

~ AVAIL a Plan of Action to Human Settlement Practitioners to be implemented together with Municipalities and 
Sector Partners. 

» PROMOTE participatory planning during the entire project lifecycle process of developing sustainable livelihoods. ” 



Pixley Ka Seme DM 
Informal HH Total 6478 


Source: NC Strategy and Programme for the Upgrading of Informal Settlements -2014 

Current running Human Settlements Projects in the District 


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Municipality 


Town 


Progress 


Challenges 


Umsobomvu 

Colesberg 

♦ Ouboks ±-2 220 houses 

♦ 1126 complete 

4 Contractor has abandoned the site 

4 Houses build, but not completed 

4 17 of the 1 026 were vandalized and were not 

handed over 

Noupoort 

♦ Noupoort 100 

♦ 49 rectification 

4 Project is on standstill as contractor is experiencing 
financial challenges 

Renosterberg 

Philipstown 

♦ Building 341 houses 

♦ 98 completed and occupied 

- 

Keurtjieskloof 

♦ 50 house build, completed 

and occupied 

- 

Siyathemba 

Pries ka 

4 Building 365 houses 

4 100% completed 

- 

Niekerkshoop 

4 54 houses 

- 

Marydale 

4 55 houses 

- 

Kareeberg 

Carnarvon 

4 81 Houses 

4 81 completed and occupied 

- 

Vanwyksvlei 

4 130 (50) houses 

4 80 houses complete and 

occupied 

4 10 houses of phase 3 is 

currently under construction 

- 

Siyancuma 

Bongani 

4 Phase 1:149 houses 
completed 

4 Phase 2:71 houses 
completed 

- 

Campbell 190 

4 700 top structures 

- 

Schmidtsdrift 

- 

- 

Thembelihle 

Hopetown 

4 201 houses build 

4 Contractor still to be appointed 

Strydenberg 

4 Civil services 

4 Project completed 


Source: PkS DM I DP 2016 & PkS Housing Office 

Conclusion: 

The MHSP and IDP integration is of importance to inform the IDP and to ensure that Human Settlement Planning is 
aligned and horizontally and vertically integrated. The content of MMHSP in terms of housing projects will be related to 
the other IDP needs and priorities in an integrated and prioritized fashion. 

The involvement and participation of all stakeholders is of critical importance. The roles and functions of stakeholders 
within sustainable housing development differ. Housing per se is legally a concurrent competency between the first 
(National) and second (Provincial) sphere of Government. However, Local Municipalities is the closest form of 
government dealing with local communities. They are also in a favorable position to oversee the process of housing 
development in terms of land identification and the application of the principles as contained in the SDF. Municipalities 
are also in terms of their powers and functions responsible for infrastructure development and municipal management. 
The challenges thus remains to integrate and align the funding for sustainable housing development through 
accessing such development funding within the budgetary cycles of each Sphere of Government and external funding 
sources such as MIG and form private development institutions such as DBSA. The budgetary cycles of the National 
and Provincial Sphere of Government and that of the Municipal Sphere of Government differs. 

Dedicated housing capacity within PKSDM is limited. The institution of the Housing Voice on PKSDM level, will 
however address this position. The principles are to centralize expertise on DM level with the joint responsibility of 


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sustainable housing provision, delivery and operation within each of the Local Municipalities. Housing delivery on LM 
and PKSDM level can be negatively impacted upon if the principle of the Housing Voice establishment on DM sphere 
of government is not accepted locally. On the positive side there is the fact that PKSDM resolved to have MMHSP’s 
be prepared at DM cost, a positive sign of the needs for cooperation between the PKSDM and its constituent LM’s. 
The establishment of the housing voice will ensure collective ability in order to access housing subsidies on LM level. 

In the MHSP of the Local Municipalities the conclusion can be drawn that the settlement patterns with PKSDM is not 
only dispersed but that the residential land uses are concentrated in an inter and intra settlement dispersed spatial 
distribution. This makes the application of the development principles such as sustainable human settlement 
development from an urban integration perspective a huge challenge and in some cases only attainable over a long 
term. If further necessitates the prioritization of settlements within predetermined urban development boundaries with 
the focus on spatial infill, densification and urban consolidation as the preferred spatial form as objective of housing 
development within PKSDM area. 

Therefore it is necessary for Municipalities to take the leading role on negotiating the location of housing supply to 
facilitate concentrated spatial restructuring and development. Furthermore, they must also facilitate an improved 
match between the demand and supply of different state-assisted national housing programmes. This approach 
envisages that municipalities will play a significantly and increased role in the housing process. This will assist to build 
linkages between housing delivery, spatial planning, socio-economic development, basic infrastructure provision and 
improved transportation system. It will thus support the integration of housing into the IDP’s, ensuring more effective 
management, budgetary and delivery coherence. 

3.10.5 LED Component 

LED is about communities continually improving their investment climate and business enabling environment to 
enhance their competitiveness, retain jobs and improve incomes. Local communities respond to their LED needs in 
many ways, and a variety of approaches can be taken that include: 

- Ensuring that the local investment climate is functional for local businesses; 

■ Supporting small and medium sized enterprises; 

- Encouraging the formation of new enterprises; 

■ Attracting external investment (nationally and internationally); 

■ Investing in physical (hard) infrastructure; 

■ Investing in soft infrastructure (educational and workforce development, institutional support systems and 
regulatory issues); 

* Supporting the growth of particular clusters of businesses; 

* Targeting particular parts of the city/town/region for regeneration or growth (areas based initiatives); 

* Supporting informal and newly emerging businesses; 

■ Targeting certain disadvantaged groups. 


Vision 

To economically enable the resource base in the Pixley ka Seme District Municipality to build a sustainable district for 
future generations. 


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Mission 


Pixley ka Seme District Municipality will achieve its vision with a primary focus on industrialisation and strengthen the 
local economy through diversification of various sectors for effective investment, enterprise and supplier development 
and job creation through the following economic enablers and sectors: 


Objectives 

The objectives of Pixley ka Seme District Municipality Local Economic Development is to: 

Create a conducive business environment; 

Reduce unemployment; 

Reduce inequality; 

Alleviate poverty; 

Enhance the effective implementation of the main drivers of the Northern Cape Provincial Growth and 
Development Plan vison 2040 which includes; 

* Economic Transformation, Growth and Development 

* Social Equity 

* Environmental Sustainability and; 

* Governance 

Institutional Arrangements 

The institutional arrangements for LED start from the National mandate right up to the local level. This need to be 
enabled in the municipality on the principles of structure follows strategy and budget follows function. LED is not 
conducted in isolation by a particular municipal unit. It is an integrated strategy that involves a number of key role 
players, who are responsible for a variety of activities that are important to the potential success of any LED strategy. 
This range from entering the town in terms of astatic, cleanliness, cleaning and greening, rates and taxes, availability 
of services, land, business and investment support. 

Council Committee 

Municipalities are encouraged to establish a dedicated Council committee dealing with LED and reporting to council 
on economic development. In terms of Section 80 for planning for Local Economic and Rural Development, of the 
Municipal Structures Act of 199, the committee must facilitate oversight across all relevant departments in the 
municipality, taking into consideration the transversal nature of LED. 

LED-related functions of a dedicated council committee on planning and Local Economic and Rural Development 
must include: 

■ Provide political direction and oversight over the development of the municipality’s LED strategy and the 
implementation thereof across all departments in the municipality; 

* Mobilise external and local stakeholders with the aim of encouraging inward as well as local investment in 
strategic projects; 

■ Mobilise communities by fostering a cohesive vision and understanding of local economic and rural 


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development within the community that will energise the community into entrepreneurial action. 


Municipal Management Committee 

LED is affected by all municipal mandates including cost of services, access to land and services and operating in 
municipal space, therefore LED must be a standing matter on the municipal management committee. 

The purpose of the Management Committee is to prepare for, as well as process, inputs from the LED stakeholders, 
i.e. national, provincial government and private sector in other words, do the more collective strategic thinking and 
planning as internal and external partners and then have it implemented on operational level. LED is very wide 
ranging and need dedicated focus and enablement i.e. incentives, consultation forums, promotion and marketing as 
an investment destination. 

Pixley ka Seme Municipality Economic Sectors 
Agriculture and Agro processing 

Agriculture is one of main economic activities in the Pixley ka Seme district which has ideal conditions for irrigation 
farming, especially the cultivation of grains and vegetables due to the Orange River which runs through the 
Municipality. The main livestock farming in the region include cattle, sheep and goat farming. Game breeding has also 
been identified as one of the opportunities which could be linked with the tourism sector for Game reserves and 
hunting activities. 

As agriculture is the cornerstone of food security in the country, Pixley ka Seme could position itself to be the supplier 
of agri-produce through the expertise from companies such as GWK, OVK, BKB and all other agriculture companies in 
the area. Innovative agricultural methods exist such as hydroponic farming which has proven to reap success and can 
be explored as an expansion of the agriculture sector. The district municipality should leverage of the province 
agricultural strategy to leverage and realize benefits that can be derived from agricultural and agro processing 
activities. With the Agri Parks as a strategic pillar for the economic growth of the district, some key elements are: 

■ Primary Production 

■ Processing 

* Agro Logistics 

■ Marketing 

■ Training and Extension Services 

Agriculture is the key economic factor in the district. Despite the largely semi-arid and arid environment in the district, 
the fertile land that lies alongside the Orange, Vaal and Riet Rivers supports the production of some of the country’s 
finest quality agricultural products. The district is well known for the quality of its meat - the term Karoo lamb comes to 
mind - as well as the production of wool, mohair, wine, maize and wheat. Livestock production is spread throughout 
the district municipality, with sheep and goats being the main livestock commodities. Commodities in the PKSDM were 
designated in two categories, namely. Support commodities - those commodities produced by small and emerging 
farmers. These support commodities for inclusion into the Pixley ka Seme Agri-Park are indicated below: 

■ Cattle 

* Goats 

■ Vegetables 

Aquaculture at the Van der Kloof Dam shows huge potential and can be investigated despite the challenges of long 


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time delays due to ElAs and other studies. 


Mining 

The main deposits in Pixley ka Seme include alluvial diamond mining along the Orange River and various semi¬ 
precious stones, such as tiger-eye and zinc deposits. The region also has various saltpans for the potential of salt 
production. The development of new Orion Mine in the region provides prospects for job opportunities and 
procurement opportunities. 

Manufacturing 

Agro-processing is the main manufacturing activity in Pixley ka Seme, which consists of the production of various 
plant and meat products. Linked to the agriculture sector, potential exist for storage, packaging and distribution of 
vegetable production. 


Tourism 

Tourism is not identified as a sector in terms of the standard industrial classification. It has however been identified as 
one of the six categories of economic potential according to which the South African space economy has been 
classified in the National Spatial Development Perspective (NSDP 2003). The following narrative is an analysis of the 
tourism sector as classified according to the NSDP. The tourism sector in the district contributes 15.6% to the 
provincial gross value added (GVA).The municipalities Emthanjeni, Kareeberg, Umsobomvu and Siyancuma 
municipalities are the biggest contributors to the provincial gross value added (GVA). The tourism opportunities in the 
district will definitely increase due to the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT), a project being driven at a national level. The 
Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Telescope is an international initiative by the International Square Kilometre Array 
Committee that sought to establish a fourth site that will be situated in the Southern Hemisphere. The Karoo Array 
Telescope (MeerKAT) project situated in the Northern Cape involves the construction of a world-class radio telescope, 
which is being built by the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation near the towns 
of Carnarvon and Williston. The Square Kilometre Array project is of national and potentially international importance. 

Services sector 

Trade and services sector is accommodates the presence of shopping centres, traders, finance, transport etc. 
dominate the services sector indicating a very services dependent economy. Informal traders also play a role in this 
sector as such Shared Enterprise Infrastructure Facilities (SEIF) need to be developed or revitalised where such exist. 

Renewable energy 

South Africa has embarked in a process of diversifying its energy-mix to enhance energy security while also lowering 
green-house gas emissions. The country is blessed with a climate that allows Renewable Energy (RE) technologies 
like solar photovoltaic (PV) and Wind generation to be installed almost anywhere in the country. 

According to the REIPPPP focus on Northern Cape Provincial Report Volume 1, March 2018, Siyathemba has 5 
REIPPP projects in the area which produce 408MW combinedly. By successfully attracting a share of the IPPPP 
portfolio investment, Emthanjeni, Siyathemba, Ubuntu and Renosterberg and Umsobomvu, is benefitting from 


Page 63 







substantial socio-economic development (SED) and Enterprise development (ED) contributions leveraged by the 
IPPPP commitments. The SED and ED contributions provide an opportunity for the identification of viable projects that 
will promote the economic development of Siyathemba. 

Community services 

Government services and community services are the main economic drivers of Siyathemba. Community services 
also include the SASSA grant payments, pension payments and government contracts. The municipality has a 
backlog of housing provision in the area and many people are registered as indigents and qualify for free basic 
services. 


