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WAR RECORD 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ISLIP 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2011 with funding from 
The Library of Congress 



http://www.archive.org/details/warrecordoftownoOOwick 



WAR RECORD 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ISLIP 

Long Island, New York 



,««^^«M., 







WORLD WAR 

1917-1918 



^ 



Dedicated to the American Soldiers, of whom 
General Pershing said: 



'to 



'^^Finally, I pay the supreme tribute to our 
officers and soldiers of the line. Wlien I think 
of their heroism, their patience under hardship, 
their unflinching spirit of offensive action, I am 
filled with emotion which I am unable to express. 
Their deeds are immortal and they have earned 
the eternal gratitude of our country." 



CONTENTS 

Dedication 4 

Portraits of the Town Board and Mr. Wicks 6 

Preface 8 

Foreword. By Rev. William Richard Watson 9 

The White Acres. Poem. By John H. Finley 11 

Memorial Portraits and Records 12 to 19 

In Memoriam 20 

The Army Nurse. By Hiram N. Rosstick 27 

Portraits and Records of Service Men 28 to 127 

Records Without Portraits 128 to 133 

Lists of Other Service Men 134 to 137 

Personal Narratives of Service Men 138 

Portrait of the Draft Board 146 

The Selective Draft. By Ralph S. Pullis 147 

The Air Station at Bay Shore, including Letter of Commander A. C. 

Read 154 

Section Base No. 5, Sayville. By Walter L. Suydam, Jr 161 

The Wireless Station at Sayville. By Lewis H. Noe 163 

The Women Speak. Poem. By Theodosia Garrison 164 

The Patriotic Gardeners. By Mrs. Irving J. Long 165 

Red Cross Record of Islip Township, 1905 to 1919. By Frances Pusey 

Gooch 166 

Portraits and Records of Women Volunteers 168 and 169 

Bay Shore in the Liberty Loans. By Acosta Nichols 170 

The Knights of Columbus. By R. A. Bachia 172 

The Y. M. C. A. Hostess Houses 174 

Entertaining Our Boys in France. By Ruth Rossuck 175 

Four Minute Men. By H. M. Brewster 176 

War from a Soldier's Standpoint 177 

A Soldier Boy's Death 183 

The Influenza Epidemic 184 

War Orphan of the American Legion 188 

American Legion. By Edwin B. Sonner 189 

List of Menln the Coast Guard 190 

War's Effect on the Cost of Living. By Francis Hoag 191 

Civil War Data 194 

Reminiscences 195 to 200 



On the opposite page are the portraits of 

John Westerbeke, Supervisor 
Charles Suydam, Town Clerk 
Daniel D. White, Justice of the Peace 
Joseph A. Moore, Justice of the Peace 
P. R. HuBBS, Justice of the Peace 
Frank Nohwell, Justice of the Peace 

The town board who voted to submit the ques- 
tion of an appropriation of $4,000 to defray the 
cost of this book. Also the portrait of Perry S. 
Wicks, who was appointed to compile the book. 
At his own suggestion his compensation was fixed 
at one dollar. 



PREFACE 



rr^HIS book originated in a desire to show the gratitude felt by the people of the 
J- town of Islip toward the young men and young women who helped to make 
the world safe for democracy. 

In January, 1919, Mr. Perry S. Wicks, President of the Southside Bank, pub- 
lished a letter in the Bay Shore Journal suggesting that it would be eminently fitting 
for the Town of Islip to publish a memorial of the Great World War in the form of 
a book giving the records of the men from this vicinity and setting forth the various 
local activities incident to the war. In August Mr. Wicks appeared before the town 
board and asked for an appropriation of four thousand dollars for such a memorial. 
The board gladly laid the matter before the voters, and in November the appropria- 
tion was voted. Mr. Wicks was appointed to have full charge of the compilation of 
the records and the publication of the memorial. This book is the result. 

It is to be regretted that out of some nine hundred service men the records of 
only about four hvindred fifty could be obtained. Not a few because of false mod- 
esty or because of a misconception of the purpose of the memorial declined to fur- 
nish their pictures or to give details regarding their service. Through no fault of 
their own, about half of these nine hundred men were in the United States when 
the armistice was declared. These men were every whit as patriotic, every whit as 
brave, as the men who had already had opportunity to show what they could do over- 
seas. While we are honoring the man who saw active service in France, let us not 
forget that the other man did all that was required of him and thus proved himself a 
good soldier. We owe them both a debt of gratitude that can never be discharged. 

The compiler of this work is under great obligation to the many persons who 
have aided him in collecting data, or who have prepared the various articles that' 
appear over their names in this memoriah To mention by name all who have helped 
would be impossible. The work of preparing such a record as this memorial con- 
tains is tremendous. The amount of detailed information given makes it almost cer- 
tain that errors may have crept into the record, yet the compiler dares to hope 
that the book will be found to serve a real purpose and that his labor of love will 
prove not to have been in vain. 

Bay Shore, N. Y., November, 1921. 



FOREWORD 



THE people of the Town of Islip are under a debt of gratitude to the compiler of this 
book, Mr. Perry S. Wicks, who, out of a deep and enthusiastic devotion to the cause 
in which "Our Boys" were participants, and with a keen desire to have the record of their 
service preserved, has spent himself in generous labors to gather together this impressive 
memorial. It comes to us as a labor of love to remind us of the men and the service they 
rendered out of a heart of love for their country and humanity. What we herein possess 
is but a local portraiture and narrative, intensely interesting to us because of the intimate 
personal touch, and yet it transcends the local, for it is of value as part of the detail of 
the wondrous contribution made by every countryside, village, town and city to the vast 
and glorious enterprise that we were called upon to share in and undertake as a people dedi- 
cated to Freedom, Justice and the Rights of Man. 

The most hurried and cursory view of the faces and data of this book will at once cause 
poignant memories, while a close and studied reading is bound to stir again in brain and 
heart something of the passion and the pain, the thrill and temper of the stern and tragic 
years in which we have lived. Great days they were — 'though they brought their hours of 
supreme anxiety and of heartbreak, and the recording of the worst alongside of the best in 
our human nature. We recall the startling disruption of our world seemingly on its way 
to peace among men through the manifold influences wrought by Religion, Science, Art, 
Commerce and Invention. But underneath the apparent amicable ordering of the life of 
men and nations, sinister forces were at work, that challenged the entire world with a 
mighty ambition, and with a power of organization, an arrogance and strength and disci- 
pline that for the moment had Victory almost within their grasp. "The Day" had come in 
which Prussia and all that it stood for appeared to have established its claims and its dreams. 
But the Freemen of the world had to be reckoned with. Loud did the battle roll among 
the hills and plains of France and Flanders, and on that line that stretched from the North 
Sea to the Sands of the River Euphrates. As a nation, we were early counselled to be neu- 
tral, 'though all the while, we could not escape seeing the implications of the conflict, the 
decisive threat to the decencies and dignities of civilization as they had been handed down to 
us. Finally, the obvious intention and determination of the foe could no longer be mis- 
understood and the unmistakable challenge hurled at us found a nation ready to reply 
and respond to humanity's call and need, though far from being prepared to assert its 
power. 

Then began those days of feverish activity, of getting our resources of men and material 
organized to do their part and render their telling efi^ect. One need not go into detail con- 
cerning the splendid achievements. Every man and woman, as well as every boy and girl, 
that lived in those years will "have many memories of the hours tiiat saw boys enlist and 
submit to the Draft that made thenr members of the armed forces of the United States, who 
— on Sea and Land and in the Air — were to defend the cause of Liberty and establish another 
fresh tradition and write another lustrous page in the history of the nation. It would be 
impossible for anyone but the supremely gifted to voice all that lay in the hearts and minds 
of those "Singing warriors" — men and boys a? they mated themselves to the service; and 
how inadequately even the most gifted can pen the words that tell of the pent-up feelings 
of those mothers and fathers and loved ones who saw their boys march and sail away, and 



kept vigil with them as they went through perilous seas, or watched and waited in trench 
and bloody battlefield. How eagerly we waited "News," anticipating the report of splendid 
courage and effective promises, yet anxious and apprehensive, saddened and solemnized by 
the reminders of the costly price of victories won. 

The facts and faces presented here will be to each and every reader reminiscent of the 
great days through which we have lived. The intimate touch will recall the varied personal ex- 
periences. Some gold-starred mothers and fathers will have their wounds reopened as they 
look into this volume, yet — while they sorrow, may they sense the heartfelt sympathy of 
those who recognize the great debt we owe to the unselfish sacrifices so royally mad*. And 
at the same time, may the saddened hearts rejoice with the pride of those who have so 
greatly given to mankind's benefit. Others will see in this book the likeness of one who has 
come back, marked and tinged by a deep and profound experience. Many will prize this 
record as a transcript of a great adventure in their life — to be handed down to a younger 
generation with the befitting pride that comes to one having served in a great cause for the 
world's good. 

But while it stresses and accentuates what these "Our Boys" did and endured, may this 
Volume also recall the fact that behind their every effort and achievement lay the splendid 
services and sacrifices of unnamed men and women, boys and girls who sought to hold up 
the hands of Uncle Sam and were keenly desirous that the "Boys Over There" should not 
lack for anything that would make them able and fit for the battle; console and cheer 
them in the hours of rest and meet their every need in the hour of sickness, wounds and 
death. The years of warfare found us as a nation banded together in the superb spirit of 
co-operation in a conunon task — looking toward one common end and accomplishment, 
welded into a solidarity beyond the dreams of the most ardent patriot and in the face of 
grave questioning and doubt. Through manifold agencies, we shared in the achievement; 
in the Red Cross and War Camp Community Associations, in Liberty Loans and as Can- 
teen Workers and Four Minute Men, as Boy Scouts and Camp Fire Girls and Patriotic 
Gardeners, we were all enlisted in the Great Cause and Shared in the Service. 

This book will recall to us the personal and intimate associations and associates, the 
Service and Servers of a great hour in the nation's and the world's history. But may it do 
more than remind us of what was done and endured; may it be an inspiration to give our- 
selves as freely and finely in the peaceful adventures of Democracy, and lead us to contri- 
bute in temper of mind and worthiness of living, in noble thought and word and deed to 
the better America that should come out of the contentions and consecrations of these tragic 
years. 

WILLIAM RICHARD WATSON 

ST. PETER'S RECTORY, 
BAY SHORE, NEW YORK. 

Memorial Day, 1921 



The White Acres in France 

By JOHN H. FINLEY 




American Cemetery at Belleau Wood 



How many eyes have searched (and some through tears) 
To find the names upon the map of France 
Of these now silent fields where lie their dead — 
Theirs whom the golden stars cannot requite ; 

A prairie mother by her lonely lamp ; 

A schoolgirl over her geography; 

A gray old father proud of his brave loss; 

A wife that was; a wife that was to be. 
How many! And how many thousand lips 
Have learned to speak and love those once strange names: 
"Romagne," "Suresnes" and "Belleau Wood"; 
And "Bony" over in the Flanders fields; 
And all the valiant rest; — become as dear 
As was the name of that vast tumulus 
Of Athens' dead to her. 

And our own dead! 
They are our "cloud of witnesses" in France, 
Whose great white shadows lie upon these hills. 
These vales, in sun and cloud, by day and night. 
And wheresoe'er these white-cross shadows fall. 
There are our "Fields of Honor"; for whene'er 
Earth drew our dying soldiers to herself 
(Soldiers enlisted in Earth's cause of right) 
She gave the ground they touched to their own land: — 
White acres added to America! Paris, 1921. 



-"TTSS^l^t^ 




American Cemetery at Romagne 

(Reprinted by permission of New York limes) 



12 



WAR RECORD OF 



IN MEMORIAM 



J. Frederick Wever 

of Sayville, enlisted in the 302nd Engineers, Com- 
pany D', and served with his regiment in France 
in the A. E. F., with the rank of Sergeant. He 
died on Vesle River in France on Aug. 28, 1918. 



Eniil Joseph Bohm 

of Islip, was inducted into service in December, 
1917, and trained at Camp Upton in Company G, 
of the 305th Infantry 77th Division. He was killed 
in action on the 27th of September, 1918, in the 
Argonne Forest. 



Charles E, Johnson 

of Sayville, was called to service on April 29, 1918, 
and sent to Camp Dix, where he was assigned to 
Battery D, 308th Field Artillery. He sailed for 
France in June and fought in the battle of St. 
Mihiel and the Argonne. He died on Oct. 25, 1918, 
from wounds received in action. 



Joseph Rusy 

of Islip, was inducted into the service on April 1, 
1918, and trained at Camp Upton, Long Island, be- 
ing later transferred to Camp Dix, New Jersey, 
and assigned to Company K, 310th Infantry, 78th 
Division (Lightning Division). On May 14, 1918, 
he sailed for France, arriving in June. On Sept. 
22, about midnight, he went out on a raiding party 
near Thaicom-t, France, and when the raid was 
over and roll call taken, he was missing. His 
comrades were questioned and the Red Cross did 
all they could to find him. When his division re- 
turned, one of his comrades from Central Islip 
said that he saw him fall but could not stop to 
help him. Word was received from Washington 
on Jan. 4, 1919, that he is reported to have been 
killed on Sept. 22, 1918. 



William Balek 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service and 
trained at Camp Upton, Long Island, in the 310th 
Infantry. He fought in the St. Mihiel Offensive 
and Meuse-Argonne Offensive. He was killed in 
action on Oct. 30, 1918. 



Charles E. Boyeson 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on April 16, 1917, at Brook- 
lyn, New York. He died in the hospital there 
of pneumonia on May 26, 1917. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



13 




14 



WAR RECORD OF 



IN MEMORIAM 



Robert S. Raven 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 7th Regiment of 
New York, Company K, and trained at Camp 
Wadsworth, South Carolina. He was appointed 
Corporal on December 15th, 1917. He served over- 
seas with his regiment which had become the 107th 
United States Infantry, Company K. He was killed 
on Sept. 28, 1918 while on dayfight patrol on the 
Hindenburg Line near Le Catelet, France. 



Matias Mandak 

of Bay Shore, volunteered his services in Com- 
pany k, 23rd National Guard Regiment on the 
29th of June, 1917, and was later made Cook in 
Company K, 106th Regiment, 27th Division. He 
trained at Spartanburg, South Carolina. He 
served at the front in Belgium and was killed in 
action on Oct. 2, 1918. 



Richard M. Raven 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 7th Infantry Regi- 
ment, New York, and did service on the Mexican 
border. The regiment was taken into federal ser- 
vice in 1916 and became the 107th Infantry, U. S. 
A., 27th Division. He was promoted from 1st 
Sergeant in Company K, to 2nd Lieutenant, on 
Jan. 30, 1918, at Camp Wadsworth, South Caro- 
lina. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in France. 
He was in command of Company E, 107th Infantry, 
when he was killed at La Raux Farm, near St. 
Souplet, France, on Oct. 18, 1918. 



John Barkenbush 

of West Sayville, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 4, 1918, and sent to Syracuse, New York, for 
special service. He entered the 82nd Company, 
20th Battalion, and was awaiting a transfer from 
Syracuse when he was taken ill with influenza and 
double pneumonia and after being ill only two 
weeks, died on Oct. 13, 1918. He was the only one 
in West Sayville who did not return from service. 



E. Stanley Hart 

of Bay Shore, volunteer. At the time the United 
States declared war with Germany, he was only 
19 years of age. He was rejected by the United 
States Aviation Corps on account of a slight weak- 
ness in one eye. He enlisted in the Royal Flying 
Corps on Sept. 23, 1917, and trained in Canada, 
and also in Texas. He went overseas, arriving at 
Liverpool on April 15th. He trained in various 
camps in England. He was killed on June 5, 191S, 
by a fall in his aeroplane. 



Orazio Romano 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service on 
Feb. 25, 1918, and served in Company I, 308th 
Infantry, at Camp Upton. He sailed for France on 
April 4, 1918. On Oct. 22nd he was killed by a 
bomb explosion. 



THE TOW N OF I SLIP 



15 




16 



W AR RECORD OF 



IN MEMORIAM 



Irving Edward Smith 

of Sayville, enlisted on June 21, 1916, and served 
at Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala., with the 4th 
Regiment, N. G. N. J., as 1st Lieutenant, Company 
M, 113th Infantry, 29th Division. While there he 
was transferred to the Air Service and ordered 
to Mineola; thence going overseas, arriving in Eng- 
land on Jan. 1, 1918. He commanded a squadron 
under Captain Marcel Bloch, Escadrille C 46, 
Escadre de Cambat No. 1. He was in the fighting 
lines from March until August, 1918. He was in- 
jured in a crash in May and spent (6) weeks in 
Abbeville Hospital, later rejoining his squadron 
and going over the lines. However, on account of 
deafness due to anti-aircraft fire, he was obliged 
to give up combat flying and asked for detail as 
instructor. He was sent to Hythe, England, to 
aerial gunnery school, then to New Romney and 
later to Turnbury, Scotland, where he was gradu- 
ated as Aerial Gunnery Officer and Pilot. From 
there he took a squadron to Tours, France, for 
orders; was ordered back to England with a squad- 
ron, but before leaving went to Hospital No. 27 at 
Tours for treatment for an attack of bronchitis. 
He died at this hospital on Nov. 2, 1918. Of his 
personal citations and decorations, no official 
knowledge was obtained, but his squadron won the 
Fourragere and had to its credit thirty-two (-32) 
German planes. He has been credited officially 
with three (3) German planes and unofficially with 
two more. 



William Joseph Drab 

of Oakdale, enlisted in the United States Navy as 
2nd class seaman. Shortly after he was assigned 
to duty at Camp Farragut, in the U. S. N. T. S. 
Great Lakes, 111., he caught cold while doing duty 
and was taken to the hospital where his case was 
pronounced as influenza and pneumonia. He passed 
away four (4) days later. After his death his body 
was removed to his home at Oakdale. He was 
buried on October 5th from St. Mary's church, at 
East Islip, where a Requiem High Mass was cele- 
brated in his honor. He was attended by a naval 
escort from the U. S. N. A. Station at Bay Shore. 
The burial at St. Patrick's Cemetery was a military 
one. Mr. Drab was the first boy from East Islip 
to sacrifice his life for his country. 



John Herold 

of Central Islip, Sergeant, Company C, 308th In- 
fantry, entered the service on Sept. 19, 1917, and 
went overseas on April 6, 1918. He was injured in 
action on July 24th, 1918, by a gun shot wound in 
his left side and foot and died in Evacuation Hos- 
pital No. 2, two days later, having developed gas 
gangi'ene. These words are those of the chaplain 
of the 308th Infantry: "John was remarkably 
courageous under fire, and during his suffering 
never lost hope. His regiment reveres him as one 
of its first heroes." He was given a military fun- 
eral in the French Military Hospital, about 150 
yards from where the barrage had been in which he 
lost his life. 



Herbert E. Ketcham 

of Islip, enlisted in New York Division of Coast 
Guard on May 19, 1916. He was stationed at 
Barge Office, Battery Park, New York, and served 
on patrol duty aboard the U. S. Cutter. After 
one year service here, he received an honorable 
discharge and re-enlisted on May 19, 1917, at Sandy 
Hook. He later served at Highlands, New Jersey, 
and South Amboy. He was in South Amboy at the 
time of the Morgan explosion; part of their pilot 
house and other parts of their boat being carried 
away. In going ashore to render service in help- 
ing to carry the dead and wounded to the ambu- 
lances, he contracted a severe cold which resulted 
in pneumonia. He died in the Marine Hospital on 
Nov. 4, 1918, just eleven (11) days before his twen- 
ty-fourth birthday. His body was brought home 
and the funeral services were being held just as the 
first (false) rumor of peace was being celebrated. 
It was his dearest wish to see the end of the war 
and to see the boys come home, so many of whom 
he had seen sail away from the harbor, looking 
like so many ant hills on the ships. He was buried 
at Oakwood Cemetery. A detachment of eighteen 
(18) marines attending the funeral, it being mili- 
tary in form. At this time his brother Harold was 
in the fighting lines in France. 



James F. Tierney 

of Central Islip, was inducted into the army in 
November, 1917. He trained at Camp Upton and 
went overseas from there. He landed at Brest on 
January 24, 1918. He was promoted to Office 
Chief, Motor Transport Service, at Base Section 
No. 1, A. E. F., A. P. O. 701. On June 1, 1919, 
while guarding the roads on his motorcycle, 
collided with another machine and was killed. He 
was given a military funeral at St. Nazaire, 
France, and later, the Government sent his body 
to his home in America, where he was buried with 
military honors on Oct. 4, 1920, in St. John of God 
Cemetery, at Central Islip, New York. 



Louis Riffard 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service and 
served in Company M, 307th Infantry, A. E. F., as 
Corporal. He was wounded at Grand Pre on Oct. 
13, 1918, and died on October 23d of the same year. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



17 




18 



WAR RECORD OF 



IN MEMORIAM 



Joseph J. Loeffler 

of Brentwood, was inducted into service and served 
at Camp Upton, Long Island, in Company K, 310th 
Regiment, 78th Division. He served overseas with 
his regiment and was killed in action at St. Mihiel 
on Sept. 22, 1918. 



Eugene M. Ford 

of West Islip, called to the service and assigned 
to the 452nd Engineers, Motor Transport Service. 
Died of disease in the hospital at St. Nazaire, 
France, his remains brought home and buried with 
military honors in St. James Cemetery at Babylon, 
N. Y. 



Joseph C. Soucek 



of Bayport, was inducted into service Sept. 19, 
1917. Served as Corporal with Co. M, 305th In- 
fantry, 77th Division, Camp Upton. Died April 
21, 1919, at Camp Upton. Age 25 years. 



Jacob C. Wagner 

of Bay Shore, enlisted May 18, 1917, in the Head- 
quarters Troop of the 27th Division. Served with 
his division until his death in hospital on Oct. 30, 
1918. 



Ernest H. Yandle 

of Bay Shore, called to service October, 1917. Dis- 
charged the next day for defective eyesight. Born 
in England. Later called to service Sept. 4, 1918. 
Died of influenza Oct. 4, 1919, at hospital, Edge- 
wood, Maryland. 



Joseph Aloysuis Phillips 

of Sayville, served in Company E, 316th Infantry, 
79th Division, A. E. F. He was killed in action in 
France on September 29, 1918. 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



19 




20 



WAR RECORD OF 



IN MEMORIAM 



Additional Information, Personal Letters by and about 
Some of Our Boys Who Made the Supreme Sacrifice 



J. Frederick Wever 

(From .Suffolk County News) 

Although not yet confirmed by the official 
casualty list, reliable information was re- 
ceived at the Neius office this morning to 
the effect that Sergeant J. Fred Wever, of 
Sayville has been killed in action. The w^ord 
comes in a letter to Mrs. George Reeve from 
her son, Sei'geant Howard Reeve, and was 
dated, "Somewhere in France, Aug. 24, 
1918." He writes: 

"Dear Mother:— 

"Just received three of your loving let- 
ters yesterday and was very glad to hear 
from you again and that you are well. 

"I have bad news this time, as I saw poor 
Freddie Wever laid away last night. Night 
before last I was in charge of a detail dig- 
ging trenches and 'Jerry' threw some of 
his beautiful shells over and scattered us 
far away. One shell struck about 20 yards 
from us and wounded one of my men. One 
piece of shrapnel passed through his fore- 
arm and one through his leg. We carried 
him out of the trench and then I gave him 
first aid and put him on a stretcher and 
started for the dressing station. On the 
way I met Fred Wever and shook hands 
with him but could not talk to him, as we 
were in a hurry to get to the dressing sta- 
tion. That night his company of engineers 
was building a pontoon bridge with which 
they were going to cross the river to get at 
'Jerry' but they had to work three hours 
under shell fire and poor Fred and one other 
sergeant was killed." 

Sergeant Wever was the eldest son of 
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Wever, of Foster 
Avenue, this village, and probably few Say- 
ville young men were more widely known. 
For years prior to his entering the Army, 
August, 1917, he had acted as professional 
in charge of the Sayville golf course, a diffi- 
cult position, and one of responsibility, 
which he handled exceedingly well, and 
through which he acquired a wide circle of 
acquaintances and friends. 

The young man went to Camp Upton a 
year ago and was mustered into Company 
D., 302nd Engineers. There his capabilities 



were quickly recognized and through his 
courtesy and attention to duty he was ad- 
vanced first to the grade of corporal and 
later to that of sergeant. 

No details other than the above brief ex- 
tract from a comrade's letter are at hand, 
but it is evident that Fred Wever is the first 
of our boys to make the supreme sacrifice 
and that he was killed in action. He died 
bravely in the performance of his duty. 

The blow comes as a heavy one, not only 
to the family which has another son in the 
service, but comes as a personal loss to hun- 
dreds of Sayville people who knew Fred 
Wever as a modest, gentlemanly young man 
with many likeable qualities, and to scores 
of members and patrons of the Sayville 
Golf Club, who for years have been in- 
debted to him for numberless courtesies. 
From all Sayville goes the deepest sympathy 
to the bereaved parents, brothers and sister. . 



Charles E. Johnson 

(From Suffolk County News) 

A third golden star has been placed upon 
Sayville's honor roll. Henry Johnson, a 
farmer who resides on Broadway Avenue, 
received a telegram Wednesday night from 
the War Department with the information 
he has for months been awaiting with ap- 
prehension. He has made a tremendous 
sacrifice upon the altar of Democracy and 
has four sons in the service. The message 
told him that his youngest son, Charles Ed- 
win Johnson, had died on October 25th, of 
wounds received in action. There were no 
details. 

The young man was born here on Feb. 8, 
1896, but was drafted from Naples, On- 
tario Co.. April 29. 1918. He had been 
farming in central New York for the past 
two years but when drafted he declined to 
take anv advantage of that fact and asked 
to be placed in the first classification. He 
was sent to Camp Dix. N. J., mustered into 
Battery D, 308th Field Artillery and after 
but six weeks of training was sent to 
France. 

When last heard from, a letter written 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



21 



home by the young man on September 4th, 
he was in a very active sector and that fact 
increased the feeling- of uneasiness which 
has oppressed the family for weeks past. 
He was a young man of exceptional habits, 
and of the highest character and a faithful 
and consistent member of the Sayville Con- 
gregational Church. 

Mr. Johnson has two other sons in the 
army. Lieutenant Frank Johnson who was 
mustered in on October 8, 1917, and on 
October 21st, 1918, was commissioned a 
second lieutenant in the 302d Engineers, a 
regiment which has seen much hard service 
and in which were Frederick Wever, Ralph 
Rogers, Daniel Murdock, Benjamin Broere 
and a number of other lads from here- 
abouts. 

Albert Johnson is in Battery B, 26th 
Field Artillery, Camp McClellan, Ala., and 
a fourth son, George Johnson, is in the 
Navy, being stationed on board the U. S. S. 
Foam of the mine sweeping division. 

A devoted sister, Ellen, and a brother, 
Harry, live at home with their father. 
* * * 

Emil Joseph Bohm 

The folloumig is a letter ivritteyi by Emil 
Bohm to a member- of the Islip Fire Com- 
patiy — of ivhich Mr. Bohm loas a member: 
Mr. Bohm was killed ten days after writing 
this letter. 

September 17th, 1918. 
Dear Charles : — 

Just a few lines to let you know that I'm 
well and hoping that these few lines will 
find you and the rest of the Fire Company 
the same. Well, Charles, this is sure some 
place, but the front is Hell. Tenica and I 
are both together. Well, how is everything 
in that good old little town of Islip? Did 
you get the new truck yet? We got Jerry 
on the go now. We got him where he was 
in 1914, so you can see we are advancing 
pretty well. Is Charles Rusy home yet? 
He is some lucky to be home. Joe is here 
somewhere ; I got a letter from him here in 
France — him and Frank. I see Tom Sind- 
ler often. I saw John Rahahan about a 
month ago but I did not get a chance to 
talk to him. I sure would like to have a 
chat with one from home. The weather is 
pretty fair ; it's been hot but is getting cool 
now. Well, think that is all I have to say. 
Give my regards to all the boys in the com- 
pany, please. 

Best regards, 

Emil Bohm. 



First Lieutenant Richard M. Raven 

Corporal Robert S. Raven 

Historical Sketch by Captaiyi Charles G. 

Leland 

There have been four generations of the 
Ravens in the Seventh Regiment. The two 
representatives on the rolls during the 
Great War, Richard M. Raven and Robert 
S. Raven, of Bayshore, Long Island, both 
made the supreme sacrifice on the battle- 
field in France. 

Better soldiers than these two men have 
never fought in any cause under any flag. 
In an organization where the standards of 
efficiency, loyalty, and devotion to duty were 
particularly high, they were easily recog- 
nized by their comrades as men of unusual 
caliber. Their whole record of service 
proved the correctness of this estimate. 
Richard died at the head of his company in 
an attack on the enemy's trenches. Robert 
was killed while leading his squad in a day- 
light reconnoitering patrol in "No Man's 
Land." 

Richard M. Raven was a member of Co. 
K, Seventh New York Infantry, National 
Guard. On the Mexican border in 1916 he 
was promoted to a Sergeancy, and served 
with the regiment during its five months of 
training and toughening under the tropical 
sun. He was a Seventh "non-com" par ex- 
cellence and as such, one of the creators of 
that state of discipline for which the regi- 
ment has always been noted. In the fall 
of 1917, when the New York Division was 
finally ordered to Camp Wadsworth, S. C, 
he went with it as first sergeant of Co. K 
and held this important office through the 
period of stress and reorganization when 
the Seventh and the First, with drafts from 
the Twelfth and Tenth were merged into 
the 107th United States Infantry. 

First Sergeant Raven was selected to at- 
tend the Officer's Training School at Spar- 
tanburg in January, 1918, and was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant before the gradua- 
tion of his class, — an honor conferred upon 
a very few candidates of particular prom- 
ise, — and assigned to his old company, 
which was a unique distinction. 

As second lieutenant of "K" he went to 
France with the 107th and during the 
period of training in Picardy with the Brit- 
ish Army attended the School for Gas De- 
fense at St. Valery on the Somme and the 
Musketry School at Pont Remy. During 
July and August while the 27th Division 
was serving in Belgium, Lieutenant Raven 
remained with his original company in the 
East Poperinghe lines and at Dickiebusch 



22 



WAR RECORD OF 



in the Ypres salient, a baptism of fire which 
no man who experienced it will be likely 
to forget. 

Promoted during the summer for his cool- 
ness and soldierly qualities in the field, he 
was transferred, as first lieutenant, to the 
1st Battalion of the 107th about September 
1st, and appointed battalion adjutant. Cap- 
tain Clinton E. Fisk, then in command of 
the 1st Battalion, remarked shortly before 
his death that in his experience he had 
never met a more efficient or a more valu- 
able officer than Richard Raven. 

For three weeks after having been with- 
drawn from the Flanders front, the 77th 
Division trained near the city of Doullens 
for the drive against the Hindenburg Line. 
The latter part of September the Second 
Corps consisting of the 27th and 30th Divi- 
sions, supported by the Australian Corps 
moved up to the front and on the 27th of 
September the attack began. On Sunday 
morning, the 29th, the 107th Infantry left 
their trenches and in one of the most des- 
perate assaults of the war rushed through 
the wire and up into the machine gun nests 
of the Boches. The 1st Battalion on the 
left of the sector took and held the Knoll, 
an outpost of the Hindenburg system near 
the village of Vendhuile after heavy losses. 
Lieutenant Raven took part in this attack 
and came through unhurt. The day before 
in an effort to feel out the enemy's line a 
patrol from Co. K, including the squad of 
Corporal Robert Riaven encountered heavy 
machine gun fire and left many dead on the 
field, the corporal among them. 

When after three days of terrific fighting 
the enemy's line was broken, the regiment 
— what there was left of it — was relieved 
by the Australians and went into camp at 
Doingt, a suburb of Peronne. Its losses in 
those three days amounted to 1266. Most 
of the companies were reduced to mere 
handfuls of men. It was during this brief 
breathing spell that Lieutenant Raven asked 
to be returned to a line company in order 
that he might be in the thickest of whatever 
was to come, close to the men, and where he 
could find opportunities to make the Hun 
pay dearly for the lives of the comrades who 
had fallen. He was given command of Co. 
E, and at its head marched eastward again 
on October 6th. The 27th Division for four 
days moved forward in support of the 30th, 
pushing the enemy back rapidly to his pre- 
pared positions on the Selle river. Here he 
made a stand. In the vicinity of Busigny 
the 107th held the front line under con- 



tinued artillery fire and gas bombardments, 
and on the 17th took part with the 108th 
in the assault of St. Souplet. By noon the 
town was cleared, the river crossed and the 
heights to the east in the hands of the New 
York troops. Under cover of the railroad 
embankment a group of 107th officers sat 
down waiting for orders, compared notes 
and ate whatever food they could find in 
their pockets. In this group was Lieutenant 
Raven in an enlisted man's overcoat, and 
carrying a rifle which he had used to advan- 
tage during the morning, for he was an ex- 
cellent shot. He protested against the way 
in which his brother officers went into ac- 
tion with trench coats and revolvers and 
made themselves special marks for German 
snipers. He spoke aflfectionately of his new 
company and the gallant way in which they 
had conducted themselves. Orders came to 
move forward to the support of the 108th 
at Bandival Farm where the enemy was 
putting up a stubborn resistance, and he 
led his company across the open into posi- 
tion. Holding on to the farm that night, 
early the following morning the 107th went 
over the top, took the Boche trenches in a 
hand to hand fight and drove them beyond 
the Jonc de Mer ridge. Co. E's line had 
just begun to move forward when Lieuten- 
ant Raven was struck by a machine gun 
bullet and fell dead. On the right of the line 
in the same attack Captain Fisk, command- 
ing the 1st Battalion, was killed. Their 
bodies were taken back to St. Souplet and 
buried in the American cemetery southwest 
of the town. And so, in the thick of the 
fight at the head of his men, Dick Raven 
died — an ideal soldier's death. 

Robert Raven's story is that of the typi- 
cal doughboy of 1918. When America en- 
tered the war, he enlisted in the Seventh. 
In training camp he won his chevrons. He 
carried the pack and the rifle through Flan- 
ders and northern France. After back- 
breaking hikes, he slept in barns, in ruined 
buildings or in the ditch beside the road, 
wherever night overtook him. He kept up 
with the column though his feet were 
bruised and blistered and every step a new 
torment. He went to sleep cold and hungry, 
or he stood guard half dead with fatigue. 
He growled about it, then joked about it 
and smiled. It was all a part of the game. 
He lived for days in a filthy trench under 
artillery fire and saw his comrades killed 
and maimed beside him, with no chance to 
strike back. He stuck to his post and bided 
his time. And when the order came, he 
went out to his death in the same spirit, — 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



23 



just as thousands of other boys — for the 
cause of decency and fair play and the peo- 
ple back home. 

Corporal Bob Raven lies in the American 
cemetery at Bony near where he fell in the 
center of the Hindenburg line. 



Historical Sketch of Lieutenant E. Stanley 
Hart 

{By a Member of His Family) 

Lieutenant E. Stanley Hart was born in' 
Amityville, L. L, March 31, 1898. All of 
his life was spent in that village until he 
was seventeen years old. He attended 
school there also the Methodist Church and 
Sunday School. He was a charter member 
of the Boy Scouts of the Methodist Episco- 
pal School. 

After the family moved to Bay Shore, 
L. I., part of his time was spent there and 
part in Freeport, L. I., with his elder 
brother. 

At the time the United States declared 
war with Germany, he was then a boy of 
nineteen years ; he wanted to go and take 
his part in the great struggle. He applied 
to the U. S. Aviation, but was rejected on 
account of a slight weakness in one eye. He 
then applied to the Royal Flying Corps, 
passed the examination and was accepted. 

On September 23, 1917, he left for 
Toronto, where he first went to Medical 
Hall, Toronto University. From here he 
was sent to Camp Long Branch twelve miles 
outside of Toronto. Here they had long 
hours of drilling, mainly for discipline, and 
also had to go out on the range for machine 
gun practice. All had to do guard duty, 
having four hours on and four hours off. 

On November 12, 1917, he went back to 
Toronto to enter School of Military Aero- 
nautics, Toronto University; there he had 
to take up twenty-three subjects, studying 
every night but one. This course was sup- 
posed to take about three weeks. There he 
studied the different kinds of engines which 
was very interesting. 

After passing all examinations, they were 
sent to Texas, to start flying; as the weather 
was too cold in Canada. They left Canada 
on December 11, 1917, reaching Fort 
Worth. Texas, December 14, 1917. He was 
sent first to Camp Taliaferro where he 
practised sending wireless messages in the 
a,ir, artillery observations, taking photo- 
graphs, etc. He made his first flight on 
December 15, 1917, in a Curtiss J. N. 4- 
Model. The Captain of his squadron was 



Vernon Castle, and he was one of the best. 
After he had had ten hours of flying, he 
started taking pictures in the air and signal- 
ing; also cross country and altitude tests, 
bombing, etc. He had to get in thirty-five 
hours of flying before getting his commis- 
sion for Second Lieutenant. 

He finished the course about March 1, 
and went to Toronto to get his commis- 
sion, after which he came home for a fur- 
lough of three weeks, before going to Eng- 
land to get into training for an aviation 
Scout. 

On April 1 he left Bay Shore, went to 
Toronto to report for duty overseas ; arriv- 
ing at Toronto on April 2, 1918, he en- 
trained for Halifax then sailed on the 
transport Scandinavian April 8, 1918, 
arriving in Liverpool April 15, and from 
there by train to London. From London 
he was sent to Camp Shotwick, Queens 
Ferry-Chester, England, about fifty miles 
east of London. 

At this camp he had to fly the Scout 
Machine, which is a smaller and much 
faster machine than the Curtiss. He also 
had two classes and a lecture every day. 
After graduating from this camp, which 
would probably take three months, he 
would get a First Lieutenant's commission. 
He had to learn stunting in the Avars ma- 
chine, a very large machine, and then do 
Solo flying, in a Camel Scout Machine ; and 
after that in a Service machine, doing four 
hours in that, then to be sent to an aerial 
fighting camp, before going over to France. 

He never reached the fighting camp, for 
on June 5, 1918, while flying a Camel Scout 
machine, at a height of 3000 feet, the ma- 
chine developed a series of spinning nose 
dives, and crashed to the earth, and he was 
killed instantly. 

After a month his remains were sent 
home from England and he was buried in 
Amityville, L. I., where he spent most of 
his life. 

His one ambition was to get over into the 
thick of the flghting, but God willed other- 
wise, and we can only bow our heads in sub- 
mission, and say, "Thy Will be done." 



Lieutenant Irving Edward Smith 

(From Suffolk County News). 

The arrival of ships the first of this week 
with a heavy foreign mail brought joy and 
thanksgiving to scores of families here- 
abouts, in many cases relieving the uncer- 
tainty and suspense of parents, wives and 



24 



WAR RECORD OF 



sweethearts who had not heard for weeks 
or months from the boys who have been in 
the thick of the fighting in France. 

In other cases there has been sad news 
of casualties and the joy and thanksgiving 
attendant upon the close of the war has 
been submerged in personal grief. A mes- 
sage of this kind came on Monday evening 
to Mrs. R. G. Smith, wife of General R. G. 
Smith, bringing the news of the death in 
the hospital at Tours, France, of her son, 
Irving E. Smith, of the U. S. Army Air 
Service. His death was due to meningitis, 
following influenza. 

Until Monday of this week, Mrs. Smith 
had not heard from her son since October 
16. A letter received on Monday, written 
on October 30, said he had been sick for 
several weeks with influenza but was con- 
sidered out of danger and hoped the follow- 
ing day to be discharged from the hospital. 
On November 2nd his death occurred. 

Lieutenant Smith has been in France 
since last spring as a fighting observer in 
the Air Service. He had done much hazard- 
ous work on the Western front. Late in the 
summer his plane fell and he was badly in- 
jured. His family never knew the extent 
of his hurts, but he was in a French hospi- 
tal for six weeks. Later he was sent to 
England to perfect himself in aero gunnery 
in order that he might be detailed as an in- 
structor. After a course of work in Eng- 
land and then in Scotland he was graduated 
and started for the headquarters in Tours 
to receive his orders. 

He wrote to his mother that he intended 
to ask for a billet in the United States. For 
this reason Mrs. Smith when she did not 
hear from her son for a long time, felt that 
he was probably on his way to America and 
was going to surprise her. The shock was, 
therefore, more terrible. 

Lieutenant Smith during the winter of 
1916 and 1917 served as senior first lieuten- 
ant with the 4th New Jersey Infantry dur- 
ing the troubles on the Mexican border. 
The 4th New Jersey later became the 113th 
in Camp at Anniston, Ala. Early last 
spring he transferred to the Air Service, 
came to Mineola for ten days and then 
went to France. 

He was born in New York on November 
7, 1881. Besides his mother, he is survived 
by two sisters, Mrs. Frances Baldridge, 
wife of Commander H. A. Baldridge, U. S. 
N., Miss Laurie Smith and two brothers, 
Edward and Jewett Smith. 

Although he spent much time in New 
York and Washington and had traveled ex- 



tensively, Lieutenant Smith had, since early 
boyhood, considered Sayville his home, and 
was one of the most popular young men in 
our summer colony. He was possessed of 
an unusually generous and happy disposi- 
tion and his death was a shock and brought 
keen regret to hundreds in all walks of life. 
Last Memorial Day v/hen the flagpole 
erected by the Women's Village Improve- 
ment Society in the village square was dedi- 
cated. Lieutenant Smith and his two broth- 
ers, who are also in the service, presented 
a large and beautiful American ensign 
which has since flown there. Early on 
Tuesday morning the flag — his flag — was 
placed at half mast in deference to the 
memory of a royal good fellow, a gentle- 
man and a brave soldier. 



Herbert E. Ketcham 

The folloiviyig is a letter received by his 
mother — Mrs. Smith Ketcham of Islip, L. I., 
from Captain Cardin, Division Commander 
of the United States Coast Guard: 

"I have your letter of the 14th instant 
and on behalf of the officers and men of the 
New York Division, I want you to know 
that you have our sincere sympathy in the 
loss of your son — Herbert Ketcham, late a 
Seaman in the Pati'ol of the Patrol Fleet of 
the New York Division. 