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Chapter 4: Development Strategies 


Strategic Vision of the Municipality 


The strategic vision of the Municipality is built around the strategic objectives. A clear linkage between these 
objectives, the IDP, the budget, all budgetary documentation, as well as performance tools are maintained throughout: 


Strategic objective 

Goal 

Outcome 

Municipal Division 

mSCOA Function 

Compliance with the 
tenets of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and best 
practice 

Good clean governance 

Good clean governance 

♦ Community 

Liaison 

♦ Communication 

♦ Special 

Programmes 

♦ Municipal 

Manager 

♦ Support Services 

Executive and Council 

Compliant support 
services 

Compliant support 
services 

♦ Support Services 

♦ Performance 
management 

Finance and 
Administration 

Administer finances in a 
sustainable manner 
and strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a favorable 
audit outcome 

♦ Viable and 
compliant financial 
management 

♦ Clean Audit 

Viable and compliant 
financial management 

Clean Audit 

♦ Finance 

♦ Budget Control 

♦ Supply Chain 
Management 

♦ Asset 

Management 

♦ Salaries 

Finance and 
Administration 

Monitor and support 
local municipalities to 
enhance service 
delivery 

Compliant support 
services 

Compliant support 
services 

Support Services 

Finance and 
Administration 

Enhanced support to 
local municipalities 

Enhanced support to 
local municipalities 

♦ Infrastructure 
Development 

♦ Housing 

Planning and 
Development 

Promote economic 
growth in the district 

Enhanced economic 
growth 

Enhanced economic 
growth 

LED 

Planning and 
Development 

Guide local 
municipalities in the 
development of their 
IDP’s and in spatial 
development 

Improved integrated 
development planning 

Improved integrated 
development planning 

Spatial Planning 

Planning and 
Development 






To provide a 
professional, people- 
centered human 
resources and 
administrative service 
to citizens, staff and 
Council 

Compliant HR Services 

Compliant HR Services 

♦ Human Resources 

♦ Legal Services & 
Labour Division 

Finance and 
Administration 

To provide an 
independent and 
objective internal audit 
assurance and 
consulting service to 
add value and to 
improve the 
administrative 
operations of all the 
municipalities in the 
district through an 
approach that is 
systematic and 
disciplined 

Clean audit 

Clean audit 

Internal Audit 

Internal Audit 


Page 65 






















Strategic objective 

Goal 

Outcome 

Municipal Division 

mSCOA Function 

To provide disaster 
management services 
to the citizens 

Disaster readiness 

Disaster readiness 

Disaster Management 

Community and Social 
Services 

To provide municipal 
health services to 
improve the quality of 
life of the citizens 

Healthy environment 

Healthy environment 

Municipal Health 
Services 

Health 


National, Provincial and Municipality’s Strategic Alignment 


The table below indicates the Municipality’s alignment with national government: 


National KPA 

National Development Plan 
Outcomes 

Municipality Strategic Objectives 

Good 

Governance and 
Public 

Participation 

Chapter 13: Building a 
capable and developmental 
state 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by 
legislation and best 

♦ To provide an independent and objective internal audit assurance and 
consulting service to add value and to improve the administrative 
operations of all the municipalities in the district through an approach that 
is systematic and disciplined 

♦ Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with 
legislative requirements to achieve a favorable audit outcome 

♦ To provide a professional, people-centered human resources and 
administrative service to citizens, staff and Council 

Local Economic 
Development 

Chapter 4: Economic 
infrastructure 

♦ Promote economic growth in the district 

♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 

Chapter 5: Environmental 
sustainability and resilience 

To provide municipal health services to improve the quality of life of the citizens 


Chapter 3: Economy and 
employment 

Promote economic growth in the district 

Local Economic 
Development 

Chapter 6: Inclusive rural 
economy 

Chapter 9: Improving 
education, training and 
innovation 

Promote economic growth in the district 

Local Economic 
Development 

Chapter 8: Transforming 
human settlements 

Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 


Chapter 9: Improving 
education, training and 
innovation 

Promote economic growth in the district 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Chapter 10: Health care for 
all 

n/a 


Chapter 11: Social protection 

♦ Promote economic growth in the district 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by 
legislation and best 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Chapter 14: Fighting 
corruption 

Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation 
and best 

Chapter 15: Nation building 
and social cohesion 

♦ Promote economic growth in the district 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by 
legislation and best 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Chapter 12: Building safer 
communities 

To provide disaster management services to the citizens 


Page 66 





























Municipal Development Strategy per Function 


Executive and Council 


Strategic objective 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Good clean 
governance 

Submit a 
report to 
council 
annually on 
the monitoring 
and evaluation 
of community 
participation 

Office of the 
Executive 
Mayor 

Submit a report 
to council by 30 
June on the 
monitoring and 
evaluation of 
community 
participation 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Good clean 
governance 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
District 

Communicatio 
n Forum 

Office of the 
Executive 
Mayor 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
District 

Communication 

Forum 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

Good clean 
governance 

Fiost 

commemorativ 
e days as per 
the approved 
list by the 
Municipal 
Manager and 
Mayor 

Office of the 
Executive 
Mayor 

Fiost 

commemorative 
days as per the 
approved list by 
the Municipal 
Manager and 
Mayor 

5 Days 

5 Days 

5 Days 

5 Days 

5 Days 

Good clean 
governance 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
District 
HIV/AIDS 
council 

Office of the 
Executive 
Mayor 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
District 
HIV/AIDS 
council 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

Good clean 
governance 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
Youth Council 

Office of the 
Executive 
Mayor 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
Youth Council 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 

Good clean 
governance 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
District 

Intergovernme 
ntal Forum 
(Technical) 

Municipal 

manager 

Facilitate the 
meeting of the 
District 

Intergovernmen 
tal Forum 
(Technical) 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

Good clean 
governance 

Sign 57 
performance 
agreements 
with all 

directors by 31 
July annually 

Municipal 

manager 

Sign 57 
performance 
agreements 
with all directors 
by 31 July 

4 signed 
agreements 

4 signed 
agreements 

4 signed 
agreements 

4 signed 
agreements 

4 signed 
agreements 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Report 
quarterly to 
council on 
Shared 
Services 

Municipal 

manager 

Report quarterly 
to council on 
Shared 
Services 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 


Page 67 























Finance and Administration 


Strategic objective 

♦ To provide a professional, people-centered human resources and administrative service to citizens, staff 

and Council 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 
♦ Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with legislative requirements to achieve a 

favorable audit outcome 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Review the 
Study Bursary 
policy to 
include 
unemployed 
people of the 
district to get 
the critical 
skills 

Corporate 

Services 

Review the 
Study Bursary 
policy to include 
unemployed 
people of the 
district to get 
the critical skills 
and submit to 
Council by 30 
June 2019 

n/a 

Reviewed 

Bursary 

policy 

submitted to 
Council 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Spent 1% of 
personnel 
budget on 
training 

Corporate 

Services 

Spent 1 % of 
personnel 
budget on 
training by 30 
June (Actual 
total training 
expenditure 
divided by total 
personnel 
budget) 

1 % of 
personnel 
budget on 
training 

1 % of 
personnel 
budget on 
training 

1 % of 
personnel 
budget on 
training 

1 % of 
personnel 
budget on 
training 

1 % of 
personnel 
budget on 
training 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Submit a 
business 
proposal to 
LGSETA for 
discretionary 
grant to avail 
funds to train 
employees 
and 

unemployed 

Corporate 

Services 

Submit a 
business 
proposal to 
LGSETA for 
discretionary 
grant to avail 
funds to train 
employees and 
unemployed by 

31 March 2018 

Business 
proposal 
submitted to 
LGSETA 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Implement the 
WPSP to train 
officials 

Corporate 

Services 

Implement the 
WPSP to train 
officials (Total 
number of 
officials that 
received 
training as was 
identified in the 
WPSP/total 
number of 
officials that 
were identified 
for training in 
the WPSP) 

90% of 
Officials as 
identified in 
WPSP 
received 
training 

90% of 
Officials as 
identified in 
WPSP 
received 
training 

90% of 
Officials as 
identified in 
WPSP 
received 
training 

90% of 
Officials as 
identified in 
WPSP 
received 
training 

90% of 
Officials as 
identified in 
WPSP 
received 
training 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Develop a 
policy to 
implement a 
system of 
understudy 
within the 
Municipality 

Corporate 

Services 

Develop a 
policy to 
implement a 
system of 
understudy 
within the 
Municipality by 

31 December 
2019 

n/a 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Review the 
organizational 
structure of the 
district 
Municipality 

Corporate 

Services 

Review the 
organizational 
structure of the 
district 

Municipality and 
submit to 
council by 30 
June 2021 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

1 

n/a 


Page 68 




















Strategic objective 

♦ To provide a professional, people-centered human resources and administrative service to citizens, staff 

and Council 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 
♦ Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with legislative requirements to achieve a 

favorable audit outcome 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Limit the 
vacancy rate 
to less that 
10% of 
budgeted 
posts 

Corporate 

Services 

Limit the 
vacancy rate to 
less that 10% of 
budgeted posts 
by 30 June 
((Number of 
posts filled/Total 
number of 
budgeted 
posts)x100) 

Maximum 

10% 

Vacancy 
rate on 
budgeted 
posts 

Maximum 
10% 
Vacancy 
rate on 
budgeted 
posts 

Maximum 
10% 
Vacancy 
rate on 
budgeted 
posts 

Maximum 

10% 

Vacancy rate 
on budgeted 
posts 

Maximum 

10% 

Vacancy 
rate on 
budgeted 
posts 

Compliant 

HR Services 

Review the 
Workplace 
Skills Plan and 
submit to the 
LGSETA 

Corporate 

Services 

Review the 
Workplace 
Skills Plan and 
submit to the 
LGSETA by 30 
April 

Workplace 
Skills Plan 
and 

submitted to 
the 

LGSETA 

Workplace 
Skills Plan 
and 

submitted to 
the 

LGSETA 

Workplace 
Skills Plan 
and 

submitted to 
the 

LGSETA 

Workplace 
Skills Plan 
and 

submitted to 
the LGSETA 

Workplace 
Skills Plan 
and 

submitted to 
the LGSETA 

Compliant 

HR Services 

One person 
from 

employment 
equity target 
groups to be 
appointed in 
one of the 
three highest 
levels of 
management 
annually in 
compliance 
with the 
Municipality’s 
approved 
employment 
equity plan 

Corporate 

Services 

One person 
from 

employment 
equity target 
groups to be 
appointed in 
one of the three 
highest levels of 
management 
annually in 
compliance with 
the 

Municipality’s 
approved 
employment 
equity plan 
(Occupational 
category of mid 
management) 

1 Person 
appointed 

1 Person 
appointed 

1 Person 
appointed 

1 Person 
appointed 

1 Person 
appointed 

Compliant 

support 

services 

Submit the 

Top layer 
SDBIP for 
approval by 
the Mayor 
within 21 days 
after the 
budget has 
been approved 

Corporate 

Services 

Submit the Top 
layer SDBIP for 
approval by the 
Mayor within 21 
days after the 
budget has 
been approved 

Top layer 
SDBIP 
submitted 

Top layer 
SDBIP 
submitted 

Top layer 
SDBIP 
submitted 

Top layer 
SDBIP 
submitted 

Top layer 
SDBIP 
submitted 

Compliant 

support 

services 

Submit the 
draft Annual 
Report to 
Council 
annually by 31 
January 

Corporate 

Services 

Submit the draft 
Annual Report 
to Council 
annually by 31 
January 

Draft 

Annual 

Report 

submitted 

Draft 

Annual 

Report 

submitted 

Draft 

Annual 

Report 

submitted 

Draft Annual 
Report 
submitted 

Draft Annual 
Report 
submitted 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Draft 

implementable 
and realistic 
SLA for the 
rendering of 
shared 
services in all 
local 

municipalities 

Corporate 

Services 

Draft 

implementable 
and realistic 
SLA’s for the 
rendering of 
shared services 
in all local 
municipalities 

8 SLA’s 
drafted 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 


Page 69 




















Strategic objective 

♦ To provide a professional, people-centered human resources and administrative service to citizens, staff 

and Council 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 
♦ Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with legislative requirements to achieve a 

favorable audit outcome 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Clean Audit 

Compile and 
approve an 
Audit Action 
Plan annually 
to address the 
issues raised 
by the AG 

Finance 

Compile and 
approve an 
Audit Action 
Plan annually 
by 31 January 
to address the 
issues raised by 
the AG 

Approved 
Audit Action 
Plan 

Approved 
Audit Action 
Plan 

Approved 
Audit Action 
Plan 

Approved 
Audit Action 
Plan 

Approved 
Audit Action 
Plan 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Report 
quarterly to 
council on 
meetings with 
and 

correspond- 
dence to 
defaulting 
municipalities 
on debt 
relating to 
services 
rendered 

Finance 

Report quarterly 
to council on 
meetings with 
and 

correspondence 
to defaulting 
municipalities 
on debt relating 
to services 
rendered 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Prepare and 
submit the 
draft budget to 
Council by 31 
March 
annually 

Finance 

Prepare and 
submit the draft 
budget to 
Council by 31 
March annually 

Draft 

Budget 

submitted 

Draft 

Budget 

submitted 

Draft 

Budget 

submitted 

Draft Budget 
submitted 

Draft Budget 
submitted 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Prepare and 
submit the 
final budget to 
Council by 31 
May annually 

Finance 

Prepare and 
submit the final 
budget to 
Council by 31 
May annually 

Final 

Budget 

submitted 

Final 

Budget 

submitted 

Final 

Budget 

submitted 

Final Budget 
submitted 

Final Budget 
submitted 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Prepare and 
submit the 
adjustments 
budget to 
Council by the 
28 February 
annually 

Finance 

Prepare and 
submit the 
adjustments 
budget to 
Council by the 

28 February 
annually 

Adjustments 

Budget 

submitted 

Adjustments 

Budget 

submitted 

Adjustments 

Budget 

submitted 

Adjustments 

Budget 

submitted 

Adjustments 

Budget 

submitted 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Submit the 
annual 
financial 
statements to 
the Auditor- 
General by 31 
August 
annually 

Finance 

Submit the 
annual financial 
statements to 
the Auditor- 
General by 31 
August annually 

Annual 

Financial 

Statements 

submitted 

Annual 

Financial 

Statements 

submitted 

Annual 

Financial 

Statements 

submitted 

Annual 

Financial 

Statements 

submitted 

Annual 

Financial 

Statements 

submitted 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Co-ordinate 
the District 
MM/CFO 
forums 

Finance 

Co-ordinate the 
District 
MM/CFO 
forums 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 

2 Meetings 


Page 70 





















Strategic objective 

♦ To provide a professional, people-centered human resources and administrative service to citizens, staff 

and Council 

♦ Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 
♦ Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with legislative requirements to achieve a 

favorable audit outcome 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Financial 
viability 
measured in 
terms of the 
Municipality's 
ability to meet 
it's service 
debt 

obligations 

Finance 

Financial 
viability 
measured in 
terms of the 
Municipality's 
ability to meet 
it's service debt 
obligations by 

30 June ((Short 
Term Borrowing 
+ Bank 
Overdraft + 
Short Term 
Lease + Long 
Term Borrowing 
+ Long Term 
Lease) / Total 
Operating 
Revenue - 
Operating 
Conditional 
Grant) 

45% Debt 
coverage 

45% Debt 
coverage 

45% Debt 
coverage 

45% Debt 
coverage 

45% Debt 
coverage 

Viable and 
compliant 
financial 
management 

Financial 
viability 
measured in 
terms of the 
available cash 
to cover fixed 
operating 
expenditure 

Finance 

Financial 
viability 
measured in 
terms of the 
available cash 
to cover fixed 
operating 
expenditure by 

30 June ((Cash 
and Cash 
Equivalents - 
Unspent 
Conditional 
Grants - 
Overdraft) + 
Short Term 
Investment) / 
Monthly Fixed 
Operational 
Expenditure 
excluding 
(Depreciation, 
Amortisation, 
and Provision 
for Bad Debts, 
Impairment and 
Loss on 
Disposal of 
Assets)) 

1 Month to 
cover fix 
operating 
expenditure 
with 

available 

cash 

1 Month to 
cover fix 
operating 
expenditure 
with 

available 

cash 

1 Month to 
cover fix 
operating 
expenditure 
with 

available 

cash 

1 Month to 
cover fix 
operating 
expenditure 
with available 
cash 

1 Month to 
cover fix 
operating 
expenditure 
with 

available 

cash 


Internal Audit 


Strategic objective 

To provide an independent and objective internal audit assurance and consulting service to add value and to 
improve the administrative operations of all the municipalities in the district through an approach that is 

systematic and disciplined 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Clean audit 

Submit a 
Quality 
Assurance 
Plan to the 
Audit 

Committee 

Internal Audit 

Submit a 
Quality 

Assurance Plan 
to the Audit 
Committee by 

30 November 

Plan 

submitted 

Plan 

submitted 

Plan 

submitted 

Plan 

submitted 

Plan 

submitted 


Page 71 





























Strategic objective 

To provide an independent and objective internal audit assurance and consulting service to add value and to 
improve the administrative operations of all the municipalities in the district through an approach that is 




sysiemanc ana aiscipnnea 



Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Clean audit 

Submit 
quarterly 
internal audit 
reports to the 
local 

municipalities 
in terms of the 
Service Level 
Agreements 

Internal Audit 

Submit 
quarterly 
internal audit 
reports to the 
local 

municipalities in 
terms of the 
Service Level 
Agreements 

12 Reports 
submitted 

12 Reports 
submitted 

12 Reports 
submitted 

12 Reports 
submitted 

12 Reports 
submitted 

Clean audit 

Compile the 
Risk based 
audit plan 
(RBAP) and 
submit to the 
Audit 

Committee for 
consideration 

Internal Audit 

Compile the 
Risk based 
audit plan 
(RBAP) and 
submit to the 
Audit 

Committee for 
consideration 
by 30 
November 

RBAP 

submitted 

RBAP 

submitted 

RBAP 

submitted 

RBAP 

submitted 

RBAP 

submitted 

Clean audit 

Compile the 
Risk based 
audit plans 
(RBAP) for the 
local 

municipalities 
in terms of the 
Service Level 
Agreements 
and submit to 
the local 
municipalities 

Internal Audit 

Compile the 
Risk based 
audit plans 
(RBAP) for the 
local 

municipalities in 
terms of the 
Service Level 
Agreements 
and submit to 
the local 
municipalities 
by 30 June 

3 RBAP's 
submitted 

3 RBAP’s 
submitted 

3 RBAP's 
submitted 

3 RBAP’s 
submitted 

3 RBAP’s 
submitted 

Clean audit 

Review the 3 
year Strategic 
Audit Plans of 
applicable 
local 

municipalities 
and submit to 
the Audit 
Committee 

Internal Audit 

Review the 3 
year Strategic 
Audit Plans of 
applicable local 
municipalities 
and submit to 
the Audit 
Committee by 

30 June 

3 Strategic 
Audit Plans 
submittedl 

3 Strategic 
Audit Plans 
submittedl 

3 Strategic 
Audit Plans 
submittedl 

3 Strategic 
Audit Plans 
submittedl 

3 Strategic 
Audit Plans 
submittedl 

Clean audit 

Review the 3 
year Strategic 
Audit Plan and 
submit to the 
Audit 

Committee 

Internal Audit 

Review the 3 
year Strategic 
Audit Plan and 
submit to the 
Audit 

Committee by 

30 November 

Strategic 
Audit Plan 
submittedl 

Strategic 
Audit Plan 
submittedl 

Strategic 
Audit Plan 
submittedl 

Strategic 
Audit Plan 
submittedl 

Strategic 
Audit Plan 
submittedl 


Community and Social Services 


Strategic objective 

To provide disaster management services to the citizens 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Disaster 

readiness 

Complete 
institutional 
assessment to 
determine 
extend of 
underfunding 
for disaster 
Management 
function 

Corporate 

Services 

Complete 
institutional 
assessment to 
determine 
extend of 
underfunding 
for disaster 
Management 
function and 
submit report to 
council by 30 
December 2018 

Report 

submitted 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 


Page 72 































Strategic objective 

To provide disaster management services to the citizens 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Disaster 

readiness 

Submit 

application for 
increased 
funding for 
disaster 
management 
to COGHSTA 

Corporate 

Services 

Submit 

application for 
increased 
funding for 
disaster 
management to 
COGHSTA by 

31 March 2018 

Application 

submitted 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Disaster 

readiness 

Train 

volunteers ito 
Disaster 
Management 

Corporate 

Services 

Train volunteers 
ito Disaster 
Management 

1 Training 
session 

1 Training 
session 

1 Training 
session 

1 Training 
session 

1 Training 
session 

Disaster 

readiness 

Conduct a risk 
analysis on 
disaster 
threats in the 
district 

Corporate 

Services 

Conduct a risk 
analysis on 
disaster threats 
in the district 
and submit 
report on 
analysis to 
council by 30 
June 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Report 

submitted 

Disaster 

readiness 

Review the 
Disaster 
Management 
Plan annually 

Corporate 

Services 

Review the 
Disaster 
Management 
Plan annually 
and submit to 
Council by 30 
June 

Plan 

reviewed 

and 

submitted 

Plan 

reviewed 

and 

submitted 

Plan 

reviewed 

and 

submitted 

Plan 

reviewed and 
submitted 

Plan 

reviewed 

and 

submitted 


Health 


Strategic objective 

To provide municipal health services to improve the quality of life of the citizens 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 


2021/22 

Healthy 

environment 

Investigate the 
possibility of 
introducing an 
electronic 
reporting 
system for 
municipal 
health 

Corporate 

Services 

Investigate the 
possibility of 
introducing an 
electronic 
reporting 
system for 
municipal health 
services and 
submit report 
with 

recommendatio 
ns to council by 
30 June 2018 

Report 

submitted 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Healthy 

environment 

Compile 
monthly water 
quality 

analysis report 
to local 
municipalities 
in terms of the 
Water quality 
monitoring 
programme 

Corporate 

Services 

Compile 
monthly water 
quality analysis 
report to local 
municipalities in 
terms of the 
Water quality 
monitoring 
programme 

96 Reports 
submitted 

96 Reports 
submitted 

96 Reports 
submitted 

96 Reports 
submitted 

96 Reports 
submitted 

Healthy 

environment 

Develop a 
Municipal 
Health 

Services By- 
Law 

Corporate 

Services 

Develop a 
Municipal 
Health Services 
By-Law by 30 
June 2019 

n/a 

By-Law 

published 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 


Page 73 
































Strategic objective 

To provide municipal health services to improve the quality of life of the citizens 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Healthy 

environment 

Submit 
quarterly 
reports to 
council on 
municipal 
health services 
rendered 

Corporate 

Services 

Submit 
quarterly 
reports to 
council on 
municipal health 
services 
rendered 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

4 Reports 

Healthy 

environment 

Take samples 
of potable 
water within in 
the district to 
monitor 
bacterial levels 

Corporate 

Services 

Take samples 
of potable water 
within in the 
district to 
monitor 
bacterial levels 

1000 

samples 

taken 

1000 

samples 

taken 

1000 

samples 

taken 

1000 

samples 

taken 

1000 

samples 

taken 

Healthy 

environment 

Take samples 
of waste water 
within in the 
district 

Corporate 

Services 

Take samples 
of waste water 
within in the 
district 

100 

samples 

taken 

100 

samples 

taken 

100 

samples 

taken 

100 samples 
taken 

100 samples 
taken 

Healthy 

environment 

Inspect food 
outlets and 
premises 

Corporate 

Services 

Inspect food 
outlets and 
premises 

400 

Inspections 

400 

Inspections 

400 

Inspections 

400 

Inspections 

400 

Inspections 

Healthy 

environment 

Inspect 
government 
premises and 
private entities 

Corporate 

Services 

Inspect 
government 
premises and 
private entities 

260 

Inspections 

260 

Inspections 

260 

Inspections 

260 

Inspections 

260 

Inspections 

Healthy 

environment 

Inspect funeral 
undertakers 

Corporate 

Services 

Inspect funeral 
undertakers 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

Healthy 

environment 

Inspect landfill 
sites 

Corporate 

Services 

Inspect landfill 
sites 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

24 

Inspections 

Healthy 

environment 

Inspect 
premises for 
chemical 
safety 

Corporate 

Services 

Inspect 
premises for 
chemical safety 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 

Healthy 

environment 

Inspect 
premises for 
vectors control 

Corporate 

Services 

Inspect 
premises for 
vectors control 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 

684 

Inspections 


Planning and Development 


Strategic objective 

♦ 

♦ Promote economic growth in the district 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 

Guide local municipalities in the development of their IDP's and in spatial development 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Enhanced 

economic 

growth 

Obtain a social 
impact report 
from CSIR 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Obtain a social 
impact report 
from CSIR by 

31 December 
2017 

Report 

obtained 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Enhanced 

Integrated 

Development 

Planning 

Review the 
District Growth 
and 

Development 
Strategy to 
include an 
implementation 
plan with 
actions and 
timeframes 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Review the 
Spatial 
Development 
Framework that 
include Land 
Use 

Management 
Schemes and 
submit to 
Council by 30 
June 2019 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 


Page 74 





































Strategic objective 

♦ 

♦ Promote economic growth in the district 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 

Guide local municipalities in the development of their IDP's and in spatial development 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Enhanced 

economic 

growth 

Review the 
District Growth 
and 

Development 
Strategy to 
include an 
implementation 
plan with 
actions and 
timeframes 

Infrastructure 
, Fiousing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Review the 
District Growth 
and 