"Your son's record was clean and his de- 
votion to his duty commended him to all 
who knew him. You have every reason to 
be proud of him and our sincere sorrow is 
extended both for the loss of this excellent 
man and your personal loss of a son." 



(Signed) 



L. Cardin — Co. G. 



Louis Riffard 

{From Suffolk County Neivs). 

News reached Sayville on Tuesday from 
a source which we very much wish we 
might believe inaccurate bearing the in- 
formation that Corporal Louis Riifard had 
died in France as the result of wounds re- 
ceived in action. The sad intelligence will 
bring sincere grief to many of the young 
man's friends, for everywhere we find 
people who were fond of him and who 
speak in only the highest terms of him. 

In the first place. Corporal Leonard 
Sharp, of West Sayville, who was with 
Corporal Louis RiflFard and was in Company 
M, of the 307th Regiment, wrote that he 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



25 



had seen the young man fall wounded and 
heard a few days later that he had died as 
the result of wounds. The same day — 
Tuesday — there came to the News office, a 
letter from Wesley Rohm of Sayville, who 
said that he had seen Louis' grave and that 
he was killed in the Verdun drive. 

RifFard came to Sayville from his home 
in Jersey City to live with his sister, who 
became the wife of Henry Hartmuller, Jr. 
Later, he made his home with Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Hartmuller, Sr., and the family 
is grief stricken, although they have heard 
nothing officially. He was drafted in Sep- 
tember, 1917, after having been employed 
for a year as a meter reader in Sayville by 
the Long Island Lighting Company — fol- 
lowing employment with William H. 
Aldrich, a Patchogue electrician. He 
trained at Upton until early in the spring, 
when he went to France and has seen 
months of hard action. The last letter re- 
ceived from him came to his fiancee. Miss 
Adele Bamberger, Patchogue, to whom he 
became engaged at Christmas time. It was 
written on September 22. The young man 
was about 24 years of age. 



Joseph A. Phillips 

(From Suffolk County Neivs) 

In the midst of our rejoicing over the 
defeat of the Huns, sad news came again 
to Sayville when an official telegram from 
the War Department at Washington an- 
nounced that Private Joseph A. Phillips, 
of Co. E., 316th Infantry, had been killed 
in action in France on September 29. 
The telegram was addressed to his sister. 
Miss Elizabeth Phillips, who resides on 
Hanson Place in this village. 

Unlike Frederick Wever, the first of Say- 
ville's sons to make the supreme sacrifice, 
Phillips was not a native of Sayville, but 
was born in Providence, R. I., 30 years ago. 
He had lived with his sister in this village 
for about two years and nearly all of that 
time he had been employed in the News 
office and in the interval had become a 
valued employee, loyal to the paper and a 
friend of every one connected with it. "Joe" 
was a gentleman by instinct, good natured, 
willing and obliging and the news of his 
tragic death brought grief deep and genuine 
to every one in the Neivs office, and indeed, 
to all who knew him. 

He was called to Camp Upton on the 29th 
of last May and there were many who pre- 
dicted that because of his lack of weight 



and his frail physique he would not be 
retained in the service, but Joe was every 
inch a patriot. He came of fighting stock 
and had no notion of claiming exemption, 
and while he weighed little more than his 
pack and rifle he was pure grit, what there 
was of him. 

He came back only once for a few hours' 
leave and after two or three weeks of train- 
ing at Upton he was sent to Camp Meade, 
Maryland, and sailed from New York for 
France the first week in July. Perhaps 
one reason why his training was shorter 
than most men require was because of the 
fact that Phillips had served a term of en- 
listment in the National Guard of his native 
State, Rhode Island. 

About three weeks ago the News received 
and published a long letter from Private 
Phillips which told in entertaining fashion 
of his experience on the way to France on 
board the transport and in training camps. 
The letter caused much comment and was 
by many people considered one of the best 
of the long list of interesting communica- 
tions we have received from the boys over 
there and have published in the News. This 
letter was written just ten days before the 
fighting in which Joseph met his death. 

We have no details, but judging from the 
number of casualties about that time from 
among men of his division his baptism of 
fire was a hot one. Those who knew him 
best will never question that he gave a good 
account of himself in the conflict. 

Joe proved himself a patriot and a real 
man in more ways than one. For years he 
had taken care of his youngest sister, Eliza- 
beth, or Bessie, as he affectionately called 
her, and their devotion was most touching. 
Immediately after he entered the Army he 
"signed up" to have half his pay sent to 
her and then half of the remainder went to 
pay for a life insurance of $10,000 in her 
favor, all he could get, to make provision 
for the sister whom he loved more than any- 
thing else in this world. 

Her grief when the telegram came was 
rathetic and she was a sad little figure at 
the memorial mass which was said in honor 
of her soldier brother by the Rev. Father 
Fitzpatrick in St. Lawrence Church at 
eight o'clock on Monday morning. 



Corporal Joseph C. Soucek 

(From Suffolk County News) 

Although the village of Bayport has 
proved her patriotism by sending an un- 



26 



WAR RECORD OF 



usually large proportion of her sons into 
the Army and Navy service she has just 
recorded her first war loss in the death of 
Corporal Joseph Soucek, only son of Joseph 
Soucek. He was one of Bayport's soldiers 
of whose record she was proudest. He died 
at the base hospital at Camp Upton of sep- 
tic poisoning on Monday night after being 
a patient there for nearly four months. He 
was born in Bayport 25 years ago and be- 
cause of his excellent principles and his 
many likeable qualities, was one of Bay- 
port's most popular young men, a graduate 
of the Bayport school, a member of the Jr. 
0. U. A. M., and of the Bayport Fire De- 
partment. The young man went to France 
with Co. M., of the 305th Infantry after 
training at Camp Upton and being one of 
Upton's picked men to give exhibition drills 
at the New York Hippodrome and in Mon- 
treal, where parades of our crack National 
Army men were held. 

He was wounded in the side by a piece of 
shrapnel while fighting at Chateau Thierry 
and came home early in January. The 
young man at first did not consider his 



wound serious and was so anxious to stay 
in the fighting that he failed to report at a 
hospital until his hurts became very pain- 
ful and he realized that failure to report 
the injury might render him liable to the 
criticism of his officers. He also feared 
disturbing his father and three sisters at 
home by the appearance of his name in the 
casualty list. When he first arrived home 
he seemed to be looking and feeling well but 
the poison soon spread through his entire 
system and a number of operations had to 
be performed. 

Funeral services were held from his home 
on Kensington Avenue and from St. Ann's 
Episcopal Church in Sayville, the Rev. 
John H. Prescott officiating. 

The flag-draped casket was borne to its 
last resting place in St. Ann's Cemetery by 
seven young veterans of the war, in their 
army uniforms. Corporal Soucek's former 
Bayport friends who acted as pall bearers 
were Lieutenant Paul Smith, Lieutenant Al- 
fred Frieman, Sergeant Samuel J. Hicks, 
Edward Sharp, Wilfred Breckenridge, 
Otto Haer, and John J. Sullivan. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



27 



THE ARMY NURSE 



By Hiram N. Rossuck 



(The ivriter of this article, Hiram N. 
Rossuck, knoivs whereof he writes. F^or 
many weary months he lay in the hospital 
seriously ivounded by shrapnel throtigh the 
right breast. And out of a gratefid heart 
he pays this tribute to The Army Nurses. — 
The Editor.) 

ONE of Uncle Sam's children about 
whom, perhaps, we hear the least, and 
about whom we can never say enough, 
is the Army Nurse. We called her "Sister," 
and sister she was, in the finest sense of 
the word — more a sister to many of us 
than our own sisters could ever hope to be. 

We hear of the horrors of war as ex- 
perienced by the men who went over the 
top. Much has been written about the men 
who suffered severe wounds, and who saw 
their buddies suffer, and, in many instances, 
saw them killed. Yet how much do we ever 
hear of the horrors of war as they affected 
the Army Nurse? 

Probably no one saw more horrible sights 
than the nurses in the base hospitals. It 
was they who had to receive the wounded 
when they were brought in from the battle- 
field, torn and bleeding, and so completely 
covered with mud that it was sometimes 
difficult to recognize them as human beings. 
It was they who had to assist in the dress- 
ing of the men's wounds, to care for them 
while they were recovering, or, in less 
happy instances, which were all too numer- 
ous, ease their last moments. Certainly 
these were not pleasant sights for these 
delicately nurtured girls to have to witness, 
and it took a tremendous amount of cour- 
age for them to carry on their work. 



Nor was the necessity of witnessing these 
horrible sights, of seeing fine, sturdy youths 
mangled and torn, the worst part of the 
nurse's life. Not only must she live through 
some of the most horrible experiences 
through which any one could live, and pet- 
form the most unpleasant tasks, but she 
must like it, or appear to do so. The 
wounded doughboy had the privilege of 
sinking to the depths of despair, but his 
nurse enjoyed no such privilege. No mat- 
ter what she might have to live through, 
she must always be cheerful, and have a 
bright smile and a cheery word for her 
patients, for this they needed as much as 
they did medical attention. She must listen 
interestedly to the convalescents as they 
talked of mother, home, and friends, with- 
out indulging in her own longing for her 
mother, home and friends. She must help 
him write to the folks back home, and often 
write his letters for him. 

It was her duty to keep her patients in a 
happy frame of mind, or rather to keep 
them, as far as within her power lay, from 
absolute despair. She must always give 
them courage to go on with their fight for 
life, when often she knew that it was a 
hopeless fight, or that, while there was a 
possibility of the boy's life being saved, it 
would be better for him if he were allowed 
to follow so many of his buddies. 

Through all this, her smile was never 
allowed to falter, but she must go on, put- 
ting on a brave front, and pretending to be 
happy and cheerful. The world in general 
will never know all that the Army Nurse 
did, but the boys for whom she did so much 
will never cease to love and respect her. 



28 



WAR RECORD OF 



Charles E. Kirknp, Jr. 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in Ambulance Service on 
June 20, 1917, and trained at Allentown, Pa. Ar- 
rived in France on Feb. 4, 1918. Assigned to French 
Army, serving- with them in the Aisne and on the 
Marne River on May 27, the next German Offensive 
in the Champagne Sector, July 15; the Meuse-Ar- 
gonne Offensive of Sept. 27 and on the Aisne-Oise 
on Oct. 30. After the Armistice, the section oc- 
cupied Northern Luxemburg until Feb. 5, 1919. 
They started for Brest on April 25 and sailed from 
there on May 7, arriving in Boston May 19. Mr. 
Kirkup was discharged from service at Camp 
Devens on May 23. He received the Croix de 
Guerre for bravery under fire on the Aisne-Oise 
front Oct. 30. 



After the Armistice was signed, he was sent to 
the United States, arriving at Newport News, 
Virginia, in Jan., 1919. He was then sent to Gen- 
eral Hospital No. 30, Plattsburg, New York, being- 
later transferred to General Hospital No. 5, Fort 
Ontario, New York. After being fully recovered 
he was sent to Camp Upton, from where he was 
discharged from service on June 16, 1919. 



Percy L. J ay tie 

of Bay Shore, was with Section 580 of the Ameri- 
can Ambulance Corps and served in France with 
them during the period of the war. No further 
record could be obtained of his services. 



George F. Doyle 

of Bay Shore, enlisted at New York on June 13, 

1917, in the U. S. Ambulance Service. He sailed 
on the Carmania on Jan. 9, 1918, arriving at Liver- 
pool, England, on Jan. 22 1918. They went to 
Champagne front, France, by way of Havre and 
St. Nazaire, arriving at the front on March 17, 

1918. Here they were attached to the 72nd French 
Division and later transferred to the 4th French 
Army, 13th Division. He saw service through four 
major operations on the Champagne front with 
the French Army, namely, Aisne-Maiiie, May 27, 
1918, to Jan. 7, 1918; Champagne, July 15 to Aug. 1, 
1918; Marne-Argonne, Sept. 4 to 27; Last Battle of 
Aisne, Oct. 4 to Nov. 11, 1918. He was decorated 
by the French with the Croix de Guerre on May 
28, 1918. He sailed from Brest, France, on May 
21, 1918, arriving at Camu Devens, from where he 
was discharged on Jan. 12, 1918. 



Frederick Delemarre 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Army Ambu- 
lance Service, in Section 580 on June 17, 1917. He 
trained at Allentown, Pa., sailing for overseas 
with his section on Jan. 9, landing in Liverpool, 
England. From there they proceeded to Camp Win- 
chester, where they remained for one week, when 
ordered to St. Nazaire, at which place their full 
Section formed with full equipment. On March 
5 they were ordered to the front, in the Champagne 
Sector, Bourvancourt. Mr. Delemarre served in 
France, driving the staff car. His first experience 
at the front took place on March 17, 1918, in the 
Champagne Sector, where he was detailed to drive 
the staff car. He served in the following battles: 
Champagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, Meuse-Argonne, 
Oise-Marne and in the final attack of Sept. 26. 
His Section was cited for bravery. Upon his re- 
turn to America he was honorably discharged from 
service at Camp Devens on May 19, 1919. 



Arthur A. Perkinson 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Am- 
bulance Service in June, 1917, and trained at Allen- 
town, Pa., until Jan., 1918. He served overseas 
with this outfit until the termination of the war. 



Earle B. Gibson 

of Bay Shore, enlisted at New York City on June 
27, 1917, and trained at Allentown, Pa., in U. S. 
Ambulance Service until Jan. 9, 1918, when he sailed 
from the United States, arriving at Liverpool, 
England, on Jan. 24, 1918. From there he was sent 
to France, arriving at the front on the Champagne 
Sector in March, 1918. From there to the Marne- 
Aisne and then to the Argonne. For service there- 
in the Section as a whole was awarded the Croix de 
Guerre or Sectional Citation. In October, 1918, he 
was sent to Paris for rest and for examination. 



James McBreen 

of Central Islip, enlisted in the American Ambu- 
lance Corps and served on the Western Front, in 
France with Section 580 during the entire period 
of the war. He engaged in the Aisne Defensive, 
Champagne-Marne Defensive and Aisne-Marne Of- 
fensive, Meuse-Argonne, Oise-Aisne Offensive. He 
was honorably discharged from service on May 
16, 1919. 



Arthur K. Drake 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in American Ambulance 
Corps and served in France during the war with 
Section 580. Was captured and held as German 
prisoner until after the s'gning of the Armistice. 
(See Narrative Page 138). 



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WAR RECORD OF 



Roland William Baiter 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 
1917. Trained at Rock Island Arsenal, 111., Camp 
Dodge, Iowa, Camp Logan, Texas. Served with 
the 5th Mobile Ordnance Repair Shop, 5th Am- 
munition Train, 5th Regular Division as Sergeant 
of Ordnance. Sailed from New York, May 27, 
1917, on S. S. Derbyshire. While overseas took 
part in the St. Mihiel Offensive and the Argonne 
Forest Offensive. With the Army of Occupation 
in Luxemburg Duchy from Nov., 1918, to July, 
1919. Sailed from Brest, France, July 18, 1919, 
on the S. S. Zeelandia. Arrived in the States on 
July 31. Discharged Aug. 5, 1919. 



Joseph Edmund Stanton 

of West Islip, called to service Sept. 14, 1917; 
trained at Camp Upton; made Corporal Nov. 1, 
1917; assigned to 308th Infantry, 77th Division. 
Sailed for overseas April 16, 1918, to Calais, 
France; then sent to front, where he remained al- 
most continuously until the Armistice was signed. 
Served in the following sectors : Bacarot and Vesle, 
Oise, Aisne, Meuse-Argonne Offensive. At the lat- 
ter place was wounded in the hip by machine gun 
bullet, recovering completely after spending two 
weeks in the hospital. Was a member of the so- 
called "Lost Battalion." Was discharged at Camp 
Upton, May 9, 1919. 



Reuben P. Lindholm 

of Bay Shore, called to service Sept. 19, 1917; as- 
signed to 306th Infantry, 77th Division; promoted 
to First Sergeant Nov. 10, 1917; graduated from 
Officers' Training School; sailed for overseas April 
15, 1918; received commission as Lieutenant July 
13, 1918, assigned to 307th Infantry; served con- 
tinuously with this regiment and division until Oct. 
4, 1918, when his company and two others were 
trying to cut through to the relief of the "Lost 
Battalion." He was struck by a machine gun bullet, 
which paralyzed his left arm and he was ordered 
to leave. This he refused to do, as he was then in 
command of the company, the captain having been 
wounded. For this he was recommended for and 
received a citation. He was then sent to base 
hospital, where he stayed four weeks. He left the 
hospital on Dec. 13, 1918. He was erroneously re- 
ported killed in action and had the pleasure of 
reading his obituary. Returned home with 77th' 
Division and took part in the parade in New York 
City. 



Alfred Wagstaff, Jr. 

of West Islip, was commissioned a First Lieuten- 
ant in the Ordnance Department on Aug. 15, 1918, 
and sent to Raritan Arsenal, New Jersey, where he 
spent two months in the Ordnance Motor Instruc- 
tion School. On Oct. 4 he was assigned as Ord- 
nance Officer of the S'8th Artillery. C. A. C. at 
Camp Eustis, Va. This regiment was about to 
sail for France and was at Camp Stewart, New- 
port News, Va., at the time of signing the Armis- 
tice. They then came to Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., with this regiment on Dec. 22, 1918; the 
38th Artillery was demobilized and he was later 
transferred as Ordnance Officer of the S. I. Artil- 
lery C. A. C. This regiment spent the winter and 
summer of 1919 at Fort Hamilton and on Oct. 15 
moved to Camp Jackson, S. C. 



/. Newman Wagner 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the New York Field Ar- 
tillery May 1, 1917; was mustered into the 104th 
Regiment, 27th Division; trained at Spartanburg, 
S. C; arrived in France July 12, 1918. On Aug. 30, 
moved up to the support of the French Division 
north of Verdun; on Sept. 9 to Sept. 24 in the St. 
Mihiel Offensive, supporting the 33rd American 
Division. During this time their losses were 
heavy. After the Armistice they remained in camp 
in France until March 2, 1919. Was discharged at 
Camp Upton, April 1, 1919. 



Frank H. Wagner 

of Bay Shore, called to service at Camp Upton Dec. 
5, 1917; was assigned to the 305th Infantry, 77th 
Division. Was later transferred to the General 
Headquarters department; sailed for France March 
29, 1918; on arrival in France was stationed at 
Chaumont for two months. The general records 
office to which he was attached was moved to 
Boinges, where he served the remaining twelve 
months. Sailed for the United States April 10, 
1919. Was discharged May 15. 



William C. Ladman 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 165th Infantry, 42nd 
Division, the so-called "Rainbow Division" ; trained 
at Camp Mills, Hempstead, L. I.; arrived in Brest, 
France, Nov. 11, 1917. From Feb. 17, 1918, to 
March 21 was in Loraine Sector; on the latter date 
was seriously gassed; was blind for five weeks, was 
then given the chance to return home, but did not 
take it. He was in the Champagne Sector during 
the battle from July 1, 1918, to July 16; in the bat- 
tle of the Ocquea River on July 28. Was slightly 
wounded in the right leg by machine gun bullet. 
After spending several months in hospitals and 
camps he returned to the United States on Jan. 9, 
1919, and was discharged at Camp Dix. 



Arthur LeRoy Baldwin 

of Bay Shore, called to service April 1, 1918, at 
Camp Upton. Sent to Spartanburg to join the 27th 
Division. After a few days training the division 
was sent to Camp Stewart, Newport News until 
May, when they sailed for France; moved in re- 
serve trenches late in July with the English Army, 
remaining with that army until the Armistice was 
signed. The Allies were preparing to break the 
Hindenburg line and his company went over the 
top after about two hours of fierce fighting. He 
was shot through the arm and was sent to a field 
hospital and then to a hospital in England. Later 
he had influenza, and was not able to return to his 
company until the Armistice was signed. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



H. Aubrey Brewster 

of Bay Shore, joined Naval Reserve and was called 
to duty when war was declared. After several 
months training volunteered for foreign service. 
He was assigned to the U. S. S. Powhatan trans- 
port; member of gun crew. He was discharged 
Sept 1, 1919, with rating of Coxswain. 



Leonard W. Young 

of Bay Shore, passed physical examination, but on 
account of his age (70 yrs.) could not enlist. He 
was retained as a civil employee on U. S. S. New- 
port on patrol duty from New London, Conn., to 
the Chesapeake Bay, until May 4, 1919. 



LeRoy F. Young 

of Bay Shore, volunteered July 5, 1917, on U. S. S. 
Granite State in 1st Battalion, New York State 
Naval Militia. Here until Oct. 24, 1917, then trans- 
ferred to U. S. S. President Grant, transporting 
troops until his discharge March 5, 1919. 



Louis Holtje 



of Bay Shore, volunteered in the U. S. Naval 
Reserve April 3, 1917. After training at Benson- 
hurst and Pelham Bay, sailed for France on the 
U. S. S. Von Steuben on duty at the Pavillac Air 
Station, later served in the Naval Relief Unit in 
Belgium and northern France, arriving at Nor- 
folk, Va., on the U. S. S. Westbridge. Was retired 
to private life. 



Henry S. Farley 



of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Coast Guard May 
3, 1917. Trained at Fort Turnbull. Served on 
U. S. S. Manning for thirteen months, which was 
on patrol duty, and convoy with base at Gibraltar. 
He was discharged in Sept., 1919, as Carpenter's 
Mate, 1st Class. 



Chester T. Bahan 

of Bay Shore, volunteered Aug. 6, 1917, at Section 
Base at Tompkinsville, N. Y., 3rd Naval Base. 
Duty with Mine Sweeping Squadron No. 10. Ci- 
tation for efficiency. 



William Reddington 



of Bay Shore, volunteered May 29, 1917, at New- 
port, R. I. Went to sea one week later on the 
U. S. S. Arizona, after nine months he was trans- 
ferred to the Owl and served on this ship and the 
Petrel, mine sweeping on the U. S. Coast until he 
was discharged, with the exception of two months, 
when he did shore duty. 



Ernest James Patthey 



of Bay Shore, volunteered April 10, 1918, as a Sea- 
man 2nd Class; called for service in 2nd Regiment, 
Pelham Bay; passed examination for Petty Officer; 
detailed to train rookies; later promoted to Com- 
pany Commander. Discharged Dec. 18, 1918. 



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34 



WAR RECORD OF 



Raymond J. Ciishman 

of Bay Shore, enlisted Nov. 13, 1917, at Brooklyn 
Navy Yard. Trained at Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology; Bay Shore Flying Station; Pensa- 
cola Flying Station; Florida. He was discharged 
Jan. 31, 1919. He was overseas as an ambulance 
driver with the American Red Cross from June to 
November with Section No. 11 in the Verdun, 
Champagne de Dame, Berry Au Bac sectors. 



Victor M. Smith 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 23rd Regiment, 
N. Y. N. G.; trained at Camp Wardsworth, S. C, 
in Company K, 106th Regiment, 27th Division. He 
served in France and Belgium with the British 
Army from May 10, 1918, to March 6, 1919. He 
took part in the battles of the Hindenburg line, 
St. Souplet, Jonce de Mer Ridge, Mt. Kerniel, The 
Knoll at Guillemont Farm, Marne River, Dichen- 
buch Sector, Belgium. 



Chester B. Harper 

of Bay Shore, was in the U. S. Navy from May, 
1903, to May, 1911, serving the latter part of the 
time as Gun Captain. He re-enlisted in April, 1917, 
leaving Philadelphia on the submarine Mother-Ship 
Dixie, serving ten months with the destroyer flo- 
tilla operating in the English Channel with Naval 
Base at Queenstown. On April 6, 1918, he was 
transferred to the U. S. Naval Air Station at Agha- 
da, having charge of that camp of fifteen hundred 
men for two months. After an examination for 
Machinist, he was detailed to the flight division, 
later taking up flying as a flight mechanic and do- 
ing sub-patrol in the English Channel and Irish 
Sea. He was transferred to the Air Station at 
Whiddy Island in Bantry Bay as Chief Flight Me- 
chanic, arriving there by air. This bay was a 
German sub-base at the beginning of the war. 
From that time until the Armistice was signed he 
had full charge of all flying boats and their prep- 
arations. Total flying time 102 hours. He was dis- 
charged March 6, 1919. 



John A. Burchell 

of Bay Shore, enlisted May, 1917, in 1st Platts- 
burg Officers' Training Corps; Commissioned First 
Lieutenant Aug., 1917, at Plattsburg; served as 
Company Officer, Co. H, 305th Infantry, 77th Divi- 
sion acting as divisional instructor in bayonet 
training at Camp Upton for six months. He went 
overseas, arriving at Calais April 29, 1918. On 
May 2, the Division was thrown into the Calais 
Valley as reserves to the British Forces opposing 
the German Drive of April 28 and May 20, 1918. 
He visited the front lines at Haberterne and Gone- 
court Woods May 9, manoeuvred about Calais Val- 
ley until June 1. Was sent home July 28, com- 
missioned Captain Co. C Machine Gun Battalion. 
Spent the balance of the time, until he was dis- 
charged Feb., 1919, in Machine Gun School. 



Edward C. Raven 

of Bay Shore, enrolled as Lieutenant in the U. S. 
Naval Reserve Force in May, 1918, and served as 
Executive Officer on the U. S. S. American until 
Oct. 1, 1918. He was assigned to the U. S. S. West 
Cressy and served in the same capacity. Previous 
to this he had been chief officer of the S. S. Ameri- 
can in the Army Transport Service. He was re- 
leased from active duty in May, 1919, and then took 
command of the ship he had been on as Executive 
OflScer. 



Frank Yezek 

of Bay Shore, enlisted as a Sergeant Chauffeur in 
the 2nd M. E. R. C. at Governor's Island on May 8, 
1917. He was assigned to the Motor Truck Co. 66, 
at Camp Dix. He was transferred to the Motor 
Truck Co. 327, acting as Sergeant Mechanic of 
that. Nov. 1918, he was recommended for a com- 
mission, but owing to the Armistice, it was not is- 
sued. He was discharged April 19, 1919. 



Frederick S. Rhodes 

of Bay Shore, enlisted April, 1917, in the 2nd Tele- 
graph Battalion Reserve Signal Corps and later 
changed to the 407th National Army. He was called 
to service in June, 1917. He trained at Monmouth 
Park, Md., and Camp Alfred Vail. He sailed for 
France in August; served in the Alsace-Lorraine, 
Belgium, Luxemburg and Germany. He received 
two Citations from General Russell, Chief Signal 
Officer of the A. E. F. He was discharged from 
the service May 2, 1919. 



Irving Loucks 

of Bay Shore, enlisted at Brooklyn, N. Y. Trained 
at Newport, R. I. He was detailed Yoeman at the 
Detention Training Camp at Deer Island, Mass. 
He was discharged April 29, 1919. 



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36 



WAR RECORD OF 



Wolfer Van Popering, Jr. 

of West Sayville, volunteered in the U. S. N. R. 
Force; was installed in service Nov. 3, 1917; trained 
at Pelham Bay Park and the Federal Rendezvous. 
He was discharged at Marine Basin, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., on June 23, 1919. 



Lewis Van Popering 

of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed m 
service Dec. 28, 1917, at Philadelphia. He served 
with the U. S. N. R. Force in Naval Aviation. He 
sailed for France Feb. 23, 1918, landing at Bor- 
deaux March 5, 1918. From there he was sent to 
Pauillac, where he did construction work until 
Aug. 14, 1918. Later he was sent to Arsschon, 
where he served until the 22nd of November, doing 
construction and repair work. He left Arsschon on 
the 22nd of November for Pauillac and sailed from 
there Nov. 28, 1918, for the U. S. A. He was re- 
leased from service Jan. 22, 1919. 



Arthur Leland Lynch 



of Bayport, was inducted into the service, arriving 
at Camp Upton Sept. 19, 1917, training at this 
camp. He served with Company D, 302nd En- 
gineers, 77th Division. He arrived overseas April 
15, 1918. He had six weeks training in Flanders 
with the English troops. He went to the front for 
the first time on June 20. Served in the Lorraine 
Sector, Vesle, Aisne, Champagne and the Meuse- 
Argonne. 



Walter Herbert L^Honiniedieu 

of Bayport, volunteered and was sworn in the serv- 
ice at Fort Slocum, N. Y., on the 15th of March, 
1918. He trained at Fort Howard, Md., and was 
made Corporal on July 11, 1918, and was promoted 
to Sergeant on the 13th of October, 1918. He went 
overseas with Battery A, 7th Anti-Aircraft Bat- 
tallion. He did not see any active fighting, but 
was stationed in Villiers-la-Belle, a village about 
twelve miles outside of Paris. He was sent to 
Bordeaux, France, on the 3rd of November and 
sailed for home from Brest on Jan. 2, 1919. He 
was discharged from Fortress Monroe, Va., on the 
28th of January, 1919. 



Roy C. Hildebrandt 

of Central Islip, entered service by voluntary in- 
duction on June 5, 1918; trained at St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, Washington, D. C, in the Neuro-Psychi- 
atric Unit Medical Department. He was trans- 
ferred to Neuro-Psychiatric Unit Embarkation 
Hospital Corps Medical Department at Newport 
News, Va., on July 7, 1918. He was discharged 
Feb. 3, 1919, from Newport News, Va., Camp 
Stewart, as Sergeant. 



Carroll Livingston Honian 

of Sayville. Having been a student at Cornell Uni- 
versity for two years, he was called there Aug. 1, 

1917, to act as Civilian Instructor in Wireless Tel- 
egraphy, which position he held until March 8, 

1918, when he was commissioned from civilian life 
as Second Lieutenant and continued to act as Radio 
Instructor in the U. S. Army School of Military 
Aeronautics in Ithaca. N. Y. He was discharged 
from here December 15, 1918. 



Mortimer F. Brown 

of Sayville, volunteered in U. S. Naval Reserve and 
was sworn in Nov. 2, 1918. He trained at Pelham 
Bay Naval Training Station. He was discharged 
Dec. 21, 1918. 



Benjamin Franklin Woodward 

of Sayville, volunteered and was installed in serv- 
ice April 7, 1917. He trained at Pelham Bay Naval 
Training Station and served with the Secret Serv- 
ice and Naval Communication. He was released 
before going overseas, at New York on Aug. 17, 
1919. 



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38 



WAR RECORD OF 



Schuyler Watts 

of Bay Shore, called to service May 21, 1918; 
trained at Camp Upton; sailed for France and was 
engaged in the Metz Offensive. He was wounded 
by bayonet thrust. 



John Leo Fitzpatrick 

of Bay Shore, enlisted Sept. 26, 1917, at New York; 
assigned to 6th Engineers; trained at Belvoir, Va. 
He arrived in France Dec. 22, 1917; engaged in 
erecting cantonments at Haute-Marne until Feb., 
1918. They moved to the British Front; took part 
as Infantry at Warfusse-Abancourt until the Ger- 
mans were repulsed on April 3. For their work 
there they received the D. S. C. They were engaged 
in constructing trenches, entanglements and dug- 
outs until July 18, when they joined the 3rd Divi- 
sion at Chateau-Thierry. Advanced from the 
Marne to the Vesle River. After a short rest, 
moved to St. Mihiel and from there to Argonne. 
While on the way to storm Metz the Armistice was 
signed, Nov. 11, 1918. On Nov. 14 the 6th Engi- 
neers, Marne Division, became part of the Army of 
Occupation and started on the 220 mile hike to 
Germany, where it remained until Aug. 10, 1919. 
Received orders to sail for home and left Brest 
Aug. 15 on the Manchuria, arriving in New York, 
Aug. 25. He was discharged four days later from 
Camp Dix, N. J. 



Frank X. Creedon 

of Bay Shore, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917. He was as- 
signed to Machine Gun Co., 106th Infantry, 27th 
Division, General Ryan commanding. Trained at 
Spartanburg, S. C; arrived in France in May, 
1918, operating with the British Army at Mt. Ken- 
nel on the Flanders Front in different sectors, 
Vierstraet Crossing, East Poperinge line and Diche- 
buch. Moved on Sept. 10, 1918, to the Picardy 
Front, where they fought until the Armistice was 
signed. On this front fought at Guillemont Farm, 
Quenemont Farm, The Knoll and the famous Hin- 
denburg line, and then later at the LaSelle River 
and the St. Maurice River. This division was cited 
four times for being under fire. He was promoted 
to Sergeant July 20, 1918; was attending officers' 
training school when Armistice was signed. Was 
discharged April 2, 1919. 



Sidney W. Chew 



of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force June 29, 1917. He was ordered to the Naval 
Training Station at Bensonhurst. On Aug. 29, 
1917, he was sent on board the U. S. S. Leviathan, 
at that time the S. S. Vaterland of the Hamburg- 
American Line. They made the trial trip to Cuba 
in November, 1917. The trip was successful and in 
seven months the ship was converted from the 
passenger service to the transport service. Made 
the first trip across the Atlantic in December, 
carrying on the sixteenth trip 14,300 men. This 
trip was also their record for time, taking fifteen 
days to make the round trip from Ambrose Chan- 
nel to Brest, France. Before the Armistice was 
signed this ship carried 4,500 officers and 100,000 
men to Europe, about one-twentieth of the A. E. F. 
On May 30, 1918, the ship, with Brest plainly in 
sight, sighted a periscope on her port quarter. 
There followed about one-half hour of rapid firing 
by their battery. They had a very narrow escape. 
This was only one of their many miraculous es- 
capes during Sidney Chew's stay on this ship, 
which was two years and twenty-one days. He 
was released from active service Sept. 21, 1919. 



Henry S. Hall 

of Bay Shore, volunteered. Entered service June 
23, 1917; trained at Sayville, L. I., Section, Base 
5. Discharged Dec. 13, 1918. 



Lewis J. Hall 

of Bay Shore, volunteered and was installed in 
service Jan. 27, 1917. Served with the U. S. Naval 
Reserve Force, Transport Service, Aug. 10, 1917, 
to Jan. 27, 1919. He was promoted to Lieutenant, 
Junior Grade on the U. S. S. Floridian. 



Walter Henry Welcher 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the Naval Reserve on 
Dec. 4, 1917. Trained at Pelham Bay, N. Y. He 
was assigned to the U. S. S. Avocet, a mine sweep- 
er of the so-called suicide fleet, on Sept. 16, 1918; 
cruised the Atlantic Coast mine sweeping and an- 
swering S. 0. S. calls; transferred to the U. S. S. 
Brant on the same duty until in the fall of 1919; 
sailed with the Pacific Fleet through the Panama 
Canal to Santiago, Cal., and was there released 
from active duty on Oct. 21, 1919. 



Joseph W. Hall 

of Bay Shore, called into service May 29, 1918. 
Was sent to Camp Upton and placed in the 152nd 
Depot Brigade for three weeks. He was trans- 
ferred to Camp Devens, Mass., and served in the 
76th Division, Battery E, 301st Field Artillery. 
Trained at Camp Devens and later, after going 
overseas, finished training in a French Artillery 
Ti-aining Camp (Camp de Bouge) in the southern 
part of France. Returned to this country Jan. 5, 
1919, and was discharged Jan. 18, 1919. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



George Edtvard Davis 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve Force 
March 30, 1917, as a plumber and fitter. He was 
called to active service April 10, 1917. He was 
stationed at the Navy Y. M. C. A., Sand Street, 
Brooklyn, and later transferred to the 2nd Bat- 
talion, Naval Militia Armory, 50th Street, Brook- 
lyn. On June 30, 1917, he was transferred to Yard 
Craft Repair Force, Navy Yard, N. Y. On May 
9, 1918, he was appointed to the rank of Warrant 
Carpenter and assigned to the Examining Board at 
Bensonhurst, N. Y. June 24, 1918, he was as- 
signed to the U. S. S. Denver, then doing convoy 
duty. He was later transferred to Brest, France, 
via Liverpool, London, Southampton, LeHavre and 
Paris, and assigned to U. S. Repair Ship Prome- 
theus as Junior Repair Officer. He was released 
from active service and ordered home Oct. 25., 1919. 



Harry Nathaniel Brown 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve Force 
and was called for duty on June 21, 1918. He was 
trained at U. S. Naval Training Station, Pelham 
Bay Park, New York, in the 4th Regiment, 3rd 
Company. After satisfactorily passing his ex- 
aminations, he received the rate of F'irst Class 
Plumber and Fitter and served in that capacity in 
the Engineer Department at the United States 
Naval Training Station, Pelham Bay Park, N. Y., 
at which place he was released from active duty 
on April 26, 1919. 



Koy Edmund Pardee 

of Islip, volunteered and was installed May 14, 1917. 
He was trained at Plattsburg, N. Y., where he re- 
ceived his commission of Second Lieutenant of In- 
fantry Aug. 15, 1917. He sailed for France un- 
attached on Sept. 8, 1917. On his arrival he was 
sent to the second British Army, behind Ypres, for 
training. He saw action in front of Ypres (Flan- 
ders) and at Wychett Woods. He was assigned to 
1st Battalion of the 2(3th Infantry, 1st Division, 
commanded by Major Roosevelt, on Oct. 17. He 
went into the trenches Oct. 21 in the Looneville 
Sector. After ten days they were relieved by the 
2nd Battalion. He was then transferred to the 
3rd Battalion and went back to the front on Nov. 
10 for a time. He was later sent to the 42nd Di- 
vision as an instructor. On Dec. 5, he was at- 
tached to the 168th Infantry as Regimental Gas 
Officer. He went into the trenches on Feb. 22, 
1918, and left when he was gased on June 18-19, 
1918. He was treated at Camp Hospital 13 and 
Base Hospitals 15 and 8. He was ordered in class 
"D" and to be returned to the United States Dec. 
20, 1918. He sailed for home on Jan. 11, 1919, 
and was sent to a hospital in New York on his ar- 
rival Jan. 22. He was later transferred to hospital 
at Camp Upton, L. I., from where he was dis- 
charged on Feb. 5, 1919. 



Joseph Paul Consigler 

of Islip, enlisted on July 25, 1918, in the U. S. 
Navy. He was stationed at Pelham Bay Training 
Station in the 9th Regiment, 2nd Company. He 
was later transferred to the Fleet Supply Base, 
where he remained until he was discharged on 
April 17, 1919. 



Charles H. Jackson 

of Islip, volunteered for service and was called for 
duty on Sept. 8, 1918. He was in a Casual Com- 
pany, attached to overseas railway operating di- 
vision. He sailed for overseas Oct. 1, 1918, and 
was stationed at the Railway Division, Bordeaux, 
lours, etc. 



Joseph A. Leek 



of Islip, was inducted in service at Camp Upton on 
Sept. 19, 1918, and attached to the 27th Company, 
7th Battalion, 152 Depot Brigade; later trans- 
ferred to Local Board No. 2 Bay Shore, L. I., for 
selective service. He was discharged from Camp 
Upton on Jan. 15, 1919. 



George Edtvard Hubbs 

of Islip, enlisted Nov. 25, 1917; trained at Kelly 
Field, Texas, and served with the 148th Aero 
Squadron. He was overseas ten months. On Sept. 
4, 1918, while on duty, he was struck by an Aero- 
plane propeller, resulting in an amputation of the 
light forearm and causing complete paralysis oi' 
the right shoulder. He was operated on and a 
nerve graft made, but shoulder remained the same 
after eighteen months treatment. He was dis- 
charged from the Walter Reed Hospital, Washing- 
ton, D. C, on April 7, 1920. 



Ambrose J. Shaughnessy 

of Islip, volunteered and was installed July 10, 1917, 
at Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, N. Y. He was at- 
tached to Battery F, 59th Coast Artillery, 32nd 
Artillery Brigade. He arrived in France on April 
6, 1918. Trained at Limoges and LaCourtine with 
eight inch Howitzers. He saw action in St. Mihiel 
Drive and Meuse-Argonne Offensive. He sailed 
for home Jan. 8, 1919. 



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42 



WAR RECORD OF 



Jasper Bissett Gartnany 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on July 6, 1917, in the 23rd 
Infantry, N. G. N. Y. and was transferred to 
Supply Co. 165th Infantry U. S. A., 42nd Division 
and trained at Camp Mills, N. Y. He left for over- 
seas service Oct. 28, 1917, and served with the 
165th Infantry as Wagoner, on the Lorraine and 
Champag-ne sectors and also at Chateau Thierry, 
St. Mihiel and the Argonne. He arrived in the 
U. S. on Jan. 3, 1919, a casual and was discharged 
at Camp Upton on Jan. 15, 1919. 



George Mackenzie Gartnany 

of Bay Shore, enlisted Jan. 22, 1918, in the Private 
Engineers. He was assigned to Engineer Officer's 
Training School, Camp Humphrey, Va., Aug. 1, 
1918, commissioned Second Lieutenant, Engineers, 
U. S. A., Oct. 25, 1919; assigned to 5th Engineer 
Training Regiment, Camp Humphreys, Ga., Oct. 
28, 1918. Transferred to 1st Engineer Training 
Battalion, Camp Forest, Va., Nov. 10, 1918. He 
was discharged from Camp Forest, Ga., Jan. 4, 
1919. 



Percy W. DeMott 

of Bay Shore, was called to service Sept. 28, 1917. 
He trained at Camp Upton and was assigned to 
the 306th Infantry, 77th Division. He left Camp 
Upton April 13, 1918, for overseas, landing at 
Calais, France. He trained at Larone Ville for 
three weeks and was sent to the front with his 
company to relieve the 42nd Division at Alsace- 
Lorraine. After forty-five days in the trenches 
received orders to move to Chateau Thierry. He 
was in heavy action above Fismes, where they 
drove the enemy back to the Vesle River. There 
he was severely wounded Aug. 13, 1918. He was 
picked up by the French First Aid men and taken 
to a French field hospital. He was operated on 
there and after four days was sent to the Amer- 
ican hospital at Royal, France. After another op- 
eration, he left the hospital on Nov. 17, 1918, for 
a convalescent camp where all wounded men were 
put in companies. After his company was com- 
plete, he left for St. Nazaire, where he spent 
Christmas. He sailed for home Dec. 27, landing in 
Newport News; later sent to Camp Dix, N. J., 
where he was discharged, Jan. 25, 1919. 