Development 
Strategy to 
include an 
implementation 
plan with 
actions and 
timeframes and 
submit to 
Council by 30 
June 2019 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Enhanced 

economic 

growth 

Review the 
LED strategy 
to include an 
implementation 
plan with 
actions and 
timeframes 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Review the LED 
strategy to 
include an 
implementation 
plan with 
actions and 
timeframes and 
submit to 
Council by 30 
June 2018 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Enhanced 

economic 

growth 

Review the 
District Growth 
and 

Development 
Strategy 
implementation 
plan annually 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Review the 
DGDS 

implementation 
plan annually 
and submit to 
council by 30 
June 

n//a 

n/a 

1 

1 

1 

Enhanced 

economic 

growth 

Review the 
LED 

implementation 
plan annually 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Review the LED 
implementation 
plan annually 
and submit to 
council by 30 
June 

n/a 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Improved 

integrated 

development 

planning 

Annually 
compile an 

IDP framework 
by 31 

December to 
guide local 
municipalities 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Annually 
compile an IDP 
framework by 

31 December to 
guide local 
municipalities 

IDP 

framework 

compiled 

IDP 

framework 

compiled 

IDP 

framework 

compiled 

IDP 

framework 

compiled 

IDP 

framework 

compiled 

Improved 

integrated 

development 

planning 

Annually 
review the IDP 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Annually review 
the IDP and 
submit draft to 
council by 31 
March 

Draft IDP 
submitted 

Draft IDP 
submitted 

Draft IDP 
submitted 

Draft IDP 
submitted 

Draft IDP 
submitted 

Enhanced 

economic 

growth 

Arrange 
quarterly LED 
forum meeting 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Arrange 
quarterly LED 
forum meeting 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

Enhanced 

economic 

growth 

Create job 
opportunities 
through the 
Expanded 
Public Works 
Programme 
(EPWP) 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Create job 
opportunities 
through the 
Expanded 
Public Works 
Programme 
(EPWP) 

55 

Opportunities 

created 

55 

Opportunities 

created 

55 

Opportunities 

created 

55 

Opportunities 

created 

55 

Opportunities 

created 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Arrange and 
convene 
quarterly 
Infrastructure 
Forum 
meetings 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Arrange and 
convene 
quarterly 
Infrastructure 
Forum meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 

4 Meetings 


Page 75 
























Strategic objective 

♦ 

♦ Promote economic growth in the district 
♦ Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 

Guide local municipalities in the development of their IDP's and in spatial development 

Goals 

Action 

Responsible 

Directorate 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

2017/18 

2018/19 

Targets 

2019/20 

2020/21 

2021/22 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Submit 
quarterly 
progress 
reports that 
include 

expenditure on 
all MIG 
projects in the 
district to the 
portfolio 
committee 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Submit 
quarterly 
progress 
reports that 
include 

expenditure on 
all MIG projects 
in the district to 
the portfolio 
committee 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Compile 
maintenance 
plans for water 
and electricity 
for 4 

municipalities 
annually by 30 
June 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Compile 
maintenance 
plans for water 
and electricity 
for 4 

municipalities 
annually by 30 
June 

4 

Mainte¬ 
nance plans 

4 

Mainte¬ 
nance plans 

4 

Mainte¬ 
nance plans 

4 

Mainte-nance 

plans 

4 

Mainte¬ 
nance plans 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Submit 
quarterly 
progress 
reports on the 
Implementatio 
n of 

infrastructure 
grants/allocati 
ons according 
to set 

conditions and 
submit to the 
portfolio 
committee 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Submit 
quarterly 
progress 
reports on the 
Implementation 
of infrastructure 
grants/allocatio 
ns according to 
set conditions 
and submit to 
the portfolio 
committee 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Annually 
review the 
Human 
Settlements 
Sector Plan 
and submit to 
Council for 
approval by 30 
June 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Reviewed 
Human 
Settlements 
Sector Plan 
submitted to 
council annually 
by 30 June 

Human 

Settlements 

Plan 

reviewed 

Human 

Settlements 

Plan 

reviewed 

Human 

Settlements 

Plan 

reviewed 

Human 

Settlements 

Plan 

reviewed 

Human 

Settlements 

Plan 

reviewed 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Review the 
Housing 
Service Level 
Agreement 
and distribute 
it for adoption 
by non- 
accredited 
municipalities 
in the district 
annually by 30 
June 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Review the 
Housing 
Service Level 
Agreement and 
distribute it for 
adoption by 
non-accredited 
municipalities in 
the district 
annually by 30 
June 

Housing 

Service 

Level 

Agreement 

reviewed 

and 

adopted 

Housing 

Service 

Level 

Agreement 

reviewed 

and 

adopted 

Housing 

Service 

Level 

Agreement 

reviewed 

and 

adopted 

Housing 
Service Level 
Agreement 
reviewed and 
adopted 

Housing 

Sen/ice 

Level 

Agreement 
reviewed 
and adopted 

Enhanced 
support to 
local 

municipalities 

Quarterly 
report to the 
portfolio 
committee on 
the number of 
households 
educated on 
housing 
consumer 
education in 
towns of non- 
accredited 
municipalities 
in the district 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

Quarterly report 
to the portfolio 
committee on 
the number of 
households 
educated on 
housing 
consumer 

education in 
towns of non- 
accredited 
municipalities in 
the district 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 

4 Reports 
submitted 


Page 76 





















Other 


Strategic objective 


Promote economic growth in the district 


Action 


Responsibl 

e 

Directorate 


Key 

Performance 

Indicator 


2017/18 


2018/19 


Targets 

2019/20 


2020/21 


2021/22 





Research the 









options to 
improve the 







Research the 


tourism function 






Enhanced 

options to 
improve the 

Infrastructure 
, Housing, 
Planning and 
Development 

and role of the 
district and 






economic 

tourism 

submit a report 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

growth 

function and 
role of the 

with the findings 
and 







district 


recommenda¬ 
tions to council 









by 31 









December 2017 







Page 77 














Chapter 5: 5 Year Corporate Scorecard: 
Development and Service Delivery 

Priorities 


Based on the development strategies included in Chapter 4 the table below includes the 5 Year Corporate Scorecard 
which is aligned with the budget and will be implemented and monitored in terms of the annual Top Layer SDBIP: 


Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Compile and approve 
an Audit Action Plan 
annually by 31 
January to address 
the issues raised by 
the AG 

Audit Recovery Plan 
compiled and 
approved by 31 
January 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Report quarterly to 
council on meetings 
with and 

correspondence to 
defaulting 
municipalities on 
debt relating to 
services rendered 

Number of reports 
submitted 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Prepare and submit 
the draft budget to 
Council by 31 March 
annually 

Draft budget 
submitted by 31 
March annually 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
6outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Prepare and submit 
the final budget to 
Council by 31 May 
annually 

Final budget 
submitted by 31 

May annually 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
6outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Prepare and submit 
the adjustments 
budget to Council by 
the 28 February 
annually 

Adjustments budget 
submitted by 28 
February annually 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Page 78 




















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Submit the annual 
financial statements 
to the Auditor- 
General by 31 
August annually 

Statements 
submitted to the AG 
by 31 August 
annually 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Co-ordinate the 
District MM/CFO 
forums 

Number of meetings 
held 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Financial viability 
measured in terms of 
the Municipality's 
ability to meet it's 
service debt 
obligations by 30 
June ((Short term 
Borrowing + Bank 
Overdraft + Short 
Term Lease + Long 
Term Borrowing + 
Long Term Lease)/ 
Total Operating 
Revenue - Operating 
Conditional Grant) 

% debt coverage 

45% 

45% 

45% 

45% 

45% 

Administer 
finances in a 
sustainable 
manner and 
strive to comply 
with legislative 
requirements to 
achieve a 
favorable audit 
outcome 

Finance and 
Administration 

Financial viability 
measured in terms of 
the available cash to 
cover fixed operating 
expenditure by 30 
June ((Cash and 
Cash Equivalents - 
Unspent Conditional 
Grants - Overdraft) + 
Short Term 
Investment) / 
Monthly Fixed 
Operational 
Expenditure 
excluding 
(Depreciation, 
Amortisation, and 
Provision for Bad 
Debts, Impairment 
and Loss on 
Disposal of Assets)) 

Number of months it 
takes to cover fix 
operating 
expenditure with 
available cash 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Executive and 
Council 

Submit a report to 
council annually by 

30 June on the 
monitoring and 
evaluation of 
community 
participation 

Report submitted to 
council by 30 June 
annually 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Page 79 


















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Executive and 
Council 

Facilitate the meeting 
of the District 
Communication 
Forum 

Number of meetings 
held 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Executive and 
Council 

Host commemorative 
days as per the 
approved list by the 
Municipal Manager 
and Mayor 

Number of 
commemorative 
days hosted 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Executive and 
Council 

Facilitate the meeting 
of the District 
HIV/AIDS council 

Number of meetings 
held 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Executive and 
Council 

Facilitate the meeting 
of the Youth Council 

Number of meetings 
held 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Executive and 
Council 

Facilitate the meeting 
of the District 
Intergovernmental 
Forum (Technical) 

Number of meetings 
held 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Executive and 
Council 

Sign 57 performance 
agreements with all 
directors by 31 July 

Number of 
performance 
agreements signed 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Executive and 
Council 

Report quarterly to 
council on Shared 
Services 

Number of reports 
submitted 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Finance and 
Administration 

Submit the Top layer 
SDBIP for approval 
by the Mayor within 

21 days after the 
budget has been 
approved 

Top Layer SDBIP 
submitted annually 
to Mayor within 21 
days after the 
budget has been 
approved 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Compliance 
with the tenets 
of good 
governance as 
prescribed by 
legislation and 
best practice 

Finance and 
Administration 

Submit the draft 
Annual Report to 
Council annually by 

31 January 

Draft annual report 
submitted annually 
to council by 31 
January 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Page 80 






















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Finance and 
Administration 

Draft implementable 
and realistic SLA's 
for the rendering of 
shared services in all 
local municipalities 

Number of SLA's 
drafted 

8 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Planning and 
Development 

Arrange and 
convene quarterly 
Infrastructure Forum 
meetings 

Number of meetings 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Planning and 
Development 

Submit quarterly 
progress reports that 
include expenditure 
on all MIG projects in 
the district to the 
portfolio committee 

Number of reports 
submitted 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Planning and 
Development 

Compile 

maintenance plans 
for water and 
electricity for 4 
municipalities 
annually by 30 June 

Number of 
maintenance plans 
compiled annually 
by 30 June 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Planning and 
Development 

Submit quarterly 
progress reports on 
the Implementation 
of infrastructure 
grants/allocations 
according to set 
conditions and 
submit to the 
portfolio committee 

Number of reports 
submitted 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Planning and 
Development 

Annually review the 
Human Settlements 
Sector Plan and 
submit to Council for 
approval by 30 June 

Reviewed Human 
Settlements Sector 
Plan submitted to 
council annually by 

30 June 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Planning and 
Development 

Review the Housing 
Service Level 
Agreement and 
distribute it for 
adoption by non- 
accredited 
municipalities in the 
district annually by 

30 June 

Reviewed, adopted 
and signed Housing 
SLA by 30 June 
annually 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Monitor and 
support local 
municipalities to 
enhance 
service delivery 

Planning and 
Development 

Quarterly report to 
the portfolio 
committee on the 
number of 

households educated 
on housing 
consumer education 
in towns of non- 
accredited 
municipalities in the 
district 

Number of reports 
submitted 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


Page 81 





















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

Guide local 
municipalities in 
the 

development of 
their IDP’s and 
in spatial 
development 

Planning and 
Development 

Review the Spatial 
Development 
Framework that 
include Land Use 
Management 
Schemes and submit 
to Council by 30 June 

Reviewed Spatial 
Development 
Framework that 
include Land Use 
Management 
Schemes submitted 
to Council by 30 June 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Guide local 
municipalities in 
the 

development of 
their IDP’s and 
in spatial 
development 

Planning and 
Development 

Annually review the 
IDP and submit draft 
to council by 31 
March 

Draft reviewed IDP 
submitted annually 
to council by 31 
March 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Guide local 
municipalities in 
the 

development of 
their IDP’s and 
in spatial 
development 

Planning and 
Development 

Annually compile an 
IDP framework by 31 
December to guide 
local municipalities 

IDP framework 
annually completed 
by 31 December 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Other 

Research the options 
to improve the 
tourism function and 
role of the district 
and submit a report 
with the findings and 
recommendations to 
council by 31 
December 

Report with findings 
and 

recommendations 
submitted to council 
by 31 December 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Planning and 
Development 

Obtain a social 
impact report from 
CSIR by 31 
December 

Report obtained by 

31 December 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Planning and 
Development 

Review the District 
Growth and 
Development 
Strategy to include 
an implementation 
plan with actions and 
timeframes and 
submit to Council by 
30 June 

Reviewed DGDS 
submitted to council 
by 30 June 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Planning and 
Development 

Review the LED 
strategy to include an 
implementation plan 
with actions and 
timeframes and 
submit to Council by 
30 June 

Reviewed LED 
strategy submitted 
to council by 30 
June 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Planning and 
Development 

Review the DGDS 
implementation plan 
annually and submit 
to council by 30 June 

Reviewed 

implementation plan 
submitted to council 
by 30 June annually 

n/a 

n/a 

1 

1 

1 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Planning and 
Development 

Review the LED 
implementation plan 
annually and submit 
to council by 30 June 

Reviewed 

implementation plan 
submitted to council 
by 30 June annually 


1 

1 

1 

1 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Planning and 
Development 

Arrange quarterly 
LED forum meeting 

Number of meetings 
held 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


Page 82 























Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

Promote 
economic 
growth in the 
district 

Planning and 
Development 

Create job 

opportunities through 
the Expanded Public 
Works Programme 
(EPWP) 

Number of 
opportunities 
created 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Review the Study 
Bursary policy to 
include unemployed 
people of the district 
to get the critical 
skills and submit to 
council by 30 June 

Reviewed Study 
Bursary policy 
submitted to council 
by 30 June 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Spent 1 % of 
personnel budget on 
training by 30 June 
(Actual total training 
expenditure divided 
by total personnel 
budget) 

% of the personnel 
budget spent 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Submit a business 
proposal to LGSETA 
for discretionary 
grant to avail funds 
to train employees 
and unemployed by 

31 March 

Proposal submitted 
by 31 March 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Implement the 
WPSP to train 
officials (Total 
number of officials 
that received training 
as was identified in 
the WPSP/total 
number of officials 
that were identified 
for training in the 
WPSP) 

% of identified 
employees that 
completes training 
as identified in 
WPSP 

90% 

90% 

90% 

90% 

90% 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Develop a policy to 
implement a system 
of understudy within 
the Municipality by 

31 December 

System developed 
by 31 December 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Review the 
organizational 
structure of the 
district Municipality 
and submit to council 
by 30 June 

Reviewed 
Organizational 
Structure submitted 
to council by 30 
June 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

1 

n/a 


Page 83 




















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Limit the vacancy 
rate to less that 10% 
of budgeted posts by 
30 June ((Number of 
posts filled/Total 
number of budgeted 
postsjxlOO) 

% vacancy rate of 
budgeted posts 
(Number of posts 
filled/Total number 
of budgeted 
postsjxlOO 

10% 

10% 

10% 

10% 

10% 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

Review the 
Workplace Skills 
Plan and submit to 
the LGSETA by 30 
April annually 

Plan submitted to 
the LGSETA by 30 
April 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

To provide a 
professional, 
people-centered 
human 

resources and 
administrative 
service to 
citizens, staff 
and Council 

Finance and 
Administration 

One person from 
employment equity 
target groups to be 
appointed in one of 
the three highest 
levels of 
management 
annually in 
compliance with the 
Municipality’s 
approved 

employment equity 
plan (Occupational 
category of mid 
management - speci 

One person to be 
appointed in one of 
the three highest 
levels of 
management in 
compliance with a 
Municipality’s 
approved 

employment equity 
plan 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

To provide an 
independent 
and objective 
internal audit 
assurance and 
consulting 
service to add 
value and to 
improve the 
administrative 
operations of all 
the 

municipalities in 
the district 
through an 
approach that is 
systematic and 
disciplined 

Internal Audit 

Submit a Quality 
Assurance Plan to 
the Audit Committee 
by 30 November 

Quality Assurance 
plan submitted 
annually by 30 
November 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Page 84 

















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

To provide an 
independent 
and objective 
internal audit 
assurance and 
consulting 
service to add 
value and to 
improve the 
administrative 
operations of all 
the 

municipalities in 
the district 
through an 
approach that is 
systematic and 
disciplined 

Internal Audit 

Submit quarterly 
internal audit reports 
to the local 
municipalities in 
terms of the Service 
Level Agreements 

Number of reports 
submitted 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

To provide an 
independent 
and objective 
internal audit 
assurance and 
consulting 
service to add 
value and to 
improve the 
administrative 
operations of all 
the 

municipalities in 
the district 
through an 
approach that is 
systematic and 
disciplined 

Internal Audit 

Compile the Risk 
based audit plan 
(RBAP) and submit 
to the Audit 
Committee for 
consideration by 30 
November 

RBAP submitted by 
30 November 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

To provide an 
independent 
and objective 
internal audit 
assurance and 
consulting 
service to add 
value and to 
improve the 
administrative 
operations of all 
the 

municipalities in 
the district 
through an 
approach that is 
systematic and 
disciplined 

Internal Audit 

Compile the Risk 
based audit plans 
(RBAP) for the local 
municipalities in 
terms of the Service 
Level Agreements 
and submit to the 
local municipalities 
by 30 June 

Number of plans 
submitted 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 


Page 85 
















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

To provide an 
independent 
and objective 
internal audit 
assurance and 
consulting 
service to add 
value and to 
improve the 
administrative 
operations of all 
the 

municipalities in 
the district 
through an 
approach that is 
systematic and 
disciplined 

Internal Audit 

Review the 3 year 
Strategic Audit Plans 
of applicable local 
municipalities and 
submit to the Audit 
Committee by 30 
June 

Reviewed 3 year 
Strategic Audit plans 
submitted to the AC 
by 30 June annually 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

To provide an 
independent 
and objective 
internal audit 
assurance and 
consulting 
service to add 
value and to 
improve the 
administrative 
operations of all 
the 

municipalities in 
the district 
through an 
approach that is 
systematic and 
disciplined 

Internal Audit 

Review the 3 year 
Strategic Audit Plan 
and submit to the 
Audit Committee by 

30 November 

Reviewed 3 year 
Strategic Audit plan 
submitted to the AC 
by 30 November 
annually 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

To provide 
disaster 
management 
services to the 
citizens 

Community and 
Social Services 

Complete 
institutional 
assessment to 
determine extend of 
underfunding for 
disaster 
Management 
function and submit 
report to council by 

30 December 2018 

Assessment 
submitted to council 
by 31 December 
2018 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

To provide 
disaster 
management 
services to the 
citizens 

Community and 
Social Services 

Submit application 
for increased funding 
for disaster 
management to 
COGHSTAby 31 
March 

Application 
submitted by 31 
March 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

To provide 
disaster 
management 
services to the 
citizens 

Community and 
Social Services 

Host training session 
by 30 June to train 
volunteers ito 
Disaster 
Management 

Training sessions 
hosted by 30 June 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

To provide 
disaster 
management 
services to the 
citizens 

Community and 
Social Services 

Conduct a risk 
analysis on disaster 
threats in the district 
and submit report on 
analysis to council by 
30 June 

Annually by 30 June 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 


Page 86 



















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

To provide 
disaster 
management 
services to the 
citizens 

Community and 
Social Services 

Review the Disaster 
Management Plan 
annually and submit 
to Council by 30 
June 

Reviewed plan 
annually submitted 
to council by 30 
June 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Investigate the 
possibility of 
introducing an 
electronic reporting 
system for municipal 
health services and 
submit report with 
recommendations to 
council by 30 June 

Report submitted to 
council by 30 June 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Compile monthly 
water quality analysis 
report to local 
municipalities in 
terms of the Water 
quality monitoring 
programme 

Number of reports 
compiled 

96 

96 

96 

96 

96 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Develop Municipal 
Health Services By¬ 
law by 30 June 

By-Law developed 
by 30 June 

n/a 

1 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Submit quarterly 
reports to council on 
municipal health 
services rendered 

Number of reports 
submitted 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Take samples of 
potable water within 
in the district to 
monitor bacterial 
levels 

Number of samples 
taken 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Take samples of 
waste water within in 
the district 

Number of samples 
taken 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Inspect food outlets 
and premises 

Number of 
inspections 

400 

400 

400 

400 

400 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Inspect government 
premises and private 
entities 

Number of 
inspections 

260 

260 

260 

260 

260 


Page 87 






















Strategic 

objective 

Function 

Key Performance 
Indicator 

Unit of 

measurement 

Target 

2017/18 

Target 

2018/19 

Target 

2019/20 

Target 

2020/21 

Target 

2021/22 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Inspect funeral 
undertakers 

Number of 
inspections 

24 

24 

24 

24 

24 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Inspect landfill sites 

Number of 
inspections 

24 

24 

24 

24 

24 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Inspect premises for 
chemical safety 

Number of 
inspections 

684 

684 

684 

684 

684 

To provide 
municipal health 
services to 
improve the 
quality of life of 
the citizens 

Health 

Inspect premises for 
vectors control 

Number of 
inspections 

684 

684 

684 

684 

684 


Page 88 

















Chapter 6: Sectoral Contributions 


Chapter 5 of the Municipal Systems Act (Act 32 of 2000) in particular provides instruction on cooperative governance, 
encouraging municipalities to develop their strategies in line with other organs of state so as to give effect to the five- 
year strategic plan. It goes further to inform that the IDP must link, integrate and coordinate development plans for the 
Municipality. Resources and capacity must align with the implementation of the plan, forming the foundation on which 
the annual budget is based. The plan must also be compatible with national development plans and planning 
requirements binding on the Municipality in terms of legislation. The IDP should therefore serve as a guideline for 
where sector departments allocate their resources at local government level. The Municipality should however also 
take into consideration the sector departments’ policies and programmes when developing its own policies and 
strategies. For this reason is it in the interest of the sector departments to participate in municipal IDP planning 
processes to ensure alignment between programmes. 

The following projects are planned by the various national and provincial sector departments: 

The tables below indicates projects that are planned by the various national and provincial sector departments. 
Unfortunately not all the applicable sector departments submitted information: 


Page 89 





National Sector Projects 


Department of Water and Sanitation 


Town/Area 

Name of Local 
municipality 

Project description 

Purpose 

Budget allocation (R’ooo) 

2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 

Douglas 

Siyancuma 

Douglas Water Treatment 
Works 

Bulk water upgrade 

5150 

21237 

15 000 

Van Wyksvlei 

Kareeberg 

Van WyksVlei Groundwater 

Bulk water upgrade 

30 OOO 

46 824 

0 

De Aar 

Emthanjeni 

De Aar Borehole 
Development 

Bulk water upgrade 

0 

20 000 

6796 

Marydale 

Siyathemba 

Marydale Bulk Water 
Scheme 

Bulk water upgrade 

7 621 

0 

0 

Britstown 

Emthanjeni 

Britstown Oxidation Ponds 

Bulk sewer upgrade 

0 

30 000 

4757 

Campbell 

Siyancuma 

Campbell bulk 
Augmentation 

Bulk water upgrade 

10 000 

0 

0 

Hopetown / 
Strydenburg 

Thembelihle 

Easiflush toilets Installation 
in Hopetown and 
Strydenburg 

Eradication of Sanitation 
backlogs 

4 000 

0 

0 

Vanderkloof 

Renosterberg 

Upgrading of Vanderkloof 
WWTW 

Bulk sewer upgrade 

10 000 

0 

0 

Colesberg 

Umsobomvu 

Colesberg Bulk pipe 
refurbishment 

Refurbishment of bulk 
water pipeline 

4 000 

0 

0 

Victoria West 

Ubuntu 

Victoria West Borehole 
development 

Bulk water Augmentation/ 
source development 

4 000 

0 

0 

De Aar / Britstown 

Emthanjeni 

De Aar Borehole 
refurbishment / Britstown 
Sanitation reticulation 

Refurbishment / Sewer 
reticulation extension 

14 000 

0 

0 

Prieska 

Siyathemba 

ACWS: Water Backlog for 
Siyathemba Municipality 
(Prieska WTW) 

Water backlog 

7 000 

0 

0 

Breipaal 

Siyancuma 

New pumpstation 

Eradication of sanitation 
backlogs 

4 400 

0 

0 


Department of Public Works (Expanded Public Works Programme) 


Project description 

Budget allocation (R’ooo) 