Stanley Jerome Gleason 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force at Babylon, April 7, 1917, and changed over 
to the regular Navy at Brooklyn, N. Y., April 23, 
1917. He trained at Naval Signal School, New- 
port, R. I., from April 24 to Aug. 2, 1917. He was 
detailed to U. S. S. Florida. August 6; served as 
Signal Quartermaster on the U. S. S. Florida over- 
seas. He was connected with the British Grand 
Fleet from Dec. 6, 1917, to Dec. 2, 1918. He was 
discharged from U. S. Navy at the New York Re- 
ceiving Ship, Aug. 30, 1919. 



Harry Lewis Chew 

of Bay Shore, was called to service Sept. 28, 1918. 
He was detailed to Camp Upton for one month 
and then was sent to Camp Gordon, Ga., and was 
placed in Company B, 327th Infantry, 82nd Divi- 
sion, where he received six months' training. At 
the end of this time they were inspected by officials 
from Washington and pronounced a first-class 
Combat Division and embarked for overseas for 
immediate service. He landed in France May 11, 
where he saw six months' active service in the 
lines, with the exception of three weeks which he 
spent in a hospital, due to the eflfect of a high- 
explosive shell. He was in active service on Taul 
Sector, Marbach Sector, took part in St. Mihiel 
oflFensive and went through Meuse-Argonne Offen- 
sive. After the Armistice was signed, he was sent 
to Southern France to recuperate. All of the men 
of this division received a special mention from 
General Pershing for their excellent work in the 
lines. They received news of their departure for 
home in the latter part of May. 



Edwin B. Sonner 

of Bay Shore, trained at Plattsburg Barracks in 
1916 so that he was able to accept an appointment 
as Second Lieutenant, Signal Corps, reporting for 
duty to Camp Vail, N. J., May 22, 1918. On July 
4, 1918, he was assigned to the command of 186 
military telegraphers and signal corps specialists 
for transportation to Blois, France. Twenty-five 
days later he was assigned to the staff of General 
Russell, Chief Signal Officer of the A. E. F. This 
duty made it possible for him to travel from the 
Spanish to the Dutch borders, visiting the British, 
Belgian and French areas as well as all of the 
training areas of the Yanks. After the Armistice, 
his work took him through Belgium to the principal 
headquarters cities, thence to Cologne, down the 
Rhine to Coblenz to Metz and Paris. He experi- 
enced an unusual trip on his work of appraisal for 
the Peace Conference in covering for survey of 
communication the entire American battle area of 
St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne, including all of 
the captured German lines. After completion of 
this duty he was assigned to the 406th as Battalion 
Adjutant for transportation to the States. While 
on duty in France he was promoted to a First 
Lieutenant, besides being awarded a certificate for 
meritorious service with the A. E. F. 



Joseph M. Wallace 



of Bay Shore, called to service at Camp Upton, 
N. Y., Sept. 10, 1917. He was Regimental Supply 
Sergeant, 304th Regimental Field Artillery, 77th 
Division. He was discharged July 7, 1919. 



Carleton E. Brewster, Jr. 

of Bay Shore, volunteered for service and was 
called May 15, 1917. He was in the United States 
Navy and served during the war on the U. S. S. 
Bailey Destroyer. He served on patrol and convoy 
duty, and was discharged March 30, 1919. 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



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44 



WAR RECORD OF 



Leon Carellos 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the Naval Reserve in 
April, 1918, and trained at Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, 
New York. He was detailed to special duty and 
retained there until released from active duty in 
Jan., 1919. 



Transportation Corps, whsre they served until 
May 20, when the company was relieved. He re- 
turned to America on July 5 and was sent to Camp 
Devens, Ayer, Mass., from where he was dis- 
charged from the service on July 8, 1919. 



Albert Fisher 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Avia- 
tion as Machinist on Dec. 15, 1917, and trained ac 
Pensacola, Fla. On Feb. 18, 1918, he was sent 
to Philadelphia, from where he left aboard the 
U. S. S. De Kalb for France. Arriving at St. 
Naziare, France, on March 2, he was then sent to 
Bordeaux and from there to Pauillac, at which sta- 
tion he remained until May, when he was sent to 
Bolsena, Italy. His left hand was wounded while 
he was in Bolsena, Italy. He left for the United 
States on Jan. 4, 1919, and upon his return was 
sent to Pelham Bay Naval Station. From there 
he was sent to Charleston, S. C, and then to Bay 
Ridg'e, Brooklyn, from where he was discharged on 
March 22, 1919, as First Class Machinist. 



John J. Nagazyna 

of West Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Marines, 95th 
Company, 6th Regiment, on July 25, 1914, and 
trained at Marine Barracks, Norfolk, Va. He went 
overseas in Sept., 1917, landing at St. Nazaire and 
proceeding to Brest, which was at that time opened 
as American port for shipping of troops. From 
Brest went to Domblian for one month's in- 
tensive training, afterward going to Ver- 
dun Sector, where they relieved French troops, 
going back from lines in April in order to re- 
organize. On May 29, 1918, they were put in 
trucks and taken to Chateau Thierry to stop the 
German Offensive at that time in the Marne Val- 
ley. On July 4, 1918, they were relieved by the 
26th American Division and they went to Soissons, 
where they took part in the Marne Valley Offensive, 
later taking part in the last Battle of the Arg-onne. 
He served in Germany in the Army of Occupation 
until July 26, 1919. Mr. Nagazyna was wounded 
in Soissons on July 19, 1918, and was at the Base 
Hospital No. 20, Chatel Guyon, France, where he 
fully recovered. He received the following deco- 
rations: D. S. C, Croix de Guerre with gold and 
bronze star and palm leaf and the Medal Militaire 
of France, "For displaying courage under severe 
fire of the enemy and leading troops under my 
command at all fronts." 



William M. Washwick 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. N. R. F., 13th 
Squadron and trained at Bay Shore and at Georgia. 
He received his honorable discharge from service 
at Georgia, having been awarded the war chevron 
for patroling duty. 



Charles Koniroski 

of Bay Shore, was called to service on May 29, 
1918, at Camp Upton, where he trained, being later 
sent to Camp Johnston, Fla., and to Camp Myers. 
He went overseas in Sept., 1918, and was assigned 
to the Supply Train and served with the 91st Di- 
vision in Belgium. He was discharged from serv- 
ice in April, 1919. Out of seventy-five men in this 
unit fifteen were killed in action. 



De Witt J. Cohen 

'of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Air Service at 
Hazelhurst Field No. 1, and served in the 213th 
Squadron, Mineola, New York. He left New York 
about Jan. 22 on the troop ship Tuscania and was 
torpedoed off the coast of Ireland on the 5th of 
February at 5:47 P. M. He was taken off the 
sinking troopship at 8:05 P. M. and landed at an 
Irish port, from where they proceeded to Belfast. 
From there they went to England and to a rest 
camp at Winchester, England. They were next sent 
to Ayr, Scotland, and finally crossed the English 
Channel and landed at La Havre, France. They 
were then sent to Clessidon, a large aviation field. 
Mr. Cohen was then sent to the front and served 
in the Toul Sector, St. Mihiel Drive, the Argonne, 
and served in France with his squadron until the 
termination of the war. 



Steven Konstanty Paprocki 

of Bay Shore, enlisted at Fort Slocum on Jan. 5, 
1918, and trained at Camp Hancock, Augusta, Ga., 
in the 5th Company, 2nd Regiment, Air Service 
Mechanics. He left for France on April 16 aboard 
the U. S. S. Pocohontas, landing at Brest, France. 
He trained in Air Service Casual Camp at St. 
Maixent. at Tomorantin, and in various Air Service 
Shops. His company was later transferred to Motor 



Engene S. Helbig 



of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service in 
June, 1918, at Camp Upton, L. I. He was sent from 
there to Charleston, S. C, and later to the Buffalo 
Aviation Mechanics' School. At the time of his 
release from active service, June 1, 1918, he was 
a first class carpenter's mate, aviation. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



45 




i;ewi 



rYo.TOH£i:_y. -^^eNL s HCLBIC 



46 



WAR RECORD OF 



Josiah Carpenter Robbins 

of Bay Shore, enlisted June 26, 1917. Trained at 
Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C. He served 
■in Company A, 105th Machine Gun Battalion, 27th 
Division. Arrived at St. Nazaire May 30, 1918. 
Saw service in Belgium w^ith British and at Pi- 
cardy (Cambrai, St. Quentin) ; Hindenburg Line; 
Bony; Guillemont Farm; St. Souplet and LeSelle 
River. He sailed from Brest, France, on the Le- 
viathan, March 1919. 



Hiram N. Rossuck 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 23rd Regiment In- 
fantry on May 10, 1917. Trained at Spartan- 
burg, S. C. Sailed from Hoboken in May, 1918, 
with the 106th Infantry, a unit of the 27th Divi- 
sion, New York National Guard. Entered the lines 
on the Belgium front, Ypres Sector, in the early 
part of July. He was seriously wounded through 
the right chest by shrapnel, on July 31, 1918. 
He went through several hospitals and was sent 
home from England, landing in New York Nov. 
15, 1918. He was discharged Jan. 20, 1919. 



underwent intensive training in infantry drill and 
on coast defense guns. He had enlisted in the 
Coast Artillery of the Regular Army. On May 

24 he was part of a contingent of two hundred 
who were sent from Hoboken to the Panama 
Canal Zone. The ship arrived there on June 3, 
1917, disembarking the men at Christobal. TTiey 
were taken by train across the Isthmus to Fort 
Amador (Grant) where they were assigned to the 
Eighth Company (Old 144th) Regular Army. He 
was in quarantine for three weeks during which 
time he received intensive drilling in infantry, 
coast guns, mine laying, trench construction and 
gas mask drills. He was acting Casemate Elec- 
trician from Nov. 19, 1917, to Feb. 20, 1920. He 
passed the entrance examinations and attended the 
Electrical school at Fort Amador, C. Z., from Feb. 

25 to May 17, 1918. He received the highest 
averages of his graduating class and was trans- 
ferred to Fort Monroe, Va., where he attended the 
electrical school of enlisted specialists from May 
30 to Sept. 15. After the completion of his course 
there, he received a warrant and rating as Elec- 
trician Sergeant First Class and was assigned as 
an unattached N. C. O. Staff Officer with orders to 
sail about Oct. 7, 1918. He was taken with the 
Spanish influenza which developed into pneumonia 
on Oct. 2nd and remained in the hospital until 
Nov. 26th. He received his discharge from Fort 
Monroe, Va., on Dec. 6, 1918. 



Andrew Wilson Dow 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Marine 
Corps on June 28, 1917. Trained at Quantico, Va. 
He was a sharpshooter for two years and the third 
year made Expert Rifleman and shot on Regi- 
mental Rifle Team. He did not get to France, al- 
though at one time was under orders to go in 1917. 
His regiment was sent to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 
later and put in nearly one year in the tropics. He 
was honorably discharged Aug. 15, 1919, in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., at that time being Acting Color Ser- 
geant. Total service was two years, two months. 



Anton Riha 

of Bay Shore, enlisted April 1, 1918, at Camp 
Upton, L. I. He trained at Camp Unton and served 
in the Quartermaster Corps. His duty there was 
driving the Chief of Staff, Colonel Powers. He 
received rating as Corporal. He was later trans- 
ferred to the Motor Transport Corps. He was dis- 
charged April 5, 1919. 



Joseph John O'Kelly 

of Islip, volunteered and was installed in service 
Dec. 12, 1917. He trained at San Antonio, Texas, 
and Field Artillery Central Officers Training School 
at Louisville, Ky. He served in the 507th Aero 
Squadron, 18th Battery F. A. C. 0. T. S. He was 
discharged Dec. 17, 1918, at Louisville, Ky. 



Thomas T. Patch 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into service on June 
15, 1918. He trained at Cornell University and Camp 
Johnson, Fla. He served with 532nd Motor Trans- 
portation Co. He was overseas from Sept. 30, 1918, 
to July 9, 1919. He received his discharge July 16, 
1919. 



Donald Hooper Long 

of Bay Shore, volunteered on April 16, 1917, was 
sworn in on April 24, 1917. He was sent from 
New York to Fort Slocum where he stayed for 
examination and equipment. Was sent from there 
to Fort Wright on May 2, where he stayed until 
May 23rd. During his stay at Fort Wright he 



William Willet Barto 

of Bay Shore, enlisted May 15, 1917. He trained 
at and was stationed at Fort Brown, Texas. He 
saw active service on the Mexican border. He 
served with Troop G, 16th U. S. Cavalry. He was 
discharged from Fort Brown, Texas, March 20, 
1919. - 



THE TOWN OF I SUP 



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48 



W^AR RECORD OF 



George Kirk Nauert 

of Sayville, volunteered for service in the U. S. 
Naval Reserve Force, trained at Pelham Bay Park. 
He was released from duty May 1, 1919. 



William J. Beyer 

of Sayville, volunteered July 21, 1917, in Signal 
Corps. Sent to Fort Slocum, N. Y., thence to Depot 
Co. H, at Fort Wood, N. Y., later to Camp Alfred 
Vail, N. J. Assigned to Co. E, 55th Telegraph 
Battalion, S. C, as chauffeur, which position he 
held until his discharge. Left in April, 1918 for over- 
seas. In July he went in active service. Took part 
in the engagements at Vosges Sector, St. Mihiel, 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Received citation for 
good work under heavy artillery fire and sniping. 
Slightly wounded and sent to a hospital for two 
weeks. At time of signing of Armistice he was at 
Beauclair. His company was assigned to the Army 
of Occupation. They repaired and maintained the 
German telephone lines along the Moselle River. 
Left Germany the first week in April, arriving in 
Hoboken, June 27, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Upton July, 1919. 



Jetvett Holt Smith 

of Sayville, enlisted May 1, 1917. Called into ac- 
tive service July 23, 1917. Trained at Section Base 
No. 5, Third Naval District, U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force. Served at Base No. 5, S. P. 966 and S. P. 
251. He enlisted as a Seaman and was promoted 
to Coxswain. He was released on Dec. 13, 1918. 



Frank Veverka, Jr. 

of Sayville, enlisted in U. S. Navy in May, 1912, 
and was honorably discharged in May, 1915. He 
re-enlisted in the Fleet Reserve U. S. Navy in July, 
1917. He served during the war on the U. S. 
Transport Pocahontas, making in all, fourteen 
round trips with troops and cargo, nine of the 
trips being made before the Armistice was signed. 
He was in an engagement with a German Sub- 
marine on his third return trip during which 
neither side did any damage. He was released from 
active duty on June 24, 1919, and is now attend- 
ing college, taking up a course in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 



William, Edward Westerbeke 

of Sayville, was installed in service at Bridgeport, 
Conn., and sent to Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass., and 
from there to Kelly Field, Texas, where he was 
placed in an Aero Squadron. He was sent north to 
Camp Mills, L. I. In January, 1918, he was sent to 
a North River pier, and from there he sailed on the 
Carpathia. via Halifax, N. S., to Glasgow, Scotland. 
From here taken by train to Winchester, England. 
During these three months he received a little 
training as a soldier. Since Winchester was only 
a rest camp he was sent to Farnborough, England, 
and there trained for about four months for aero- 



plane mechanics. He crossed the English Channel 
to LeHavre, and then by train and march went 
on to a British Aeroplane Repair Depot at Courbon, 
near Chaumont. He worked here seven months as 
a repair man on aeroplanes. At Tours he passed 
the physical examination for aerial pilot and then 
trained at Chateauroux, a French school, for one 
month. The signing of the Armistice caused the 
moving of this school to Issoudun, an American 
Training School. It also canceled their training 
orders. From here he was sent to Bordeaux, and 
after waiting for three months sailed on the U. S. 
S. Texan to New York. He received his discharge 
at Camp Mills, L. I., on May 5, 1919. Before 
sailing from the United States, he was made a 
Corporal and after arrival in England was made 
a Sergeant, later in France became a Sergeant 
First Class, each promotion being made by a dif- 
ferent Commanding Officer. 



Carl Stein 

of Sayville, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force on May 15, 1917, and was called to active 
service Sept. 17, 1917, to report at Section Base 
No. 6, South Brooklyn, N. Y. Here he was in train- 
ing two months and rated a First Class Machinist 
Mate. He was then transferred to an S. P. Chaser 
for dispatch duty and later was ordered to Montauk 
Naval Air Station, with orders for special duty 
there. Here he remained on duty until the Armis- 
tice was signed and obtained his release Dec. 16, 
1918. 



John Cornelius Van Wyen 

of West Sayville, was called to service at Camp 
Upton, L. I., Oct. 8, 1917. He was transferred to 
Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 29, 1917, remain- 
ing here until his division began overseas move- 
ment. He served in Company C, 325th Infantry, 
82nd (All American) Division. He left New York 
on April 25_, 1918, aboard the British Transport 
Shyber, arriving in Liverpool on May 8. He 
proceeded to camp at Winchester. The Regiment 
was officially reviewed by King George and his 
staff on parade in London on May 11. He left 
Southampton for LeHavre on May 12. Brigaded 
with the British in the Albert Sector on the Somme. 
Left British to take ud American Sectors in June. 
He served in the Toul Defensive, June 26 to August 
6; in the Marbache Defensive, August 15 to Sept. 
11; the St. Mihiel Offensive, Sept. 12 to Sept. 16. 
and the Marbache Defensive, Sept. 1 to Sept. 20, 
also the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Sept. 26 to Nov. 
3. He sailed from Bordeaux, April 27, 1919, on 
the Transport U. S. S. Santa Cecelia, arriving in 
New York, Mav 9. He was discharged from Camp 
Upton, L. I., May 16, 1919 



George John Benedict 

of Bohemia, was called to service May 1, 1918. He 
served in Company A, 116th Regiment, 29th Divi- 
sion, trained at Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala. 
He was overseas six months. He was shot in the 
left hand and shot through the left lung on Oct. 
11. 1918, in the Argonne Offensive. He has not 
fully recovered. 



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50 



WAR RECORD OF 



Peter W. Kwaak 

of West Sayville, volunteered for service and was 
installed Aug. 30, 1915, and trained at Berely, Va. 
He was Chief Quartermaster in Naval Reserve 
Force. Went overseas several times on a Torpedo 
Destroyer. He was discharged in California in 
July, 1920. He served on the U. S. S. Topeka. 



William Bevelander 

of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed 
October, 1917. Trained at Pelham Bay, N. Y. He 
was a Petty Officer in Naval Reserve Force. He 
did not go overseas. Was discharged in May, 1919. 



Gustave Jacob Pagels 



of West Sayville, was a volunteer in service, studied 
at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., and took ex- 
amination for Ensign. He entered service January, 
1918, and went on board ship Wyandotte for 
trial, and was First Marine Engineer. He later 
became First Ensign and First Lieutenant. He 
made two trips overseas on board the Wyandotte 
and then was transferred to the S. S. Westlake. 
He has made four trips across on this ship. 



John Bevelander 

of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed in 
service April, 1917, and trained at Pelham Bay 
Training Station, N. Y., and became a Petty Officer 
in the Naval Reserve Force. He was discharged 
in May, 1919. 



John Southway 



of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed in 
, service December, 1917. He trained at Elmer Park 
Marine Basin, Brooklyn, N. Y., and at Pelham Bay, 
N. Y. He was a sailor in the Merchant Marine 
but did not go overseas. 



Albert Van De Griek 

of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed in 
service in July, 1918, trained at Naval Training- 
Station, Rockaway Park, N. Y. He was a sailor 
in Naval Reserve Force. He made four trips across 
on transport. He served until October, 1919, when 
he was discharged. 



Marinus Verschure 

of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed 
in service May 6, 1918. Trained on Boston training 
ship. He was a sailor in the U. S. Merchant 
Marine, made two trips overseas, his ship carry- 
ing ammunition which was unloaded at Bordeaux 
and Marseilles, France. 



Henry Lewis Otto 

of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed in 
service in April, 1917. Trained at Naval Base, 
Bath Beach, Brooklyn, N. Y., and became a Chief 
Petty Officer in Naval Reserve. He did not go 
overseas and is still in the service. 



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52 



WAR RECORD OF 



Charles Lewis Murdoch 

of Sayville, volunteered and was installed in ser- 
vice Dec. 7, 1919. Trained at Pensacola, Fla. He 
served with Company 3, Naval Aviation. He served 
as a Machinist for nine months overseas. He had 
his wrist broken at Kilenholm August, 1919. He 
rated as a First Class Machinist. 



Percy P. Sawyer 

of Sayville, enlisted in the United States Regular 
Army for duration of the war at Fort Slocum, New 
York, on Dec. 10, 1917. Left Fort Slocum Dec. 
30, 1917, for Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., arriving there 
January 2, 1918. Organized the Evacuation Hos- 
pital No. 8, remained here for four months and 
then received orders for overseas. Left Fort Ogle- 
thorpe May 1st for Camp Merritt, arriving here 
May 5, 1918. Left for France on May 10, 1918, 
arriving at Brest May 23rd. Went from Brest to 
Toul; upon arrival was ordered back to Paris; 
from here was sent to Juilly, south of the Belleau 
Woods, where they set up their first hospital in 
"Back of the Marines." Left Juilly after Chateau 
Thierry engagement in August, for St. Mihiel Sec- 
tor. Was stationed at Petit Majuny Sur Meuse un- 
til Dec. 16, 1918. Entrained for Coblenz, Germany, 
but after arriving here their orders were changed 
and they were sent to Mayen, Germany, where they 
set up a hospital, taking over all the school build- 
ings and also the German hospital. Left Ger- 
many for home March 13, 1919, arriving in southern 
part of France, Vertoy, March 17, 1919, and waited 
here until May 8, 1919, and left for Savenay, where 
they stayed for two weeks. From here they were 
sent to Brest, boarded ship on June 2nd and sailed 
the next day, arriving in the United States June 
10, 1919. Shipped from Camp Merritt to Camp 
Upton for discharge which was on June 19, 1919. 
He served in the following engagements: Cham- 
pagne-Marne Defensive, Aisne-Marne Offensive, 
St. Mihiel Offensive and Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



Jack H. Sawyer 

of Sayville, enlisted on June 25, 1917. He served 
with the Coast Artillery, New York National 
Guard. Called out for active service July 1st and 
shipped to Fort Hancock, Sandy Hook, New York. 
He was at Fort Hancock until September, 1918, and 
was ordered overseas. Shipped from Fort Han- 
cock to Camp Upton and from here to France. 
Arrived in France Sept. 23. 1918. Left St. Nazaire 
as replacement in the Field Artillery of the Second 
Division. Battle engagements, Meuse-Argonne. 
Was gassed in October and sent back to Base Hos- 
pital. Left Brest, France, for United States D'ec. 
13, 1918, and arrived Dec. 22, 1918. Discharged 
January, 1919, 



Carl Kilter 

of Sayville, inducted into service and sent to Camp 
Upton Sept. 28, 1917. Reinained here until Nov. 
9, 1917. Transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga., where 
he trained for five months. He served in Company 
K, 325th Regiment, 82nd Division, known as the 
"A. A." Division. Left U. S. A. April 25, 1918, 
arriving in Liverpool May 5. Went by train to 



Winchester, England, trained in camp there two 
days. He was then sent to London where they 
were reviewed by the King and Queen of England. 
Embarked by the way of Southampton for 
Havre, arriving at three o'clock in the morning. 
May 14th. Spent four days and three nights on 
the train, arriving at a town called Neu. Went to 
an English town, a few days later hiked thirty 
miles to Von Rue. Trained there two weeks on the 
coast. He was in the hospital for three weeks be- 
cause of poison. Went to front line trenches June 
16. 1918, in the Toul Sector. Relieved the 26th 
Division, remaining in the front lines fifteen days. 
Were relieved by the 89th Division. After two 
weeks drilling in a town called Peggy left for St. 
Mihiel to relieve the French Division. Was in the 
battle of St. Mihiel, also the Argonne Forest. 
About October 16th he was wounded at Grand Pre 
and taken to Base Hospital 14, Bordeaux. Trans- 
ferred from there to Base Hospital 69, at Savenay. 
Left here for St. Nazaire and embarked on the Sus- 
quehanna for the States, arriving at Newport News 
Dec. 16, 1918, not fully recovered from wounds. 
Stayed in hospitals in United States until dis- 
charged. He was at Base 71, Camp Meade, trans- 
ferred to No. 1, Gun Hill Road, New York, then to 
No. 41, Staten Island, where he was discharged 
Nov. 21, 1919. 



Harry Howard Reynolds 

of Sayville, volunteered and was installed May 
17, 1917. Trained at Section Base 5, West Say- 
ville, where he stayed ten months. He was trans- 
ferred to Bensonhurst for sea duty on board the 
U. S. S. Joyance for the duration of the war. 



Tjerd Van Wyen 



of West Sayville, was inducted into service on 
May 29, 1917. Trained at Camp Upton, Greenleaf 
and Crane. Served with Mobile Hospital No. 10, 
Medical. Served overseas for ten months with 
hospitals, caring for helpless, moved from sector 
to sector. 



Albert Verbeke 

of West Sayville, enlisted in the Merchant Marine 
Aug. 20, 1918, and became a sailor on the U. S. S. 
Nantasket which sailed between New York and 
Rotterdam, Netherlands. This ship was a freighter. 
He made one trip across before being discharged 
from service. 



Dingness P. W. Kivaak 

of West Sayville, volunteered and was installed 
April 19, 1917, and trained at Fort Wright, Fisher's 
Island, New York. He served with Battery F, 
Regular 56th Coast Artillery Corps. Sailed for 
Brest and trained there until July 20, 1917, when 
they went into the lines. Was at Chateau Thierry 
and went through the terrors of the Argonne dur- 
ing three months continual fighting without relief. 
Received two gold stripes for overseas duty and 
was one of Pershing's first half million. He was 
discharged from Fort Totten, February, 1919. 



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54 



WAR RECORD OF 



Lambert Synis Collins 

of Sayville, volunteered and was installed in service 
May 17, 1917. He trained at Naval Base No. 1, 
New Haven, Conn., as First Class Carpenter's 
Mate. He was there for the duration of the war. 



Ralph Ellsworth Rogers 

of Sayville, inducted into service on Dec. 5, 1917, 
at Camp Upton. He served with Company C, 
302nd Engineers, 77th Division. Served at Bac- 
carat Sector June 21 to Aug. 4, 1918, Vesle Sector 
Aug. 11 to Aug. 18th, in the Oise-Aisne Offensive 
Aug. 18 to Sept. 16, 1918, and the Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive Sept. 26 to Nov. 11, 1918. 



Cornelius John Konian 

of West Sayville, was called on draft and rejected, 
he asked for a special examination and received 
same and passed. He entered service on May 29, 
1918, and trained at Camp Hancock, Georgia. He 
served with the 1st Army Ordinance Detachments. 
Also served with the Field Artillery Outfits and 
handled ammunition for same. He was with the 
4th, 5th, 32nd and 42nd. He was with the 4th and 
5th at Verdun Sectors. He was at Mont Fauconne 
and sectors of the same. Advanced as far as 
Mont Tigny and then formed into companies and 
collected and destroyed the German ammunition 
left on the fields. Returned to St. Nazaire on 
April 29th, waited there for the 4th Division to 
sail on July 19. Landed at Hoboken and sent to 
Camp Merritt July 30, later sent to Camp Upton 
and discharged on Sept. 7, 1919. 



John E. Christoffel 



of Sayville, was inducted into service Sept. 10, 
1917. Trained at Camp Upton and Fort Sill. He 
served with Battery A, 304th F. A., 77th Division. 
Served at Baccarat, Aisne-Marne, Vesle, Oise- 
Aisne, St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne Sectors. 
He was wounded at La Chalade, Sept. 26, 1918. 
He was operated on and had three gas pockets 
taken from the lungs. 



William Henry Averill 

of Sayville, volunteered and was installed into the 
Third Service Company Signal Corps, Oct. 31, 1918, 
at New Haven, Conn. He completed the first 
course for Signal Corps Officer candidates as pre- 
scribed by the office of the Chief Signal Officer, 
Washington, D. C. He was honorably discharged 
from the service at New Haven, Conn., Dec. 9, 1918. 



Roland Edwards Strong 

of Sayville, volunteered for service in the Dental 
Corps, U. S. Army. Received a commission as 
First Lieutenant Dental Reserve Corps, July 23, 

1917. He was called to active service Aug. 26, 

1918, and was assigned to the 17th Infantry, Camp 
Meade, Maryland. He received honorable dis- 
charge from service May 3, 1919, while at Camp 
Meade, Md. 



Royal H. Theiss 

of Sayville, inducted into service on May 29, 1918. 
Ke served with the Quartermaster Corps. He was 
overseas in the battles of St. Mihiel, Argonne and 
the Meuse. He was also with the Army of Occu- 
pation. He was discharged July 3, 1919!^ 



Joseph A. Fisher 

of Sayville, entered service Dec. 5, 1917, as a Pri- 
vate, promoted to Sergeant, April 1918, and 2nd 
Lieutenant Coast Artillery Corps, Dec. 21, 1918. 
He was overseas and served in the Vesle Sector 
and the Argonne. He was gassed. He was dis- 
charged from service May 12, 1919. 



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56 



WAR RECORD OF 



Albert Griek 

of West Sayville, inducted into service June 1, 
1918, trained at Camp Laurel, Maryland, and was 
a member of Company C, 57th Regiment Engineers, 
Island Waterways. He worked as stevedore and 
later as barge operator. 



John Kaan 

of West Sayville, inducted into service Oct. 5, 1918. 
Trained at Syracuse Rec. Camp, Syracuse, N. Y. 
and was a member of Co. 7, 153rd Depot Brigade. 
He was transferred to Camp Dix, N. J. and dis- 
charged Nov. 15, 1918. 



William Griek 

of West Sayville, inducted into service July 22, 
1918. Trained at Camp Upton, New York. He 
worked in the Base Hospital, Camp Upton, until 
Nov. 15, 1918, when he sailed for France. He was 
stationed at Base Hospital 136, Vannes, France. 
He served overseas until July 7, 1919, when he 
returned to the United States and was discharged 
from Camp Upton. 



Christopher Locker 



of West Sayville, entered service Feb. 13, 1918. 
Was Chief Boatswain's Mate in the U. S. N. 
Reserve Force and trained at Base No. 6 Benson- 
hurst, Brooklyn, N. Y. He was discharged from 
service August 11, 1919. 



Carmine Vincent Luce 

of West Sayville, volunteered Sept. 15, 1917. He 
was stationed at Fort Slocum, Camp Robinson and 
served overseas in France and Germany. He was 
a member of the 17th Field Artillery Band of 
the Second Division and was wounded at Chateau 
Thierry. He returned from overseas at the end 
of the war. 



Garret E. DeGraff 

of West Sayville, volunteered for service Nov. 2, 
1917 and trained at Ulmer Park, Marine Basin, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. He was a member of U. S. N. 
Reserve Force, was discharged from service June 
28, 1919. 



Marinus A. Van Popering 

of West Sayville, inducted in service July 22, 1918, 
in the 5th Company, 152nd Depot Brigade, Camp 
Upton. On August 15, 1918, was transferred to 
41st Provost Guard, Camp Upton and served with 
this company from August 12, 1918, until Dec. 
8, 1918. On Dec. 8, 1918, was transferred to Camp 
Provost Guard Co. and with the same until July 
1, 1919, when he was dischai'ged from Camp 
Upton. On April 1st, 1919, he was promoted to 
Private 1st Class and on June 1, 1919, promoted 
to Corporal. 



Ivanhoe Stein 

of West Sayville, volunteered for service April 19, 
1917, and was a sailor at Section Base No. 5, West 
Sayville, N. Y., U. S. Naval Reserve Force. Was 
released from duty Jan. 18, 1919. 



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VA(^HOESTeiN. 



58 



WAR RECORD OF 



James Milton ISohowec 

of Sayville, inducted into service, October, 1917. 
He served with the 302nd Engineers, 71st Regiment 
as Cook. He was discharged February 28, 1919. 



Harry Humphrey Danes 

of Sayville, inducted into service Dec. 5, 1917. He 
trained at Camp Upton and Camp Grant, Rock- 
ford, HI. Left for overseas Jan. 20, 1918, with 
the 35th Engineers, Co. H. He was stationed at 
LaRochelle, France, during the war, making box 
cars. 



William H. Whalen 

of Sayville, inducted into service Sept. 10, 1919. 
Served with 306th Infantry. He was a German 
prisoner at Rastate for three months. 



Louis Ruzicka, Jr. 

of Sayville, enlisted in the U. S. Army Sept. 19, 
1917, served with the 27th Division, Co. C, 106th 
Infantry. He was promoted to a first class pri- 
vate. While in France he was wounded. He was 
discharged April 2, 1919. 



John Frederick James 

of Sayville, volunteered at outbreak of war, he 
held commission as Lieutenant of Field Artillery, 
United States Volunteer Forces. He was sworn 
into active service April 12, 1917; ordered to report 
at Plattsburg Barracks, New York, May 12, 1917 
and remained there until Aug. 15, 1917. On this 
date he was assigned to the Fourth Field Artillery 
Regular Army. He served with Battery C and 
Supply Company of the Fourth Field Artillery at 
Pine Camp, New York; Camp Shelby, Mississippi; 
Camp Logan, Texas; Corpus Christi, Texas, and 
Camp Stanley, Texas. He resigned commission 
in regular forces March 8, 1919, at Camp Stanley, 
Texas. He was appointed First Lieutenant Field 
Artillery Reserve Corps, April 16, 1919. 



Vincent Lamar Skinner 

of West Sayville, volunteered for service May 20, 
1918. He trained at Base No. 6, Bensonhurst, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. He was rated as chief petty officer 
Chief Carpenters Mate (C. C. M.) in the U. S. 
Naval Reserve. He was discharged in Septem- 
ber, 1919. 



Clarence Sawyer 

of Sayville, entered service as a private in the 
Regular Army on Nov. 17, 1901. He served with 
Signal Corps. His promotions were as follows: 
Corpoiral, Sergeant, Sergeant 1st Class, Master 
Signal Electrician, and First Lieutenant from 
Sept. 29, 1917 to Oct. 3, 1919. Ee was overseas 
in France from June 10, 1918 to Sept. 14, 1919. 
He is still in the service. 



Matthew DeGrajf 



of West Sayville, volunteered for service May 20, 
1918. He trained at Base No. 6, Bensonhurst, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Rated as chief petty officer C. 
C. M. in the U. S. Naval Reserve Force. He was 
discharged from service June, 1919. 



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60 



WAR RECORD OF 



George C. White, Jr. 

of Bay Shore, inducted into service July 20, 1918. 
He trained at Camp Upton and served in the 61st 
Ambulance Co. overseas. He returned to the 
United States and mustered out of service at Camp 
Devens, June 12, 1919. 



Frederick Ruschnieyer 

of Bay Shore, enlisted July, 1918, in the U. S. 
Naval Reserve, listed in Aviation as Machinist 
Mate. He trained in Bay Shore and Miami, Fla. 
He was released from service Dec. 11, 1918. 



Harry Hafele 



of Bay Shore, was called to service Oct. 8, 1917, 
trained at Camp Upton. He was promoted to 
Corporal Motor Transport Service and took part 
in the following engagements while overseas — 
Somme Defensive, Aisne Defensive, Argonne 
Offensive, Champagne-Marne Defensive, Aisne- 
Marne Offensive and Somme Offensive. He was 
discharged from the service at Camp Upton, 
June 25, 1919. 



Mayne S. Williams 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Navy on June 
30, 1917 and trained at Newport, R. I. In March 
1918 he went to France and served in the U. S. 
Navy land force for fifteen months. While in 
France, was in Brest for eight months. He served 
as a guard at Peace Conference for three months 
and spent the remaining four months at Pauillac, 
France. 



Herman Greenberg 

of Bay Shore, was a Private in S. A. T. C. U. S. 
Army, he was three months in secondary officer's 
training camp, artillery section. 



Harry C. Raven 

of Bay Shore, at the time war was declared was 
in the Island of Celebes, Malay Peninsula, for 
the National Museum of Washington, D. C, where 
he had been for about two years. Immediately 
on receipt of the information that we wei'e at 
war he communicated with the authorities that he 
wished to return to the United States to enter 
service. Notwithstanding that they replied that 
he could do more good where he was, he attempted 
to i-eturn, but was unable to do so on account of the 
seizure of the Dutch ships. He finally reached the 
U. S. in Sept., 1918, and enlisted, passed examina- 
tions for the Intelligence Corps. Was discharged 
soon after. 



Jesse M. Oakley 

of Bay Shore, entered U. S. service in March, 1917, 
at Bay Shore, trained at the Bay Shore Naval Air 
Station acting as pilot of boats for aid to flying. 
He was discharged in March, 1918. 



William C. Kirkland 

of Bay Shore, enlisted June 19, 1917, in the Medi- 
cal Corps Canadian Army. He was transferred to 
the 48th Canadian Highlanders, Toronto. He 
served in England from September, 1918, to April, 
1919, and was discharged in April, 1919. 



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62 



WAR RECORD OF 



Thomas ]. Julian 

of Central Islip, was inducted into the service on 
September 19, 1917, and sent to Camp Upton, 
Long Island, where he served in the 77th Divi- 
sion, 305th Regiment, Company M ; was later 
transferred to the Medical Department where he 
served until the date of his discharge, July 30th, 
1919. 



Chester F. Kelly 



of Central Islip, entered service on October 5, 1918, 
and served in the Naval Training Unit at Columbia 
University, New York City: ranked A. S. U. S. N. 
R. F. Was trained in the school for commissioned 
and non-commissioned officers until the Armistice 
was declared, when the Unit dis.banded on Dec- 
17, 1918. 



John Joseph McGiiirk 

of Central Islip, was inducted into the service on 
April 1, 1918, and was sent to Camp Upton where 
he trained in the 1st Company, 152nd Depot Bri- 
gade for four weeks, being later transferred to 
the 37th company of the same Regiment and then 
to General Hospital Number 1, Bronx, New York. 
Was discharged on June 11th, 1919. 



Alfred Wolf 

of Central Islip, was admitted to service on May 
1, 1918, and served as a 1st class private in Com- 
pany E, 114th Infantry, 29th Division. He served 
in France, in the Meuse-Argonne and at Alsace- 
Lorraine. He was gassed on Sept. 16th, while 
in the trenches on the outskirts of Ballersdorf, 
Alsace. From there he went to Verdun and later 
into the Argonne. He was in the midst of the fight- 
ing when the Armistice was declared. Sent home 
and discharged on May 1, 1919. 



Abraham Sarlin 

of Central Islip, was inducted into the service on 
February 25, 1918. He served in Company F, 
308th Infantry of the 77th Division. He was 
wounded in the right arm, by machine gun bullets 
while serving in the Argonne Forest, on October 
15, 1918. Several surgical operations resulted in 
saving the arm, though it was shortened by a 
couple of inches. Just before being wounded, he 
acted as a runner, and was connected with the 
Lost Battalion. He was discharged from Base 
Hospital No. 2 at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, on April 4th, 1920. 



George Trenton 

of Central Islip, was admitted to service on May 
29, 1918, and served as a Private in Company M, 
316th Infantry, 79th Division. Ke fought in the 
Argonne when the 79th Division captured Mont- 
faucon from the German Crown Prince. After 
four days battle there, they went into the Troyone 
Sector where they held the lines for twenty-one 
days in the trenches. From there, they went to 
the Grand Montague where they made another 
drive v/hich lasted until November 11th, when the 
Armistice was signed. The Lorraine Cross, the 
ancient symbol of Victory was the official emblem 
of the 79th Division, as in all its war operations, 
the 79th faced the enemy in Lorraine — and Victory, 
in the face of stubborn opposition — crowned their 
efforts. Private Trenton received his honorable 
discharge on June 9, 1919, at Camp Dix. 



Victor S. Kelly 



of Central Islip, entered the Naval Training Unit 
at Columbia University, New York City, on Octo- 
Ijer 5, 1918, where he spent two months in train- 
ing in the school for commissioned and non- 
commissioned officers — when the armistice was 
signed and the unit disbanded, Dec. 17, 1918. 



John F. McNeill 

of Central Islip, First Lieutenant, served in Medi- 
cal Corps from Jan. 26, 1918 to July 26, 1919. He 
was stationed in the U. S. at Neurological Insti- 
tute, New York; at Camp Devens, Mass., Camp 
Meade, Md., Camp Dix, N. J. Served in France 
with the following organizations: Evacuation Hos- 
pital No. 116, Base Hospital No. 117 and also 
Nos. Ill, 114 and 106. 



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64 



WAR RECORD OF 



Frederick W. Lindner 

of Central Islip, Sergeant 1st Class, entered Med- 
ical department of Service on Sept. 28, 1917 (Sani- 
tary Det., 307th Infantry, 77th Division). He 
served with the aforesaid continuously during the 
Argonne Offensive, Oise-Aisne Offensive and also 
in the Baccarat and the Vesle Sectors. He -was dis- 
charged from the service on May 9, 1919. 



Josiah J. Pulling 

of Central Islip, entered the service on May 30, 
1918, and served as 1st class private in the Medi- 
cal Department; in the U. S., at Fort Morgan, 
Alabama and at Fort Crockett, Galveston, Texas. 
He was discharged on June 19, 1919. 



James P. McKiernan 

of Central Islip, Sergeant 1st Class, volunteered 
on October 2, 1917, and entered the service in the 
Medical Department. He trained at Fort Ogel- 
thorpe, Ga., at Fort McPherson, Ga., and at Camp 
Crane, Allentown, Pa. He left for France on 
April 17, 1918, with Base Hospital No. 117 (Neuro- 
psychiatric Service) ; remained with this hospital 
at La Fauche, France, until Sept. 2, 1918j on which 
date, was transferred to duty with Neurological 
Hospital No. One — attached to the First Army, 
A. E. F. in the St. Mihiel Offensive. On Sept. 
22, 1918, was transferred to Neurological Hospital 
No. Three, Third Army A. E. F., taking part in 
the Meuse-Argonne Offensive until Nov. 11, 1918. 
On Dec. 4th, he left for Coblenz, Germany, and 
remained there in the Neurological service until 
August 12, 1919, when he received orders to return 
to the United States with a convoy of patients. 
Arriving at Camp Merritt on August 23, 1919 and 
was discharged from there on Aug. 26, 1919. 



Percy J. Elliott 

of Central Islip, volunteered his services on 
August 17, 1917, and trained at Fort Jay, Gov- 
ernor's Island, New York, assigned to the band, 
Headquarters Company, 22nd Infantry. He served 
as Musician 3rd class in the toand until July 4, 
1918, when he was promoted to Band Corporal. 
His company did not go overseas. The band as- 
sisted at all the numerous patriotic functions in 
and around greater New York — Liberty Loan 
drives. Red Cross drives, etc. Following the 
armistice, this band was continuously in service at 
the receptions and demonstrations accorded the 
troops returning from foreign service. 



William J. Baird 

of Central Islip, Sergeant in Company C, 102nd 
Field Signal Battalion, 27th Division. He was in 
the service from June 30, 1917, to April 4, 1919. 
He was stationed at Camp Wadsworth, Ga., and 
from there, went overseas, serving in Belgium 
and France. He took part in the following engage- 
ments: In Belgium, at East Poperinghe Line, 
Dickebusch Sector, Vierstraat Ridge; in France, 
The Knoll, Guillemont Farm, Quenemont Farm, 
Hindenburg Line, La Salle River, Jonede Mer 
Ridge and St. Maurice. 



George P. Crowe 

of Central Islip, Sergeant, Company M, 305th 
Infantry, 77th Division. He served from Sept. 
17, 1917, to Mgy 9, 1919. He trained at Camp 
Upton and from there went overseas. He took 
part in the Aisne-Marne Offensive, Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive and Baccarat Defensive. He was wounded 
at Death Hole Valley of the Vesle in the Aisne- 
Marne Offensive on the night of August 15, 1918. 
He received a shrapnel wound below the left knee 
and mustard gas burns. He was taken to Base 
Hospital No. 202. He was temporarily blinded 
while there. 



John Herold 

(See memorial pages). 



James F. Tierney 

(See memorial pages), 



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66 



W AR RECORD OF 



Howard A. Kelly 

of Central Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Dec. 5, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, Long- 
Island. Ke served in Company G, and in Head- 
quarters Company of the 355th Infantry, 77th 
Division. Left Camp Upton on April 15th and 
sailed on the S. S. Cedric. He arrived at Liver- 
pool, England, on April 28th and in France on 
April 29, 1918. He was in training with the 
British troops and then went to Lorraine Sector 
where he remained until August. Participated in 
operations on Vesle River and Oise-Aisne Offen- 
sive; also in Argonne Offensive in September and 
in Argonne-Meuse Offensive to November 11th. 
Was with organization continuously during action. 
Was promoted to Corporal, later to Sergeant and 
finally to Regimental Sergeant Major which was 
his rank on the date of receiving his discharge. 
May 9, 1919. 



William A. Conlon 

of Central Islip, Major, volunteered from Central 
Islip State Hospital Staff in May, 1917, at the 
age of 41, accepting a First Lieutenant's Commis- 
sion in the Medical Corps, dated June 1, 1917. He 
trained at M. 0. T. C, Fort Benjamin Harrison 
until Nov. 11, 1917. On November 6th, he was 
commissioned Captain after an examination held 
in October. From that time until Aug. 24, 1918, 
he was Registrar of the Base Hospital at Camp 
Zachary Taylor, Ky. He was then assigned to the 
position of Camp Psychiatrist at Raritan Arsenal, 
Metuchen, New Jersey, where he remained until 
January 1, 1919. He was commissioned Major 
M. C. on October 11, 1918. On the arrival of 
overseas patients at General Hospital No. 39, Long 
Beach, he was transferred there and remained 
until it closed on March 31st, 1919 when he was 
assigned to Plattsburg General Hospital 31. He 
was transferred to Gen. Hospital 30 at Carlisle, 
Pa., where he received his discharge. 



James W. Fraser 

of Central Islip, entered the service on May 1, 
1918. He served about one month in America at 
Camp McClellan at Anniston, Alabama. He went 
from there overseas where he served with the 112th 
Machine Gun Brigade and engaged in operations 
at Alsace-Lorraine, the Meuse, Argonne and at 
Verdun. He was discharged from Camp Upton 
on June 6, 1919. 



Ernest Houck 

of Central Islip, entered the Navy on July 3, 1917, 
and served as a seaman on board the U. S. S. Von 
Steuben and Le Croisic, France, and U. S. S. C. 
100. While on board the Von Steuben, three days 
off coast of France, on Nov. 9, 1917, they collided 
with the U. S. S. Agamemnon. On the 11th at 
the same hour, a submarine fired a torpedo which 
missed them by 200 feet. They reached port the 
following day without the loss of a man. 



Elvin Cordingley 



David Holmes 

of Brentwood, enlisted in Medical Corps and 
trained at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, 
D. C, and at "Old Soldiers' Home," Hampton, Va. 
He was then called to Plattsburg Hospital and 
served there, helping soldiers suffering from nerv- 
ousness and shellshock until his discharge on 
November 26, 1919. 



of Central Islip, First Class Carpenter's Mate on 
the U. S. S. Von Steuben from May 2, 1917,_to 
June 30, 1919. He did mostly transportation 
service. He was in three engagements with sub- 
marines and in a couple of collisions. He was 
present at the scene of disaster in Halifax, N. S. 
on Dec. 6, 1917, and all the men were kept busy 
fighting fire and digging bodies from ruined 
buildings and burying them. The following night, 
a Great Lake's steamer was blown against the 
Von Steuben and sank a motor launch which was 
tied to the boom. This caused a near-panic as 
the men's nerves were not at best after witnessing 
the disaster of the day before. 



Geoffrey C. H. Burns (M. D.) 

of Central Islip, served in the medical department 
from August 9, 1917, to July 1, 1920. He was sta- 
tioned at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, at 
Ann Harbor, Michigan, Camp Upton, Long Island; 
Camp Green, N. C; Camp Funston, Kansas; Fort 
Porter, Buflfalo, N. Y. ; Columbus Barracks, Ohio, 
and Camp Dix. 



Frank G. Midler 

of Central Islip, entered the service on May 13, 
1918, and served as a cook in Headquarters Com- 
pany, Machine Gun School at Camp Hancock, 
Georgia, from that date until Feb. 15, 1919, the 
date of his discharge. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



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68 



WAR RECORD OF 



Charles H. Lafferrandre 

of Sayville, enlisted in the service on Dec. 7, 1917, 
in Motor Truck Company No. 424, an independent 
unit which was organized for duty overseas. He 
was sent to France on May 8, 1918. His Com- 
pany served with different divisions and took part 
in the Chateau Thierry Drive, the St. Mihiel Drive 
and the Argonne Forest engagements. Mr. Laf- 
ferrandre was on duty at Headquarters, M. T. C. 
Park No. 721, Dijon, and received a citation from 
General Pershing for "Meritorious and Conspic- 
uous Services." He was in France over a year. 
Upon his return, he was discharged from the 
service, July 2, 1919. 



William F. Pausewang, Jr. 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Sept. 
19, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton and later at 
Camp Gordon. He served in Company G, 307th, 
Ammunition Train, 82nd Division. Mr. Pause- 
wang went overseas with his regiment on May 
18, 1918, and continued his training at La Cour- 
tine, France. They were held in reserve at 
Chateau Thierry but went into action in the Toul 
Sector. They took part in the St. Mihiel drive 
and in the Mouse Argonne. Mr. Pausewang was 
honorably discharged from service on May 16, 1919. 



Robert J. Beebe 

of Sayville, served four months in Friendship 
crew as Machinist Mate. He later served seven- 
teen months on the U. S. S. "Hospital." 



Theodore E. Jedlicka 

of Sayville, enlisted in the United States Submai-- 
me service at the age of 16, April 5, 1917. He 
had the honor of being one of the 210 men who 
served aboard United States Submarines during 
the period of the war. Mr. Jedlicka became in- 
tei-ested in the radio and wireless at the Sayville 
station and it was through his knowledge of this 
that he was able to serve his country in this 
manner. He had many narrow escapes in the 
undersea battles and his "Sub" sank a Hun U-Boat 
in July, 1918. He was in London during a severe 
air raid (the most disastrous that London ever 
saw. May 20th). Mr. Jedlicka brought home 
many interesting souvenirs from enemy submar- 
ines — one being a replica of the famous Lusitania, 
which had been struck in Germany to commem- 
orate the sinking of the Lusitania by a German 
Sub-sea craft. 



Joseph Brutscky 

of Sayville, enlisted in the U. S. Army M. D., on 
November 26, 1917, and trained at Fort Ogel- 
thorpe, Georgia, for three months. In France he 
was on detached service with a British Field hos- 
pital for four months. He was later at Base 
Hospital No. 17 where he remained until the sign- 
ing of the armistice. 



Gustave A. Wever, Jr. 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service in May, 
1918, and trained at Fort McClellan, Alabama in 
Company E, 114th Infantry. In France, he fought 
at Chateau-Thierry and at Verdun. He was gassed, 
and later captured by the Germans and held as 
prisoner of war for six weeks. Upon his release 
from the prison, he was in a hospital for three 
months. When he had recovered sufficiently, he 
was sent to America and cared for at Mineola, 
Long Island, thence to Fox Hills Hospital and 
finally to Camp Upton, from, where he was dis- 
charged from service on April 9, 1919. 



Edgar Sidney Howell 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Naval Reserve in April, 
1917, and was called to active service in November 
of the same year. After training at Pelham Bay, 
he was ti-ansferred to the armory at 52nd Street, 
Brooklyn. He was later detailed to the U. S. S. 
Adams, stationed at Rosebank, Staten Island, 
where he remained until the time of his discharge, 
March, 1919. Mr. Howell enlisted as a seaman 
and was discharged as Yeoman, 1st Class. 



James L. Mullen 

of Sayville, enlisted at Camp Upton, Long Island 
on October 8, 1917. He sailed for France on Jan. 
13, 1918 with a Casual Detachment. In July, 1918, 
he was transferred to the Headquarters of the 
Motor Transport Corps at Tours, France, where 
he remained until his return to the United States 
in July, 1919. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



Edmund C. Simpson 

of West Sayville, was inducted into the service on 
April 29, 1918, and trained at Camp Devens, Mass., 
in Headquarters Company of the 303rd F. A., 
76th Division. He left Boston in July, 1918, for 
Newport, Wales, and here entrained for Camp 
Wennall Down at Winchester, England. He left 
this camp after four days, going to Southampton, 
thence to La Havre, France, Clermont Ferrand, 
Aubiere, Cyrat and Beaumont. After serving two 
months on telephone switchboard and line work, he 
left for the front and was assigned to the 28th 
Division in the Toul Sector, taking part in the 
Meuse-Argonne Drive up until the signing of the 
armistice. Upon his return to America he re- 
ceived an honorable discharge from service at 
Camp Devens, Mass., on May 1, 1919. 



Joseph Frederick Jedlicka, Jr. 

of Sayville, enlisted in the United States Naval 
Reserve on March 29, 1917, and was detailed for 
Recruiting Service at Sayville until Aug. 1, 1917. 
He volunteered for foreign service and was sent 
to Bensonhrust Training Station, where he re- 
mained for three weeks, when he was transferred 
to U. S. S. Aeolus, which was being refitted for 
transport service. He made thirteen trips to 
France aboard this ship, carrying troops and sup- 
plies. He was released on inactive service on 
June 30, 1919. 



Frank J. Simpson 

of West Sayville, was inducted into the service on 
April 29, 1918, and trained at Camp Devens, Mass., 
in Headquarters Company of the 303rd F. A., 76th 
Division. He left Boston in July, 1918, for Newport, 
Wales, and here entrained for Wennall Dowti 
Camp, Winchester, England. He left this camp 
four days later, going to Southampton, thence to 
La Havre, France — Clermont Ferrand. His regi- 
ment used the 6-inch G P F 155-MM. rifle. After 
two months' training with the battalion in tele- 
phone, switchboard and line work, he was sent to 
the front and assigned to the 28th Division in the 
Toul Sector, taking part in the Meuse-Argonne 
Drive up until the signing of the armistice. He 
left for America in April, 1918, and received his 
honorable discharge from service at Camp Devens, 
Mass., on May 1, 1919. 



William Gabriel De Waal 

of West Sayville, was inducted into the service on 
Oct. 16, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, Long 
Island, and later at Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga., 
in Company F, 326th Field Artillery of the 82nd 
Division. He served overseas as First Sergeant, 
fighting in five battles. His company went over 
the top with two hundred men and came back with 
twenty-six. After the signing of the armistice he 
was sent to training school, where he studied until 
Jan. 31, 1919, receiving commission as Second Lieu- 
tenant. During the fighting Mr. De Wall's gas 
mask was shot from his face. He was gassed and 
was speechless for two weeks. Upon his return to 
America he was discharged from service at Camp 
Upton, Long Island, on May 26, 1919. 



Julius O. Ritter 

of Sayville, entered the service on April 1, 1918, 
and trained with the 78th Division, Company L, of 
the 310th Infantry. He sailed for France on May 
20, 1918, and engaged in the following battles: 
St. Mihiel (served in Limey Section from Sept. 17 
to Oct. 5, 1918) ; was wounded in action on Sept. 21, 
1918. He served with the American Expeditionary 
Forces for one year from. May 20, 1918, to May 23, 
1919. 



Edward J. Beintuma 

of West Sayville, enlisted in the United States 
Navy and trained aboard the U. S. S. Meade at 
Boston, Mass. He made one trip across on this 
ship and landed at Plymouth, England; Belfast, 
Ireland; and Dunkirk, France. He was discharged 
from service on March 7, 1919. 



Howard C. Edds 

of Sayville, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve in 
May, 1918, and trained as Port Guard, New York 
Harbor. He was honorably discharged from the 
service at Pelham Bay in December, 1918. 



Walter D. Van Popering 

of West Sayville, enlisted in the United States 
Reserve on May 20, 1918, and trained at Ulmer 
Park Marine Basin, Brooklyn, N. Y. He served 
there until the date of his discharge from service 
at the 52nd Street Armory, Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 
27, 1918. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



Albert Marshall Johnson 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service on 
Aug. 5, 1918, and trained at Camp McClellan, An- 
niston, Ala., in Battery B, 26th Field Artillery. 
He received an honorable discharge from service 
on March 6, 1919. 



George Stephen Johnson 

of Sayville, enlisted in the United States Naval 
Reserve on April 4, 1917, as Seaman. He trained 
at Pelham Bay, receiving rating as Quartermaster, 
3rd class. Ke served aboard the Mine Sweeper 
U. S. S. Foam. He was released from active serv- 
ice on Dec. 16, 1918. 



Percy S. Webber 

of Sayville, left Pratt Institute on Dec. 12, 1917, 
to enroll in the United States Ordnance Corps as a 
Draughtsman. He was assigned to Foi't Slocum and 
later trained at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, 
and at Camp Hancock, Georgia. After five months 
in the Southern camps he went to Camp Mills, from 
where he sailed for France, landing at St. Nazaire. 
He was then assigned to detached service as 
Draughtsman in the Engineering Department of 
the Aircraft Armament at Paris, where he re- 
mained for nine months. He was then transferred 
to Tours and promoted to the rank of Corporal. 
He sailed for home on July 12, 1919. 



Frank Johnson 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Oct. 8, 
1919, and trained at Camp Upton, Long Island, 
in the Headquarters Company of the 302nd Engi- 
neers. He sailed for France in April, 1918, receiv- 
ing a commission as 2nd Lieutenant on Sept. 25, 
1918. He returned to the United States and re- 
ceived his honorable discharge on May 10, 1919. 



Arthur E. Rose 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Naval Reserve as 2nd 
Class Seaman on the 5th of April, 1918, and trained 
at Pelham Bay, New York, where he remained for 
seven months, going through Petty Officers' School, 
receiving 3rd, 2nd and 1st P. O. rating. From 
there he went to the Naval Auxiliary Reserve Offi- 
cers' School to take the two months' cadet cruise 
on the coastwise steamer Madison of the Old Do- 
minion Line. From there he went to Pelham to 
Officers' School. After finishing the course and 
receiving his commission he was sent to Head- 
quarters at South and Whitehall streets, New 
York City, where he remained until mustered out 
of the service on May 16, 1919. 



John Heyboer 

of West Sayville, enlisted in the U. S. Merchant 
Marine and served at Boston, Mass., from Nov. 1, 
1918, until the end of the war. 



John ISelson Van Essendelft 

of West Sayville, enlisted in the United States 
Merchant Marine on Sept. 26, 1918, and served on 
board ship, making several trips to South Africa. 



William Henry Westerbeke 

of West Sayville, enlisted in the United States 
Naval Reserve on May 20, 1918, and trained at 
Base No. 6, at Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. He was 
rated as second class carpenter's mate. He was 
discharged from the service in Decemher, 1918. 




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WAR RECORD OF 



Douglas Talniage Goodale 

of Bayport, enlisted on Jan. 8, 1918, in the Signal 
Reserve Corps, Aviation Section, and graduated 
from Ground School at Ithaca, N. Y., on Aug. 3, 
1918. He served at Air Service Concentration 
Camp, Camp Dick, Dallas, Texas; later at Carru- 
thers Field, Benbrook, Tex., where he received 
flying instructions until Dec. 12, 1918. He was com- 
missioned 2nd Lieutenant in the Aviation Section 
of the Signal Officers' Reserve Corps on Dec. 13, 
1918. Discharged from active duty on Dec. 14, 
1918. 



Paul Whitman Smith 

of Bayport. Lieutenant Smith enlisted as a Pri- 
vate in the 23rd Regiment, Brooklyn, N. Y., on 
April 12, 1916. In Federal Service at Pharr, 
Texas; mustered into Federal Service in 1917 and 
appointed Corporal on April 10 of that year. He 
was discharged on June 29, 1917, to enlist in the 
Signal Reserve Corps, Aviation Section. He then 
trained at Princeton, N. J., Gi'ound School from 
Sept. 5 to Nov. 3, 1917. He sailed on Nov. 14 in 
Foreign Detachment, Aviation Cadets. He arrived 
in France on Dec. 1 and was there and at Tours 
and St. Maxient unt 1 April 30, awaiting flying in- 
structions. He studied at French Aviation School, 
Vores, France, until June 29, 1918. He was com- 
missioned 2nd Lieutenant on June 6; received 
Brevet D'Aviatuur Militaire Francais on June 29; 
was at French Flying School until Aug. 15; at 3rd 
Aviation Instruction Center, Issoudun, until Sept. 
14; also at Aerial Gunnery School, St. Jean de 
Monto, ferrying planes from Romoranten to front; 
was instructor in Aerial Observers' School, Tours, 
France. He left Brest, France, on March 31, 1919, 
and was discharged at Mineola N. Y., on Sept. 18, 
1919. 



John Jacob Hodge, Jr. 

of Bayport, enlisted in the United States Marine 
Corps on Aug. 3, 1918, and received training with 
the 324th Company, Battalion R, at Paris Island, 
South Carolina. From there to Quantico, Virginia, 
and transferred to the Second Separate Machine 
Battalion. On Jan. 16 he left the United States 
and went to Santo Domingo City, Dominican Re- 
public. After several months of service with the 
115th Company, 3rd Provisional Regiment, at Fort 
Ozama, he was transferred to Azua, a foothill town 
some miles from the coast. Duty in the Dominican 
Republic consisted of giving American plantation 
owners and natives protection from the raiding 
outlaw bands. He was discharged on Sent. 30. 1920, 
at Marine Barracks, League Island Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



took part in all service of the 1st Division until 
Nov. 1, 1918, including the Toul Sector. Cantigny 
(Trench Mortars and ^Hcn iniantry), Montdiaie/ 
Sector, Soissons (with 26th Infantry), Ansonville 
Sector, St. Mihiel (with 26th Infantry), Meuse- 
Argonne (where the battery was used as runners, 
stretcher bearers, and for general liaison. He 
was promoted to Corporal on Aug. 17, 1918, and 
recommended for commission. -On Nov. 1, 1918, he 
was ordered to Artillery Candidates School at Sau- 
mur, from where he graduated on Jan. 25, 1919, 
and ordered to St. Aignan, and then to Camp Pon- 
tenezen. He received commission as 2nd Lieuten- 
ant in Reserve and was transferred to Newport 
News and then to Camp Upton, and discharged 
there on May 23, 1919. Mr. Post was slightly 
wounded at Coulemelle and again in the battle of 
Soissons. He was cited in battery orders for lay- 
ing telephone wires during gas attack on Toul 
Sector and again for carrying wounded man out of 
Coulemelle. 



Charles Kintzing Post 

of Bayport, volunteered in the regular navy on 
June 30, 1913, in the U. S. Naval Academy. Dur- 
ing the war he served as midshipman on the U. S. S. 
Wyoming and U. S. S. Kansas. He graduated from 
the Naval Academy on June 6, 1918, as commis- 
sioned EnsigTi and was ordered to U. S. S. New 
York of the 6th Battle Squadron of the Grand 
Fleet and served on that ship in the North Sea 
during the rest of the war. He was commissioned 
temnorary Lieutenant, Junior Grade, on Sept. 21, 
1918. 



George W. Egner 

of Bayport, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 3, 1918, and served at Camp Jackson in Bat- 
tery E of the 60th Field Artillery, 20th Division. 
He was later sent to Camp Upton, from where he 
was discharged from service on Feb. 3, 1919. 



Fred Ogden 

of Bayport, enlisted in regular Navy on Oct. 15, 
1903, and served as Chief Special Mechanic. On 
May 19, 1917, he was transferred to U. S. S. Dixie 
and sailed for Overseas. He arrived at Queens- 
town. Ireland, on the 12th of June and was as- 
signed to duty in the repair of torpedo boat de- 
stroyers. He left Queenstown in December, stop- 
ping at Ponta Del Gada, Azores, until Feb. 10, and 
arriving at Philadelphia Navy Yard on Feb. 22, 
1919. 



Langdon Ward Post 



of Bayport. enlisted in the First Trench Mortar 
Batterv, First Division, on May 28, 1917, and 
trained at Fortress Monro, Fort Dupont, Fort 
Wadsworth and Camp Valdahon, in France. He 



Herbert Edward Green 

of Bayport, enlisted; served in the Atlantic patrol 
and Convoy sauad. being stationed at Boston, Mass. 
While in service he took part in the convoying of 
troop ships which sailed to foreign ports. He was 
honorablv discharged from service on July 7, 1919, 
at Bay Ridge, New York. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



W . Charles Macy 

of Islip, enlisted in the 407th Telegraph Battalion 
(which was the first Battalion sent overseas by tne 
New York Telephone Company) on June 14, 1917. 
He sailed on the Antilles in August of that year 
and landed at St. Nazaire, France. While over- 
seas he served in France, Luxemburg, and Ger- 
many. He held the following ranks: Sergeant, 
Acting Sgt. Major, Statistical Sgt., Corporal, Pri- 
vate, and twenty minutes as "K. P" — once. He 
was transferred to American School Det. at Tou- 
louse University in February, 1919, where he held 
the position of University publicity manager and 
was a member of the track team for four months. 
During these four months he visited most parts of 
France, spending some time there. 



Allan D. Macy 

of Islip, enlisted in the 17th Field Artillery, Head- 
quarters Company, 2nd Division, and trained at 
Camp Robinson, Wisconsin. He served with his 
regiment in France and took part in the following 
operations: Toulon-Trojon Sector; Oise Defen- 
sive; Chateau Thierry; Aisne-Marne Offensive; 
Marbache Sector; St. Mihiel Offensive (Cham- 
pagne and Mont Blanc), and Meuse-Argonne Offen- 
sive. He served in the army of occupation from 
Dec. 14, 1918, until July 26, 1919. 



William A. Macy 

of Islip, enlisted in Headquarters Company of the 
17th Field Artillery, 2nd Division, on June 26, 
1917, and trained at Camp Rohinson, Wisconsin. 
He served overseas and took part in the following 
operations: Verdun, Chateau Thierry, Soissons, 
Marbache, St. Mihiel, Champagne and Argonne. 



Ralph /v. Raynor 

of Islip, enlisted in the United States Naval Avia- 
tion and trained as Carpenter's Mate, 2nd Class, 
at Charleston, ffouth Carolina. He was later sent 
to Penascola, Florida, where he remained until the 
date of receiving his discharge, March 22, 1919. 



Ellsworth Epstein 

of Islip, enlisted in the United States Naval Re- 
serve on June 24, 1918, at Washington, D. C. He 
was assigned to U. S. S. Triton and later to Bu. 
Nav., D. C, where he was made acting YIC and 
given honorable service certificate. He was re- 
leased on inactive duty on Jan. 7, 1919, and on' 
June 20, 1920, was given an honorable dischargei 
from service. 



Earle E. Velsor 

of Islip, enlisted in the service on July 6, 1917, in 
the 7th New York National Guard Infantry Regi- 
ment, 27th Division, being taken into the Federal 
service on the 16th. Aften seven months of inten- 
sive training at Spartanburg, South Carolina, he 
sailed for France, landing at Brest on May 23, 
1918. They were held in reserve on the Somme and 
Picardy fronts for a short time, later relieving the 
English and taking over the East Poperinghe Line 
and Dickebush Sector, Belgium, on July 9. Mr. 
Velsor was wounded on the 24th day of August. 
One month later he arrived back with his outfit 
and started for the line again, taking part in the 
breaking of the Hindenburg line between St. Quen- 
tin and Cambria in the vicinity of Bony, being 
gassed three days later. He arrived in America 
on March, 1919, and was honorably discharged 
from service on April 2, 1919. 



Louis Francis Garhen (M.D.) 

of Islip, enlisted in the United States Navy Medi- 
cal Corps on Oct. 5, 1917, starting his service with 
the rank of Lieutenant (J. G.). He did recruiting 
duty in New York and Bridgeport until April, 1918, 
when he was transferred to the U. S. Naval Air 
Station at Key West, Florida. He served there as 
Senior Medical Officer until the signing of the 
armistice. In July, 1918, he was promoted to the 
rank of Lieutenant, U. S. N., Medical Corps. After 
the armistice he was transferred to the U. S. S. 
Aevlus, remaining on this transport until released 
irom the service, Sept. 22, 1919. 



Charles E. Gilniartin 

of Islip, was inducted into the service on Sept. 28, 
1917, and trained at Camp Unton in Company A, 
308th Regiment, 77th Division. He sailed for 
France on April 6, 1918. and served in the follow- 
ing operations: Oise-Aisne Offensive; Baccarat 
Sector; Vesle Sector; Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 
Sergeant Gilmartin was cited for bravery on 
Nov. 6, 1918, for accompanying his platoon leader 
in an advance which caused two German machine 
gunners to flee their post and thereby aiding in 
liberating the town, which was then held by the 
enemy. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



James Van Orden 

of East Islip. He served in the Naval Reserve, 
Public Works Division, during the years of 1918 
and 1919. 



Frank J. Podlaha 

of East Islip, served in the New York State Guard 
at Islip and enlisted in the regular army on May 11, 
1919. He served at Fort Totten, New York," and 
also at Camp Jackson and at Fort Schuyler. 



William John ISowah 

of East Islip, enlisted in the Navy on June 18, 
1918, and trained at Pelham Bay in the First Bat- 
talion of the Third Regiment. He sailed on the 
U. S. S. George Washington and landed in Brest, 
France. He later went to Southampton, England, 
and to U. S. Naval Base No. 29, Cardiff, Wales, 
where he served for three months on land duty. 
From here he was assigned to U. S. S. Lake Char- 
lotte, and acting as Seaman on this ship, he touched 
the following ports: St. Mario w, France; Barry, 
Wales; Bordeaux. France, and Avemouth, Eng- 
land; Southampton, England, and Boulogne, 
France; thence to Penarth, Wales, and to Cardiff, 
Wales, carrying coal and ammunition to the respec- 
tive ports. He returned to America, landing at 
Philadelphia, and was transferred to Bay Ridge, 
Brooklyn, and released from service on Sept. 30, 
1919. 



Frank Ralph Krenicky 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
May 29, 1918. He served in the 418th M. S. T. 
and in the 471st M. T. C. He also served overseas, 
taking part in the following operations: St. Mihiel, 
Meuse-Argonne, Araennes, Haute-Marne, and 
served in the army of occupation. 



Henry Kleuner 

of East Islip, was inducted into service in August, 
1918, and trained at Boston, Mass., and served in 
the Merchant Marine until the end of the war. 
He was discharged from the service at Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



Harvey B. Conkling 

of Great River, enlisted in the Coast Guard Service 
on May 30, 1917, and trained at Fort Trumbull, 
New London, Conn., being later transferred to the 
U. S. S. Acushnet. He served on Guard duty off 
Watch Hill, Rhode Island, from where he was trans- 
ferred to Boston, on wrecking duty. There they 
assisted in getting many ships on the way which 
had become disabled. After the great explosion at 
Halifax they were sent there to assist ships. They 
stopped at the following ports: Halifax, Louis- 
burg, North Sidney, Port Hastings, Port Mulgrave, 
and Souris. His ship was among those which as- 
sisted in aiding the Northern Pacific when it went 
aground off Fii-e Island. Mr. Conkling was dis- 
charged from service on Feb. 28, 1919. 



William J. Slanec 

of East Islip, enlisted on May 1, 1918, and served 
at Fire Island in the U. S. Coast Guard, Station 
No. 83, during the time of the war. He was dis- 
charged from service at Bay Shore, N. Y., on 
Nov. 30, 1920. 



Anton Nadvornik 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into service on May 29, 
1918, and trained in the 56th Infantry, Company B, 
Seventh Division. He served overseas one year, 
taking part in the following operations: St. 
Mihiel Offensive and Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



Charles J. Vorac 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 29, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, Long 
Island. He served in Company G, 306th Infantry, 
77th Division. He went overseas with his Division 
and took part in operations in the Baccarat Sector 
and Vesle River Sector. 



Joseph Charles Gill 

of East Islip, enlisted in the United States Naval 
Reserve on April 3, 1918, and served at Submarine 
Chaser Base at Bridgeport, Conn. He was later 
transferred to the Naval Aviation Station at Bay 
Shore, Long Island, and from there to U. S. S. 
Plattsburg, Army Transport, on which he made 
four complete voyages to England and France. He 
was discharged from service in April, 1919. 



William J. Hriibes 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 22, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, Long- 
Island. He served in Company D, 308th Infantry, 
and in the military Police overseas. He was dis- 
charged from Camp Upton, May 9, 1919. 



William Cunningham 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Feb. 25, 1918, and trained at Camp Upton, Long 
Island, in Company A, of the 302nd Supply Train, 
77th Division. He sailed for France aboard the 
Leviathan on April 24. Arriving at Brest, he 
drove to Baccarat Sector; thenCe to the Vesle 
Sector. He took part in the following engage- 
ments: Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive. Upon his return he was sent to Camp 
Upton, from where he was discharged from the 
service. 



William Louis Krenicky 

of East Islip, enlisted in the Navy on May 28, 
1918, and trained at the Navy Yard at Philadel- 
phia, in the Engineering Division. He later served 
at Submarine Chaser Base No. 27, Plymouth, Eng- 
land, with U. S. Nucleus Crew No. 14, U. S. S. 
Zeppelin. 



Herman Miller 

of East Islip, re-enlisted in the Navy on Nov. 2, 
1917. He was injured on his way overseas and was 
in the hospital for nine months, during which time 
he was forced to undergo four operations. 



Joseph Podlaha 

of East Islip, enlisted in Motorcycle Company No. 
306 in December, 1917, and trained at Camp Jo- 
seph, Florida. He served in France for one and a 
half years, during which time he served as a de- 
spatch rider in the St. Mihiel Sector and Meuse- 
Argonne. After the Armistice he served as a rider 
for Mr. Hoover in northern France and Belgium. 
He was honorably discharged from service at 
Camp Dix, New Jersey. 



Jacob J. Barhanes 

of East Islip, Sergeant, was inducted into the serv- 
ice on Sept. 30, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, 
serving in the 359th Motor Truck Company of the 
Mallet Reserve American Mission. He served in 
France with his company and engaged in the fol- 
lowing battles: Somme Defensive; Aisne Defen- 
sive; Montdidier-Noyon Defensive; Champagne- 
Marne Defensive; Aisne-Marne Offensive: Oise- 
Aisne Offensive; Somme Offensive. He was 
decorated with eight Bronze Stars, a star for each 
battle in which he took part. 



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81 




WAR RECORD OF 



Charles Jedlicka 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 10, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, L. I., 
in the Medical Detachment, 305th Field Artillery, 
77th Division. He was promoted to the rank of 
Sergeant on Jan. 10, 1918. He embarked for France 
on April 26, 1918, aboard the U. S. S. Von Steuben, 
making trip in six days and landing at Brest, 
France. While in France he served in the following 
battles: Baccarat Sector, July 10 to Aug. 1, 1918; 
Vesle Sector, Aug. 16 to Aug. 18, 1918; and in ihe 
following major operations: Oise-Aisne Offensive, 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive. After the signing of the 
Armistice, Mr. Jedlicka received a nine day fur- 
lough, which he spent in Aix Les Bains, near the 
Swiss border. He also visited Paris and other 
principal cities. He received his discharge from 
service on May 10, 1919, at Camp Upton, L. I. 



Edward Jedlicka, Jr. 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on Oct. 
8, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, L. I., in the 
Medical Detachment, 319th Field Artillery, 82nd 
Division. He sailed for overseas May 19, 1918, ar- 
riving at Liverpool, England, and later at Havre, 
France. He took part in the following battles: 
Marbach Sector, St. Mihiel Offensive, Meuse-Ar- 
gonne Offensive. Mr. Jedlicka was recommended 
for the D. S. C, but due to delay did not receive 
same. 



Frank J. Hruhes 

of East Islip, enlisted in the 76th Field Artillery, 
3rd Division, and trained at Fort Ethen Allen, 
Hattisbury, Miss. He trained at a training camp 
in France and took part in the following opera- 
tions: Marne Sector, Toul Sector, Verdun Sector, 
and did active service in the Army of Occupation 
in Germany. 



E. L. De Reeder 

was residing in South Africa in 1916. Volunteered 
for active service in German East Africa as a 
motor dispatch rider; was rejected, being only 
sixteen years old. In Sept., 1917, enlisted in the 
South African Medical Corps, and was transferred 
for duty to No. 1 General Hospital, Wynberg, Cape 
Town, where, after one year's service as secretary 
to the officer commanding, was promoted to cor- 
poral. After nearly two and a half year's service 
was discharged on request and sailed for England 
as wardmaster on the H. M. Hospital Ship Ebani 
and transferred for U. S. A. 



Rudolph Jedlicka 

of East Islip, was inducted into service on Aug. 31, 
1918, and trained at Camp Gordon, Ga., in the 
330th Infantry, 83rd Division, and also in Com- 
pany C, 108th Infantry, 27th Division. He sailed on 
Oct. 13, 1918; was struck by a submarine while 
crossing the English Channel, but landed safely in 
France. He returned from France aboard the 
Mauretania, March 6, 1919, and was discharged 
from service on March 31, at Camp Upton, L. I. 



Louis Joseph Suda 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on July 
22, 1918, and trained at Camp Upton, L. I., in the 
43rd Company of Provost Guard, during the period 
of the war. He was discharged from service on 
June 24, 1919, at Camp Upton, L. I. 



Louis Theodore Hauck, Jr. 

of Islip, was inducted into the service on Dec. 18, 
1917, and trained at Camp Upton, L. I., in Company 
L, 49th Infantry. He sailed for overseas on July 
21, 1917, with the 49th Infantry and was later as- 
signed to the Prisoner of War Escort Company as 
desnatch rider. He was discharged from service 
on Oct. 21, 1919. 



Rosario Ricciardelli 

of Islip, was attached to the Navy Fleet, Naval 
Reserve and was called back to active duty on 
April 6, 1917, when he became attached to the 
U. S. S. Georgia, at Submarine Base, New London, 
Conn., and also later to the U. S. S. Fulton. He 
was later transferred back to the Fleet Naval Re- 
serve and continued his service by cruising. Mr. 
Ricciardelli took part in the Spanish American War 
and was wounded in the Battle of Manila Bay on 
May 1, 1898. 



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84 



WAR RECORD OF 



Anton G. Wcela 

of East Islip, enlisted in the service on June 5, 
1918, and served at Sandy Hook, N. J., in the 
U. S. C. 9 Cutter Service during- the period of 
the war. He was discharg-ed from service at the 
Barge Office, New York City. 



William S. Savage 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Air Service in 1917 
and studied at the University of Texas as a Flying 
Cadet. He served as a Second Lieutenant in the 
Army Reserve Corps diu'ing the war and was dis- 
charged from service in June, 1919, at Kelly Field, 
San Antonio, Texas. 



Edivard Archibald Kiikacka 

of East Islip, was inducted into service on May 29, 
1918, and trained at the following camps in Amer- 
ica; Camp Upton, Long Island; Camp Joseph E. 
Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla. He sailed for France 
on Aug. 13, 1918; landed at Brest. He was pro- 
moted to Corporal on Sept. 1, 1918. While in 
France he served in the Prisoner of War Escort 
Company, escorting German prisoners through 
France and also in the R. R. & C. Company No. 
14, finding billets and billeting incoming troops 
from the Army of Occupation. He was discharged 
from service at Camp Upton, L. I., on Oct. 29, 
1919. 



Jack McGuinness 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on Oct. 
12, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, L. I., and 
at Camp Gordon, in Company F, of the 307th En- 
gineers, 82nd Division. He served overseas with 
his division and took part in the following battles: 
St. Mihiel Offensive, occupying towns of Pont a 
Manson, Nomoy and Vandiers; Advance on Chatel, 
Argonne Sector and Chateau Thierry. Upon his 
return to America he received his honorable dis- 
charge in May, 1919. (See Narrative). 



Lewis Chilar 

of East Islip, enlisted in the Regular Army on 
Dec. 29, 1911, and served the period of two enlist- 
ments. He trained at Fort Slocum, New York, and 
was later in the 57th U. S. Regular Army Infantry 
Band, 15th Division. He was discharged from 
service on April 2, 1919, at Camp Pike, Arkansas. 



Henry J. Vollbracht 

of East Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Coast Guard on 
May 31, 1918, and trained at New London, Conn., 
during the period of the war. He was discharged 
from service on June 10, 1919. 



Gordon Prescott Savage 

of Islip, L. I., enlisted in the service in 1917 and 
trained at Officers' Training Camp, Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, 111. He was permanently commissioned 
Captain in the Regular Army, 10th U. S. Infantry, 
in 1918. He is still in the service of his country. 
Captain Savage did not get overseas. 



Charles J. Brady 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on July 
14, 1918, and trained at Fort Slocum. He served 
six months at Brest, France. He was discharged 
from service on March 22, 1918. 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



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86 



WAR RECORD OF 



Joseph M. Whelan 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in Signal Corps in Ne'w 
York City and trained at Camp Alfred Vail, Little 
Silver, N. J. He sailed for France, landing at St. 
Nazaire, France, on April 13, 1918. During his 
service in France his regiment equipped and main- 
tained all lines of communication throughout 
France, operating on the various fronts. After 
the signing of the Armistice, they were attached to 
the Peace Commission Personnel with headquarters 
at Hotel Du Crillion, Paris. His command installed 
and maintained all telephone and telegraph facili- 
ties for the above commission at Versailles and in 
the Chateau of Prince Murab, occupied by Presi- 
dent Wilson during his stay in Paris. General 
John J. Pershing, after the signing of the Armis- 
tice, cited the entire personnel of the Chief Signal 
Officers for their work during the war. After 
completion of duties with the Peace Conference, 
Mr. Whelan was transferred to the Replacement 
Camp at Coves Cheverney and assigned to the 
113th Field Signal Battalion of the 88th Division. 
He sailed for America on May 23, 1919, and was 
honorably discharged from service on June 19, 
1919, at Camp Upton, New York. 



Lieutenant on Aug. 1, 1918. He sailed for Eng- 
land in September and served with the Royal Air 
Force established at Cranwell, Sleaford. Lin- 
colnshire, from Oct., 1918, to May, 1919. He ar- 
rived at Montreal on July 9, 1919, and received an 
honorable discharge from service on July 10, 1919. 



Dudley Wemple Hayivard 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Aug. 
14, 1917 at Camp Upton, L. L, and trained at the 
14th Company, 152nd Depot Brigade, 77th Divi- 
sion. He was promoted to Corporal on Nov. 19, 
1917, and to Sergeant on March 6, 1918. He was 
transferred to Company 2, Central Officers' Train- 
ing School, Infantry, at Camp Custer, Battle 
Creek, Mich., as Sergeant Cadet, on May 3, 1918. 
On June 12, 1918, he was transferred to Company 
2, 1st Battalion, Central Officers' Machine Gan 
School at Camp Hancock, Augusta, Ga. On Oct. 
27 he was transferred to Company 2, Quarter- 
masters Officers' Training School, Camp Joseph 
E. Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla. He received his 
honorable discharge on Nov. 28, 1919. 



Elward Smith 

of Sayville, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force on May 1, 1917, and trained at Section Base 
No. 5, West Sayville, L. L He later served aboard 
the S. P. 38, at the Naval Reserve Instruction 
School at Columbia University; aboard the S. P. 
343, and at the Federal Rendezvous, 52nd Street, 
Brooklyn. He was commissioned Ensign of the 
line on June 12, 1918, and was detailed as Officer- 
Messenger. He was transferred to the Naval Re- 
serve Flying Corps in July, 1918, as Chief Quarter- 
master. He was on inactive duty at the time of 
the Armistice. 



Joseph G. Antos 

of Sayville, enlisted in the United States Marine 
Corps on July 5, 1918, at Paris Island, S. C, at the 
age of 20 years. After a period of intensive train- 
ing, he sailed for overseas and joined the 74th 
Company, 6th Regiment Marines, 2nd Division. He 
served overseas from Oct. 21, 1918, to Aug. 10, 
1919, in France, Belgium, Luxemburg and Ger- 
many. He was honorably discharged from the 
service on Aug. 18, 1919, at Quantico, Va. 