2017/18 

Upgrading of streets in Schmidtsdrift 

790 

Communications Field Worker 

30 

Tourism Worker 

3° 

Renovation of Pixley ka Seme District Building in De Aar 

100 

Administration cost 

50 

Total 

1 000 


Page 90 






































Provincial Sector Projects 


Department of Education 


PROJECT NAME 

LOCAL 

MUNICIPALITY 

SUB- 

PROGRAMME 

MTEF 2018/19 

MTEF 2019/20 

MTEF 2020/21 

MAINTENANCE AND 

REPAIRS - ALL 

SCHOOLS AFFECTED 

ALL LOCAL 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 15 000 000.00 

R 10 000 000.00 

R 10 589 449.54 

SUPPLY AND 

RELOCATION OF 

MOBILES 

ALL LOCAL 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 3 000 000.00 

R 4 800 000.00 

R 3 000 000.00 

VARIOUS SCHOOLS 

ALL LOCAL 

FURNITURE 

R 392 734.33 



ECD EQUIPMENT - ALL 
SCHOOLS AFFECTED 

N/A 

EQUIPMENT 

R 2 000 000.00 



FURNITURE - ALL 
SCHOOLS AFFECTED 

N/A 

FURNITURE 

R 4 000 000.00 

R 4 000 000.00 

R 4 000 000.00 

MOBILE 

CONNECTIONS 

N/A 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 2 000 000.00 



NEIMS ASSESSMENTS 

ALL LOCAL 

NEIMS 

ASSESSMENTS 

R 384 000.00 



NEIMS ASSESSMENTS 

ALL LOCAL 

NEIMS 

ASSESSMENTS 

R 408 000.00 



NEIMS ASSESSMENTS 

ALL LOCAL 

NEIMS 

ASSESSMENTS 

R 492 000.00 



NEIMS ASSESSMENTS 
PROGRAMME 

ALL LOCAL 

NEIMS 

ASSESSMENTS 

R 1 000 000.00 



SCHOOL 

IMPLEMENTED BY V3 
CONSULTING 

ENINEERS 

N/A 

MANAGEMENT 

FEE 

R 5 528 775.00 



SCHOOLS 

IMPLEMENTED BY 

INDEPENDENT 
DEVELOPMENT TRUST 

N/A 

MANAGEMENT 

FEE 

R 10 000 000.00 

R 10 000 000.00 

R 10 000 000.00 

SCHOOLS 

IMPLEMENTED BY ISJX 
GENERAL 

CONSTRUCTORS & 

TRADING 

N/A 

MANAGEMENT 

FEE 

R 4 329 875.00 



SCHOOLS 

IMPLEMENTED BY 

PSP's 

N/A 

MANAGEMENT 

FEE 

R 2 520 000.00 



ALPHA PRIMERE 

SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

FENCING 



R 669 600.00 

ALPHA PRIMERE 

SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

HALL 



R 500 000.00 


Page 91 



























DISTRICT OFFICE - 
PIXLEY KE SEME - DE 
AAR 

EMTHANJENI 

OFFICE 

ACCOMMODATION 

R 1 000 000.00 



EMTHANJENI PUBLIC 
PRIMARY SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

ABLUTION BLOCK 

R 280 913.55 



EMTHANJENI PUBLIC 
PRIMARY SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 



R 750 000.00 

EMTHANJENI PUBLIC 
PRIMARY SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

FENCING 


R 733 330.00 


EMTHANJENII LOCAL 
MUNICPALITY 

EMTHANJENI 

SPORT FACILITIES 

R 2 000 000.00 

R 2 000 000.00 


HANOVER PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 612 900.00 



HAYES PRIMERE 

SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 200 000.00 


HOERSKOOL DE AAR 

EMTHANJENI 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 



R 500 000.00 

HOERSKOOLTHERON 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 321 000.00 



HOERSKOOLTHERON 

EMTHANJENI 

ABLUTION BLOCK 


R 1 160 644.03 


HOERSKOOLTHERON 

EMTHANJENI 

FENCING 


R 450 000.00 


KAREEVILLE PRIMERE 
SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

ABLUTION BLOCK 

R 38 160.00 



LUVUYO PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

FENCING 


R 506 400.00 


MONWABISI HIGH 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 

R 1 800 000.00 



MONWABISI HIGH 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

FENCING 


R 400 000.00 


ORION SEKONDERE 

SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 13 808.00 



ORION SEKONDERE 

SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 750 000.00 


ORION SEKONDERE 

SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

ACCESSABILITY 



R 1 500 000.00 

PHAKAMISANI HIGH 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 200 000.00 



PHAKAMISANI HIGH 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 810 200.00 



PHAKAMISANI HIGH 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

ABLUTION BLOCK 


R 1 160 644.03 


VAN RENSBURG 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 500 000.00 



Page 92 





























VERITAS SEKONDERE 
SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

WATER 

R 36 000.00 



VERITAS SEKONDERE 
SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 416 001.23 



VERITAS SEKONDERE 
SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

ABLUTION BLOCK 



R 1 160 644.03 

VERITAS SEKONDERE 
SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 750 000.00 


WILLIE THERON 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 195 200.00 



ZINGISANI PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 500 000.00 


ZINGISANI PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

EMTHANJENI 

FENCING 


R 400 000.00 


CAREL VAN ZYL 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

KAREEBERG 

ABLUTION BLOCK 

R 491 710.21 



CARNARVON 
SECONDARY SKOOL 

KAREEBERG 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 5 938 450.20 

R 659 827.80 


DELTA PRIMARY 

SKOOL 

KAREEBERG 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 



R 500 000.00 

VAN WYKSVLEI 

INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

KAREEBERG 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 250 000.00 


VAN WYKSVLEI 

INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

KAREEBERG 

FENCING 


R 512 000.00 


KEURTJIEKLOOF 
PRIMERE SKOOL 

RENOSTERBERG 

ABLUTION BLOCK 


R 100 000.00 


PHILLIPSTOWN 

HOERSKOOL 

RENOSTERBERG 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 



R 450 000.00 

REPLACEMENT 

SCHOOL 

PHILLIPSVALE 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

RENOSTERBERG 

REPLACEMENT 

SCHOOL 

R 3 713 492.90 



VISISANI PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

RENOSTERBERG 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 500 000.00 


AALWYN 

INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

WATER 

R 15 751.29 



AALWYN 

INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 19 000.00 



ANDERSON PRIMERE 
SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 



R 450 000.00 

BONGANI 

SECONDARY SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

HALL 

R 72 152.30 



BONGANI PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

ABLUTION BLOCK 

R 3 092.18 




Page 93 




























BONGANI PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 



R 500 000.00 

BUCKLANDS (NGK) 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

WATER 

R 2 000.00 



DOUGLAS 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 300 000.00 


GRANGE PRIMERE 

SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 


R 150 000.00 


GRIQUATOWN 

INTERMEDIATE 

SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 



R 800 000.00 

HOERSKOOL 

RIVERSIDE 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 300 000.00 


HOERSKOOL 

WESLAAN 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 550 000.00 


IKAGENG 

INTERMEDIERE 

SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 


R 350 000.00 


IKAGENG 

INTERMEDIERE 

SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 50 000.00 


KARRIKAMA 

HOERSKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 500 000.00 

R 500 000.00 

MORESON 

INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

ABLUTION BLOCK 



R 1 107 771.00 

MORESON 

INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 



R 350 000.00 

NEW SCHOOL - VAAL 
ORANJE PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

NEW SCHOOL 

R 9 884 720.26 

R 28 830 434.08 

R 16 474 533.76 

PRIESKA PRIMERE 

SKOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 1 500 000.00 


SALT LAKE PRIMARY 
SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 500 000.00 



SONSKYN 

INTERMEDIATE 

SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 450 000.00 


VOLOP INTERMEDIATE 
SCHOOL 

SIYANCUMA 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 1 000 000.00 


GARIEP HIGH SCHOOL 

SIYATHEMBA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 3 250 000.00 



JJ DREYER PRIMERE 
SKOOL 

SIYATHEMBA 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 300 000.00 



PRIESKA 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

SIYATHEMBA 

TECHNICAL 

WORKSHOP 

R 600 000.00 

R 2 400 000.00 


HOPETOWN 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

THEMBELIHLE 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 2 000 000.00 



NEW SCHOOL 

STEYNSVILLE 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

THEMBELIHLE 

NEW SCHOOL 

R 19 163 442.44 

R 4 790 860.61 



Page 94 





























ORANJE DIAMANT 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

THEMBELIHLE 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 



R 300 000.00 

STRYDENBURG 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

THEMBELIHLE 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 507 000.00 



STRYDENBURG 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

THEMBELIHLE 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 

R 2 300 000.00 



HOERSKOOL 

RICHMOND 

UBUNTU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 13 200.00 



HOERSKOOL 

RICHMOND 

UBUNTU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 79 468.59 



HOERSKOOL 

RICHMOND 

UBUNTU 

WATER 

R 484 826.00 



HOERSKOOL 

RICHMOND 

UBUNTU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 6 465 807.31 



IKHAYA PRIMARY 

SCHOOL RELOCATED 
FROM HOERSKOOL 

HARTSWATER 

UBUNTU 

CLASSROOM 

BLOCK 

R 12 768 578.95 

R 3 648 165.42 

R 1 824 082.71 

JJ BOOYSEN PRIMERE 
SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 275 849.20 



JJ BOOYSEN PRIMERE 
SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

REPLACEMENT 

SCHOOL 

R 9 048 400.38 

R 17 899 543.37 

R 18 294 058.15 

JOHN ROSSOUW 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

ECD CLASSROOM 

R 1 025 310.89 



JOHN ROSSOUW 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

ABLUTION BLOCK 



R 899 919.65 

MELTON WOLD 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 35 364.80 



VAN DER 

WALTSPOORT 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 


R 500 000.00 


VAN DER 

WALTSPOORT 

PRIMERE SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 350 000.00 


VICTORIA-WES 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

UBUNTU 

CLASSROOM 

BLOCK 


R 2 000 000.00 

R 2 833 145.46 

VICTORIA-WES 
INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 
(HIGH SCHOOL) 

UBUNTU 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 101 160.00 



COLESBERG PUBLIC 
PRIMARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 800 000.00 


ENOCH MTHETHO 

SECONDARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

WATER 

R 61 240.00 



ENOCH MTHETHO 

SECONDARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

ABLUTION BLOCK 


R 1 457 771.00 


ENOCH MTHETHO 

SECONDARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

ASBESTOS 



R 750 000.00 


Page 95 




























EUREKA 

INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

CLASSROOM 

BLOCK 


R 4 625 625.00 


IKHWEZI LOKUSA 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

ECD CLASSROOM 

R 175 005.83 



IKHWEZI LOKUSA 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 

R 1 695 023.74 



IKHWEZI LOKUSA 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

WATER 



R 450 000.00 

LOWRYVILLE 
INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

ABLUTION BLOCK 


R 1 107 771.00 


LOWRYVILLE 
INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

REPAIRS & 

RENOVATIONS 


R 500 000.00 


NORVALSPONT 

INTERMEDIATE 

SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 1 250 000.00 

R 1 250 000.00 

NOUPOORT 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 750 000.00 


NOUPOORT 

GEKOMBINEERDE 

SKOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

WATER 


R 456 609.90 


REPLACEMENT 

SCHOOL - EUREKA 
INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

REPLACEMENT 

SCHOOL 



R 1 243 174.02 

SS MADIKANE 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
PREVENTATIVE 


R 1 000 000.00 

R 500 000.00 

UMSO HIGH SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

WATER 

R 152 125.00 



UMSO HIGH SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 458 000.00 



UMSO HIGH SCHOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 

R 750 000.00 

R 2 250 000.00 


VLUGFONTEIN 
INTERMEDIERE SKOOL 

UMSOBOMVU 

MAINTENANCE - 
CORRECTIVE 


R 250 000.00 


REPLACEMENT 

SCHOOL - VICTORIA 
WEST PRIMARY 

SCHOOL 


REPLACEMENT 

SCHOOL 



R 1 322 659.09 


Page 96 























Department of Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs: Human 
Settlement Grant Allocation 


The Department has made the following Human Settlement grant allocations for the 2018/19 financial year: 


Town 

Purpose 

Subsidies 

Budge(R) 

Developer 

Dalton (177) 

Environmental 

Impact 

Assessment 


R 350 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Douglas Breipal (100) 

Geotechnical 

Investigation & 

Internal services 


R4 898 500.00 

COGHSTA 

Petrusville 

Military 

Veterans 

1 

R188 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Phillipstown 

Military 

Veterans 

1 

R188 000.00 

COGHSTA 

De Aar 

Top Structures 

2 (MV) 

R 376 000.00 

COGHSTA 

De Aar 

Internal Services 

400 

R18 200 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Hanover 

Top Structures 

165 

R22 000 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Norvalspont 

Planning 

- 

R 140 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Noupoort 

Top Structures 

14 

R1 800 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Loxton 

Geotechnical 

Investigations 

& EIA 


R300 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Hopetown 

Retention 

- 

R500 000.00 

COGHSTA 

Strydenburg 

Geotechnical 

Investigations 

& EIA 

63 

R400 000.00 

COGHSTA 


Page 97 





















Department of Economic Development and Tourism 


Name of Local municipality 

Project description 

Budget allocation (R'ooo) 