Kenneth Hayward 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps, 
Canada, Nov. 18, 1917, as a cadet. He received his 
training at Camp Mohawk, Deseronto, Ont., Can- 
ada; at Wycliffe College, Toronto, Canada (School 
of Military Aeronautics); Camp Rathburn, Dese- 
ronto (Instruction in Flying); Camp Leaside, 
North Toronto (School of Aerial Gunnery); served 
at Base Hospital, Toronto, Canada, and at Camp 
Rathburn and Beamsville. He was promoted to 



Robert Harvey Bason 

of Sayville, enlisted dn the Navy on Oct. 19, 1917, at 
the Brooklyn Navy Yard, being later sent to New- 
port, R. I., for training. From there he was sent 
to Harvard University for Radio Course. Having 
been successful in this course, he was sent to City 
Park Barracks to wait for a ship. He was then 
assigned to the ship "Peter H. Crowell," where he 
served one year, being then sent to Bay Ridge 
Barracks, Brooklyn. He also took the Radio Com- 
pass Course at Pelham, later serving on the Fire 
Island Light Ship. While in service he made trips 
to Brest, Lorrient, Paulliac, Ti'ompaloo, Bordeaux, 
Norfolk, Hampton Roads; Portsmouth, Va.; Boston, 
Philadelphia, San Diego, San Francisco, Port Rich- 
mond; Seattle, Wash.; Sidney, Nova Scotia, Colon 
and Balboa, Panama. He again served four months 
on the Fire Island Light Ship previous to his dis-. 
charge on Nov. 25, 1919. 



Stanley R. Jones 

of Sayville, was inducted into service on Aug. 30, 
1918, and served in the 1st Company, 152nd Depot 
Brigade, at Camp Upton, New York. He was as- 
signed to Telegraph duty in Camp Signal and Sup- 
ply Office. He contracted influenza and pneumonia 
and had a subsequent operation for empyema In 
hospital. He was released from the Base Hospital 
at Camp Upton, L. I., on March 19, 1919, and was 
honorably discharged from service on March 24, 
1919. 



Robert G. Groh 

of Sayville, trained at Fort Slocum, New York, and 
later at Camp Lee, Va. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



87 




WAR RECORD OF 



Joseph A. Moore, Jr. 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Navy on Jan. 8, 
1918, and trained at Naval Training- Camp at 
Charleston, S. C. He later served at the U. S. 
Air Station, Pensacola, Fla., in the 6th Squadron. 



Raymond A. Halsey 

of Islip, enlisted in the Veterinary Corps, taking 
the examination for Second Lieutenant V. C. on 
May 17, 1917. On July 18. he was ordered to re- 
port at Hoboken for service abroad. He sailed 
from New York, arriving- at Liverpool on Aug. 5, 
1917. He then went to Southampton and from there 
to La Havre, France, and Paris, where he remained 
until Aug. 15, when he was ordered to report to 
the 5th Marines. He stayed with them until Dec. 
15, training under the French. On Dec. 15 he was 
transferred to service with the 1st Engineers, 1st 
Division, and with them served in the following 
battles: Sommerville Sector, Ansanville Sector, 
Montdidier Sector, Cantigny, Soissons, 2nd Battle 
of the Marne, St. Mihiel, Argonne and Meuse, Se- 
dan, Coblenz Bridge Head, Army of Occupation. 
On D-ec. 19, 1917, he was promoted to First Lieu- 
tenant and on April 15, 1919, to Captain. He re- 
ceived his honorable discharge from Camp Dix. 



Fordyce C. Halsey 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. N. Reserve Force on 
Oct. 1, 1918, and served as App. Seaman, being 
stationed at Naval Unit at Pratt Institute, School 
of Science and Technology, Brooklyn, N. Y., in 
connection with Students' Army Training Corps. 
He later took the annual midshipmen's cruise 
aboard the U. S. S. Connecticut as electrician, 
visiting Honolulu and West Coast, making ports 
of Seattle, San Francisco and San Pedro. He was 
released from active service on Dec. 15, 1918, the 
cruise, however, lasting until Sept. 7, 1920. 



Oscar Henry Doxsee 



of Islip, was inducted into the service on Sept. 29, 
1917, and served at Camp Upton, L. I., in Head- 
quarters Company of the 306th Infantry, 77th Di- 
vision. He served overseas with his regiment and 
took part in the following engagements: Baccarat, 
Vesle, Oise-Aisne, Meuse, Argonne. (See Nar- 
rative). 



Robert J. Bartley, Jr. 

of Islip, enlisted in the Quartermaster Corps on 
June 17, 1918. He served in the Quartermaster 
Corps as Lieutenant, organizing Negro Labor Bat- 
talions for Engineer and Quartermaster Corps. 
He received his discharge from service on March 
13, 1919. 



Franklin S. Foster 

of Islip, was inducted into the service and trained 
at Camp Upton, L. I., in Company H, of the 302nd 
Supply Train, 77th Division. He served overseas 
with his regiment and fought on four battle fronts. 
Upon his return to America he received an honor- 
able discharge from service at Camp Upton. 



Clyde H. Ketcham 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Navy on April 5, 
1918; studied at the U. S. N. Engineering School 
at Stevens Tech., Hoboken, N. J., and at U. S. N. 
Steam Turbine School at Carnegie Tech., and grad- 
uated from both of the above schools. He served 
aboard the U. S. S. Celtic and aboard the U. S. S. 
West Hosokie as engineer division and senior watch 
engineer officer. He successfully steamed out of 
several emergencies at sea. He was released from 
active service on Aug. 6, 1919. 



Willis C. Raynor 

of Islip, enlisted in the Students' Army Training 
Corps at Columbia University and trained there in 
Company H during the period of war. 



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90 



WAR RECORD OF 



Herbert E. Ketchani 

See memorial pages. 



Henry Monzet 

of Islip, enlisted on Feb. 25, 1918, in Battery E, 
341st Field Artillery, 89th Division. He served in 
France from May 20, 1918, to June 4, 1919. 



Harold A. Ketcham 

of Islip, was inducted into the service and trained 
at Camp Upton, L. I., for six months in Company 
I, 308th Infantry. He served with the A. E. F. for 
twelve months in France, fighting in the Baccarat 
Sector, Oise-Aisne Offensive, Meuse-Argonne; was 
lost for five days in Argonne. He suffered many 
hardships but returned safely to New York on 
April 28, 1918; went to Camp Mills, from where 
the 77th Division held their parade in New York 
City. He received his honorable discharge from 
service on May 9, 1919, at Camp Upton, L. I. 



William P. Hoivell 

of Islip, enlisted in the Medical Corps of the U. S. 
Army on May 27, 1914, went to Fort Slocum for a 
few days and was sent direct to Mexican border. 
After serving on the border in different forts 
for two and a half years he returned north and 
was later sent to Allentown, Pa., from where he 
sailed for France. He was held up on the ship 
owing to the explosion at Halifax. During this 
time, he had very interesting experiences. Arriv- 
ing in France, he served there for nineteen months. 
He returned to America and received an honorable 
discharge from service on Aug. 19, 1919. 



Joseph J. Kiitil and George H. Gates 

of Islip, volunteers. They enlisted together and 
remained together until the time of their discharge 
from service. (See Narrative page 141). 



Bernard M. Schramm 

of Islip, enlisted in the Enlisted Ordnance Corps at 
New York City on Dec. 10, 1917; was assigned to 
the office of the Inspection Division, Ordnance De- 
partment, at Albermarle Building, 24th Street & 
Broadway, New York City; transferred to the same 
office at Washington, D. C, early in Jan., 1918. 
On April 10, he was transferred to Aberdeen Prov- 
ing Grounds, Maryland. He was assigned to Head- 
quarters Company, Ordnance Corps and appointed 
clerk to the Post Adjutant. He was promoted to 
First Class Private, Corporal and Sergeant. He 
was honorably discharged from service at Aberdeen 
Proving Grounds on Jan. 27, 1919. 



Edward I. Kay nor 

of Islip, enlisted in Company A, 40th Engineers, 
Camouflage Corps. He trained at American Uni- 
versity at Washington, D. C. He served in France 
and was wounded on Oct, 24, being in the hospi;;al 
for fifteen months following. He is now disabled 
for life, one leg being left two inches shorter than 
the other. The Government has sent him to Co- 
lumbia College and is giving him a course in archi- 
tecture. 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



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92 



WAR RECORD OF 



George E. Pennell 

of Great River, was inducted into the service and 
trained at Camp McCIellan, Anniston, Ala., in tiie 
104th Motor Supply Train, Company D, 29th Di- 
vision (The Blue and Gray Division). He served 
in France for one year, taking part in the following- 
battles: Center Sector, Haute Alsace Defensive, 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



Benjamin F. Hoivell 



of Islip, enlisted in 1913 in the U. S. Navy and 
trained at Newport Naval Training Station. He 
served as a Seaman on the U. S. S. Vermont, from 
where he was transferred to the New U. S. S. Ari- 
zona, on which he made trips to the different 
southern countries. He re-enlisted on same ship. 
He served as Gunner's Mate and was later made 
C. P. 0. He made two trips to France, then went 
to Cuba, South America and the West Indies. He 
was honorably discharged from service in Aug., 
1919. 



Joseph M. Ward 

of Islip, was inducted into the service on Sept. 28, 
1917, and entered the Officers' Training School at 
Camp Upton, L. I. He was made Sergeant of 
J. S. Infantry on April 24, 1918, being later trans- 
ferred to Camp Gordon, Ga., where he was com- 
missioned as Second Lieutenant, U. S. Infantry, on 
June 5, 1918. On Sept. 27, 191S, he was promoted 
to First Lieutenant. He received his discharge 
from Camp Gordon on Dec. 2, 1919. 



John J. Hanford 

of Islip, enlisted on Oct. 15, 1918, in Motor Trans- 
port at Rochester, N. Y. He served in this com- 
pany at Rochester until the date of his release 
from service, D-ec. 6, 1918. 



William Frederick Faber 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Navy on May 20, 191(5, 
and trained at the U. S. N. T. S., Newport, R. I. 
He trained and served aboard the U. S. S. Paducah, 
doing patrol duty overseas from April 6, 1917, to 
Jan. 7, 1919. 



Harry Livingston Hubbs 

of Islip, enlisted in the 4th Company at Fort SIo- 
cum and served there and in Arsenal Company No. 
1 at Raritan, N. J. He was made Sergeant on 
March 2, 1918, and First Class Sergeant on May 
30, 1918. He received his discharge froin service 
at Camp Raritan on March 11, 1919. 



Henry Karpinsky 

of Islip, enlisted in the Army and trained at Fort 
Slocum, from there being sent to Camp McCIellan, 
Ala., where he served during the remainder of the 



Harold A. Duryea 

of Islip, enlisted on June 22, 1916, in 2nd Field 
Artillery of Brooklyn, Battery C, and served at the 
Border until March, 1917. He returned to the re- 
serves and when the reserves were called in for the 
World War, was placed in Company I of the 23rd 
Infantry of Brooklyn. After training nine months 
with this regiment at Spartanburg, S. C, he se- 
cured a transfer and entered the Aviation School 
at Princeton; trained at Dallas, Fort Worth, Texas, 
being afterwards stationed at Detroit, Dayton and 
at Mineola. He was discharged from service on 
Jan. 3, 1919. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



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94 



WAR RECORD OF 



John F. Ranahan, Jr. 

of Islip, enlisted in the service on Nov. 23, 1917; 
sailed for France on Jan. 13, 1918, where he served 
until May 8, 1919. He was honorably discharged 
from the service on May 31, 1919. 



Francis E. Ward 

of Islip, enlisted in the 379th Motor Truck Com- 
pany on June 3, 1918, and trained at Camp Upton, 
L. I. On October 27 he was transferred from Camp 
Upton to the Aviation Section of the Bureau of 
Standards, at Washington, D. C. He was dis- 
charged from service at Camp Meigs, Washington, 
D. C, on Jan. 14, 1919. 



Vernon T. Lee 

of Islip, enlisted Sept. 9, 1918, in the C. 0. F. S. 
and trained at Camp Lee, Va. He served there 
until the date of his discharge from service, Nov. 
23, 1918. 



Robert Mcintosh 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Navy on April 14, 
1917. Was discharged from service on Feb. 14, 
1919. ((See Narrative page 140). 



John J. Machacek 

of Islip, was inducted into the service on Sept. 18, 
1917, and trained at Camp Upton, L. I., in 152nd 
Depot Brigade, 77th Division, being later trans- 
ferred to the 358th Engineers at Camp Merritt, 
N. J., from where he was transferred to the 304th 
Field Artillery at Camp Upton; then to the Signal 
Corps, Meteorological Division, Washington, D.C.; 
then to Aviation, Science and Research Division, 
Bureau of Aircraft Production, Washington, D. C. 
He was discharged from service at Camp Meigs, 
Washington, D. C. 



Joseph John Machacek 

of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve on 
April 3, 1918, and trained at U. S. N. T. S., Pelham 
Bay, from July 8 to Jan. 23, 1919. He served 
aboard the Transport U. S. S. Matsonia and North- 
ern Pacific, making six round trips and landing 
at Brest, St. Nazaire and Bordeaux. He was trans- 
ferred to the U. S. S. Chesapeake on Jan. 28, 1919, 
which was used for salvage and later was con- 
verted into a mine sweeper. He was sent to Brest, 
France, where his ship relieved the U. S. S. Fa- 
vorite in July, 1919; was transferred to Mme 
Sweeping Force, in the North Sea Base at Kirk- 
wall, in the Orkneys, Scotland; circled the British 
Isles twice, hitting Liverpool, London, Newcastle, 
Belfast, New Haven, Southampton, Milford Haven 
and Scapa Flow. Mine Sweeping was completed on 
Oct 19, 1919. He was then sent to Brest, where 
he was transferred to the U. S. S. Mercury. He 
then returned and received his honorable discharge 
from service at Bay Ridge on Dec. 6, 1919. 



Abel Jensen 

■of Islip, enlisted in the service on Nov. 30, 1917, 
and was sent to Camp J. E. Johnston, Jacksonville, 
Fla., for training. He left for France on Sept. 2, 
1918, with August Automatic Replacement Com- 
pany. He served in France until Aug. 15, 1919, 
when he left the Anny of Occupation and sailed 
for America. He was discharged from service on 
-Sept. 2, 1919. 



Joseph A. Yezek 



of Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Marines on Jan. 26, 
1917. He trained at Paris Island, S. C; then aboard 
the U. S. S. Minnesota. He did foreign service 
from Jan. 8, 1918, to July 25, 1919, in the A. E. F. 
and engaged in the following battles: Belleau 
Woods, Mohrbach Sector, St. Mihiel Offensive, 
Champagne Offensive, Meuse-Argonne Offensive, 
Army of Occupation and Germany (seven months). 
He was honorably discharged from service upon 
his return to America. 



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96 



WAR RECORD OF 



William Adams 

of East Islip, enlisted in the 104th Machine Gun 
Battalion of the 27th Division, and trained at 
Spartanburg, S. C. He served in France with his 
Battalion and served in the following engage- 
ments: Hindenburg Line (in vicinity of Bony), La 
Salle River (vicinity of St. Souplet), Joue de Mer 
Ridge, St. Maurice Stream, The Knoll, Guillemont 
Farm, Quennemont Farm, all in France; East Po- 
peringhe Line in Belgium. 



to Langley Field, Hampton, Va., a Reconnaisance 
School for Observers, to drive Reconnaisance 
Planes. After a month there he was ordered to 
Talliafero Field, Fort Worth, Texas, an Aerial 
Gunnery School for Pilots. On Aug. 1, 1918, he 
was ordered to Selfridge Field, Mich., an Aerial 
Gunnery School for Observers to be a "Pilot In- 
structor." Discharged from service on Dec. 26, 
1918, at Selfridge Field. 



Joseph Stransky 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 19, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, L. I., 
in Company G, 302nd Ammunition Train, where he 
was appointed Corporal. He was then sent to 
Camp Merritt, where he served in Headquarters 
Company as Sergeant. He served at Camp Mer- 
ritt until the time of his discharge from service, 
March 6, 1919. 



Henry Stransky 

of East Islip, enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve in 
Aug., 1917, at Bay Shore Naval Air Station. He 
trained for three months on the School Ship Granite 
State, located in New York. On Dec. 25, 1917, he 
was transferred to the U. S. S. President Grant, 
doing transport service. He made twelve trips 
from New York to Brest, France, transporting 
troops. During the time of his service aboard this 
ship he was made Coxswain. He received his 
honorable discharge from service in Nov., 1920. 



Bayard Gushing Hoppin 

of East Islip, enlisted on Aug. 27, 1917, at Platts- 
burgh and trained in Company G, 380th Infantry, 
95th Division. He was discharged from the service 
on Dec. 14, 1918. 



Warren C. Haff 

of Islip, enlisted in the Aviation Section, Signal 
Reserve Corps on Nov. 11, 1917, and entered the 
U. S. School of Militai-y Aeronautics at Cornell 
University as a student for a commission as Pilot. 
Graduated on Jan. 19, 1918, and was ordered to 
Ellington Field, Houston, Texas, to receive instruc- 
tion in Flying. On April 23 he was commissioned 
Second Lieutenant, A. S. S. R. C, and was ordered 



William George Silhan 

of East Islip, enlisted on Oct. 8, 1915. in the Naval 
Training Station, Newport, R. I., where he trained 
for some time, being later transferred to the U. S. S. 
Dubuque and then to U. S. S. Pelican. He served 
aboard these ships during the war, their duty be- 
ing Mine Sweeping. 



Francis J. Drab 

of Oakdale, was inducted into the service on May 
29, 1918, and trained at Camp Upton, Camp J. E. 
Jackson and Camp Stuart in the 474th Motor Truck 
Company and 418th Motor Supply Train. He was 
made Corporal while at Camp Jackson. He served 
overseas with his outfit, supplying ammunition dur- 
ing the battles of Verdun, Argonne and Grande 
Pre. They handled men, food, guns and supplies; 
always in action up until the 11th of November, 
when he was sent to the 52nd Pioneers to haul 
salvage. After that he was sent to Buzancy, where 
their trucks were used in hauling, and loading the 
outfits which were being sent home. This he did 
until the latter part of Jan., 1919, later working 
with the 77th Division, getting them ready for 
their departure to America. He was taken sick 
overseas with influenza and pneumonia and was 
in the hospital for seven weeks. Upon his return 
to America he was sent to the Base Hospital at 
Camp Mills. He was discharged from service at 
Camp Upton, L. I., on May 19, 1919. 



Thomas F. Hart 

of Islip, enlisted in the Cavalry at Fort Slocum, 
N. J., on April 17, 1917, and trained there with 
E Troop of the 3rd Cavalry, being later trans- 
ferred to Troop L of the 11th Cavalry at Fort 
Oglethorpe. With this troop he went to San Fridro, 
Cal., doing guard on the Mexican Border of Lower 
California from Jan. 1, 1917. to June 17, 1920, when 
he was discharged. Mr. Hart was reinstated _ in 
the service and was on the expedition "Which 
searched for the missing aviators. Lieutenants 
Waterhouse and Connelly, who were later found 
dead in Lower California. 



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98 



WAR RECORD OF 



Albert Greenhalgh 



of Bay Shore, enlisted on June 26, 1917, in Com- 
pany K of the 106th Infantry, being later trans- 
ferred to Headauarters Company. He trained two 
months at Van Cortlandt Park and ten months at 
Spartanburg, S. C, where he was transferred to 
the 104th Machine Gun Battalion of the 27th Di- 
vision. He served overseas with his regiment, 
taking part in the Battle of Mount Kemmel and in 
the breaking of the Hindenburg Line; also in the 
capture of St. Quentin Canal. Returning to Amer- 
ica, he received an honorable discharge from serv- 
ice at Camp Upton, L. I., on April 3, 1918. 



Walter Theodore Ackerly 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on May 26, 1917, at Fort 
Jay, iNew York. He qualified as Sergeant and was 
sent to Camp Upton, L. I., on July 9, 1917, where 
he served in the Motor Transport Corps. In Oct., 
1918, he was transferred to Camp Sherman, Ohio, 
in Provision Company A, 320th Supply Train, 95th 
Division, where he served until Dec. 16, 1918, when 
he received his honorable discharge from service. 



John H. Wicks 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the Naval Aviation Corps 
in July, 1916, and trained at the Naval Air Sta- 
tion at Pensacola, Fla.; at Brunswick, Ga.; at Bay 
Shore, New York, and at Key West, Fla. He was 
honorably discharged as a qualified aviator at Key 
West, Fla. 



Robert F. Whitlock 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 102nd Supply Train, 
Company F, 27th Division. He served overseas 
with his Division, being transferred to the First 
Battalion Transport, 108th Infantry Truck Train 
and serving in France with his Division until the 
end of the war. 



Daniel S. Whitlock 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 102nd Supply Train, 
Company F, 27th Division. He served overseas 
with his Division, being transferred to the First 
Battalion Transport, 108th Infantry Truck Train 
and serving in France with his Division until the 
end of the war. 



Martin J. Connellan 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service at Camp 
Upton, L. I., on May 29, 1918, and trained at Camp 
J. E. Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla. He sailed for 
France in Aug., 1918, and served there with the 
Motor Truck Company, 472nd Supply Train. He 
fought in the Battle of St. Mihiel and Meuse-Ar- 
gonne Offensive. Also served with the Army of 
Occupation in Germany. He received an honorable 
discharge from service on July 3rd, 1919. 



Edwin M. Connellan 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on Dec. 14, 1917, in the Ord- 
nance Department at Fort Slocum and trained at 
Camp Upton, L. I. He sailed for France on March 
29, 1918, and served there with the 302nd M,obile 
Ordnance Repair Shop, 77th Division. He served in 
the Baccarat Sector, Vesle Sector, Oise-Aisne Of- 
fensive and Meuse-Argonne. He received an honor- 
able discharge from service at Camp Mills, New 
York, on May 9, 1919. 



William E. McCaffrey 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on April 10, 1917, at Fort 
Slocum, New York, and was sent to the 5th Field 
Artillery, Battery B. He was later transferred to 
18th Field Artillery, Battery B, 3rd Division, on 
June 1, 1917. He sailed for France on Feb. 4, 1918, 
where he fought with his Division and served in 
two major engagements: battles of River Marne 
and Chateau Thierry, under French command. He 
was wounded in the right arm and badly gassed at 
Chateau Thierry on July 27, 1918. He was in a 
hospital in France for fourteen months and upon his 
return to America was in the hospital at Fort 
McHenry, Baltimore, Md. He received an honor- 
able discharge from service on Aug. 14, 1919, at 
Camp Dix, N. J. 



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99 




100 



WAR RECORD OF 



Frank Stanley Hubbard 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in Company A, 320th Supply 
Train, 95th Division, and trained at Camp Upton, 
Long Island. He later trained at Camp Sherman, 
Ohio, from where he was discharged from the serv- 
ice on Dec. 14, 1918. 



Malcolm Reventloic 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Navy 
on April 16, 1917, and trained at Pelham Bay. He 
later served aboard the U. S. S. George Washington 
and trained at the U. S. Naval Air Station at 
Paulliac, France. He was honorably discharged 
from service on Feb. 18, 1919. 



Charles Sheldon Hubbard 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 22, 1917, and trained at Camp Dix, New Jer- 
sey, in the Second Engineers Train, Second Engi- 
neers, Second Division. He served overseas in the 
following operations: Verdun, Aisne Defensive, 
Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel Offensive, Champagne 
French Offensive, Blanc Mont; Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive, Landres et St. George to Beaument; 
en route to Block Heimback, Germany, Army of 
Occupation. He was discharged from service on 
Aug. 13, 1919. After his discharge Mr. Hubbard 
received word that he had been commissioned 2nd 
Lieutenant. 



Thomas R. Bailey 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Navy 
on April 2, 1917, and trained at Pelham Bay. 
He later served aboard the U. S. S. Manchuria, 
transporting troops to France. After training in 
various camps in France, England, Ireland and 
Scotland, he left for America on the Imperator. 
Arriving in America, he was taken ill and spent 
three months in a hospital; was then sent to Bay 
Ridge Training Station, from where he was dis- 
charged from service on July 31, 1919. Previous 
to his enlistment in the Navy, Mr. Bailey had en- 
listed in the 23rd Regiment of the 27th Division, 
but was released from this enlistment to join the 
Navy. i i I- ' 



Hugh A. Melton 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service in Oc- 
tober, 1917, and was sent to Camp Upton, Long 
Island, where he trained in Company E, 32nd Am- 
munition Train, until he went overseas, in April, 
1918. He served with his division in France, re- 
turning to the United States in May, 1919, being 
honorably discharged from service at Camp Upton. 



Eugene E. Costello 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service in Sep- 
tember, 1918, and sent to Camp Upton. He was 
later sent to Camp Jackson, South Carolina, with 
the Quartermaster's Department, where he was 
made Corporal. He served at Camp Jackson until 
March, 1919, when he was sent to Camp Upton, 
where he received his discharge from the service. 



William H. Costello 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service and 
trained at Camp Upton, Long Island, with the 
307th Infantry, 77th Division. He sailed for 
France in March, 1918, where he fought with his 
division, taking part in the battles of Lorraine, 
Soissons, Vesle River. He was wounded in the 
right arm by shrapnel. After the battle of Lor- 
raine he was promoted to Corporal. Upon his re- 
turn to the United States he was in the Lakewood 
Hospital for some time, being later transferred to 
the Convalescent Hospital at Camp Dix, from 
where he was discharged from service in April, 
1919. 



Bartley J. Costello 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service in Sep- 
tember, 1918, and sent to Camp Upton, where he 
trained with the 305th Regiment of the 77th Divi- 
sion. He sailed for France in April, 1918, where 
he served in the operations in the Baccarat Sec- 
tor, being promoted to Corporal. He also took part 
in the battles of Vesle River, Oise, Aisne, Meuse, 
and the Argonne. Upon his return to the United 
States he was sent to Camp Upton, Long Island, 
where he received his discharge from the service 
on July 1, 1919. 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



101 




102 



W AR RECORD OF 



Charles Wenzel Frienian 

of Bay Shore, volunteered and was called to service 
on Sept. 8, 1917, at Camp Upton, Long Island, in 
the 306th Infantry, 77th Division. He sailed for 
overseas on April 15, 1917, landing at Calais, where 
they trained with the British for two months. 
They then took over the Baccarat Sector in 
Alsace-Lorraine, which they held for two months, 
and they were then relieved by another American 
Division. They then proceeded along the Vesle 
River Sector to Aisne, where they were relieved 
by an Italian Division. They then moved to the 
Argonne and reached there on Sept. 25, one day 
before the eventful battle, where they remained in 
action until the signing of the armistice. 



Joseph W. Porkorney 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service on 
Oct. 8, 1917, at Camp Upton, where he served in 
Company B, 320th Supply Train. He was made 
Corporal on Nov. 24, 1917, and transferred to Camp 
Sherman, Ohio, where he served until Dec. 14, 1918, 
when he was discharged from the service. 



Lyman William Fawcett 

of Bay Shore, volunteered and was installed in 
the service on March 12, 1918, and trained aboard 
the U. S. S. Leviathan, in 3rd Division on ship. 
He was on the Leviathan from March, 1918, to 
June 13, 1919. 



Harry Riissel Kirkiip 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service and 
trained in Company G of the 305th Infantry, 77th 
Division, at Camp Upton, Long Island. He left 
America and arrived in Liverpool, England, on 
April 12, 1918. He trained with the 38th Division 
of the British Army in Flanders until June 12, 
1918, and then served in the Baccarat Sector of 
Alsace-Lorraine for two months. He served in 
the Vesle Sector until Sept. 6, 1918, when he was 
gassed due to the explosion of a mined German 
dugout. He was blind for two weeks and at the 
end of that time was discharged from A. R. C. 
Hospital No. 5, fully recovered. He was discharged 
from service at Camp Upton in May, 1919. 



Floyd William Menzel 

of Bay Shore, enlisted at Bay Shore Naval Air 
Station on June 19, 1917, as Carpenter's Mate, 3rd 
class. He was promoted to grade of quartermaster 
in November, 1917. He was transferred to Naval 
Air Station at Key West, Florida, on Dec. 17, 1917; 
promoted to rank of Ensign in February, 1918, re- 
ceiving his Aviator's Certificate at the same time. 
He later served at Naval Air Station at Miami, 
Florida, and at Naval Air Station at Pensacola, 
Florida, and also at Naval Air Station at Hampton 
Roads, Virginia. He was released on inactive duty 
on Feb. 12, 1919. 



Tremuine Hulse 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Navy 
on May 17, 1917, and served a's a Radio Operator; 
also served aboard ship, doing convoy duty, and on 
the U. S. S. South Pole. He served overseas, doing 
his Radio work aboard ships. 



William, C. Scharf 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into tbe service on 
May 5, 1918; sent from Camp Upton to Camp 
Greenleaf, near Chattanooga, Tenn. In June he 
was transferred to Skeleton Organization (Base 
Hospital No. 80) and was later sent to Camp 
Wheeler for hospital training. In July he was 
put in Carrel Dakin Laboratory to learn how to 
make the Dakin Solution, which was used by all 
armies to clean infected wounds. He was made 
Corporal in August. While home on furlough he 
was called back to camn only to find that they 
had been ordered to Camp Upton, therefore travel- 
ing over two thousand miles to get from Bav Shore 
to Camp Upton, Long Island. He sailed for France, 
arriving at Brest on Sept. 29, and proceeding to 
their destination at Dijon, where thev worked 
strenuously until they had the hospital there run- 
ning in first-class manner. This was at the time 
of the advance of the Allies and trainload after 
trainload of wounded were carried in continuously; 
their work increasing after the signing of the 
armistice, as Datients from other hospitals were 
sent there. Upon his return to America he was 
mustered out of service at Camp Upton on June 3, 
1919. ; ,-;' 



John J. Ford 

of West Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Oct. 10, 1917, and trained in the 82nd Division, 
307th Ammunition Train. He left for France on 
June 19, 1918, and s°rved in the following engage- 
ments: Toul, St. Mihiel. and Argonne. He was 
discharged from service at Upton upon his return 
to America. 



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103 




104 



WAR RECORD OF 



Raymond Grier Sheridan 

of Bayport, enlisted as a Cook, 2nd Class, in the 
United States Naval Reserve Force on Feb. 17, 
1918. He served aboard the U. S. S. Indiana. 



Irving G. Somerindyke 

of Sayville, enlisted at Mineola Aviation Field on 
Oct. 6, 1918, and was stationed at Hazelhurst Field, 
from where he received an honorable discharge 
from the service. 



George H. Mantha 



of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Sept. 5, 
1918, and trained in the 1st Regiment Field Artil- 
lery at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, and Camp 
Hill, Virginia. From Camp Hill he was shipped 
overseas, but when he was half way over the 
armistice was signed and the ship returned to its 
starting place and he was discharged from service. 



sinking the submarine. Arrived in France and 
started their return trip, the second night out com- 
ing in contact with submarine. Their ship was hit 
by shell but no damage done; submarine driven off 
by gun fire. He was later transferred to the 
U. S. S. Stewart and later to the U. S. S. Coving- 
ton for transportation of troops back to America. 
He served on convoy duty during all this time. See 
Narrative. 



Leroy Randolph Flynn 

of Sayville, enlisted in the United States Navy on 
Feb. 1, 1918; was stationed at Naval Training Sta- 
tion, Newport, Rhode Island, and was later trans- 
ferred to U. S. Naval Radio School at Harvard 
University, Cambridge, Mass. He graduated as 
Electrician, 2nd Class Radio, and was then sent 
to the N. T. S. at St. Helena, Norfolk, Va., for as- 
signment. He was assigned to S. S. Jan Van 
Nassau and sailed from Norfolk with English con- 
voy for Brest, returning to Baltimore in December, 
1918. He was transferred to S. S. Nairva (U. S. 
S. B), which sailed from Norfolk, going to La 
Pauillic, St. Nazaire, Brest, and returning to Nor- 
folk. He was discharged from service at Hamp- 
ton Roads, Va., on Oct. 1, 1919. 



John Francis Sheridan 

of Bayport, enlisted in the U. S. N. R. F. in June, 
1918, and served as Machinist Mate, 1st Class, at 
United States Experimental Station, New London, 
Conn. 



Albert Kovanda 

of Bohemia, enlisted in the United States Navy 
on June 24, 1918, and trained at Charleston, South 
Carolina N. T. S. He served at Buffalo, Great 
Lakes and Bay Ridge Naval Training Stations. 
He was discharged from service on Aug. 23, 1919. 



Roy H. Smith 



of Blue Point. When war was declared with Ger- 
many he was stationed aboard the U. S. S. New 
York as radio operator. He served aboard that 
ship until she left for European waters. He was 
transferred on Nov. 22, 1917, to Armed Guard 
Detail, U. S. N., and detailed with two others as 
electrician in charge of the S. S. Florence H. They 
left for Halifax, where their ship was slightly 
damaged by explosion of French munition ship. 
They left Halifax in convoy of 45 ships on Dec. 11. 
On Dec. 27 they sighted a submarine and were 
saved from being torcedoed by a British patrol boat 



Anton S. Thuma 

of Bohemia, was inducted into the service on Oct. 
28, 1917, and trained at Camp Stewart, Va., in 
Company M, 4th United States Infantry, 3rd Divi- 
sion. He served overseas from April 6 1918, to 
Aug. 28, 1919. He was appointed Corporal on 
June 2, 1918. He engaged in the following battles: 
Games and N. E. of Rheims, Marne Sector, Cham- 
pagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, and Meuse- 
Argonne. He also served in the army of occupa- 
tion in Germany. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



105 




106 



WAR RECORD OF 



Jules De Graff 



of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Sept. 
28, 1917, and served in Company B, 14th Supply 
Train, at Camp Upton, New York. He was honor- 
ably discharged from service on Feb. 3 1919. 



Alfred Edward Frieman 

of Bayport, enlisted on Dec. 7, 1917, and was in- 
stalled in Military School of Aeronautics, Prince- 
ton University, New Jersey; Kelly Field, San An- 
tonio, Texas. He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 
in the U. S. Air Service. He received his honor- 
able discharge from service on Jan. 4, 1919, at Lake 
Chanler, La. 



Eugene Clayton Weeks 

of Bayport, was inducted into the service and in- 
stalled in Company L, 307th Infantry, on Sept. 29, 
1917. He later served in Company I, 128th Infan- 
try, Company L, 128th Infantry, and Field and 
StaflP, 128th Infantry. He served overseas with 
the 77th Division until July 15, 1918, when he left 
this regiment at the front line (at St. Maurice and 
St. Pol Lorraine), and joined the 33rd Division at 
Moulin-au-Bois, near Albert, France. His division 
was part of General Mangin's 10th Army, north- 
east of Soissons. He was in the Argonne for 
twenty-one (21) days continuously, his division 
breaking the Kriemhelde Stellung, capturing Ro- 
magne sous, Montfaucon, etc. He was made Cor- 
poral on Nov. 1, 1917; sent to Officers' Training 
School on Jan. 1. 1918: was made Sergeant on 
April 1, 1918, and 2nd Lieutenant on Oct. 4. He 
was made Captain on March 19, 1919. He received 
an honorable discharge as Captain of the United 
States Army on July 8, 1919. 



Eniile P. Antos 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Sept. 4, 
1918, and served as a Private in C. A. C. School 
Detachment at Fort Monroe, Virginia. At the time 
the armistice was signed they were forming the 
83rd C. A. preparatory to going overseas. He was 
honorably discharged from the service on Dec. 26, 
1918. 



Benjamin F. Broere 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Dec. 5, 
1917, and trained at Camp Upton in Company A, 
302nd Engineers, 77th Division. He served over- 
seas with his regiment, being attached to the Eng- 
lish forces in Northern France for two months 
when he was ordered to the Alsace front with the 
American forces and remained in the American 
Sector. He received several shrapnel wounds at 
Vaux Cere on Sept. 5 while building bridges for our 
infantry. He spent the rest of his time in France 
in a hospital. He received an honorable discharge 
from service on Jan. 29, 1919. 



Frank Yonda 

of Sayville, enlisted in the 31st Coast Artillery on 
Oct. 4, 1918, and served in that branch until the 
date of his discharge from the service — Dec. 4, 
1919. 



Daniel C. Downs 

of Sayville, enlisted in the 10th Company, 20th 
Engineers, on Sept. 17, 1917. He left the United 
States on Feb. 28, 1918, and served in France with 
his regiment, returning to America on June 1, 1919. 
He was discharged from service on June 10, 1919. 



Charles E. Byrne 

of Brentwood, enlisted in the U. S. N. A. F. as Sea- 
man on May 24, 1918, and trained at Naval Train- 
ing Station, Newport, R. I. About Sept. 1 he was 
transferred to Naval Patrol Base at New Bedford^ 
Mass., where he did patrol and guard duties, was 
schooled in the art of ordnance and gunnery and 
other subjects. When the armistice was signed the 
boys of the base got up a minstrel show in which 
;Mr. Byrne took the part of a charming chorus 
lady. Quite a sum was realized from their per- 
formances, which went toward entertaining the 
wounded men who were returning from overseas. 
He was discharged at Newport, R. I. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



107 




108 



WAR RECORD OF 



Thomas A. Cerveny 

of Islip, was inducted into the service on May 29, 
1918, and trained in 1st R. A. P. Company at Camp 
Raritan, New Jersey. He received his honorable 
discharge from the service on March 15, 1919, at 
Camp Raritan. 



Hildreth Eugene Rhodes 

of Great Rivei-, enlisted in service in March, 1918, 
and served in the Bridgehampton Coast Guard 
Station No. 70 until the date of his discharge from 
service in January, 1920. 



Grayuni Hall Cook 

of Brentwood, enlisted in the United States Naval 
Reserve Force as Seaman, 2nd Class, on Aug. 8, 
1918, and was called into active service on Sept. 15, 
1917, and sent to Great Lakes Naval Training- 
Station, Illinois, to train. He later trained at 
Hampton Roads, Va., where he was assigned to the 
U. S. S. Madawaska. He was discharged from 
service at Hampton Roads, Va., on Jan. 9, 1919. 



Charles Messiah 

of Brentwood, enlisted in Naval Reserve as Lieu- 
tenant (J. G.) and was called to active service dur- 
ing the first month of the war. He was detailed 
as Commandant of Brooklyn Navy Yard to the 
Naval Consulting Board of the United States at 
the request of the Secretary of the Board for Spe- 
cial Duty in the examination of inventions at the 
secretary's office, 15 Park Row, New York City. 
The work consisted in the examination of all inven- 
tions submitted to the Navy Department. His 
training consisted of professional civilian experi- 
ence as a patent attorney and expert and of pre- 
vious service in New York Naval Reserve. He re- 
mained attached to the Naval Consulting Board 
throughout the war as senior examiner of inven- 
tions, of committee of examiners of the board. He 
volunteered for combatant services, but his re- 
quest was refused on the ground that his training 
fitted him for the special work upon which he was 
detailed. He was later promoted to Senior Lieu- 
tenant and transferred to Class Six of Naval Re- 
serve, which consists of Engineers and Technolo- 
gists. He conducted a research in aeroplane pro- 
peller vibration and subsequently a research in 
aerial acoustical fog signals. Records of both re- 
searches will be found in oflfices of the board at 
Washington, D. C. 



Malcolm McBurney 

of East Islip, was called to duty on June 1, 1917, 
and trained at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. His service consisted in laboratory 
work at the Base Hospital. He served with rank of 
Captain at Camp Upton, Long Island, from Oct. 1 
to Dec. 21, 1918, on which date he was discharged 
from the Army. 



David B. Levy 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
Oct. 8, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, Long 
Island, in Sanitary Train Field Hospital No. 306. 
He later served in Motor Truck Company 361, 
M. S. Train No. 7, Winchester, England, and Com- 
pany 306, M. T. S.; train 402, Repair Unit 310, 
M. T. C. He served one year in France in over- 
hauling parks and doing reconstruction work. He 
served in the Army of Occupation in Germany for 
ten months, at Coblenz. 



Samuel Levy 

of East Islip, enlisted in service on March 8, 1918, 
and trained at Pelham Park, New York. He served 
with the Mine Laying Fleet in the North Sea from 
May, 1918, to December, 1918. He was released 
from active duty on Jan. 10, 1919. 



Joseph F, Kroupa 

of Islip, was inducted into the service on Sept. 17, 
1917, and trained at Camp Upton, Long Island, 
with the 77th Division, being later transferred to 
the Ordnance Department, Aberdeen Proving 
Ground, Maryland, where he served until his dis- 
charge from service on March 7, 1919. 



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109 




110 



WAR RECORD OF 



Russell W. Thomas 

of Bay Shore, enlisted at Babylon on April 6, 1917, 
the day the war was declared, as a Third Class 
Carpenter's Mate, and on Aug. 10, 1917, was or- 
dered to report to the Mine Sweeping Division, 
Section Base No. 8, Tomkinsville, S. I. As this 
base was just being opened, he was detailed to do 
miscellaneous duties about the barracks and of- 
ficers' quarters. He was later put in charge of 
repairing of mine sweepers. He was released from 
service on June 14, 1918, as Chief Carpenter's Mate. 



of the American Red Cross to join the Balkan Re- 
lief Commission. He served with the rank of Lieu- 
tenant in this Commission, doing relief work in 
Italy. 



Olin Davis 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on July 22, 1918, at Bay 
Shore Naval Air Station and served there and at 
Brunswick, Ga., during the period of the war. 



Fred J. Kuhlnieier 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps on 
April 29, 1918, and was sent to Paris Island, S. C, 
for training. He remained at this station until 
the date of his honorable discharge from the serv- 
ice, April 15, 1919. 



Thomas Komroski 

of Bay Shore, was called bo service and sent to 
Camp Upton in May, 1918. He was later trans- 
fen-ed to Edgewood Arsenal, Md., to the Chemical 
Warfare Manufacturing Plant, serving on guard 
duty until the time of his discharge, May 3, 1919. 



Stephen Kabatnik 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service on June 
5, 1918, and trained at Camp Joseph E. Johnston, 
Jacksonville, Fla. He served with the Shoe Repair 
Unit of the Salvage Division No. 1, until the time 
of his discharge from service, March 11, 1919. 



Charles L. Grampp 

of Brightwater, enlisted in the U. S. Aviation Corps 
in Dec, 1917, and trained at Kelly Field, Texas, 
Hancock, Ga., and at Camp Merritt. He sailed for 
France in March, 1918, where he served for fifteen 
months with the French. He was honorably dis- 
charged from service in June, 1919, at Camp Lee, 
Va. 



John Archibald Hartung 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service on 
Oct. 8, 1917, and sent to Mineola, where he served 
in the 200th Aero Squadron. He sailed for France 
on Oct. 20, 1917. Upon arrival at Brest, they pro- 
ceeded to Tours, where they underwent intensive 
training for several months. He received the rank 
of Corporal in Nov., 1917, and of Sers-eant in May, 
1918, and Sergeant First Class in July, 1918. He 
was honorably discharged from service ^at St. 
Aignau, France, on Jan. 29, 1919, at the request 



Alvin H. Rossuck 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service on Aug. 
5, 1918, and trained at Fort Slocum, New York, and 
at Camp McClellan, Alabama. He served as Pri- 
vate in the 2nd Caisson Company of 9th Ammuni- 
tion Train, 9th Division, and as First Sergeant of 
the School for Bakers and Cooks. He was honor- 
ably discharged from service on April 6, 1919. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



111 




112 



WAR RECORD OF 



James Arthur Cochrane 

of Bay Shore, enlisted at Brooklyn in the U. S. 
Naval Reserve Forces on June 18, 1918, as Com- 
missary Steward. He trained at Commissary 
School until Sept. 25, 1918, when he was transferred 
to the U. S. S. Merchant and detailed on guard 
duty at New York Harbor. On Jan. 16, 1919, he 
was made Chief Commissary Steward and trans- 
ferred to the transport U. S. S. Santa Rosa, on 
which he was made Senior Steward. He made a 
number of trips across carrying troops back to 
Boston, Philadelphia and New York. Mr. Cochrane 
was released from active service on Oct. 27, 1919. 



Frank A. Page 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on July 28, 1917, in the 
U. S. Aviation Corps and was sent to Cornell 
Ground School. After graduating from this course, 
he was sent to train with the British at Fabiferro 
Field, Texas. Here he received instructions under 
the direction of Captain Vernon Castle. He was 
commissioned Second Lieutenant on Feb. 28, 1918, 
and transferred to Garden City; did patrol duty on 
the coast between Fire Island and Sandy Hook. 
In June he sailed on the Mauretania for France. 
After receiving further instructions at Issondua 
and St. Jean De Mott, he was assigned to the 60th 
Aero Squadron for contact duty. His plane was 
brought down in the Argonne Forest on Oct. 14, 
1918, and he received severe head injuries from the 
fall. After numerous transfers to various French 
Hospitals, he arrived at New York on Dec. 24, 1918. 
After three weeks at Camp Merritt he was sent 
to Lakewood, N. J., for treatment. In May, 1919, 
he was transferred to Walter Reed Hospital, Wash- 
ington, D. C. After many operations, which re- 
sulted in a great improvement, Mr. Page was dis- 
charged from service, April 15, 1920. 



Andreiv Edivard Ehrler 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 12th Company, 152nd 
Depot Brigade, on June 1, 1918, and trained at Camp 
Upton, being later transferred to Headquarters 
Company, 152nd Depot Brigade, July 16, 1918, and 
sent to Camp Personnel Adjutant, from where he 
received his discharge from service, Nov. 5, 1918. 



Paul Voiles 

of Bay Shore,' enlisted at Newport News in the 
U. S. Navy, being later transferred to Philadelphia. 
He served here until the date of his discharge from 
service, March 22, 1919. 



Dunbar Burchell Adams 

of Bay Shore, was called into service at Cam.p 
Upton on Sept. 28, 1917, and trained there in the 
152nd Depot Brigade, 77th Division, until Jan. 14, 



1918, when he was transferred to Washington, 
D. C, in the Ordnance Department. He later made 
the following transfers: On Feb. 20, to Winchester 
Rifle Plant, New Haven, Conn.; on April 6, 1918, to 
U. S. Proving Grounds, Aberdeen, Md.; on May 6, to 
Medical Corps and sent to Gas Defense Service 
Plant, Long Island City. He was ordered over- 
seas on Aug. 21, 1918 and sailed on U. S. S. Baltic, 
arriving at Liverpool. While overseas he touched 
Southampton, Le Havre, etc. Later he was at- 
tached to the 40th, or "Sunshine Division" as Di- 
vision Gas N. C. 0. and Gas Instructor; took course 
of training at Gas School at Chatillon Sur Seine 
and at Haulon Fie Field. He did this duty until 
his return to U. S. Upon his return to this 
country he was sent to Camp Upton, from where 
he received an honorable discharge from service, 
Feb. 6, 1917. 



Charles S. Chase 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on June, 1917; commissioned 
Second Lieutenant in Veterinary Corps, on Aug. 
8, 1917. He served on Purchasing Board for Pub- 
lic Animals in Eastern Purchasing Zone, and as 
Post Veterinarian at Fort Myers, Va. Received 
military training at M. 0. T. C. at Camp Green- 
leaf, Chickamauga Park, Ga. After which he was 
appointed First Lieutenant, June 21, 1918, and 
ordered to Camp Cody, Deming, N. M., as Camp 
Veterinarian, 97th Division. He was honorably dis- 
charged from service on Dec. 17, 1918, with rank 
of Captain. 



Charles S. Chase, Jr. 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in Dec, 1916, at Fort Slocum, 
New York; was ordered into active duty in March, 
1917, and sent to Curtiss Aviation School at Miami, 
Fla., as Sergeant First Class. In May, 1917, he 
was ordered to Cornell University, Ithaca, New 
York, for intensive training in aerodynamics, ra- 
dio-telegraphy, astronomy, etc. Graduated after 
eight weeks, and ordered to Selfridge Field, Mt. 
Clemons, Mich., to finish flying. In Sept., 1917, he 
was commissioned First Lieutenant and made In- 
structor in Aviation. In Nov., 1917, he was or- 
dered to Ellington Field, Houston, Texas, in 
charge of Artillery Observation class, later train- 
ing cadets in acrobatics and bombing. He was 
honorably discharged from service at Ellington 
Field, Feb. 1, 1919. 



John Crawson 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service in 
Dec, 1918, and trained at Camp Upton for about 
three months, being then sent to Plattsburg Of- 
ficers' Training School. After three months there, 
he was sent overseas, where he was later attached 
to the 27th Division. He was later transferred to 
Construction Battalion, Signal Service. Upon his 
return to America, he was honorably discharged 
from service at Camp Dix, Dec 16, 1919. 



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114 



WAR RECORD OF 



Charles Runiplik 



of East Islip, was inducted into the sei'vice on 
Oct. 2, 1918, and trained at Fort Slocum in the 4th 
Company Recruit during the period of his enlist- 
ment. He was honorably discharged from service 
at this camp on Dec. 10, 1918. 



Joseph Krsnak 

of Sayville, was inducted into the sez-vice in Oct., 

1917, and served with the 302nd Engineers of the 
77th Division. He left the United States in March, 

1918, and took part in the following operations: 
Battle of Argonne Forest, Meuse, and Vesle. He 
was slightly gassed during action. He was made 
Corporal during his service in France. 



Herman H. Sonnenstiihl 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
April 28, 1918, and trained at Camp Upton for two 
months, from where he proceeded to France with 
the SOlst Field Artillery Medical Detachment, 76th 
Division, where he served for seven months. He 
was wounded while serving as a motor cycle dis- 
patch rider in the Toul Sector. While in France he 
was raised to First Class Private. He was honor- 
ably discharged from service on Jan. 18, 1919. 



Frank Svec 

of Sayville, was inducted into the Army on Sept. 
19, 1917, and trained in the Infantry at Camp 
Upton, 307th Regiment, Company H, and later at 
Camp Gordon, Ga. In the latter camp he served 
with the bakery at Camp 358. He was honorably 
discharged from service on Sept. 16, 1919. 



Otto Sulima 

entered the Navy as Boatswain's Mate on May 8, 
1917, and was stationed on board the U. S. S. C. 
No. 25, being on board at the time she caught fire 
at sea. They had a running fight with a submarine 
at night at Delaware Breakwater. Mr. Sulima was 
with Convoy that escorted the German Fleet into 
the Scapa Flow from Kiel, Germany. 



Frank Liskovec 

of Sayville, enlisted on May 28, 1918, at Sayville, 
L. I., and was sent from there to Fort Slocum, New 
York. Here he remained until July 6, when he 
was transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga., and at- 
tached to the 38th Company, Machine Gun Centre, 
4th Group. In September he sailed for France 
with the casuals. In France he was attached to 
the 148th Machine Gun Battalion, Company D, 
41st Division, but he did not get to the front, as 
the Armistice was signed before their regiment 
saw action. In July, 1919, Mr. Liskovec returned 
to the United States. 



Anton Krsnak 



Harry Herman Verity 



enlisted in Machine Gun Company of the 348th Reg- of East Islip, was inducted into the service and 

iment on June 24, 1918, and served in France with served as cook and baker at Camp Upton for three 

his regiment. Connected with the 87th Division months, being discharged from service at that 

from Aug. 20, 1918, to March 3, 1919. camp. 



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116 



WAR RECORD OF 



Adolph J. Reylek 

of Sayville, enlisted as Seaman, First Class, in the 
United States Naval Reserve Force on April 13, 
1917, and trained at Base No. 5 at West Sayville. 
He was ordered to take charge of S. P. 343, known 
as U. S. S. Nemesis, where he remained unt.l his 
discharge, Jan. 30, 1919. 



Henry Clark Coe 

of Bay Shore. Colonel, Medical Corps, U. S. A. 
Served at St. Mihiel, Chateau Thierry and Meuse- 
Argonne. Has three sons, all of whom were volun- 
teers in the service during the period of the war. 
(See Sketch.) 



Arthur Paul Coe 

of Bay Shore. He went to France in May, 1917, 
at the end of his sophomore year at Williams Col- 
lege to join American Ambulance. In September, 
1917, he enlisted in the U. S. Ambulance Corps, in 
which he served until Aug. 19, 1919, when he en- 
tered the Artillery School at Somme. He was with 
the Ambulance Corps at Verdun, Mount Faucon, 
and was decorated with the French Croix de Guerre 
for bravery. Mr. Coe was gassed several times 
but received no serious wounds. He was commis- 
sioned 2nd Lieutenant, 346 F. A., two weeks before 
the signing of the armistice. In camp at several 
places in France. He returned to the United 
States in July, 1919, and was discharged from serv- 
ice in August, 1919. 



Henry Clark Coe, Jr. 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in June, 1917. in Section 580 
of the United States Ambulance Corps at Allen- 
town, Pa., where he trained until January, 1918. 
While overseas he was at the French front, where 
he remained in active service under French officers 
until the time of the armistice. At this time the 
captain called for volunteers and he volunteered to 
serve as the Company Cook. He did not evade ac- 
tive duty on the ambulance at any time but being 
needed, stuck to his job. He was cited and re- 
ceived the Croix de Guerre for "Unusual Coolness 
in Action." He returned to the United States in 
June and was honorably discharged and accepted a 
position in the General Motors Company as In- 
spector and Assistant Superintendent. 



Fordyce Barker Coe 

of Bay Shore. Attended and completed success- 
fully the first Citizens' Training Camp at Platts- 
burg, N. Y., from Aug. 8 to Sept. 6, 1915. In Com- 
pany M 1st Kansas Infantry U. N. G. Service in 
that organization on the Mexican border at Eagle 
Pass and San Antonio, Texas, from July 9. 1916, 
to Oct. 1, 1916. He was mustered out of Federal 
Service at Fort Riley, Kansas, on Nov. 1. 1916. 
Promoted to Corporal in Companv M. 1st Kansas 
Infantry, Feb. 12, 1917. Called in+o Federal Service 
April 6, 1917, at the call of the President. Trans- 



ferred to Company M 137th Infantry, 35th Divi- 
sion, 69th Brigade, Oct. 1, 1917, at Camp Domphan, 
Fort Sill, Oklahoma. He successfully completed 
N. C. O.'s school for the brigade m bombmg 
and bayonet attack. He was recommended for and 
attended the Divisional Training School for Offi- 
cers. Was returned to former company and on 
detached service pending commission. He was 
transferred to 35th Division Casual Detachment on 
Telegraph Instructions from A. G. 0., dated Wash- 
ington, D. C, April 21, 1918, and held at Camp 
Mills, Mineola, N. Y., during which time he served 
as a clerk and Supply Sergeant with the Casual 
Detachment. He was honorably discharged from 
the U. S. N. Guard, 35th Division, Casual Detach- 
ment, on July 9, 1918, at Camp Mills, Mineola 
N. Y., for the convenience of the Government to ac- 
cept a commission as 2nd Lieutenant, Q. M. C, 
N. A., per telegraphic orders from A. G. 0., dated 
Wahington, D. C, July 8, 1918. He was then as- 
signed to Troop Movement, office at Headquarters 
P. of S., Newport News, Va., assisted in the han- 
dling of outgoing and incoming troops and invalid 
soldiers both by rail and water. Twice recom- 
mended for promotion to 1st Lieutenant, but the 
signing of the armistice interfered with the same. 
He was honorably discharged as 2nd Lieutenant, 
Q. M. C, U. S. A., at Camp Upton, on Sept. 25, 
1919. 



John Kelly 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the 1st Company of M. 
P. N. G. N. Y. and served in the 27th Company 
of the Military Police Corps on the Hindenburg 
Line, La Selle River, Jonc de Mer Ridge, the 
Knoll, Popenrighe, Dickenbushe Sector, Guillemont 
Farm, Quennemont Farm, St. Maurice River. He 
Avas honorably discharged from the service on No- 
vember 29, 1918. 



Willmirth Burton Peterson 

of Great River, enlisted in Battery F, 71st Artil- 
lery, C. A. C, on April 26, 1918," and trained at 
Fort Slocum, Ft. Revere and Ft. Andrews. He 
sailed from East Boston on July 31, 1918, on the 
Anselm and arrived in Liverpool, August 16. From 
there they entrained for Romsey. which was a 
distance of from 75 to 100 miles ; from there they 
proceeded to Le Havre. Here he was taken ill 
and spent 29 days in the hospital. He then went 
back with his regiment which was then stationed 
at Le Plessis, Grammoire. Here he drove for the 
Maior of the 3rd Battalion, until the time of 
embarking for America. He sailed on the Man- 
churia on the 11th of February and landed in 
Hoboken on the 22nd. He was honorably dis- 
chai-ged from the service on the 8th of March, 1919. 



Charles Cerveny 

of East Islip, was inducted into the service on 
May 29, 1918. and served in Company L, 5th 
Infantry, at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, 
during the period of the war. 



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118 



WAR RECORD OF 



Paul E. Mowbray 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in September, 1917, at 
New York City and served as Corporal in Com- 
pany F, 308th Infantry and 407th Motor Supply 
Train. He served overseas with his regiment, 
returning to United States and receiving his hon- 
orable discharge from service in March, 1919. 
While in France, he participated in the following 
major operations: Somme Defensive, Aisne Defen- 
sive, Montdidier-Noyon Defensive, Champaigne- 
Marne Defensive, Somme Offensive, Oise-Aisne 
Offensive, Somme Offensive (2nd). He received 
Victory Medal with eight (8) bronze stars from 
the French Government. 



Anthony Etense 

of Bay Shore, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 19, 1917, and sent to Camp Upton. He trained 
there and at Brownsville, Texas, as Corporal in 
Motor Transport Corps. His service was valuable 
as a motorcycle mechanic. He also served in M 2 
Corps — receiving his honorable discharge from 
service on May 29, 1919, at Brownsville, Texas. 



Walter E. Andrews 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Naval 
Aviation at Little Rock, Arkansas on Dec. 13, 1917, 
and trained at the Great Lakes until March 29, 
1918, when he sailed for France. While overseas 
he touched the following ports: Brest, Paulliac, 
Marseilles, Tunis, Africa, Bizerte, Africa, return- 
ing by way of Gibraltar, Azores, Bermuda. Upon 
his arrival in the United States, he was honorably 
discharged from service, at Brooklyn, on April 
7, 1919. 



Wilder M. Lahy 

of Brightwaters, enlisted in April, 1917, in Division 
Headquarters Troops, N. Y. National Guard at 
New York City. After training at New York 
for some time, he was sent to Camp Wadsworth, 
South Carolina. On December, 1917, he was 
ordered to Camp Lee, Petersburg, Va., to the 
Engineer Training Camp. In March, 1918, he was 
assigned to B Company, 27th Engineers and 
served in France with this regiment from August 
1918 to March, 1919. In France, the regiment 
was assigned to the First Army for bridge, rail- 
road and road work, participating lin the St. 
Mihiel and Argonne Offensive, receiving regimental 
citation for the character and speed with which 
this work was accomplished during these offen- 
sives. Mr. Lahy returned to United States in 
April, 1919, and received an honorable discharge 
from service in May, 1919, at Camp Gordon, 
Atlanta, Ga., with rank of 2nd Lieutenant. 



Levi Spear Stockivell 

of Brightwaters, enlisted in the 309th Field Artil- 
lery and trained at Camp, Dix, N. J. He was 
commissioned on Nov. 27, 1919, and received his 
honorable discharge from service as 1st Lieuten- 
ant, Field Artillery. 



Alfred Wolf 



W. L. Suydam, Jr. 

(See article, page 161.) 



Enlisted on May 1, 1918, in Company E, 114th 
Infantry; trained at Camp McClellan, Anniston, 
Ala. Served in France in battles of Alsace- 
Lorraine, and Meuse-Argonne Forest. Was gassed 
Sept. 16, 1918, on the Alsace-Lorraine front and 
slightly wounded Oct. 12, 1918 in the Meuse- 
Argonne battle. Honorably discharged May 21, 
1919. 



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120 



WAR RECORD OF 



John Dudley 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Feb. 25, 1918, and 

served in the Medical Corps at Camp Upton, 

Long Island, as first class Private until the date 

of his honorable discharge from service, April 
27, 1919. 



George A. Smith, Jr. 

of Central Islip, enlisted on July 18, 1918, in U. 
S. N. Hospital Corps, allied to New York Univer- 
sity Bellevue Students Training Camp, stationed 
at Bellevue. He is still in service, having been 
released from active duty in March, 1919. 



Roy C. Hildebrandt 

of Central Islip, enlisted on June 5, 1918, in the 
Neuro-Psychiatric unit, Embarkation Hospital 
Corps, Medical Department at Newport News, Va. 
He was honorably discharged from service on 
February 3, 1919. 



William Dunphy 

of Central Islip, enlisted on May 1, 1918, in the 
104th Motor Supply Train; with the A. E. F. 
and in Base Hospital No. 214. Through 12th Co., 
152nd D. B. 



James Thornton 

of Central Islip, enlisted on July 2, 1917, in the 
107th Infantry. He served in France and Belgium, 
taking part in the following engagements: East 
Poperinghe Line, Dickebush Sector, La Selle River, 
Hindenburg Line Jonc de New Ridge and St. 
Maurice River. He was discharged from service 
on April 2, 1919. 



David Cohen 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Feb. 25, 1918, in the 
152nd Artillery Brigade; served in the Army of 
Occupation in the 17th Field Artillery, Headquar- 
ters. He took part in the battles of Chateau 
Thierry and the Argonne. He was honorably dis- 
charged from service on June 26, 1919. 



Alfred J. Smith 



of Bay Shore, formerly of Central Islip, enlisted 
on Jan. 26, 1918, and served in the following 
assignments: (a) Sixth Naval Dist., Charleston, 
S. C. (b) Naval Overseas Transportation Serv- 
ice; (c) Section Commander Seventh Section, Sixth 
Naval District, Jacksonville, Fla. Promotions: 
Machinist Mate, Ensign, Lieutenant (J.G.). In- 
active status, August, 1919. Enlistment expires 
on Jan. 25, 1922. 



William Brown 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Sept. 28, 1917, in the 
Medical Detachment, 306th Infantry. In August, 
1918, he was transferred to the 305th Field Hos- 
pital, 77th Division, promoted to Wagoner. He 
took part in the defensive sectors of Baccarat and 
Viesle and the offensive sectors of Oise, Aisne and 
Meuse-Argonne. He was discharged from service 
on May 12, 1919. 



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121 



WAR RECORD OF 



William J. Delaney (M. D.) 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Sept. 1, 1918, was 
assigned to the Development Battalion at Camp 
Greenleaf, Ga. He was honorably discharged from 
service on Jan. 15, 1919. 



Frank Colgan 



of Central Islip, enlisted on Aug. 28, 1918, in the 
355th Stevedore and Labor Battalion at Camp 
Joseph E. Johnston, Florida and Camp Alexander, 
Va. Was promoted to Sergeant at Camp Alexan- 
der. He was discharged from service on Dec. 
21, 1918. 



William N. Earnhardt 

of Central Islip, enlisted on June 25, 1917, and 
was sent to Base Hospital, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, 
Ga. He was later promoted from 1st Lieutenant 
to Captain, discharged from service on Dec. 12, 
1919. 



John Johnston 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Oct. 9, 1917, in the 
38th Infantry, 3rd Division, Co. G. Served with 
the A. E. F. in France and the army of occupa- 
tion in Alsace-Lorraine, Luxemberg and Germany. 
He served in the battles of Chateau Thierry, 
Champagne, Marne, Aisne-Marne, Vesle, St. 
Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne. Discharged Aug. 
29, 1919. 



Charles L. Vaux (M. D.) 

of Central Islip, enlisted on July 1, 1918, and 
served with the 40th Division at Ravigne, France. 
He was discharged from service on April 3, 1919. 



David Stalker 

of Central Islip, enlisted on April 6, 1918, in the 
Medical Corps, stationed at Cosne-et-Loire, and 
Savenau, France. Promoted to 1st Class Private. 
He was discharged from service on July 23, 1919. 



John F. Scott 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Sept. 10, 1917, in 
Company L, 308th Infantry. He served as Private 
in the battles of Alsace-Lorraine, Vesle River 
front, Aisne River, Argonne Forest, on Meuse 
River in front line trenches on six or seven differ- 
ent occasions. Ee was over the top five or six 
times, wounded slightly at Vesle River. 



Patrick Fahey 

of Central Islip, enlisted on July 2, 1917, in the 
165th Infantry (Old 69th N. Y. National Guard) 
Co. E. Served in France, Belgium, Luxemberg, 
Germany. Took part in the following battles: 
Champagne-Marne Defensive, Aisne-Marne Offen- 
sive, Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Luneville Sector, 
Baccarat Sector, Rendezvous de Chausseurs and 
Army of Occupation. 



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124 



WAR RECORD OF 



John J. Hayes 

of Centra} Islip, enlisted on .Ded. 5, 1917, in 
Company A, Medical Dept. Base Hospital, Camp 
Upton, N. Y. Served as Private, 1st class, and 
Nurse. Was discharged from service on July 8, 
1919. 



Joseph Farrell 



of Central Islip, enlisted on Sept. 10, 1917, in the 
305th Machine Gun Battalion, Company B. He 
served with the A. E. F. in Lorraine, Chateau 
Thierry, Toul Sector and the Arg-onne. He vi^as 
discharged on April 4, 1919. 



Joseph Williams 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Aug. 12, 1918, in the 
34th Company, 9th Battalion, 152nd Depot Brigade, 
stationed at Camp Upton, N. Y. He was dis- 
charged from service on Dec. 13, 1918. 



Philip McCullough 

of Central Islip, enlisted on Sept. 19, 1917, 
in the 82nd Division, 328th Field Hospital, 307th 
■Sanitary Train, serving at Camp Upton, Camp 
Gordon and Camp Merritt and in the battles of 
Lagny, Marbache, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne. 
In the Lagny and Marbache Sector the Division 
made up the defensive section. During the St. 
Mihiel Offensive, the Hospital was stationed about 
two miles from the front lines, and as many as 
nine hundi'ed wounded were admitted and taken 
care of in one day. During the Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive, they were stationed in a large, fully 
furnished and equipped Hospital, taken from the 
enemy. There they remained, dressing and taking 
care of their comrades until the signing of the 
armistice. Mr. McCullough was discharged from 
service on May 12, 1919. 



Charles Kelley 

of Central Islip, was called to service on Dec. 
5, 1917. and assigned to the 305th Infantry. He 
sailed from New York in April, 1918, arriving in 
Calais, France. The regiment went into action on 
July 2 in the Luneville Defensive Sector. Mr. 
Kelley took part in the battles of Vesle River, 
Aisne River, Argonne Drive and the Meuse Offen- 
sive. He was discharged from service at Camp 
Mills on May 9, 1919. 



William Leddy 

of Central Islip. enlisted on April 12, 1918, in the 
U. S. Navy. Was promoted from 2nd to 1st Class 
Ship-Fitter. During his service he made thirteen 
(13) trips across the ocean, being chased a few 
times by German Subs and a torpedo missed the 
stern of their ship ahout fifty feet. On their re- 
turn they sunk a sub about 300 miles off the Atlan- 
tic Coast, believed to be one of the subs that sunk 
eleven of our ships off the Jersey Coast during the 
time that New York City was in darkness, and 
later they were given credit for sinking the Sub 
that hit the U. S. S. Mount Vernon about 500 miles 
off Brest. They sank the Sub by gunfire and later 
a destroyer dropped depth bombs to make sure 
that the job was done right. Mr. Leddy was dis- 
charged on Sept. 25, 1919. 



Richard J. Flanagan 

of Central Islip, enlisted on July 17, 1917, in the 
102nd Signal Corps B, trained at Spartanburg; 
served in France and Belgium. He took part in 
the battles of Hindenburg Line, La Selle River, 
Jonc-de-Mar Ridge, France, and in engagements, 
Vierstraat Ridge, The Knoll, Quillemont Farm, St. 
Maurice River and was active in the East Poper- 
inghe Line, and Dickebush Sector, Belgium. Dis- 
charged on April 4, 1919. 



Anton Nadvornik 

of Central Islip, enlisted on May 29, 1918, in the 
308th Company of the 56th Infantry, A. E. F., 
France. He served as Private in the Meuse- 
Argonne from Oct. to Nov. 11, 1918. He was hon- 
orably discharged from service on July 2, 1918. 



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WAR RECORD OF 



Edward R. Jackson 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on Aug. 13, 1918, in 153rd 
D. B., Camp Dix, N. J., and served there as Ser- 
geant in the 49th Company until the date of his 
honorable discharge from service, Anril 7. 1919. 



France with the 15th Regiment and served there 
until April 8, 1918, taking part in the battles of 
Champagne, Argonne, Axrthis range, staying at 
the front until the signing of the armistice. He 
returned to the United States in Feb., 1919. 

No records were received from the others but 
we believe they were all members of the 15th Regi- 
ment. 



Herbert Mills 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on June 25, 1917, in the 
S'69th Regiment, Company E. He served overseas 
for fourteen months and took part in the battle 
of Champagne, being wounded at this battle in 
Sept., 1918. He was twice decorated, once in 
France and once in the United States. 



Benjamin Murray 

Member of the 15th Regiment. 



Oscar Miller 

of Bay Shore, was called to service at Camp Upton 
on Oct. 1, 1917, and served as Corporal, in the 
367th Regiment, 92nd Division and took part in 
the following operations: St. Die Sector, Vosges, 
Meuse-Argonne, Marbacke Sector. 



Henry Thomas 

Member of the 15th Regiment. 



Andrew S. Jackson 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on May 11, 1917, and went 
to Peekskill for training; later training at Camp 
Whitman and Camp Upton. Spartanburg, Van 
Cortland Park and Camp Merritc. Sailed for 



Eugene Hicks 

Member of the 15th Regiment. 



According to iyiformation received from He^rrij Thomas, the 15th Regiment was a 
part of the 91st Division, and participated in all the battles of that Division, acting ivith 
the French Army. In the battle of Champagne on the afternoon of Jidy 15th, 1918, ivhile 
on a forward movement and engaged in cleaning up machine gun "nests," Jay White, one 
of the Bay Shore boys, was shot through the leg and ivas so badly icounded that he coidd 
not stand. As soon as Thomas coidd get permission he carried White to the dugout on his 
shoulder. After a wait of about two hours Thomas ivas ordered to take White behind the 
lines to a hospital. White remained in the hospital until the Armistice was signed and 
then returned with the regiment to the United States. Thomas told me many stories of 
the fighting, some very sad and all told tvith wo mention of himself, except as related 
above. 

A friend tells me this story about this regiment: "When the French had almost 
given up hope of preventing the Germaiis from breaking through their lines, General 
Foch sent French officers to intervietv the American officers and try to ascertain hoio 
much help they might expect from the American troops. After one of these officers had 
a very serious interview tvith the colonel of this (15) regiment, the orderly, tvho had heard 
all that was said, after the French officer had left, said, "Colonel, there was one thing 
you. didn't tell that gemma, if them Germans break through he can depend on us to carry 
the news to every part of France." — The Editor. 



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128 



WAR RECORD OF 



Kenneth Cecil Stellenwerf 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Ser- 
vice and saw active service on Yale Boat House at 
New Haven, Connecticut. 



S. C. Frieman 

of Bayport, enlisted on March 13, 1917, at Fort 
Slocum, New York, and served there in 6th Com- 
pany, C. A. C, during the period of this war. 



Anthony Erickson 

of Bay Shore, enlisted on July 17, 1918, at Pelham 
Bay, Regiment No. 2. On Feb. 8, 1918, he was 
transferred to Brooklyn Navy Yard, where he re- 
ceived his final discharge from service. 



Thomas John Heme 

of Bay Shore, was called into service on April 27, 
1918, and trained at Camp Upton and at Camp 
Devens. He sailed from Boston with the 26th 
Infantry, Company D, on July 8, 1918, and re- 
turned to the United States on April 2, 1919, being 
rejected from the service as being physically un- 
fit. He took part in the battles of the Argonne 
Forest, St. Mihiel, as a gunner. He was gassed 
twice and at Argonne a shrapnel exploded, killing 
both his ammunition carriers and shooting away 
the calf of his right leg. After lying on the bat- 
tlefield for a long time, he was found and carried 
back of the line, being officially reported as missing 
in action. He laid in the base hospital for several 
months at Reinacourt, France, from Oct. 5 to Feb. 
20, and was transferred to the base hospital at 
Brest and sent home as a casual on the Leviathan. 
He was honorably discharged from service on April 
15, 1919. 



Howard Heme 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the United States Navy 
when 17 years old, on April 10, 1917, and reported 
at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on the 12th and was 
assigned as a messenger at the yard, being later 
assigned to the destroyer U. S. S. Sabola No. 225, 
stationed off Ambrose Channel Lighthouse and do- 
ing convoy duty between Ambrose Channel and 
Nantucket Shoals and Newfoundland Banks. He 
became Gunner's First Mate, 1st class, on March 
1st. When the Sabola went out of commission he 
was transferred to the receiving ship at Bay Ridge 
and shipped out on the U. S. S. Leviathan and 
made the last six trips, bringing back General 
Pershing and his staff. He was later granted a 
release and was appointed Machinist's Mate in the 
Army Transport Service and was stationed at Ho- 
boken, serving there for several months and re- 
signed and shipped over in the U. S. S. Bagaduce. 



Justin Steigerwald 

of Bayport, was inducted into the service on Octo- 
ber 8, 1917, and trained in Company J, 307th 
Supply Train at Camp Upton and Camp Gordon, 
Georgia. He served overseas 11 months with his 
regiment, taking part in the following engage- 
ments: Toul Sector, St. Mihiel, Meuse- Argonne and 
Marbache. 



Edward Frank Sharp 

of Bayport, was inducted into the service on Aug. 
29, 1918, and trained at Camp Gordon in Company 
L, 83rd Division. After serving overseas for three 
months, he returned to America and was honorably 
discharged from service on Feb. 13, 1919. 



Arthur LeUind Lynch 

of Bayport, was inducted into the service on Sep- 
tember, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, in Com- 
pany D, 302nd Engineers, 77th Division. He served 
overseas, taking part in the following operations: 
Lorraine, Vesle, Argonne, Meuse River, Aisne. 



Frank J. Vererka 

of Bayport, enlisted in United States Navy at 
Brooklyn Navy Yard and trained in the Electrical 
School there and later served on Flagship Dixie. 
He went overseas eleven times during the war, 
serving as Chief Electrician. He was also awarded 
a prize for shooting. 



John P. Steigerwald 

of Bayport, enlisted on May 29, 1918, and served 
in the army at Camp Upton and Camp Gordon 
during his training in America. He served over- 
seas with his regiment for eleven months. 



Oakley John Dallard 

of Bayport, enlisted in April, 1917, at Bay Shore, 
New York, in the United iStates Naval Aviation 
Corps and served there and at Miami, Florida, un- 
til the date of his discharge from service, in April, 
1919. (Lieutenant, J. G.) 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



129 



John Thomas Rogerson 

of Bayport, enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps in 
Canada on July 11, 1917, and received his train- 
ing: at the University of Toronto, (Theory and 
Flying) at Camp Mohawk and Camp Borden. He 
served as Instructor in the Royal Flying Force in 
England, as Test Pilot, Fievvillers, France, No. 1 
Squadron Canadian Air Forcie and in No. 12 Squad- 
ron Royal Air Force, in Germany. 



Percy O. UEcluse 

of Bayport, enlisted at Fort Slocum on Dec. 11, 
1917, in the Medical Department, being later trans- 
ferred to Sanitary Engineei-s and served at Camp 
Hill and Camp Stewart until April 1st, when he 
was transferred to Camp Wheeler, Ga. He later 
trained at Camp Beauregard, La., and at Camp 
Taylor, Kentucky. He was honorably discharged 
from service at this camp on Dec. 1, 1919. 



James Edicard Hayes Rogers 

of Bayport, enlisted in the Royal Air Force in 
Canada, and received his training at Camp Mo- 
hawk, University of Toronto, Camp Everman, 
Texas, Camp Borden and Hoston Hall, England. 
He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant just before 
sailing for England. 



John F. Barbee 

of Central Islip, entered service as private, in the 
325th Infantry Headquarters Co., 82nd Division, 
on Sept. 20, 1917. Seven months were spent in 
training in Camp Gordon, Ga., then overseas to 
England, where we were the first American troops 
to pass in review before the King and Queen. 
Served with the British in France, in the Somme 
Sector, the front lines in Toul, and 26 consecutive 
days in the Meuse-Argonne. Narrowly escaped 
death in the St. Mihiel drive, when as we were 
passing out of a dugout, a shell hit the entrance 
and killed 6 comrades. Discharged from the Army 
May 16, 1919. 



George A. Rogerson 

of Bayport, was inducted into the service on April 
1, 1918, and trained at Camp Dix, in Company L, 
and in Headquarters, 3rd Bn., 310th Infantry, 
78th Division. He served in France from May, 
1918, to May, 1919; was wounded in St. Juvin and 
sent to Base Hospital No. 11, near Nantes, France, 
where he remained for about seven weeks, but 
returned to his company fully recovered. Mr. 
Rogerson saw action in St. Mihiel Offensive, in the 
"Limy" sector, and in the Meuse-Argonne Offen- 
sive. 



James Conlon 

of Central Islip, served with the 327th Infantry, 
Co. C, 82nd Division. Was stationed at Camp 
Upton, N. Y., and Camp Gordon, Ga. Overseas, 
engaged in the Toul Sector, Marbache Sector, St. 
Mihiel Offensive and Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 
Length of service from Sept. 19, 1917, to June 16, 
1919. 



Silas Carman Seaman 

of Bayport, enlisted in the service on July 3, 1917, 
at Mare Island, California, and trained in the 
13th Regiment U. S. Marine Corps. He served 
overseas during the war, being attached to the 
Marine Guard Company at Bordeaux, France. 



Irving Houck 

of Central Islip, served with the 316th Infantry 
from date of induction to discharge. Was in action 
at St. Mihiel and the Argonne. 



August Scott Behman 



of Bayport, enlisted in May, 1917, in a U. S. 
Hospital Unit as Ambulance Driver and served 
overseas during the war, being stationed at Brest 
for 11 months. 



Joseph Miller 

of Central Islip, entered the service Oct. 3, 1917, 
Company L, 304th Infantry. Sent to Camp 
Devens; transferred to Camp Gordon November 
12th, 6th Company, 2nd Training Battalion, 157th 
D'epot Brigade. Appointed Sergeant June 1, 1918; 
commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Aug. 26, 1918. As- 
signed to Camp Wadsworth, Company A, 61st 
Pioneer Infantry, Dec. 23, 1918. Discharged from 
Camp Dix. 



130 



WAR RECORD OF 



Michael Foley 

of Central Islip, entered the service May 28, 1918. 
Went overseas with Company H, 21st Engineers, 
serving continuously with them during their ex- 
perience in the St. Mihiel Drive and in the Meuse- 
Argonne Offensive. Discharged June 14, 1919. 



George Henry Densing 

of Islip, enlisted in Company A, 1st Division, on 
Aug. 8, 1918, and trained at New London, Conn., 
until the date of his discharge, Dec. 19, 1918. 



Robert J. P. Pearson 

of Central Islip, admitted to service Sept. 10, 1917. 
Sergeant in Headquarters Company, 4th U. S. In- 
fantry, 3rd Division. Fought in the Champaigne, 
Marne, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel and the Meuse 
Argonne Defensive sectors. On the morning of 
July 15, 1918, 600 Germans crossed the Marne 
Eiver and were taken prisoners by our Division 
in Chateau Thierry. TTiis encounter won for the 
38th Infantry, 3rd Division, the name, "The Rock 
of the Marne." We were the only Division flight- 
ing there from May 30, 1918, to July 29, 1918, 
when we were relieved by the 32nd Division. Re- 
ceived discharge Aug. 29, 1919. 



William E. Brown 

of Bayport, was inducted into service on Sept. 28, 
1917, and trained at Camp Upton in Company I, 
307th Infantry. He served in France with the 
English, in the Arras sector for six weeks and 
later on the front in the Baccarat Sector. From 
August 1st to September 17th, he took part in the 
Oise-Aisne Offensive. He was gassed on Septem- 
ber 17th and received treatment at Allery Base 
Hospital 56. He was honorably discharged from 
service on June 9, 1919, at Camp Dix. 



Patrick J. Qiiinn 

of Central Islip, inducted May 2, 1918, Medical 
Department. Stationed at St. Elizabeth's Hospi- 
tal, Washington, D. C. Served overseas from Sept. 
28, 1918, to May 21, 1919 in Base Hospitals No. 117 
and 214, caring for shell shock cases. While at St. 
Elizabeth's in Washington, D. C, was attacked by 
an insane patient and severely wounded about the 
face and neck, necessitating 32 stitches to be taken 
in the same. Sailed from St. Nazaire with 396 
patients on board the Pocahontas May 21st. 
Reached Newport News June 1st. Discharged 
from Camp Upton July 18, 1919. 



Arthur George Griffiths, Jr. 

of East Islip, enlisted in the Navy at Brooklyn on 
Nov. 5, 1917, and served aboard the U. S. S. 
Cheyenne, Submarinne Base, New London, Conn., 
and also the U. S. S. Warbler, until the date of his 
discharge. 



William Soukup 



of East Islip, enlisted in the United States Navy 
on July 18, 1918, and trained at Pelham Bay 
Naval Station and later served aboard the U. S. S. 
George Washington, the U. S. S. Calamares and at 
the United States Naval Air Station at Pauilliac, 
France. 



Wilfred Vernon Breckenridge 

of Bayport, enlisted in Supply Company, 23rd Regi- 
ment, 27th Division, and served as a Mechanic. 
Served overseas, carrying supplies to 106th In- 
fantry. 



Harold William Wehhe 

of Great River, enlisted in the Signal Corps and 
served as Captain in Company C, 79th Division. 
He trained at Camp Knox, Kentucky. He later 
commanded Signal Detachment of the 13th Infan- 
try during the defensive action in Verdun Sector. 
He served as Brigade Signal Officer during Meuse- 
Argonne Drive and in the defensive action of St. 
Mihiel Sector. 



Urnnie Bernard 

of Bohemia, was inducted into the service on Sept. 
19, 1917, and served at Camp Upton, in Company 
H, 327th Infantry, 82nd Division. He next trained 
at Camp Gordon, Georgia, where he remained un- 
til he sailed for France. In France he served in 
the following engagements: Abbeville, with the 
English; in the Toul Sector, St. Mihiel Offensive, 
the Marbache Sector and the Meuse-Argonne Of- 
fensive. Upon his return to America, he was sent 
to Camp Upton, where he received an honorable 
discharge from service on May 26, 1918. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



131 



Anton A. Bartek 

of Bohemia, enlisted in the United States Marines 
and trained at Port Royal, South Carolina, in the 
43rd Company, 5th Regiment, 2nd Division. He 
served overseas with his regiment, being wounded 
at Chateau Thierry on the 6th of June, 1918, and 
also being gassed badly at Belleau Woods. Mr. 
Bartek has not fully recovered. He was honorably 
discharged from service on August 22nd, 1919. 



Regis Henry Post, Jr. 

of Bayport, volunteer. He served at West Point. 
In Camp Taylor during the period of the war. 



Harry Joseph Lindsell 



of East Islip, enlisted on Dec. 5, 1917, at Brooklyn 
Navy Yard, and served there in the United States 
Navy until the date of his discharge, Jan. 10, 
1919. 



John Percy Henshaw 

of East Islip, enlisted in Company D, 54th Bat- 
talion, 4th Division, Canadian Army and trained at 
Camp Borden, Canada. He later served overseas 
with his regiment, for two years, serving with the 
Canadian Army. 



Ralph T. Norton 

of Bayport, enlisted on Oct. 15, 1917, and trained 
at Toronto in the Royal Air Force, 231st Sea 
Plane Squadron. He served in Hostile Submarine 
Patrol, being stationed at Felixstowe, England, 
Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands. 



Peter Carr 

of East Islip, enlisted in March, 1918, and trained 
at Camp Meade, Maryland, with the 27th Engi- 
neers, Company B. He later served in France with 
his regiment, taking part in the following opera- 
tions: Aisne, Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. 



William A. Gordon 

of Bayport, enlisted in the Navy in 1910 and 
served during the period of the war in the Mine 
Sweeping Division, North Sea, helping to take up 
70,000 mines. 