2017/18 

Ubuntu/ Emthanjeni/ Umsobomvu 

Karoo Highlands Route Road Signs 

400 

Ubuntu 

VIC N 12 Route 

100 

Kareeberg 

SKA Science Visitor Centre Commercial 
Feasibility 

400 

Siyancuma 

Chaap Extreme Festival 

20 

Siyancuma/ Renosterberg/ Emthanjeni/ 
Umsobomvu/ Ubuntu 

N 12 Route Sign Survey & Application 

500 

All municipalities 

Local Government Tourism Policy Makers 
Training in Uppington 

92 

Umsobomvu 

Community Tourism awareness outreach 
programme in Colesberg 

44 

Pixley ka Seme 

Events management training 

80 

Kareeberg 

Community Tourism awareness outreach 
programme in Carnarvon 

37 


Department of Health 



Facility Name 

Projets done by Public 

Works 

Projects done by 

National 

Projects done by IDT 

1 

Strydenberg Clinic 

7 

V 


2 

Britstown Clinic 

V 



3 

Wege Clinic 

V 



4 

L Adams Clinic 

V 



5 

Vosburg Clinic 

V 



6 

Van Wyksvlei Clinic 

V 

V 


7 

Masibambane Clinic 

V 



8 

Kleurtjieskloof Clinic 

V 



9 

Eurakavile Clinic 

V 

V 


10 

Hanover Clinic 

V 



11 

De Aar Clinic 

V 



12 

K.E Twani Clinic 

V 



13 

De Aar Town Clinic 

V 



14 

Niekershoop Clinic 

V 



15 

Breipaal Clinic 

V 

V 


16 

Cambe Clinic 

V 



17 

Griekwastard Clinic 

V 


V 

18 

Richmond 




19 

Kuyasa Clinic 


V 


20 

Petrusville Clinic 


V 


21 

Montana Clinic 


V 


22 

Nouport Clinic 



V 

23 

Douglas Clinic 



V 

24 

Prieska ClinicV 



V 


Page 98 















































Department of Rural Develoment and Land Reform 


KPI 

Target 

2018/19 

Municipal 

area 

Projects 
to be 

implemted 

Planned 

budgets 

Responsib 

le 

directorate 

Support 

Number of 
infrastructure 
projects facilitated 
for production 

1 

Siyathemba 

Driehoek 
(poverty node 
Marydale) 

R4 000 000.00 

RID 

PKS DM/ 
Siyathemba 

Number of agri-park 
infrastructure 
projects Facilited 

1 

Renosterber 

g 

Petrusville 

Tannery 

R1 500 000.00 

RID 

PKS DM/ 
Renosterber 

g 

Number of new 
agricultural 
enterprises 
supported in the 44 
districts aligned to 
agri-parks 

4 

Siyancuma 

Umsobomvu 

Umsobomvu 

Siyancuma 

1. Barley trust 
small stock 
production 
project 

2. nouport 
project 

3. colesberg 
livestock 
enterprise 

4. Tasset poultry 

R1 200 000.00 

R1 200 000.00 

R1 200 000.00 

R2 200 000.00 

REID 

PKS DM/ 

Siyancuma 

Umsobomvu 

Number of hectors 
acquired 

4 268 HA 

Siyancuma 

Farm Nr. 114 
and 115 hay 
district (De Hoek 
and Melkvlei) 

R6 032 600.00 

SLA 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 

Number of HA 
allocated to 
smallhilder farmes 

4 268 HA 

Siyathemba 

Farm Nr. 114 
and 115 hay 
district (De Hoek 
and Melkvlei) 

R6 032 600.00 

SLA 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 

Number of HA 
acquired through 
strengthening 
relative rights 
programme 

7 039.024 

2 HA 

Siyathemba 

Soetvlei 

R30 641 500.0 

0 

SLA 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 

Number of 
restitution farms 
supported through 
post settlement 
support 

1 

Siyancuma 

Katlani and 
Marxelfontein 

R4 500.000.00 

RADP 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 

Number of ALHA 
farms supported 
with on farm 
infrastructure 

3 

Siyancuma 

Valplan 

Kleindoorinpan 

Clifton 

48 554 000.00 

RADP 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 

CPA's compliant 
with legislation 

8 

Siyathemba 

Siyancuma 

Siyancuma 

Siyathemba 

Siyancuma 

Siyancuma 

Siyancuma 

Koegas 

Marzelfontein 

Bucklands 

Fetogang 

CKII Adam Kok 
Kock family 

Naras 

Schmidsdrift 

Goods & 
service budget 

LTA 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 

% of complaint 

CPA's established 

100% per 

request 

received 

Depend of 
request 

Depend of 
request 

Goods & 
service budget 

LTA 

PKS DM 

% of ULTRA 
projects facilited 
and finalised 

100% per 

request 

received 

Depend of 
request 

Depend of 
request 

Goods & 
service budget 

LTA 

PKS DM 


Page 99 






















KPI 

Target 

2018/19 

Municipal 

area 

Projects 
to be 

implemted 

Planned 

budgets 

Responsib 

le 

directorate 

Support 

Number of skills 
development 
opportunities 
provided to 

NARYSEC youth 

60 

Ubuntu 

Emthanjeni 

Thembelihle 

Siyathemba 

Siyancuma 

Kareeberg 

Umsobomvu 

Renosterber 

g 

Solar geyser (1) 
Security 

management (4) 
Disaster 

management ((7) 
Business 
administration 
(12) 

ECD (15) 

ODETDP (6) 
Transport 
Operation (9) 

R1 9000 

000.00 

National 

youth 

services 

corps 

(NARYSEC) 

PKS DM 

Ubuntu 

Emthanjeni 

Thembelihle 

Siyathemba 

Siyancuma 

Kareeberg 

Umsobomvu 

Renosterber 

g 

Number of 

NARYSEC youth 
absorbed into work 
programmes 

9 

All 

Municipalitie 

s 

n/a 

Goods & 
services 
budget 

National 

youth 

services 

corps 

(NARYSEC) 

PKS DM/ all 

08 LM 

Number of land 
claims finalized 

1 

Thembelihle 

Hopetown - Die 
Blok 

R36 825.00 

Regional 
land claims 
commission 
(RLCC) 

PKS DM/ 
Thembelihle 

Number of 

development 

projects 

1 

Siyancuma 

Cammpbell rights 
based 

dispossession 

R1 000 000.00 

Regional 
land claims 
commission 
(RLCC) 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 

Number of phased 
projects approved 

1 

Siyancuma 

Bucklands phase 

2 

R15 000 000.0 

0 

Regional 
land claims 
commission 
(RLCC) 

PKS DM/ 
Siyancuma 


Department of Water and Sanitation 



Name of 



Budget allocation 

Town/Area 

Local 

municipalit 

y 

Project description 

Purpose 

2018/19 

2019/20 

2020/21 

Britstown 

Emthanjeni 

WWTW 

RBIG 

R26 689 000 

0 

0 

De Aar 

Emthanjeni 

Borehole Development 

RBIG 

R20 000 000 

0 

0 

Britstown 

Emthanjeni 

Sewer reticulation phase2 

WSIG 

R9 500 000 

0 

0 

Van 

Wyksvlei 

Kareeberg 

Bulk water supply 

RBIG 

R46 824 000 

0 

0 

Carnarvon 

Kareeberg 

Bonteheuwel Reservoir 
Connection 

WSIG R5 000 000 

0 

0 

Vosburg 

Replacement of AC pipes 
Phase 2 

Phillipstown 

Renosterber 

g 

Replacement of Outfall 
sewer 

WSIG 

R5 500 000 

0 

0 

Douglas 

Siyancuma 

Upgrade of WTW 

RBIG 

R12 000 000 

0 

0 

Breipal 

Siyancuma 

Upgrading of Sewer pump¬ 
station 

WSIG 

R7 500 000 

0 

0 

Marydale 

Siyathemba 

Bulkwater supply 

RBIG 

R5 948 000 

0 

0 

Prieska 

Siyathemba 

Refurbishment/upgrade of 
WWTW 

WSIG 

R7 500 000 

0 

0 


Page 100 






































Hopetown 

Thembelihle 

Construction of storage 
reservoir and AC pipes 
replacement 

WSIG R6 000 000 

0 

0 

Hopetown 

and 

Strydenber 

9 

Construction of Easiflush 
toilets: 250 

Victoria 

West 

Ubuntu 

Water supply 

WSIG 

R4 000 000 

0 

0 

Khayelitsha 

Umsobomvu 

Upgrading Sewer network 
phase 1 

WSIG 

R10 000 000 

0 



PROJECT 

DISTRICT 

WSA/IA 

PROJEC 
T COST 

R 000 

RBIG 

COMMIT 

MENT 

R 000 

TRANSFE 
RED TO 
DATE 

R 000 

ALLOCATI 

ON 

2017/18 

R 000 

PROPOSE 
D 2018/19 

R 000 

RE¬ 
ALLOCATE 
N 2018/19 

R 000 

COMMENTS 

SCHEDULE 5B PROJECTS 

Van WyksVIei 
Groundwater 

PIXLEY KA 
SEME 

KAREEBERG 

91 824 

91 824 

15 000 

15 000 

46 824 

0 

R 30 mil transferred not spent 

Britstown 

Oxidation 

Ponds 

PIXLEY KA 
SEME 

EMTHANJENI 

34 757 

34 757 

0 

0 

26 689 

26 689 

IA submit the Co-funding 
commitment letter by April 2018 

Noupoort Bulk 
Water Scheme 

PIXLEY KA 
SEME 

UMSOBOMVU 

91 472 

70 434 

70 434 

0 

0 

3 745 

Construction 

Marydale Bulk 
Water Scheme 

PIXLEY KA 
SEME 

SIYATHEMBA 

8 831 

7 621 

0 

0 

5 948 

7 621 

R2 mil project is complete in 2018/19 

Douglas Water 
Treatment 
Works 

PIXLEY KA 
SEME 

SIYANCUMA 

95 172 

84 075 

750 

750 

12 000 

R1 800 

Design, IA not able to secure Co¬ 
funding 

De Aar 
Borehole 
Development 

PIXLEY KA 
SEME 

EMTHANJENI 

43 734 

26 796 

0 

0 

15 000 

0 

IRS 


Unfunded Projects 

The table below indicates the Municipality’s unfunded projects: 


Project description 

Name of applicable 
local municipality 

Name of applicable 
area 

Estimated cost of the 
project 

R 

Adapt to the shift of grain (maize, wheat& 
barley) production area towards east RSA 

All Municipalities 

All Areas 

4 200 000 

Minimise negative health impacts on livestock 
due to decreases in rainfall and reduction in 
herbage yields 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

3 000 000 

Loss of biodiversity and degradation habitat due 
to significant land change which impacts on 
ability to respond to climate change 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

1 000 000 

Changes in rainfall and temperature are likely to 
impact on wetlands and the ecosystem services 
they provide 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 


Page 101 









































Project description 

Name of applicable 
local municipality 

Name of applicable 
area 

Estimated cost of the 
project 

R 

Manage and minimise the impacts of increased 
storms events such as drowning, injuries and 
population displacement 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

2 000 000 

Contain the spread of vector borne diseases 
from mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies into regions 
bordering existing malaria areas that are 
currently too cold for transmission 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

Manage the increasing water borne and 
communicable diseases(typhoid fever, cholera 
& hepatitis) 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

Manage the increasing occupation health 
problems 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

Minimise potential increased impacts on 
strategic infrastructure 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

Manage potential decreased income from 
tourism 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

1 000 000 

Manage decreased quality of drinking water 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

3 300 000 

Manage the quality of water available for 
irrigation and drinking 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

1 100 000 

Coordinate climate change response in the 
Municipality so that climate change is integrated 
across all departments & is prioritised 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

To ingrate climate change adaption into 
municipal strategies & plans like the IDP & SDF 
so that it is prioritised across different sectors 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

Secure financial resources to respond to 
climate change 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

Build human capacity to respond to climate 
change 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 

To ensure that information & build awareness 
on climate change 

All Municipalities 

All Towns 

Still to be determined 


Page 102 





















Chapter 7: Financial Plan 


7.3 Financial Framework 


7.3.1 Operating Budget: Revenue and Expenditure 

The table below indicates the revenue budget by source and the expenditure budget per mSCOA function: 




Budget 


Description 


R 



2017/18 

2018/19 

2019/20 

Revenue by Source 

Interest earned - external investments 

716 468 

600 000 

500 000 

Other revenue 

2 495 039 

886 000 

609 050 

Rental of facilities 

100 714 

80 000 

85 000 

Agency services 

3 177 656 

3 446 000 

3 618 260 

Transfers recognised - operational 

49 929 942 

51 553 000 

54 839 734 

Transfers recognised - capital (Ubuntu MIG 
included) 