Alfred Frederick Von Mechoiv 

of Bayport, was inducted into the service on Oct. 
8, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton in the 302nd 
Ammunition Train, Company E, 77th Division, un- 
til the date of his honorable discharge from ser- 
vice. May 21, 1918. 



John Joseph Sullivan 

of Bayport, enlisted in the U. S. Aviation Corps 
on Oct. 29, 1918, and trained at Hazelhurst Field, 
Mineola, New York, in the 505th Aero Squadron, 
later serving at Mitchell Field, from where he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge from service on 
Jan. 22, 1919. 



Eugene Curtis Stoll 

of Bayport, enlisted on Sept, 20, 1917, at Mitchell 
Field, Garden City, New York, and trained there 
in the 6th Company, 1st Battalion, United States 
' Aviation Corps, during the period of the war. 



McKim Hollins 

of East Islip, enlisted on April 6, 1917, at Brooklyn 
Navy Yard as Ensign, Provisional Grade, 
U. S. N. R. F. Received training as gunnery of- 
ficer aboard S. P. 56, Block Island. He later took 
command of U. S. Submarine Chaser 330, at Ma- 
nitowoc, Wis., from where he brought her to 
Brooklyn Navy Yard. On June 4, 1918, he pro- 
ceeded, with 17 other chasers (known as special 
anti submarine force, under Captain Cronan, to 
attack enemy submarines off Atlantic Coast. They 
cruised from Halifax to Hatteras with this force 
until September, when they received orders to 
return. Upon their return, Mr. Hollins received 
orders to sail for overseas via Bermuda, Azores 
and Portugal. Upon being detached from the 
force, he received a citation from Captain Cronan 
for attack on Submarine U-58. On the trip to 
Bermuda, one chaser was lost, but 16 of the crew 
saved. From Bermuda they went to Azores, where 
they received orders to proceed to Gibraltar to 
participate in Gibraltar tar barrages. They left 
the Azores with 11 chasers in a heavy northeastern 
storm, which lasted 4 days, made port at Oporto, 
Portugal with 7 chasers, the others having run 
out of gas or gotten separated in the storm. They 
proceeded to Gibraltar, where he was assigned to 
U. S. S. Parker, and he remained on this barrage 
in the Gibraltar Straits, participating in nine dif- 
ferent attacks. They lost one vessel, a British 
battleship, "Buttania," credited with 4 submarines. 
In all instances but one attacks on subs were made 
at night. The exception being the one which sank 
the battleship, and he was blown out of water. 
Mr. Hollins received a citation from Admiral Ni- 
black for work on Barrage. He received grade of 
Junior Lieutenant. 



132 



WAR RECORD OF 



Peter Massick 

of Great River, enlisted in the Navy on June 6, 
1917, and served on Convoy duty and Transport 
and Mine Navy Fleet during the period of the war. 



Alvin W. Hoppe 

of Sayville, enlisted on June 28, 1916, at Brooklyn, 
New York, and served on the Mexican Border Serv- 
ice in Battery C, 2nd Field Artillery, New York. 
He served in France for eig-ht months, from June 
30, 1918, to March, 1919. When discharged, he 
was with the 105th Field Artillery, Battery C, 
27th Division. 



George Hebenstreit 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service and served 
in the 152nd Aero Squadron at Kelly Field, Texas, 
and at Rantoul, 111., and Garden City, Long Island. 
On Feb. 25, 1918, he left for England, where he 
served for eight months at Lincolnshire and later 
served ten months in France, at Colomby Les 
Belles, in the First Air Depot. He was honorably 
discharged from service on July 14, 1919. 



Edward Munsell 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Navy, in the 5th Com- 
pany, U. S. Coast Guard, on Oct. 12th, 1918, and 
served as seaman (the Coast Guard being taken 
over by the Navy) during the period of the war. 
He was honorably discharged from service on Aug. 
26, 1919. 



Leonard Von Popering 

of West Sayville, was inducted into the service on 
Sept. 28, 1919, and trained at Camp Upton in Bat- 
tery D, 306th Field Artillery, 77th Division. He 
served overseas for one year and took part in the 
Vesle-Aisne Offensive and in the Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive. He was honorably discharged from 
service on May 19, 1919. 



John M. Alvarez 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Navy on Nov. 13, 1918, 
and served on the U. S. S. Troy as Apprentice 
Seaman and later as Seaman, 2nd class. He made 
3 trips to Brest, France. 



Detvitt Rhodes 

of Sayville, enlisted on October 8, 1917, in the 306th 
Field Artillery and served in this regiment as a 
mechanic. He served in France with his regiment 
during the period of the war. 



Herman Mues 

of Sayville, enlisted in Navy and served at Radio 
Station as 1st Class Seaman, N. R. H., until the 
time of his discharge, Dec. 10, 1918. 



Raymond Smith 



of Sayville, enlisted in the Navy on Aug. 7th, 1916, 
and served on the U. S. S. New York, and in Armed 
Guard Communication Service, 3rd Naval District, 
as Apprentice Seaman and later at Radio Elec- 
trician. He was honorably discharged from service 
on Aug. 7, 1920. 



William Otto Pagels 



of West Sayville, enlisted in the Aviation Corps and 
trained at Pensacola, Fla., until his discharge from 
service. 



William E. Munsell 

of Sayville, was inducted into the service on Oct. 
8, 1917, and served in the 20th Regiment Engineers, 
Foresti'y. He served eighteen months in foreign 
service as Private and later as Wagoner. He was 
honorably discharged from service on June 3, 1919. 



Wolfred C. Romun 

of West Sayville, enlisted in the Navy on Oct. 27, 
1917, and trained at Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. He 
went overseas on March 1, 1918, where he served 
on Submarine Chaser No. 129, guarding the straits 
of Taranto, between Italy and Greece. He received 
a citation from the Italian Government for serv- 
ice during the Battle of Durazzo. He was dis- 
charged from service at the Naval Fleet Base, 
Brooklyn, on Sept. 8, 1919. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



133 



Howard Reeves 

of West Sayville, was inducted into the service 
on Sept. 19, 1917, and trained at Camp Upton, 
Long Island, in Company M, 307th Infantry, 77th 
Division. He served overseas with his regiment 
and took part in the Baccaret Sector engagements, 
June 21 to Aug. 4; the Vesle Sector, Aug. 11 to 
Aug. 18; Oise-Aisne, Aug. 18 to Sept. 16, 1918; 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Sept. 26th to Oct. 5, 
1918. He was discharged from service at Camp 
Upton, Long Island, on May 9, 1919. 



William Swanbeck 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Navy on May 17, 1917, 
and served aboard ship until the time of his dis- 
charge, Jan. 15, 1920. 



Frank W. Antos 

of Sayville, enlisted in the service on March 9, 1916, 
and was called for Mexican service in June, return- 
ing to Camp Whitman in November of the same 
year. Was called for World War in March, 1917, 
and trained at Van Cortlandt Park and Spartan- 
burg. In April, 1918, he was transferred to the 
Regular Army, being assigned to Company C, 40th 
Infantry, at Fort Riley, Kan., thence to Battle 
Creek, Mich., and Chillicothe, 0. He was later put 
in detached service with the Board of Education 
of the City of Chicago as Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. He was discharged at Chi- 
cago, 111., on Sept. 29, 1919. 



Clifford F. Campbell 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Motor Transport Corps 
in September, 1918, and served as Corporal at Gov- 
ernor's Island until the date of his honorable dis- 
charge from service, Sept. 6, 1919. 



Frank Burns 

of Sayville, enlisted in the Army and served as 
Machinist at Camp Eustos from Oct. 23, 1918, until 
Dec. 4, 1918. 



John Knapp Hollins 

of East Islip, from the National Guard of N. Y., 
enlisted for training in May, 1917, R. O. T. C. at 
Madison Barracks, N. Y. As no commission was 
forthcoming, he entered the Navy as Quartermaster 
in August, and was assigned to the Block Island pa- 
trol. Was there all winter, alternating as second 
in command of the S. P. 56 and aid to the com- 
mander of the section. 



Archibald G. Thacher 

attended First Officers Training Camp at Platts- 
burgh. May, 1917. Received Commission as Cap- 
tain of Infantry Aug. 15. Assig-ned to 306th 
Inf.. 77th Div., A. E. F., Camp Upton, and served 
as Adjutant of that regiment until it went over- 
seas in April, 1918. After landing at Calais, May 
1, 1918, the Division was brigaded with the British 
in the training area back of the Ypres-Arras Sec- 
tor until the first part of June, when it was trans- 
ferred to the Baccarat Sector, Lorraine, from June 
to the end of July; promoted to be Major of In- 
fantry in June, 1918, and given command of 2nd 
Battalion S'06th Inf.; took part in the campaign 
of the River Vesle from Aug. 10 to Sept. 
20, 1918, advancing to the River Aisne. From 
Sept. 26 to Oct. 16 participated in the Argonne 
Forest Cainpaign, the 2nd Battalion, 306th Inf., 
capturing the town of St. Juvin and Hill 182 on 
River Aire on Oct. 14. Recommended for pro- 
motion to Lieutenant^Colonel and received regi- 
mental and division citations and Silver Star cita- 
tion from Commander in Chief, A. E. F. 

On Oct. 24 ordered by Division Commander 
to hospital in Paris for operation. Remained 
in Red Cross Hospital No. 3 until Nov. 11, 
1918. Ordered to the United States to organize 
new regiment. Received honorable discharge at 
Camp Lee, Virginia, Dec. 11, 1918. 

Now Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding 306th In- 
fantry, United States Army. 



Edward McCormick 

of Sayville, was inducted into the 201st Field Ar- 
tillery on April 27, 1918, and served as Sergeant. 
He served overseas with his regiment, being hon- 
orably discharged from the service on Jan. 27, 1919- 



Allen Highland Brown 

of Great River, enlisted in the Coast Artillery 
April 28, 1918. Was sent to Fort Slocum, trans- 
ferred to the Medical Corps there until he was 
discharged from the service. 



134 



WAR RECORD OF 



The men whose names are Usted below served in the World War, but the 
compiler of this book was unable to obtain their records or photos. 



BAY SHORE 

Adams, Carl D. 
Adams, William H. 
Adams, Seward W. 
Adams, Frank W. 
Alcock, Windom R. 
Austin, Norman 
Avetta, Edward M. 
Barto, Merwiu 
Bailey, Herbert J. 
Barnes, Frederick H. 
Bates, William G. 
Broughton, Walter 
Barto, Louis 
Bayles, Washington 
Bedell, William H. 
Benjamin, Carleton 
Barto, Joseph 
Bedell, Charles 
Bachia, Richard A., Jr. 
Bayles, Oliver 
Cheron, William S. 
Carlock, Leroy 
Conklin, Albert 
Carroll, Irvin 
Nicholas, Cilento 
Costello, Joseph B. 
Crawson, Edward 
Calder, Thomas H. 
Camp, Victor F. 
Carlson, Leroy 
Ceballos, Juan 
Downey, Hugh C. 
Deardorf, Herbert C. 
Donnelly, Edward M. 
Dexter, John 
Dumper, Albert 
Doxsee, Wellington 
Donnelly, William 
Erickson, Anthony 
Eidenback, Henry 
Evert, John 
Emory, Lloyd S. 
Elliot, Arnold W. 



Franklin, Emlin P. 
Ferriss, Edward 
Florvag, Anton 
Foster, Hiram E. 
Gibbs, Fred E. 
Haines, Harry 
Haynes, Joseph 
Heynes, George P. 
Hendrickson, Raymond 
Hoffman, Arthur 
Hoffman, August 
Jayne, Lawrence 
Johnson, Charles A. 
Jackson, Patrick 
Kahaly, Arthur 
Kahaly, John G., Jr. 
Kavaltsik, Alex., Jr. 
Kirkland, Wm. 
Kittle, Percy 
Kovas, August 
Lawrence, Robert 
Linthwaite, Wilfred G. 
Latimer, Edmund C. 
Mann, Dr. John 
McCann, Hugh F. 
McDonald, John F. 
McCarthy, Chris. 
Mahan, James J. 
Mills, Jerome 
Nickel, Henry A. 
Nicholas, E. 
Owens, Joseph E. 
Pemberton, B. A. 
Pinkerton, Allan 
Peacock, Lawrence 
Pearsall, Robert 
Potter, Robt. C. 
Reynolds, Florence 
Rankeiller, Wm. 
Roode, Delano E. 
Rolnick, George B. 
Stellenwerf, Kenneth 
Strand, Frank F. 
Skogland, John A. 



Siedel, Henry B. 
Sedlacek, William, Jr. 
Schroeder, Sidney 
Smith, Ralph 
Sullivan, Henry 
Snedecor, Raymond 
Schermerhorn, F. C. 
Schultz, John 
Sylvester, Richard 
Tuohey, Martin, Jr. 
Tuohey, John 
Tushenski, John 
Thurber, Carl S. 
Urban, Barney 
Vail, Arthur H. 
Vandermeullen, Earl 
Veltman, Dudley 
Watts, Harrison 
White, Joseph 
Watts, Wilfred H. 
White, jay 
Westerlund, Jos. 
Williams, Dr. Sidney G. 
Wicks, Thomas H. 
Wood, Percy S. 
Wilson, Harry 
Watts, Claude 
Watts, Ralph 
Williams, DeWitt 
Wills, Edgar W. 
Woodward, Vivian 
Whitehead, Turner 
Williams, Julius A. 

ISLIP 

Allen, Malcolm 
Baker, Oscar 
Barteau, George E. 
Bedell, William H. 
Brooks, Arthur 
Butterworth, Herbert 
Clock, Ernest 
Clock, Harold 
Clock, Vincent 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



135 



Clock, Archie 
Curran, Daniel 
Creamer, Byron J. 
Demers, Wilfred G. 
Dick, Adolph 
Doxsee, Robert 
Doxsee, Spencer 
Dressier, F. L. 
Eccleston, Lewis T. 
Filly, P. C. 
Fisch, Edward 
Fisch, Charles 
Fisch, Conrad 
Foster, Victor 
Foley, Nellie 
Gatje, George H. 
Hambly, David 
Hanibly, Rawson 
HafT, Kenneth G. 
Hawkins, Edward 
Hulse, Harry 
Holt, Harold 
Horak, Joseph 
Johnson, Bradish G. 
Jeffrey, Lawrence 
Jones, Stanley R. 
Kasin, John E. 
King, Charles R., Jr. 
King, William P. 
Knight, Edward 
Kahler, Clarence 
Knox, Richard, Jr. 
Larson, Eric 
Macintosh, David 
Monzet, William 
Morgan, Robert W. 
Narr, Wm. 
Newton, Ralph 
Nugent, William 
O'Neill, Frederick 
Parson, Schuyler 
Paul, Charles 
Poslusny, Albert 
Ranahan, Richard J'. 
Riedel, Franklin 
Rosebush, Fred 
Root, Gustaf 
Rosebush, E. Robert 
Shaughnessy, John 
Sikovsky, Julius 
Sindler, Thomas 



Slavic, Albert 
Slavic, Frank 
Smith, Ray 

Stanchfield, John B., Jr. 
Strnad, Frank 
Strnad, Joseph 
Schmucker, John 
Smith, Peter J. 
Tanck, Paul 
Tenca, Frank 
Tenca, Ignus 
Tyman, James P. 
Taggert, J. Stewart 
Velsor, William 
Weichart, Albert 
Wendler, Edwin 
Westerlund, Alfred 
Westerlund, Arthur 
Weeks, Harold H. 
Wright, Arthur 
Wood, H. Duncan 
Young, S. J. Floyd 

EAST ISLIP 
Behownek, Jacob, Jr. 
Behownek, John 
Behownek, Frank 
Brown, Edward 
Brown, Stewart 
Carr, Gerald 
Cerveny, Thomas 
Cutting, Bronson M. 
Fisher, Joseph 
Hawkins, Herbert 
Herb a, Frank 
Herb a, Louis 
Herba, Peter 
Houlik, William 
Hollins, John 
James, Henry 
Johnson, Aymar 
Johnson, William 
Kadane, Joseph 
Kadane, William 
Kaegnear, Harry 
King, Edward 
Knapp, H. L., Jr. 
Knapp, Theodore F. 
Koucelik, William 
Kovarik, Joseph 
Krstan, Peter 



Lindsell, H. 
Lickhan, Arthur 
Loucka, Joseph 
Loucka, William 
Massik, Peter 
Mulford, L. 
Opalecky,, Albert 
Petrlak, O. 
Ricciardelli, L. 
Robbins, Clarence R. 
Rogers, William 
Rumplik, Ralph 
Silhan, George 
Slavik, Albert 
Souhrada, Charles 
Souhrada, John 
Strnad, Charles 
Strnad, Frank 
Strnad, Martin 
Soukup, William J'. 
Thatcher, Archibald G. 
Vanik, William 
Willarch, Joseph 
Wolpert, Andrews, Jr. 

CENTRAL ISLIP 
Bannon, John F. 
Barrett, Paul 
Bieringer, Charles 
Boyle, John M. 
Brady, Thomas A. 
Broderick, John F. 
Burrows, John J. 
Byrne, Dennis 
Carley, Owen 
Clerkin, Patrick 
Collins, Gilbert 
Cox, J'ohn J. 
Coyne, John 
Croman, Edward 
Crowe, Will J. 
Dehe, Andrew 
Duane, John B. 
Duke, John 
Elkins, Harry 
Finn, Thomas 
Fitzpatrick, William J. 
Flanagan, Patrick 
Flink, Robert 
Hogan, James 
Johnston, Harold 



136 



WAR RECORD OF 



Jones, Christopher 
Joyce, Clayton H. 
Kasper, Frank 
Kehoe, James H. 
Kelley, John F. 
Mann, Horace E. 
Moore, Anthony 
McVeigh, Frank 
O'Connell, Peter P. 
O'Neill, Terence 
O'Neill, Frederick 
Piigsley, Kenneth J. 
Reed, William J. 
Reynolds, Eugene 
Ross, Henry 
Skuiner, Claude 
Slima, Fred 
Verity, Harry 
Weidenkeller, Peter V. 

BRENTWOOD 

Anderson, William 
Blacker, Frank C. 
Creagh, William A. B. 
Chauvin, Dr. H. E. 
Doran, William 
Dawson, Arthur 
Holmes, Daniel 
L'Hommedeau, John L. 
L'Hommedeau, George 
Kropansky, Joseph 
Laebzansky, Vincent 
Martin, John B. 
Mason, Harold 
Stayley, Edward 
Stayley, Otto 
Scott, John L. 
Studley, Barret 
Tank, Paul 

SAYVILLE 

Adams, Oscar, Jr. 
Allmenthnger, Fred 
Anthony, William 
Antos, Frank 
Alvarez, J'ohn M., Jr. 
Benjamin, Charles Arthur 
Beebe, Edward 
Baker, Maurice 
Baker, Maurice, Jr. 



Bason, Currie 
Brandt, Carl Theo. 
Brandt, Henry J., Jr. 
Brandt, Webster 
Burnett, Allen Benj. 
Burns, Frank 
Campbell, Clifford T. 
Christoffel, John 
Collins, Frank Clinton 
Clock, Harold 
Decker, Marinus 
Demps, George W. 
Ell, Edward Dayton 
Ennis, John Daniel 
Felgenhauser, Edmund 
Fiala, Vacclav Frank 
Fuchsius, Heniy Chas. 
Geiger, Walter Joseph 
Groh, Leonard 
Gross, Charles 
Grottwald, Otto 
Gruber, Harry (Gruber, 

Carl)** 
Hawkins, Herbert 
Hebenstreit, George 
Hindla, Charles 
Hoppe, Alwyn 
Jergenson, Gustave 
J'edlicka, Francis (Mrs.) 
Julian, Joseph 
Kaler, Clifford 
Kennedy, J. Royal 
Kreamer, Charles 
Krsnak, Anton 
Leach, Edward 
Leach, William 
Leach, Robert 
Love, Lamont 
Maas, William, Jr. 
Maasch, Martin 
Maasch, William C. 
Maasch, Paul 
McCormick, George B. 
McGowan, Bertram 
Mues, Herman 
Minter, John J. 
Murdock, Daniel 
Munklewitz, Walter E. 
Munklewitz, Harry 
Mower, Elbert 



Meyers, George 
Meyer, T. Bennett 
Munsell, Edward 
Munsell, William 
Newton, Henry Douglas 
Novec, Milton 
Ohlsen, Frank Louis 
Oster, Adlet 
Peil, Peter 

Petram, Frederick, Jr. 
Phillips, Joseph A. 
Purtee, William A. 
Reynolds, John J. 
Reeve, Howard Colgrove 
Rhodes, DeWitt W. 
Rohm, Wesley 
Rogers, Clarence 
Roosevelt, Robert B. 
Roosevelt, Robert B., Jr. 
Ruzicka, Joseph 
Rogers, Ralph E. 
Steigerwald, Louis 
Swanbeck, William 
Schmand, Edward M. 
Smith, Elwood 
Tennenberg, Harry 
Terry, Lewis Spence 
Terry, Everett M. 
Ulrich, Charles 
Wachlin, William 
Wachlin, Losee A. 
Wahl, Henry 
Weeks, Frederick 
Wells, Clarence 
Webber, Frederick J. 
Wever, Gustave 
Whalen, John L. 
White, Theo. W. 
White, Nicholas 

WEST SAYVILLE 

Beket, Samuel 
Beket, Herman J. 
Beebe, Herman J. 
Hard, Anson W. 
Hack, Matthew 
Lamens, Martin 
Reeves, Howard** 
Scherpenisse, Leonard 
Van Essendelft, Albert 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



13' 



Von Wyne, Frederick 
Verveka, Frank, Jr. 
Von Poppering, Leonard 

BAYPORT 

Aschenbrand, Harry 
Bellman, August 
Brown, William B. 
Breckenridge, Wilfred 
Chichester, Basil 
Carroll, William 
Bollard, J. Oakley 
Downs, James N. 
Densing, Jacob 
Frieman, Henry 
Gordan, William 
Gerritsen, J. M. 
Glaser, August C. 
Hicks, Samuel J. 
Johnson, W. Herbert** 
Norton, Ralph** 
McGraw, Hugh 



Seaman, S. Carman 
Smith, W. H. 
Todd, J'. Herbert 
Veverka, Frank A. 
Von Mechow, Alfred 
Rogerson, J. Thomas 

BOHEMIA 

Bartik, Anton 
Bernard, Charles 
Bernard, Winnie 
Benedict, Winnie 
Hrabak, Joseph 
Hrabak, Winnie 
Jost, Otto 
Kovanda, Edward 
Kovarik, Charles 
Kovarik, Joseph 
Kriklava, Joseph 
Kubat, Edward 
Ruzicka, George 



Sedlacek, Edward 
Sabischek, Joseph 
Thuma, Julius 
Tiney, William 
Weigel, Joseph 
Zdenek, William 

WEST ISLIP 

Davies, jYilian T. 
Wagstaff, George B. 
Wagstaff, Samuel 
Wagstaff, David 
Ryan, Philip 
Fasino, John 
Fasino, Edward 
Sherman, B. F. 
Thorne, Francis B. 
Thorne, Lagdon K. 
Hitt, Frederick A. 
Arnold, E. W. C. 




138 



WAR RECORD OF 



PERSONAL NARRATIVES 



Further Interesting Data Contributed by Service Men 



Told btj Frederick D. Delemarre 

THE following incident is told by Fred- 
erick D. Delemarre of Bay Shore, who 
served in Ambulance Company 580 in 
France : 

In the Retreat of Fiume, on May 27, 
1918, our Company, then being attached to 
the 13th French Division, was immediately 
ordered to the front. I was driving the 
staff car. We proceeded to the front lines 
to establish first aid posts. Upon our re- 
turn to the Sector, three cars were detailed 
to the 109th Regiment of Chasseurs. Ar- 
thur Drake (of Bay Shore) and a French 
soldier were on their way to the post. Ger- 
mans were advancing so rapidly that Ar- 
thur and the French soldier in their Ford 
ambulance ran right into a squadron of 
German cavalry, which surrounded the car, 
captured the men and brought them 
through the rear at Fiume. When they 
arrived there, Arthur Drake was taken 
from his car and taken to a post for in- 
quiry in reference to the movements of the 
Allied troops in that section, and especially 
in regard to American Divisions, etc. 

The French soldier was then placed in a 
farmyard with his car and was told that 
he would carry wounded German officers to 
the rear. About seven o'clock that evening 
he was still in the farmyard with the car. 
The German sentries, having obtained some 
wine in the cellar of the farmhouse, were 
celebrating. He saw his chance to make 
his getaway ; walking around the car three 
times and no one taking any notice of it, 
he proceeded to cross the lines. 

In the meantime. Lieutenant Seymour 
and myself started out in search of Arthur 
and the French soldier in their ambulance. 
We arrived at the French post of artillery 
— 75s. There the Germans had full control 
of the air — ^the planes coming down as low 
as fifty feet and showering fire down from 
their machine guns. Not being able to do 
anything toward finding them, we were 
forced to return to the section discouraged 
and found the French soldier there. He 
had made his way across the lines on his 
stomach, and he told us the above story of 
their capture and of his escape. 



Told by Arthur K. Drake 

Enlisted in the United States Army 
Ambulance Service on June 13, 1917, at 
New York City. A few days later, I left for 
the training camp at Allentown, Pa. 

After several months of hard, concen- 
trated training my conipany was sent to 
France. 

We began active service with the French 
Army in March. The first several weeks 
things ran along smoothly for all of us. At 
times we were worked rather hard, but 
there was always a certain amount of fun 
attached to it. 

With the coming of summer, the Ger- 
mans launched their big offensive of May 
27th on our front. This brought us in the 
thickest of the fray. I was not destined 
to remain with my company. The first 
night of the attack, I volunteered to go out 
and search for some members of my com- 
pany who were missing. I started out at 
about eight o'clock with our French ser- 
geant, going over the same ground covered 
by the company in the afternoon. There 
was a possibility of locating them along the 
road, in distress. This trip was rather a 
dangerous one, with the Germans advanc- 
ing, and our troops (French) retreating. 
We were proceeding very slowly and cau- 
tiously along the high main roadway be- 
tween Fismes and Rheims. All firing had 
ceased with the setting of the sun. There 
were a number of English and French 
trucks along the roadside. Most of these 
had been crippled late in the afternoon by 
German Artillery and were simply left to 
the Germans. After a careful inspection of 
the trucks, we continued our journey. Sud- 
denly, from the roadside came the Bang! 
Bang ! of the German rifles directed toward 
my ambulance. I realized that it was too 
late to turn back. I applied all the gas and 
spark possible, and in a jiffy was speeding 
along at the highest rate possible over a 
shell-crated road, the Germans on both 
sides of me and blackness ahead. The fir- 
ing ceased after five minutes or so, and I 
found it necessary to slow up. As I did so, 
just ahead of my car, a large number of 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



139 



German troops jumped in front of me yell- 
ing "Halt! Halt!" Their little flashlights 
gave out enough light for me to realize 
what would happen if I did not obey. I 
stopped my car and was surrounded by 
what I thought was the entire German 
army. My feelings at that moment I can- 
not describe. The grey uniforms, the ugly 
helmets and shining bayonets of the Hun 
made me think it was some weird, hideous 
dream that I was having. Much to my 
sorrow, it turned out to be the real thing. 
Without hesitation, I was rushed before 
some German officers who, speaking in a 
mixture of French and German, plied me 
with questions. The remainder of the night 
T spent in a barn with about forty British 
and French soldiers. Sleep on that night 
was out of the question. 

At dawn I was called for by a German 
officer and was left standing in front of 
what I thought a firing squad. I cannot tell 
you what my thoughts were at that mo- 
ment. The end seemed so near at hand. 
After a ten minute conference among the 
German officers I was led back to the barn. 
Some relief! 

Then followed several weeks of hard 
work, long hours with very little to eat — 
behind the old German lines. It was a dog's 
life, working under the Germans with a 
couple of French soldiers as my sole com- 
panions. I often returned to my bunk worn 
out — with blistered hands and feet. My 
shoes and socks had worn out. I substituted 
two pieces of cloth which I wrapped around 
each foot for socks and a pair of old French 
shoes, some five sizes too large, aff'orded me 
little or no comfort. 

From here I went to a prison camp in 
Montmide. Much to my disappointment I 
found only Russian, French and Roumani- 
ans, prisoners. The sleeping quarters were 
dirty — "lousy" — and infested with rats. 
One had to tie his shoes to the bed so they 
would not be carried away by the rats. 
The "eats" were not fit to be taken by any 
human being. The work done by the pris- 
oners was of the dirtiest kind. The Ger- 
mans were none too kind. 

In two weeks I was moved to a prison 
camp in Strasbury — a mud "hell hole." 
Here I met a few American prisoners. The 
month I spent there was one of misery and 
starvation. Our meals consisted of break- 
fast, a bowl of barley coffee with a small 
piece of stale, mouldy black bread; dinner 
and supper, dried vegetable soup, which 
was ninety per cent water. At times I was 
on the verge of insanity. To add to this, 



the German sergeant piled insult upon in- 
sult upon us. 

It was a happy day for all when we were 
shipped to Rastatt, the permanent Ameri- 
can prison camp. Here conditions were 
much better inasmuch as we v/ere taken 
care of by the American Red Cross. Every 
week we received a parcel containing a can 
of corned "Bully Beef," hard tack, beans, 
etc. I was detained in this camp until De- 
cember 7th, working every day about the 
camp. 

Just after the armistice I became ill with 
diphtheria. I received little or no treat- 
ment from the Germans. How I survived 
is a mystery to me. On December 7th, the 
American Red Cross trains came through 
Switzerland to Rastatt and took us back to 
France. I was interned in the American 
hospitals in France for several weeks re- 
cuperating. On the 8th of February I 
sailed for America. 



Told by Jack McGuinness 

After the St. Mihiel offensive we pro- 
ceeded on our way and later reached the 
edge of the Argonne, where we proceeded 
to make ourselves comfortable. But on 
the following day I relayed a message 
to our C. 0., at 11 P. M., to make up 
combat packs and have all the bandages 
and splinters that were available, as we 
would require them before daybreak. And 
we surely did — for daybreak found us ad- 
vancing on the town of Chatel, which the 
enemy had occupied for three years. We 
suffered heavy casualties here but they 
couldn't break the Yankee grit or morale. 
We were their masters, and they knew it. 
The struggle continued for four days and 
nights, and on the fifth day we were in 
Chatel Cherey, which was almost in ruins. 
However, we found some dug-outs in which 
we had a few hours sleep, but there was no 
let-up, for the well-known yell was sounded, 
"Let's Go!" and we were off again — on the 
road to Fleville, where we met a battery of 
the 306th Field Artillery, which was very 
active, and a regiment of French with their 
famous 75s that were keeping "Jerry" on 
the run. We came to a halt that afternoon 
about four o'clock and got some eats, and 
we were wondering when we would get 
back again. We didn't have long to 
"wonder," however, for at midnight we 
were off again through a heavy rainstorm. 
We were now in the fourth month of activi- 
ties and going strong. As we proceeded 



140 



WAR RECORD OF 



through the town of Sommerance we re- 
ceived a big surprise, for "Jerry" kept 
pouring in his gas and high explosives — 
but continue on we must. We finally got 
clear of the town and made our way to Hill 
No. 209 and dug in before daybreak. In 
this locality we made a wonderful line of 
trenches, which were to fool the enemy, as 
he would probably think that they were 
occupied. In reality we had gone further 
ahead and remained there for eight days 
and nights, living in mud. It was then, if 
ever, that we gave special thought to that 
famous sentence of Sherman's. However, 
we were relieved on the ninth day and 
moved west of the Argonne ; then north 
again to the hills surrounding Grand Pie, 
and dug in once more until the 9th of No- 
vember. On that afternoon, it seemed so 
peculiar, as there was no noise of artillery, 
etc., such as we had become accustomed to. 
Proceeding on our hike we reached the 
town of Florient and were cleaned up and 
inspected. We thought that we were going 
to be sent to the front again, but it was 
quite a surprise to us when we were ordered 
to make up our full equipment, and on the 
morning of the 11th, having no idea of the 
armistice, we started on cur way and hiked 
for nine long days, covering 250 miles 
(not kilos). We were passing through the 
city of Neufchateau, where there was an 
American hospital and a bunch of Red 
Cross workers, who looked on in amaze- 
ment at the passing body of troops on that 
awful march. Much to our surprise, the 
natives of the town were celebrating. We 
didn't know what the cause of the celebra- 
tion was. Someone told us that it was all 
over, but we didn't believe them. Most of 
the incidents that occurred on that awful 
hike are better left untold, for only the 
fittest survived. On the 20th of November 
we arrived at our destination, which was 
the village of Leffond. From that time on 
we drilled constantly until we began the re- 
pair of the French roads, on which we 
worked for three months. After another 
hike of thirty kilos, after which we were in- 
spected by General Jack Pershing, we 
reached the poi't of Bordeaux and sailed for 
the beloved United States. 

Before closing, I'd like to give special 
praise and thankfulness to the dear ones at 
home who prayed for us and did all in their 
power to spur us on to victory, and of all 
the women in our vicinity we are justly 
proud, and it is with great pleasure that we 
raise our hats to them. May God bless the 
greatest women in the world — that's what 



we called them — the women of our great 
and glorious United States of America. 



Told by Robert McIntosh 

Although I saw a great deal of the naval 
warfare during my enlistment, the five 
months that I spent in the North Sea will 
live in my memory the longest. 

I was on board the U. S. S. Arkansas 
when she left Hampton Roads for foreign 
service. We joined the Grand Fleet on July 
25, 1918, when the "Arckie" with four other 
United States battleships made up the 
Sixth Battle Squadron. Our nickname with 
the English was "The Wreckers" or "The 
Death or Glory Squadron" — being five of 
the strongest ships in the Grand Fleet. Our 
base was at the Firth-of-Forth, Scotland or 
Scapa Flow, and we patrolled the North Sea 
constantly looking and waiting for the High 
Sea Fleet, but the submarines were the only 
things we could get a shot at. 

On the 21st of November, 1918, the 
"Arckie" was a unit of the Grand Fleet 
which received the surrender of the Ger- 
man fleet. We steamed out of the Firth at 
1 :30 that morning and met the German 
fleet, consisting of five battle cruisers and 
battleships, eight light cruisers and fifty de- 
stroyers, at eleven o'clock. We stood by 
our guns the whole time, taking no chances 
with the Dutchman. The Grand Fleet was 
formed in two columns forty miles long, 
which were separated by a space of about 
ten miles. Through these columns the Ger- 
mans sailed, and it was surely a disgraceful 
sight to see those fine ships surrendering 
without a shot. 

After the surrender of the German fleet 
our duty was finished, and we left Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, on December 1st, 1918, 
flying a 150-yard "homeward bounder" at 
our truck. On a toy balloon v/hich was 
attached to this streamer someone had 
printed — "In God we trust — New York or 
bust!" And we sailed down past the Eng- 
lish fleet with their bands playing, "Should 
Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot," and a good- 
bye signal on their yardarms, reading 
"Good-bye, our comrades of the Mist." 

We next convoyed President Wilson into 
Brest, and 48 hours later cleared for the old 
United States, where we arrived on Christ- 
mas Day, 1918, and it was sure a tickled 
crew that saw "Old Liberty" standing in 
the same old place as we steamed into New 
York Harbor. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



141 



Told by Joseph John Kutil 
and George Henry Gates 

{Voluntary enlistment — enlisted and re- 
mained together all through the war.) 

On May 14, 1917, enlisted in the United 
States Navy and were sent to the Naval 
Training Station at Newport, Rhode Island. 
Remained in training till June 28, 1917, and 
then sent to the receiving ship at Boston, 
for further transfer to sea, and from there 
were sent to do guard duty at Hingham, 
Massachusetts. 

Requested a transfer to active sea duty, 
and on May 11, 1918, were sent to the de- 
stroyer Kimberly, which had just been 
completed and was ready to start overseas. 
On May 17, 1918, they started across, con- 
voying seven troop ships, and upon arriving 
in Europe were kept busy doing patrol duty 
along the coast of France and the British 
Isles, meeting troop ships and convoying 
them into different ports, going out to aid 
torpedoed ships in answer to their S. 0. S. 
calls and picking up survivors. 

They took a party of Naval officials 
aboard in Wales, among v-^hom were Assist- 
ant Secretary of Navy Roosevelt and Sir 
Eric Geddes (First British Sea Lord), and 
brought them to Queenstown, Ireland, to 
inspect the destroyer base there. 

They were present at the time the United 
States destroyer Shaw was rammed and cut 
in half (October 9, 1918), and picked up 
fourteen survivors. 

On the 17th of October, 1918, had an en- 
gagement with the German submarine 
U 91, and received congratulations from 
the British Admiral in charge of the de- 
stroyer base ; were presented with a large 
engraved bronze plate, telling of the en- 
gagement. 

They went out with all the United States 
naval forces overseas on December 13, 
1918, to meet President Wilson, who was on 
his way to France and convoyed him into 
Brest. 

On January 8, 1919, arrived in the States 
after a period of eight months overseas. 

While overseas, the Kimberly was the 
senior ship of the destroyer flotilla base at 
Queenstown, Ireland. During the month of 
June, 1918, established a mileage record, 
having covered the most number of miles 
during the month of any ship in the United 
States naval forces. In July were out at 
sea the most number of days of any ship in 
the flotilla. 



Told by Roy H. Smith 

I left New York the first part of April 
in convoy for Brest, France. Arrived at 
Brest harbor on April 16, and proceeded 
in convoy for Pimberon. We anchored in 
Pimberon Bay on the 17th for the night. 
About 10 P. M., due to some cause — sup- 
posedly torpedo — the ammunition in the 
holds exploded. I managed to get over the 
side minus a life preserver. After an hour 
and a half in the water, I was picked up 
by a whaleboat from the U. S. S. Whipple, 
thoroughly exhausted and overcome by ex- 
posure. I was later in bed for over a week 
suffering from shock, exposure and bumps. 



Our Subs in the War 

(From Suffolk County Neivs.) 

Sayville claims the honor of being the 
home of one of the 210 men in the United 
States who served aboard American sub- 
marines in the war zone for the year 1918. 
"Ted" Jedlicka, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Jedlicka, is the man, and he is home 
again, in time to celebrate his 18th birth- 
day to-morrow. The United States sent 
over eight subs, one of which remained at 
the Azores and the other seven of which 
operated around the British Isles, in the 
Bay of Biscay, Straits of Dover and the 
Bristol and Irish Channels. Jedlicka is at 
home after obtaining his release, none the 
worse for the thrills and terrors of his ex- 
perience, except for "nerves" now and then, 
as a result of the reaction from continuous 
strain. He tells with grim humor and al- 
most calm indifference of undersea fights 
with Hun submarines and battles on the 
surface with American and British de- 
stroyers and Allied aircraft, whose attacks 
were almost as much to be feared as those 
of the enemy; the latter continuing until 
our craft could make their identity known 
through recognition signals. 

He was one of the num^ber of local lads 
who became interested in the mysteries of 
the radio when the big station was built 
here. He enlisted in the Navy when six- 
teen years old and was sent to wireless 
school in New York and Cambridge. But 
there was other need for him and he 
shipped as a general electrician aboard the 
L-2, during the entire trip only standing 
two or three wireless tricks. He came 
home to say good-bye to his parents on 
Thanksgiving Day, 1917, and on December 



142 



WAR RECORD OF 



4, 1917, the L-2 left Newport with seven 
more undersea craft, each about 168 feet 
long, 15 feet beams, and making 14 to 15 
knots. The crew numbered three officers 
and 27 men, all under 30 years of age and 
all perfect physical specimens. They were 
to have kept together, but a very bad storm 
scattered them. They were usually sub- 
merged from 15 to 16 hours a day, but the 
batteries would stand submersion of as long 
as 72 hours. 

It was on the 10th of last July that the 
L-2 was in combat with a Hun sub, and "got 
her," too. The L-2 was on her way in to 
her base in Bantry Harbor in Ireland for 
repairs, and came up about dusk of a rainy, 
windy night, about iive miles out from Fast- 
net Light. The surrounding waters seemed 
to be swarming with German subs. One 
of Heine's sub-sea craft submerged and so 
did the L-2, while other enemy subs passed 
back and forth overhead with alarming per- 
sistency. The L-2 released one of her 18- 
inch $7,000 torpedoes, of which she car- 
ried eight. There was a terrific explosion, 
and the German U-56 was sent to the bot- 
tom. The L-2 crew did not know what 
particular craft they had sunk until a few 
days later when they received advices from 
the British Admiralty, giving complete de- 
tails about the U-56, which was on its way 
back to Germany after being out for 15 
days. The German sub was about 300 feet 
long and was capable of about 20 knots. 
When sunk she was only 400 feet from the 
L-2. 

One evening about dark as the L-2 came 
to the surface, the roar of an airplane over- 
head was heard by the officer on the bridge 
who soon felt the spatter of machine gun 
bullets striking all around him. It was a 
British plane, the pilot of which thought he 
was firing on an enemy craft. Recognition 
signals were given and the firing ceased, 
the pilot signalling that the only reason 
he did not bomb was because his releasing 
apparatus would not work. Several times 
the L-2 was fired upon by American and 
British destroyers at a distance of several 
miles, when only the periscope was visible. 
Again would a destroyer discover the 
smooth water caused by bilge pumped from 
the L-2 and begin dropping "ash cans," as 
the navy men call depth charges. 

This was the life of the men aboard a 
sub for eight days at a time. Then there 
would be eight days in port. Once in two 
months each man would be given a seven- 
day shore leave with free railroad trans- 
portation anywhere in the British Isles. 



The only casualties suffered in the Ameri- 
can submarine fleet were in the loss of Lieu- 
tenant Childs of Brooklyn, an officer on the 
L-2, who was lost when the British sub- 
marine aboard which he had been sent for 
instruction was torpedoed. Several seamen 
were lost during heavy weather by being 
washed from the deck of the submarine, 
which is only three feet across. 