- 

13 980 000 

3 434 0000 

Total Revenue 

56 419 819 

70 545 000 

63 086 044 

Operating Budget: Expenditure per mSCOA function 

Executive and Council 

10 032 407 

11 477 940 

11 575 675 

Finance and Administration 

14 078 114 

13 463 305 

14 053 266 

Internal Audit 

4 470 613 

5 299 439 

6 155 655 

Corporate Services 

8 069 013 

9 107 751 

9 725 466 

Public Safety 

2 815 158 

2 947 990 

3 385 071 

Housing 

2 043 453 

2 612710 

2 341 215 

Health 

4 017 093 

5 352 850 

5 797 983 

Planning and Development 

11 948 786 

17 427 685 

8 212 535 

Total Expenditure 

57 474 637 

67 689 670 

62 146 866 

Surplus/deficit for the Year 

1 054 818 

2 855 330 

939 178 


7.3.2 Operating Budget: Revenue by Department and Division 






Budget 




Department 

Division 



R 






2017/18 

% 

2018/19 

% 

2019/20 

% 

Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice 

Council Expenses 

Council 

3 160 000 

6.9 

3 350 000 

7.3 

3 484 000 

7.7 

Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with legislative requirements to achieve a favorable 

audit outcome 

Finance 

Budget and Treasury 
Office 

46 199 421 

483 

52 135 288 

54.4 

54 640 044 

54.3 

To provide disaster management services to the citizens 

Corporate Services 

Emergency and Disaster 
Management 

350 000 

0.8 

389 000 

0.7 

246 000 

0.7 

Guide local municipalities in the development of their IDP’s and in spatial development 


Page 103 





































































Budget 




Department 

Division 



R 






2017/18 

% 

2018/19 

% 

2019/20 

% 

Infrastructure, Housing, 
Planning and Development 

Infrastructure 

Development 







Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 

Infrastructure, Housing, 
Planning and Development 

Housing 

2 282 845 

1.6 

720 000 

1.4 


1.3 

Promote economic growth in the district 

Infrastructure, Housing, 
Planning and Development 

Infrastructure 
Development(RAMS and 
EPWP) 

4 326 838 

8.7 

13 871 000 

5.9 

4 281 000 

6.0 

Total Revenue 

56 419 819 

100 

70 545 288 

100 

63 086 044 

100 


Table 1: Operating Budget: Revenue by Department and Division 


7.3.3 Operating Budget: Expenditure by Department and Division 


Department 

Division 

Budget 

R 



2017/18 

% 

2018/19 

% 

2019/20 

% 

(A) Compliance with the tenets of good governance as prescribed by legislation and best practice 

Council Expenses 

Council 

8 199 750 

17.2 

9 440 685 

1.7 

9 422 842 

1.7 

Office of the Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the Municipal 
Manager 

1 832 657 

3.4 

2 037 255 

3.4 

2 152 833 

3.6 

(B) To provide an independent and objective internal audit assurance and consulting service to add value and to improve 
the administrative operations of all the municipalities in the district through an approach that is systematic and 

disciplined 

Internal Audit 

Internal Audit 

4 470 613 

8.2 

5 299 439 

8.2 

6 155 655 

8.3 

(C) To provide a professional, people centered human resources and administrative service to citizens, staff and Council 

Corporate Services 

Human Resources 

8 069 013 

15.4 

9 107 751 

15.4 

9 725 466 

15.4 

(D) Administer finances in a sustainable manner and strive to comply with legislative requirements to achieve a 

favourable audit outcome 

Finance 

Budget and Treasury Office 

14 078 114 

19.6 

13 463 305 

19.3 

14 053 266 

19.1 

(E) To provide disaster management services to the citizens 

Corporate Services 

Emergency and Disaster 
Management 

2 815 158 

4.9 

2 947 990 

5.0 

3 385 071 

4.9 

(F) Guide local municipalities in the development of their IDP’s and in spatial development 

Infrastructure, Housing, 
Planning and Development 

Development and 
Infrastructure 

3 983 505 

8.3 

4 206 285 

8.6 

3 953 205 

8.5 

(G) Monitor and support local municipalities to enhance service delivery 

Infrastructure, Housing, 
Planning and Development 

Housing 

2 043 453 

6.0 

2612710 

6 

2 341 215 

6.3 

(H) To provide municipal health services to improve the quality of life of the citizens 

Corporate Services 

Municipal Health Services 

4 017 093 

8.1 

5 352 850 

8.2 

5 797 983 

8.2 

(1) Promote economic growth in the district 

Infrastructure, Housing, 
Planning and Development 

Development and 
Infrastructure 

7 965 281 

9.0 

13 221 400 

8.6 

4 259 330 

8.8 

Total Expenditure 

57 474 637 

100 

67 689 670 

100 

62 146 866 

100 


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Capital Budget 


The municipality did not budget for any capital projects for the next three years. 

7.2 Grants 

7.2.1 Allocations in terms of the Division of Revenue Bill (DORA) 


Grant 

2017/18 

R 

2018/19 

R 

2019/20 

R 

Purpose 

FMG 

1 250 000 

1 505 000 

1 765 000 

Improve financial 
systems 

Levy replacement 

21 043 000 

27 6176 000 

28 428 000 

Financing of 
administration 

Councilor 

Remuneration 

3 160 000 

3 347 000 

3 534 000 

Financing of 
Councilor allowances 

Equitable Share 

15 659 000 

16 733 000 

17 383 000 

Financing of 
administration 

EPWP 

1 000 000 

0 

0 

Job creation 

RAMS 

3 003 000 

3 173 000 

3 356 000 

Upgrading and 
maintenance of rural 
roads 

Total 

45 115 000 

52 375 600 

54 466 000 



7.2.2 Allocations in terms of the Provincial Gazette 


Grants 

2017 / 18 s 

2018/19S 

2019/20B 

Purposes 

NEAR-Systemo 

350-OOOn 

368-0000 

389-0000 

Maintenance-of-N EAR- 
Systemso 

Housing-Accreditations 

720-000n 

On 

On 

Housing-Delivery- 

Administrationo 

Totals 

1 - 070 * 000 n 

368-000B 

389-0000 

H 


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Page 106 




Chapter 8: Performance Management 


Performance management is a strategic approach to management, which is aimed at equipping leaders, 
managers, workers and stakeholders at different levels with a set of tools and techniques to regularly plan, 
continuously monitor, periodically measure and review performance of the organization in terms of indicators and 
targets for efficiency, effectiveness and impact. It is a requirement for local government in terms of the MSA which 
requires all municipalities to: 

« Develop a performance management system; 

« Set targets, monitor and review performance based indicators linked to their IDP; 

as Publish an annual report on performance for the councilors, staff, the public and other spheres of government; 

« Incorporate and report on a set of general indicators prescribed nationally by the minister responsible for local 
government; 

» Conduct an internal audit on performance before tabling the report; 

as Have their annual performance report audited by the Auditor-General; and, 

as Involve the community in setting indicators and targets and in reviewing municipal performance. 

Performance Management System 

Performance information indicates how well a Municipality is meeting its aims and objectives, and which policies and 
processes are working. Making the best use of available data and knowledge is crucial for improving the execution of 
its mandate. Performance information is key for effective management, including planning, budgeting, and 
implementation, monitoring and reporting. Performance information also facilitates effective accountability, enabling 
councillors, members of the public to track progress, identify the scope for improvement and better understand the 
issues involved. 

The Municipality delivers services essential to the well-being and development of the communities. To ensure that 
service delivery is as efficient and economical as possible; municipalities are required to formulate strategic plans, 
allocate resources to the implementation of those plans, and monitor and report the results. Performance information 
is essential to focus the attention of the public and oversight bodies on whether municipalities are delivering value for 
money, by comparing their performance against their budgets and service delivery plans, and to alert managers to 
areas where corrective action is required. 

Legislative requirements 

Outlined in Section 40 of the MSA, municipalities must establish mechanisms to monitor and review its performance 
management system (PMS) to measure, monitor, review, evaluate and improve performance at organisational, 
departmental and employee levels. Section 34 of the MSA furthermore points out that the IDP has to be reviewed on 
an annual basis, and that during the IDP review process the Key Performance Areas, Key Performance Indicators and 
Performance Targets be reviewed and this review will form the basis for the review of the organisational performance 
management and performance contracts of Section 57 managers. 

The Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations (2001) stipulates that a “Municipality’s 
performance management system entails a framework that describes and represents how the Municipality’s cycle and 
processes of performance planning, monitoring, measurement, review, reporting and improvement will be conducted, 
organised and managed, including determining the roles of the different role-players”. 


Page 107 





Performance Management Framework 

The Performance Management Framework of the Municipality is reflected in the diagram below: 



Organisational Performance Management Linked to Individual Performance 
Management 

The MSA requires the Municipality to establish a PMS that is commensurate with its resources; best suited to its 
circumstances and in line with the IDP. It is required to create a culture of performance throughout the Municipality. 

The PMS should obtain the following core elements: 

» Setting of appropriate performance indicators; 

* Setting of measurable performance targets; 

» Agree on performance measurement; 

« Performance monitoring, reviewing and evaluation; 

« Continuous performance improvement; 
as Regular performance reporting; and 
» Intervention where required. 


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Corporate Performance 



The performance of the Municipality is evaluated by means of a municipal scorecard (Top Layer SDBIP) at 
organisational level and through the service delivery budget implementation plan (SDBIP) at directorate and 
departmental levels. The Top Layer SDBIP set our consolidated service delivery targets and provides and overall 
picture of performance for the Municipality as a whole, reflecting performance on its strategic priorities. 

The departmental SDBIP captures the performance of each defined department which reflects on the strategic 
priorities of the Municipality. The SDBIP provides the detail of each outcome for which the senior management is 
responsible for, in other words, a comprehensive picture of the performance of each directorate/sub-directorate. 

Individual Performance: Senior Managers 

Performance agreements are concluded with the Municipal Manager and the Section 57 managers annually and 
includes the following: 

« Key performance indicators of the approved Top Layer SDBIP to ensure seamless integration with the IDP, 
budget and SDBIP; and 

» Core Competencies in terms of Regulation 21 of 17 January 2014. 

In terms of the legislative requirements: 

as Performance evaluations are conducted quarterly, with the first and third quarter only verbal. The second and 
fourth quarter is formal evaluations 
« The formal assessments are conducted by a panel 
® Record must be kept of formal evaluations 

as The overall evaluation report and results must be submitted to Council 

as Copies of any formal evaluation of the MM is sent to the MEC for Local Government 


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Performance Reporting 


Performance is reported on a regular basis and it includes the evaluation of performance, the identification of poor 
performance and corrective actions to improve performance. 

Quarterly Reports 

Reports on the performance in terms of the Top Level SDBIP are compiled and submitted to Council. This report is 
published on the municipal website on a quarterly basis. 

Mid-Year Assessment 

The performance of the first six months of the financial year should be assessed and reported on in terms of Section 
72 of the MFMA. This assessment must include the measurement of performance, the identification of corrective 
actions and recommendations for the adjustment of KPI's, if necessary. 

This report is submitted to the Mayor for approval before 25 January of each year and the Mayor submit the report to 
Council by 31 January of each year. The report is furthermore published on the municipal website. 

Annual Assessment 

The performance of the financial year should be assessed at year-end in terms of Section 46 of the MSA. The 
performance in terms of the annual targets set will be documented in the Annual Performance Report and the report 
will be finalized and submitted to the Office of the Auditor-General by 30 August annually. This report will be included 
in the Annual Report of the Municipality. The Annual Report is submitted to Council for approval before 25 January of 
each year and published for comment on the municipal website. 


MEC Comments from the IDP Engagement conducted on the 22 - 26 May 

2017 


1. Executive Summary 

The executive summary clearly articulates the municipal staus quo, challenges and achievements. 

2. Spatial Developemnt Framework (SDF) 

The SDF needs to be reviewed and alined with SPLUMA, the SDF is partially SPLUMA compliant and the 

Municipality did not budget for the SDF review for the next three financial years. 

3. Environmental Consideration 

IDP did not include the AQMP - the Municipality doesn’t have AQMP in place 

IDP makes no reference to the EMP - the Municipality doesn’t have EMP in place 

4. Local Economic Development 

The Municipality did not provide an LED/IDP component for DEDat - the LED component for Pixley has not been 

done yet, a request has been sent for assistance during 2018/2019 financial year. 

NB: No IDP engadgements was held during 2018/2019 IDP. 


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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 


AG 

Auditor-General 

AFS 

Annual Financial Statements 

CAPEX 

Capital Expenditure 

CFO 

Chief Financial Officer 

COGHSTA 

Department of Cooperative Governance, Human settlements and Traditional Affairs 

DWA 

Department of Water Affairs 

EE 

Employment Equity 

EPWP 

Extended Public Works Programme 

DGDS 

District Growth and Development Strategy 

HR 

Human Resources 

IDP 

Integrated Development Plan 

KPI 

Key Performance Indicator 

LED 

Local Economic Development 

LGSETA 

Local Government Sector Education Training Authority 

MFMA 

Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56 of 2003) 

MIG 

Municipal Infrastructure Grant 

MM 

Municipal Manager 

MSA 

Municipal Systems Act No. 32 of 2000 

NGO 

Non-governmental organisation 

NT 

National Treasury 

OPEX 

Operating expenditure 

PMS 

Performance Management System 

PT 

Provincial Treasury 

SALGA 

South African Local Government Association 

SCM 

Supply Chain Management 

SDBIP 

Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 

SDF 

Spatial Development Framework 

WPSP 

Workplace Skills Plan 


Page 111 


Final Integrated Development Plan 2019/2020 


Page 112