When the men were not actually at work 
they remained in their bunks, sleeping or 
reading, as the moving about of even one 
man destroyed the equilibrium of the craft. 
When she pitched, as she frequently did, at 
an angle of 75 degrees, the men laced them- 
selves in their bunks with marlin and tried 
not to think of the nice steady bed at home. 
They slept hanging on with both hands and 
would often wake up to go on watch more 
tired than when they went to sleep. In a 
"real" blow, the bunks would slide off" their 
hooks, and gravity, quite as eff'ective under- 
sea as above, would bring bed and men with 
a bump to the deck. The men wore leather 
suits lined with sheep's wool and were per- 
mitted to let their hair grow long in order 
to protect them from the cold (for the tem- 
perature inside was kept the same as the 
water) and also for protection against falls 
and blows resulting from cramped quarters 
and pitching of the boat. Except for influ- 
enza, which visited about 15 of the men, 
there was little sickness aboard the L-2. A 
few of the crew had ear trouble, resulting 
from the heavy air pressure, but Jedlicka's 
only trouble came from a nose broken when 
a bracing iron rolled out of place in a heavy 
blow and fell on his head. A fellow member 
of the crew set it quite satisfactorily. One 
difficulty was the abnormal appetites which 
the men had and their inability to take any 
exercise. 

Jedlicka had narrow escapes on land as 
well as at sea. One day last May he was 
in Dublin during a Sinn Fein riot, watched 
the leaders of the revolution being arrested 
and the resentment of the angry mob until 
he decided this was too tame and decided 
to go to London. He arrived there on the 
night of the twentieth and walked up and 
down the street for a time deliberating over 
which of two hotels he would choose. He 
was very tired and went to bed. About 
eleven he was awakened by cries at his door, 
"Take cover, take cover!" He thought he 
was covered enough and besides he was too 
tired to be disturbed. In a few moments 
there was a terrible explosion and the crash 
of falling timbers mingled with the cries of 
terror stricken people. It lasted only a 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



143 



very short time and "Ted" says he went 
back to sleep, realizing, however, that he 
had been in an air raid. At 3 o'clock the 
same thing was repeated and this time he 
lost no time in taking cover. He joined the 
hurrying, scurrying mob on the London 
streets, all going to refuges designated by 
pointing signs. This time the explosions 
were very close and a little later Jedlicka 
learned that the other hotel, at which he had 
almost stopped, and which was but two 
blocks away, was in ruins. The raid of May 
20 was the most disastrous London saw. 

In all the British Isles the only place in 
which the people were not pinched for food 
was in Ireland. When purchasing food 
ashore the men were given "warrants," 
slips of paper with their names and that of 
their ship. Attached to this were coupons, 
each calling for a staple food. This the 
restaurant keeper clipped when he was paid 
for the meal, and this he had to present at a 
wholesale house when he replenished his 
supplies, in order to get a like amount. 

The trip back to the Philadelphia Navy 
Yard was a very rough one and for 14 days 
the men were unable to go on deck or to 
enjoy a bit of sunshine. On both trips 
across the Atlantic the L-2 took about four 
weeks. 

Jedlicka brought with him a number of 
small souvenirs, interesting bits taken from 
enemy submarines and a replica of the fa- 
mous Lusitania medal which was struck in 
Germany to commemorate the sinking of 
the Lusitania by a German sub-sea craft. 

Account of the Services of Colonel 
Henry Clarke Coe, M. C. 

(From the Medical Times, July, 1919.) 

The host of American friends of Henry 
Clarke Coe, late professor of gynecology in 
the University and Bellevue Medical Col- 
lege, will be interested to know that he has 
been recently promoted to Colonel, Medical 
Corps, U. S. Army. Colonel Coe was the 
first civilian physician to be appointed a 
first lieutenant in the Medical Reserve 
Corps, this honor given him by his college 
classmate and life-long friend. President 
Taft, in 1908. 

Colonel Coe's connection with the Medical 
Reserve Corps is too well known to necessi- 
tate rehearsing it ; suffice to say, he has been 
the outstanding figure in this organization 
since its inception. 

Colonel Coe was commissioned a major 
at the outbreak of the war and shortly 



thereafter went abroad. He was at one 
time chief surgeon in England and after 
going to France occupied many very im- 
portant positions. At this moment he is 
the presiding genius of one of the largest 
hospitals in France, situated near Le Mans. 
Not long since The Medical Times received 
from Captain J. B. Schreiter, M. C, the 
history of Mobile Hospital No. 3, which 
was in existence from August 1, 1918, to 
August 12, 1919, and which did most bril- 
liant work at Saint Mihiel, the Meuse and in 
the Argonne Forest. This little history is 
reproduced herewith, although it was pub- 
lished merely for the personnel of the hos- 
pital : 

"The Commanding Ofiicer arrived in 
Paris from Evacuation Hospital No. 1 on 
July 1, 1918, and at once began to take over 
the material from the French with the as- 
sistance of Capt. James Worcester, M. C, 
who had already been assigned to this unit. 
As soon as a camp was assigned at the Polo 
Grounds, Bois de Boulogne, the trucks and 
camions were assembled there, Besoneau 
tents were erected and a complete inven- 
tory was made and compared with French 
lists. The following personnel were as- 
signed from various sources during the suc- 
ceeding weeks : Officers, 14 ; nurses, 22 ; 
enlisted men, 98. It was necessary to obtain 
additional instruments and medical and 
surgical supplies from various depots in the 
A. E. F., which caused unavoidable delay in 
preparations for active service. 

During the Chateau Thierry drive, all the 
personnel except a few enlisted men were 
detached and were on active duty at Cou- 
lommiers. Chateau Thierry, and at Ameri- 
can Red Cross Hospital No. 2. The nurses 
were not recalled until a week before the 
organization left for the front. The hos- 
pital left Paris for the Toul-Lorraine sector 
by train August 21, 1918, arriving on Aug- 
ust 22, and was assigned to the first army, 
temporarily attached to Evacuation Hospi- 
tal No. 1. The tent hospital of two hundred 
beds was set up and a Besoneau tent was 
equipped for an operating room with eight 
tables, which was inspected by both the 
Chief Surgeon, A. E. F., and former Sur- 
geon General Gorgas, who were pleased with 
its appearance. 

"The St. Mihiel offensive began Septem- 
ber 12, 1918, and between that date and 
September 15, 2750 wounded passed 
through Evacuation Hospital No. 1 and Mo- 
bile Hospital No. 3, eight surgical teams 
working smoothly in eight-hour shifts. Or- 
ders were received to move to Royamieux, 



144 



WAR RECORD OF 



but these were rescinded and we were or- 
dered to relieve Field Hospital No. 359, 
which was operating a hospital for medical 
cases in French barracks at Rosiere-en- 
Haye, eight kilometers south of Douilard. 
The Commanding Officer had previously in- 
spected Douilard with a view to establish- 
ing a casualty clearing station there but de- 
cided that it was unsuitable, being under 
daily shell fire. Wounded were received 
from the divisions holding the sector north 
of Thiaucourt and Pont-a-Mousson. From 
September 24 to November 12, Mobile Hos- 
pital No. 3 exercised its true function as a 
C. C. S., handling only serious, non-trans- 
ferrable surgical cases, all others being 
evacuated at once to Evacuation Hospital 
No. 1, six miles south. About two hundred 
cases were handled during the first two 
weeks, the mortality being heavy, as many 
patients died before they could be operated 
upon, the wounds being mostly from high 
explosives ''ilong-distance bombardment). 

"Four tables were in use with six surgical 
teams. Enemy aeroplanes came over con- 
stantly, but did not harm us nor did any 
shell fall within half a mile, in fact, the site 
was an ideal one as would have been dem- 
onstrated had our troops advanced eastward 
beyond the position which they held at the 
time of the armistice. On the evening of 
October 9, fire started in the x-ray room and 
the hospital was destroyed in spite of all 
efforts to subdue it. There was no loss of 
life, but all the instruments and much valu- 
able material was destroyed. The tents 
were saved and by strenuous efforts lost 
articles were replaced and the hospital was 
ready for work in tents as originally 
planned. Many of the records were burned, 
so that it is impossible to give exact data 
in regard to the number of wounded, opera- 
tions, and results. 

"From November 12 to December 20, the 
hospital (now under the second army) re- 
mained at Rosieres ready to move to Ger- 
many, but it was not needed there. On 
December 20, we moved back to Evacuation 
Hospital No. 1. and camped in tents until 
January 20, 1919, when we moved to Le 
Mans, and were directed to proceed to Alen- 
con, and operate as a camp hospital of two 
hundred beds, to serve the 37th Division, 
billeted in and near there. From Febru- 
ary 7 to March 28, when that division moved 
to Brest, we handled three hundred surgical 
and medical cases, covering the area be- 
tween Beaumont and Alencon. This area 
being abandoned, patients were evacuated 
to their units or to Camp Hospital No. 52, 



Le Mans, until the hospital was closed 
March 28, and moved to the forwarding 
camp, Le Mans, April 7, to maintain a five 
hundred bed camp hospital in this area. 

"On April 11, Mobile Hospital No. 3 was 
made a 'skeletonized unit' (one officer and 
two enlisted men), the remaining eight of- 
ficers, fourteen nurses and eighty-four en- 
listed men being transferred to Camp Hos- 
pital No. 120, their present organization, 
after nine and one-half months of active 
service. There were many changes in the 
personnel, as only six of the original offi- 
cers, thirteen of the twenty-two nurses and 
sixty-five of the enlisted men remain. The 
health of officers, nurses and enhsted men 
throughout was good, only two deaths oc- 
curring during the time of service. Private 
George W. Campbell dying of meningitis 
while we were stationed at Rosieres-en- 
Haye, and Miss Charlotte Schonheit, A. N. 
C, of influenza while she was on detached 
service at Evacuation Hospital No. 1. It 
must be said of this hospital that its officers, 
nurses and men remembered that their first 
duty was the care and comfort of the pa- 
tients, which we know was appreciated by 
the many letters received from gratified 
patients after leaving." 

The medical officers who are interested in 
the Medical Reserve Corps are anticipating 
the return of Colonel Coe to this country. 
Many expressions have been heard that if 
the interests of the corps are considered the 
War Department could do no better than to 
order Colonel Coe to Washington for the 
purpose of reorganizing the Medical Re- 
serve Corps, the members of which have 
done such valiant work during the war. 



The 77th Division, A. E. F. 
By Major Archibald G. Thatcher 

(306^7? Inf.,. 11th Div., A. E. F.) 

Every Long Islander is interested in the 
77th Division, first because the majority of 
Long Island men serving in the United 
States Army were in this division and sec- 
ondly because its training camp, during that 
cold and icy winter of 1917-1918, was 
located at Camp Upton, near Yaphank. 

The record of this division is one of which 
every New Yorker and every American 
may well be proud. A comparison of its 
achievements with those of the other 28 
combat divisions of the American Army in 
France places it in the front rank. 

The 77th Division was the first National 
Army Division to be sent to France and one 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



145 



of the last to be returned to the United 
States. It gained more ground against the 
enemy than any other American Division, 
advancing 791/2 kilometres, or about 45 
miles. The next division in ground gained, 
advanced only 60 kilometres. The average 
of the 29 combat divisions was 17 miles. 
The advance of the 77th Division was, 
therefore, 29 miles above the average of 
all the 29 combat divisions advancing 
against the Germans. There was only one 
other division which remained longer in the 
front lines in face of the enemy without 
relief than the 77th Division which was in 
line 23 days during a single period. 

The 77th Division was first in the num- 
ber of officers awarded the Medal of Honor. 
It was third in the total number of Medals 
of Honor awarded, eighth in distinguished 
service crosses, eighth in gallantry certifi- 
cates and seventh in the number of Legion 
of Honor. It was ninth in the number of 
battle casualties. 

The 77th Division was the only division 
which "combed" the Argonne Forest from 
the point of attack to the end. Other divis- 
ions which participated in the Meuse- 
Argonne ofl'ensive proceeded along either 
side of the forest but did ,not completely 
pass through. 

This division after its arrival in France 
in April, 1918, was first placed in a train- 
ing area with a British division East of 
Calais behind the line of Ypres-Arras. 
While there many of its officers and non- 
commissioned officers were sent up to the 
British front before Albert, then held by 
the Germans after their famous attack, 
which began on 24 March, 1918. The bap- 
tism of fire received by our men was a hot 
one but a most valuable experience for what 
was to come. 

From this British area, the division was 
moved, in May, to the Baccarat Sector in 
Lorraine, where they took over a rather 
quiet front line sector. Thence in the lat- 
ter part of July, the division was shifted 
and took over a very active and severely 
contested front line position on the River 
Vesle, extending practically from Bazoches 
on the left to the Chateau du Diable near 
Fismes on the right. Although the Argonne 
Campaign is better known, the suff"erings 
of our officers and men on the Vesle, and 
the number of their casualties were prob- 
ably as great, or greater than in the fam- 
ous attack through the Forest. From the 
Vesle the division forced the fighting and 
pushed on to the River Aisne, where they 
were relieved in September in time to be 



shifted around to take part in the Argonne 
Campaign, which opened after a terrific 
artillery preparation on 26 September, 
1918. From that date until 16 October, 
the division attacked daily until it had 
pushed through the Forest and gained the 
heights north of the River Aire. 

Space forbids that reference be made to 
more than one or two of the incidents which 
occurred during that advance. Probably 
the best known, and one deserving of the 
highest praise, was the famous stand and 
refusal to surrender in face of heavy casual- 
ties of the famous so-called "Lost Battalion" 
commanded by Major Whittlesey. The rec- 
ord made by the men of that battalion and 
the companies which were attached to it, 
was one of the finest examples of courage 
and determination shown by American 
troops during the war. Although tem- 
porarily cut off and surrounded, the bat- 
talion was never, correctly speaking, "lost," 
its position being at all times substantially 
known. The battalion did not only all that 
it was called upon to do, but did it in exact 
conformity with the orders of the Division 
Commander who directed that it should ad- 
vance to and hold a certain position in a 
particular way. The reason why the bat- 
talion became surrounded was due to the 
failure of troops on its right and left to 
make the advances which had been ex- 
pected of them. 

Among the many amusing, as well as 
trying, incidents that occurred during the 
Argonne advance, was one which will doubt- 
less appeal to every Long Island duck- 
hunter. During the advance of one of the 
battalions of the 306th Infantry, through 
the Forest where the trees and underbrush 
were thiner than usual, a German airplane 
was observed approaching and at an un- 
usually low elevation. In such a situation 
it was of the greatest importance that every 
man should keep his face down for if a large 
number of men look upward, their faces be- 
come visible to the aviator. The battalion 
commander having a large number of Long 
Island men under him, thought the most 
eff'ective order that he could give was to 
shout "You Long Island duck hunters, keep 
your faces down!" knowing that every man 
who had had any experience in duck hunt- 
ing would appreciate the importance of not 
showing his face to anything flying above 
it. The order was thoroughly understood 
and carefully obeyed, with the result that 
although the plane flew not more than three 
or four hundred feet above the heads of 
the battalion, the aviator did not open fire. 



146 



WAR RECORD OF 




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THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



147 



THE SELECTIVE DRAFT 



A Short History of Its Organization, 
Personnel, Duties and Accomplishments 

By Ralph S. Pullis 



LET us first note the dates on which 
I Congress passed the laws which gov- 
erned the work of Local Boards : 

On May 18th, 1917, the "Selective Service 
Law" was approved. 

On October 6, 1917, the "War Risk In- 
surance Law" was approved. Amendments 
and additions to these laws were made on 
February 12th— March 8th— March 16th— 
April 2nd— May 9th— May 20th— June 3rd 
— June 25th — July 9th-llth — and August 
31st, 1918. 

One can readily see that the task of keep- 
ing pace with the changes in the "Rules and 
Regulations" was not an easy one, but one 
which demanded constant study and close 
attention. 

The first Registration under this law 
took place on June 5th, 1917, and covered 
the ages from twenty-one to thirty-one (21 
to 31) years. 

The second, a year later, was held on 
two days, June 5th and August 24th, 1918 
— and included those who had become twen- 
ty-one years of age since the first registra- 
tion. 

The third one on September 12th, 1918, 
extended the age limits downwards to 
eighteen (18) years and upward to forty- 
five (45) years. 

The task laid out by the Selective Service 
Law was as tremendous as it was impor- 
tant. Scattered throughout the breadth of 
the land there were organized four thou- 
sand six hundred and forty-eight (4,648) 
Local Boards, one hundred and fifty-five 
(155) District Boards and fifty-two (52) 
State Headquarters. These headquarters 
were under the guidance of the Governor 
through the Adjutant General. 

In charge of the operations of the Selec- 
tive draft was E. H. Crowcter, Provost 
Marshal General — at Washington. 

In order to save time and divide the la- 
bor, all orders went from Washington to the 
State Headquarters and from there were 
relayed to the several Boards within the 
■state. Only in specified cases or under spe- 
cial conditions did the Local Board have di- 



rect communication with the Provost Mar- 
shal's Office. 

The district covered by our own Local 
Board No. 2, was a large and difficult one 
to handle, taking in all that territory from 
the Babylon Town line on the west to a line 
running through the village of Eastport and 
Manorville on the East — and from Ocean 
to Sound. 

In many cases it was a hardship for our 
registrants to respond to our orders; how- 
ever, it is to their credit that very few 
failed to respond cheerfully and willingly. 

The number registering within this dis- 
trict was as follows : First registration, 
2,698 ; second registration, 195 ; third reg- 
istration, 5,423 ; a grand total of 8,317. 

The table following shows the number of 
men called — rejected, accepted, etc., from 
this district: 

Called into service 724 

Total inducted 781 

Accepted at camps 743 

Rejected at camps 30 

Rejected by cancellation of draft. 40 

The apparent confliction in these figures 
is accounted for by inductions under "Com- 
petent Orders" where the individual made 
application and was allowed immediate in- 
duction, these not being included in the 
number "Called." 

The net expenses for the Local Board 
during its existence were $7,842.97, or 
$10.55 for each man accepted. The per 
capita cost per man accepted, covering the 
entire country, was $11.34. The cost per 
man under the Civil War Enrollment Act 
was $227.71. 

So much for the work accomplished and 
its cost. Now, let us see how this was 
done and by whom. But, first, the writer 
wants to state that he is not trying to vin- 
dicate any action taken by the Board or any 
of the many decisions which it made. These 
are all of the past, but we sincerely hope 
that they were right and just to all. 

The original Board members for this dis- 
trict as appointed by Governor Whitman 



148 



WAR RECORD OF 



were John J. Gibson, Bay Shore ; Isaac G. 
Terry, Sayville, and Dr. B. C. Andrews of 
Islip, Long Island. As organized they as- 
sumed positions as Chairman, Secretary 
and Physician, respectively. 

The Registration having taken place the 
real work began, numbering these 2,698 
names. This meant much tedious work 
and volunteers, as well as the board mem- 
bers and their paid helpers were kept busy 
for some days before this was finished. 

It was during this time that the writer 
became engaged in the work. 

Our registration cards had been given 
their Serial number, just numbered with- 
out regard to special arrangement. 

Next came the real work of assigning the 
Order Numbers from the Master List. The 
Order Number was to control and deter- 
mine the order in which the persons whose 
registration cards were in the possession of 
the Local Board were liable to be called 
for service. But few understood how this 
work was done and although the principle 
was easy the task was a tedious and trying 
one. 

This "Master List" was made in Wash- 
ington under the direction of the Secretary 
of War and prepared in the following man- 
ner: Numbers from one to 10,500 were 
placed in a jar and drawn, one at a time. 
The first number drawn was placed at the 
top of the column, the second drawn was 
placed next below and this order was fol- 
lowed until all numbers were drawn and so 
placed on the list. 

To properly begin our work, we took our 
Master List and crossed out each number 
which was higher than the highest Serial 
number on any of our registration cards. 

Having 2,698 registrants, this must be 
our highest Serial number, so our revised 
Master List now contained no higher num- 
ber than that. 

The first number on the Master List 
was 258. 

The second number on the Master 
List was 2,522. 

The third number on the Master 
List was 9,613. 

The fourth number on the Master 
List was 4,532. 

The fifth number on the Master List 
was 10,218. 

The sixth number on the Master 
List was 458. 

We had no numbers 9,613, 4,532 or 10,218 
and consequently these were crossed off. 
Our cards being filed in the order of their 



Serial number we first found Serial No. 
258. This number was No. 1 on the Master 
List, and so was assigned Serial "Order No. 
1." Serial No. 2,522 being the second, was 
assigned Order No. 2. Having crossed out 
the 9,613, 4,532 and 10,218, No. 458 be- 
came Order No. 3, and so on down the list. 

This sounds so easy now that it is over, 
but we remember well how persistently 
those figures would lose themselves or get 
into the wrong place. 

And then the typewriting of our lists — 
Registration List — Alphabetical List — Se- 
rial List and Order List 2,698 — names on 
each one and four (4) full copies of each! 

You may be sure that this meant tired 
backs and eyes for the loyal girls who spent 
so many days at our machines. Dorothy 
Long, Amy King Frieman and Christine 
Hubbard surely did their part from early 
until late. It made no difference how hot 
or cold or how hard it rained, they were 
always to be depended upon. 

Then came orders to begin the physical 
examinations and consideration of claims 
for exemptions. We set a date, ordering 
seventy-five (75) men to appear at nine, 
o'clock in the morning and seventy-five (75) 
others to appear at 1.30 P. M. of the same 
date. Six or seven physicians having vol- 
unteered to help examine, we proceeded. 

If, under the prescribed rules, the regis- 
trant was found to be physically unfit for 
Military Service, he was given a discharge. 
But, if found fit for service, he was held 
and then allowed to file a claim for exemp- 
tion or a deferred classification. Claims 
were allowed under several heads, such as 
dependent wife — children or parents — 
Sailors and Mariners ; Necessary workers 
in the Government employ ; Minister ; Agri- 
cultural claims as Farmers or Farm helpers, 
etc. All agricultural claims went to the 
District Board with the opinion of the Lo- 
cal Board, but the final decision rested with 
the District Board. All other claims were 
decided by the Local Board except in case 
of appeal from their decision. Our de- 
cision as to physical fitness was also subject 
to appeal in which case the registrant was 
re-examined by the Medical Advisory Board 
covering this district. 

The days following these examinations 
were spent in considering the claims for 
exemption or discharge, and this was by 
far the most serious part of the work of the 
Local Board Members, a duty that could 
not be approached lightly or listlessly. 
Their decisions were to be too far reaching, 
for they meant the breaking up of home ties, 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



149 



the parting from father, mother, brother, 
sister, wife or children — or possibly all of 
these. 

These decisions must be fair to all of 
these ; it must be fair to the Government : 
If John was exempt from service, George 
would have to take his place; so the de- 
cision must also be fair to George. 

Before this mass of work was finished, 
changes were made in "Rules and Regula- 
tions." New standards regarding the 
physical fitness of registrants were issued. 
This meant a review of the claims and many 
re-examined where physical discharges had 
been allowed, and it also caused much mis- 
understanding and disappointment among 
the registrants as well as added work for 
the board. 

And now came the first break in the per- 
sonnel of the board and an increase in the 
clerical force. Dr. Andrews retired and 
Dr. F. L. McCrea of Port Jefferson became 
the physician member and Mr. L. A. Walker 
of Bay Shore received appointment as clerk. 
Closely following these changes, Ralph S. 
Pullis of Bay Shore received the appoint- 
ment and took the place of Mr. Gibson, re- 
signed. The board as re-organized was 
now R. S. Pullis, chairman ; I. G. Terry, 
secretary, and Dr. F. L. McCrea, physician. 
Mr. Walker advanced to chief clerk and 
Miss Christine Hubbard engaged as clerk, 
having up to this time been a volunteer 
worker. 

Later, as more help was required, we 
were authorized to induct into the service 
a man from the special service list who was 
qualified to act in a clerical capacity, and 
have him assigned to du^;y with the board. 
Joseph Leek of Islip, Long Island, was 
chosen for this post and so we had with us 
a regular soldier — all but the gun. Pri- 
vate Leek proved to be a good soldier and 
companion. When he said "Positively yes," 
you were sure that he meant it. 

Then came the much talked about "Ques- 
tionnaire" and the necessary changes in 
rules. We now started anew by sending 
one to each registrant, who was required 
to fill out all data, make such claim as he 
felt applied to his particular case, make af- 
fidavit as to the truthfulness of his state- 
ments and return to us within the specified 
time. 

All during the time in which these were 
being sent out. Volunteer Advisory Boards 
were sitting daily at specified places, in the 
several villages, where the registrant was 
^advised to go in order that he might receive 
proper advice in filling out the answers and 



making the necessary affidavits required in 
the Questionnaire, a Notary Public being 
present for that purpose. 

The preparing, mailing and checking up 
of this work was a bigger job than one can 
realize, and even the boys in the postoffice 
were glad when it was finished. As the 
Questionnaires were returned they must be 
classified, checked on the Classification 
List as to dates mailed, returned, classifica- 
tion claimed, allowed or disallowed, physi- 
cal qualifications, appeals, etc., and then 
filed. 

Many long tedious days and nights were 
spent in going over these claims. Some 
were easy to decide on the facts and figures 
given, while others would have conflicting 
statements or lack some essential item. In 
some cases, the Questionnaire would be re- 
turned for further details, in others, the 
registrant would be ordered to appear in 
person. 

The board was always glad to have an 
interview with a registrant as it allowed us 
to clearly show our point of view and in 
most cases, a registrant would leave satis- 
fied with the final decision. 

During this period of our work many 
amusing instances came before us, and in 
part counterbalanced the serious ones. It 
was a continuous study of human nature 
with its many types. Some were deter- 
mined to escape service while others were 
just as determined to enter it, if not in one 
branch then in another. As an example of 
the latter type the following is an incident 
which took place : 

A man with a worried expression came 

in the office. "My name is Guy ; I 

heard that you are looking for me." He 
was told that he should have been exam- 
ined on a certain date, but failing to appear 
as ordered he was now recorded as a de- 
linquent. Now that he was there, we would 
examine him and no harm was done — but 
should he prove to be physically qualified 
he would be sent direct to camp. After 
his examination, he came to the writer, all 
smiles and his eyes shining. I remarked 
that I guessed he had been turned down. 
"Why," he said, "I am the happiest man in 
the world. The doctor says that I'm in fine 
shape. Can I go to camp in the morning? 
If so, I'll be here." Some time after he had 
been in camp I met him. He said that he 
liked it fine ! "Oh, I put it over on you 
people." "Why— how?" I asked. "Why, I 
tried to get into the 73rd but was turned 
down. Then I registered with you fellows 



150 



W AR RECORD OF 



and gave my age as thirty. I didn't have 
to, for I am past thirty-three." 

I received a nice letter from him since 
his return. He is settled in the West and 
doing well. 

There were more of the opposite type, 
but still not a very great number. 

One had lately lost the index finger of 
his right hand. He was sent to camp but 
came back in a couple of days with a "physi- 
cal discharge." But he went back later and 
stayed. 

One claimed the support of a widowed 
mother who needed him on the farm. He 
had three or four brothers also on the farm, 
all older and outside the draft age. We 
couldn't allow the dependent claim and the 
District Board denied the agricultural 
claim. A few days later he came back with 
an unrecorded deed, dated the previous day. 
His mother had made out that deed so he 
could file a claim as "Necessary Farm 
Owner." He went to camp. 

And then the young fellow who claimed 
a dependent wife and children, paid house 
rent, etc. Everything seemed straight, so 
we allowed the claim. A few days after 
the father-in-law came in and said that he 
had been supporting his daughter and her 
children for the past year ; that was liv- 
ing with his people and had given his wife 
absolutely nothing. Necessarily, we re- 
versed our former decision and William 
went into the service, assigning one-half of 
his wages and the allotment to the wife. 

One must not think that this constituted 
the entire work, for all during this time we 
were sending men to camp under the differ- 
ent calls. The regular calls sent men to 
Camp Upton in groups of from 15 to 90 or 
95 men. Special service calls took smaller 
groups to Pelham Bay, New York. Compe- 
tent orders took individuals to various 
camps in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland, 
Florida, Texas, and some of the Western 
States. And later students were inducted 
into service and assigned to certain colleges 
to complete studies in special branches. 

In sending these men to camp, the gov- 
ernment through the Local Boards provided 
railroad fare, and where the trip was a long 
one sleeping cars and meal tickets as well. 

And here let us record the thoughtfulness 
and loyalty shown by those ever ready 
groups of women and girls, the "Patriotic 
Gardeners" and the Red Cross. On enter- 
tainment days, they were sure to be on hand 
and with a "kit" for every man. In addi- 
tion there were enough autos to take the 
men to Camp Upton — a "Gardener" in 



every car, for company, and a stop-over for 
sandwiches and coffee at Patchogue which 
helped break the monotony of the trip. 

These were gala days and will long be 
remembered by the boys who went. As our 
auto train of 25 or 30 cars picked its way 
into camp, one would frequently hear an 
officer remark : "Some lucky boys !" 

But too much space must not be given to 
this line of thought. 

Later came the second registration, on 
June 5th and August 24th, 1918. On theso 
days, all who had become twenty-one years 
of age since June 5th, 1917, were required to 
register at either the headquarters in Bay 
Shore or Patchogue or Sayville or Port 
Jefferson. 

The same system of numbering and list- 
ing took place for these new ones. 

And then came the big registration of 
September 12th. Plans for this were of 
necessity made well in advance, and pro- 
vision was made for a registration place to 
be opened in every election district within 
our jurisdiction. 

At least two registrars had to be sworn 
in for each place. Each village and hamlet 
had to be canvassed for competent people 
who would volunteer to do this work. Then, 
too, cards, instructions, etc., had to be dis- 
tributed. 

The big day finally came and we soon 
found that everywhere the number of regis- 
trants would exceed the estimated number 
for which provision had been made. Soon 
word came that Islip would need more 
cards. Then Bellport telephoned that they 
wouldn't have any cards left by noon. We 
started off in a mad rush to supply those 
who were getting short. But it kept get- 
ting worse. Babylon headquarters wanted 
help, and when told of our condition said 
they were going to call on Supply Head- 
quarters in New York to send a messenger 
out with some. Then a few minutes later 
Babylon said that there were plenty of 
cards in New York, but all messengers were 
out delivering, for everywhere the same 
condition existed. 

Right on time, as usual, were Amy and 
Christine. "Give me an order," said Amy. 
"Christine can take me to Babylon in the 
car. I can catch the train from there and 
be back on the 2 :30." And she did. 

Then we started out on the road again — 
no limit for speed, except the power of our 
volunteer car and an able driver. 

A stop at each one of the booths from Bay 
Shore to Eastport and Manorville and up 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



151 



to Brentwood, Central Islip and Bohemia. 
Some ride! Hutton was too young for the 
service but he surely could drive a car ! 

Then after six o'clock we had to gather 
up the returns. 

This had been a hard day for the Doctor, 
too, for he had been back and forth over the 
north and middle sections of the district, 
but fortunately they had plenty of cards. 

At nine o'clock we were back at head- 
quarters with all returns in, and by work- 
ing until 3 A. M. had everything in shape 
for our volunteer army to start to work in 
the morning. 

Again came the numbering and listing 
and a new Master List to be fought with. 
And more Questionnaires, and more weary 
days and nights. Always the same old 
thing — but at times interwoven with some- 
thing to change the monotony a little. 

And so our work went on until suddenly 
one day an unusual noise and then another, 
and some more — then a bell started to ring. 
Someone said that the war was over ; then 
the fire alarm started and work stopped — 
it just had to. 

But you will remember that it was a false 
report and so the next morning we again 
started the grind and continued until No- 
vember 11th, when the noise came again. 

Following this date, orders came thick 
and fast : "From a certain date, stop this 
or that." "Start with a certain date and 
do this, completing at the earliest possible 
moment and report" — etc., etc. 

The pride, the sorrow, the sacrifice and 
the patriotism of the entire nation were 
contained within the records of the Local 
Boards. These records must be preserved, 
for they contain a record of the Nation's 
man power and a valuable accumulation of 
data upon the physical, economic and indus- 
trial condition of our people which would 
be of much value to the physicians and his- 
torians of the future. 

And so we arranged our records in ac- 
cordance with instructions crated and 
shipped them to Washington March 31, 
1919, and the Local Board No. 2 of Suifolk 
County ceased to exist, except in memory. 

This book is intended to be a record of 
the accomplishments attained by our local 
representatives in and during the great 
emergency — a book that will go into the 
homes of those who were most vitally in- 
terested, our Soldier and our Sailor. But 
the writer of this section feels that it would 
not be amiss to add a few of the national 
accomplishments, figures and records, that 
~ have not been available to the general pub- 



lic for the reason of their being given out 
only in the vast government reports. 

The following are the ofllcial figures of 
the results of the three registrations : 



Registration 


Age 
Limits 


Total 
Registered 


Inducted 


Per 
Cent 


First and second. . 
Third 


21 to 31 
18 to 20 
32 to 45 


10,679,814 
13,228,762 


2,666,867 
120,157 


25 
1 


Alaska, Hawaii and 
Porto Rico .... 


18 to 45 


325,445 


23,272 


7 


Totals 


24,234,021 


2,810,296 


12 



Our total male population was about 
fifty-four milHon (54,000,000). The first 
registration, 18 per cent ; the second regis- 
tration, 2 per cent ; the third registration, 
25 per cent ; in service, not registered, 3 per 
cent; 48 per cent, or about 26,000,000 of the 
entire male population in service or reg- 
istered. 

From the total registration of 24,234,- 
021 men, a few more than 2,800,000 were 
inducted into military service. 

When war was declared, there were two 
hundred thousand (200,000) men in the 
army, of which two-thirds were regulars 
and one-third National Guardsmen. When 
was ended, this force had increased to 
twenty times its size and four million (4,- 
000,000) had served. 

Of every hundred men in service ten were 
National Guardsmen, thirteen were Regu- 
lars, and seventy-seven belonged to the Na- 
tional Army, or would have if these serv- 
ices had not been consolidated and these 
distinctions wiped out. 

Two out of every three American soldiers 
who reached France took part in battle. 
The number who reached France was two 
million, eighty-four thousand (2,084,000), 
and of these one million, three hundred and 
ninety thousand (1,390,000) saw active 
service at the front. 

From the middle of August until the end 
of the war the American Divisions held 
during the greater part of the time a front 
longer than was held by the British. In 
October, the American divisions held 101 
miles of line, or 23 per cent of the entire 
Western front. 

In the Battle of St. Mihiel five hundred 
and fifty thousand (550,000) Americans 
were engaged, as compared with about 
100,000 on the Northern side in the Battle 
of Gettysburg. The artillery fired more 
than one million (1,000,000) shells in four 
hours, which is the most intense concentra- 
tion of artillery fire recorded in history. 

At the time of signing the armistice, the 
Signal Corps was operating 282 telephone 



152 



WAR RECORD OF 



exchanges and 133 complete telegraph sta- 
tions. The telephone lines numbered 14,- 
956 reaching 8959 stations. More than 
100,000 miles of wire had been strung. The 
peak load of operation reached was 47,555 
telegrams a day, averaging 60 words each. 

The highest troop carrying records are 
those of July, 1918, when 306,000 soldiers 
were carried to Europe, and June, 1919, 
when 364,000 were brought home to 
America. 

During our nineteen months of war more 
than 2,000,000 American soldiers were car- 
ried to France. Half a million of these 
went over in the first thirteen months and 
a million and a half in the last six months. 
See table, page 151. 

The American cargo fleet reached the size 
of 2,700,000 dead-weight tons and carried 
to Europe about 7,500,000 tons of cargo. 
Included in the cargo shipment were 26,994 
standard-gauge freight cars, and 1,791 lo- 
comotives of the 100-ton type. Of these, 
650 were shipped set up on their own 
wheels, so that they could be unloaded on 
the tracks and run ofi" under their own 
steam. Shipment of set-up locomotives of 
this size had never been made before. Mo- 
tor trucks to the number of 47,018, and 
when fighting ceased were being shipped at 
the rate of 10,000 a month. There were 
also shipped 68,694 horses and mules, and 
at the cessation of hostilities these were 
being sent over at the rate of 20,000 per 
month. 

Our cargo ships averaged one complete 
trip every seventy (70) days and our troop 
ships one complete trip every thirty-five 
days. 

The greatest troop carrier among all the 
ships was the Leviathan, VN^hich landed 12,- 
000 men, or the equivalent of a German 
Division in France every month. 

The fastest transports were the Great 
Northern and the Northern Pacific, which 
made complete turn-arounds, taking on new 
troops and starting back again, in nineteen 
(19) days. 

Of every one hundred American Soldiers 
and Sailors who served in the war with 
Germany, two were killed or died of dis- 
ease during the period of hostilities. For 
every man killed in battle, six were 
wounded. Five out of every six men sent 
to the hospitals on account of wounds were 
cured and returned to duty. 



Pneumonia killed more soldiers than 
were killed in battle. 

The number of American lives lost was 
125,500. 

Russian battle deaths were thirty-four 
(34) times as heavy as those of the United 
States, those of Germany thirty-two (32) 
times as great, the French twenty-eight 
(28) times, and the British eighteen (18) 
times. 

The total battle deaths of all nations in 
the war were greater than all the deaths in 
all the wars in the previous hundred years. 

"The stream of supplies going forward 
to an army may be likened to the water 
delivered against a fire by an old-fashioned 
bucket brigade. For every pailful thrown 
on the fire there must be many that have 
been taken from the source of supply and 
are on the way." 

The following list is of the total deliv- 
eries during the war of some of the common 
articles of clothing — the total cost of which 
was more than $1,000,000,000 : 

Wool Stockings, pairs 131,800,000 

Undershirts 85,000,000 

Underdrawers 83,600,000 

Shoes 30,700,000 

Flannel Shirts 26,500,000 

Blankets 21,700,000 

Wool Breeches 21,700,000 

Wool Coats 13,900,000 

Overcoats 8,300,000 

The Quartermaster's records show that 
during the hard fighting from June to No- 
vember, the enlisted man in the A. E. F. 
received on the average : Slicker and over- 
coat every five months ; blanket, fiannel 
shirt and breeches every two months; coat 
every 79 days; shoes and puttees every 
fifty-one days ; drawers and undershirt 
every thirty-four days ; woolen socks every 
twenty-three days. 

_The war cost the United States consid- 
erably more than one million dollars 
($1,000,000) an hour for over two years. 

The direct cost was about $22,000,000,- 
000, or nearly enough to pay the entire cost 
of running the United States Government 
from 1791 up to the outbreak of the Euro- 
pean war. 

Our expenditures in this war were suf- 
ficient to have carried on the Revolutionary 
War continuously for more than 1,000 years 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



153 



at the rate of expenditure which that war 
actually cost. 

During the first three months our ex- 
pense was at the rate of $2,000,000 per 
day. During the next year, it averaged 
more than $22,000,000 a day. For the final 
ten months of the period from April, 1917, 
to April, 1919, the daily average was over 
$44,000,000. 

The army expenditures were less than 



two-thirds of our total war costs, but they 
are nearly equal to the value of all the gold 
produced in the whole world from the dis- 
covery of America up to the outbreak of 
the European war. 

The total war costs of all nations were 
about $186,000,000,000 (one hundred and 
eighty-six billions), of which the Allies and 
the United States spent two-thirds and the 
enemy one-third. 



154 



WAR RECORD OF 



THE AIR STATION AT BAY SHORE 



(hi reply to a request to the Hon. F. C. 
Hicks for a short account of the Naval Air 
Station at Bay Shore, the compiler of this 
book received the following.) 

Navy Department 

Office of Naval Operations 

Washington 

August 20, 1920. 
Hon. F. C. Hicks, 
House of Representatives, 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Governor: 

In reply to your recent letter requesting 
information about Bay Shore, I am inclos- 
ing copies of correspondence in connection 
with the taking over of this station by the 
Navy from the Naval Militia in 1917, and 
a short history of the station written after 
the armistice. The Naval Militia personnel 
of the station in May, 1917, is given in de- 
tail with a list of instructors and the first 
class of aviation pupils at Bay Shore. From 
the inclosed history you will notice that the 
complement of the station at the time of 
the armistice consisted of about 800 men 
and 55 officers. 

It was commanded at various times by 
the following officers : 

Lieut. A. C. Read, U. S. N., June 19, 
1917, to Oct. 4, 1917; Lieut. C. P. Mason, 
U. S. N., Oct. 10, 1917, to Dec. 15, 1917; 
Lieut. Wm. Masek, U. S. N., Dec. 15, 1917, 
to April 15, 1918; Lieut. N. B. Chase, U. S. 
N., April 15, 1918, to Feb. 26, 1919. 

A letter has been written to Commander 
Read expressing the desire of the citizens 
of Bay Shore for a small article by him 
and requesting that he either forward this 
article direct to you or to me, in which case 
I will send it along to you as soon as re- 
ceived. Please let me know if any further 
information is desired concerning the activ- 
ities of Bay Shore. 

With best wishes, I am 

Yours faithfully, 

Thos. L. Brave. 

♦ sH ^ 

June 2, 1917. 

From : Commodore, Naval Militia 
To : Division of Naval Militia Affairs 
Subject : Aviation Camp at Bay Shore, L. I. 
Enclosures : 

Muster Roll, Aviation Camp 



Daily Routine, Aviation Camp 

Linwood Hotel Proposal 

Report of Surgeon MacEvitt 

List of Instructors and Aviation Pupils 

1. The following information is trans- 
mitted for the information of Commander 
N. E. Irwin, U. S. N., Bureau of Operations, 
who visited Bay Shore in company with 
Lieut. John T. Towers on May 28th. 

2. Location — The camp is located in the 
Village of Bay Shore, Long Island, imme- 
diately west of the town, on a peninsula 
jutting into Great South Bay. In area, it 
is about eight acres, and is under lease to 
the Government at a rental of $1 per year 
for the duration of war. It is bounded on 
the North by the 0-Co-Nee Improvement 
Company's property; on the west by Law- 
rance Creek; on the south by Great South 
Bay, and on the east by a shallow dredged 
inlet. It is accessible from the village by 
roadway from north, and from the east by 
a temporary foot bridge built across the 
shallow inlet referred to. A blue-print of 
this property was forwarded to the Depart- 
ment under separate cover on June 1st. The 
property was originally a sandy spit, only 
a few inches above the water; but this has 
been raised by pumping out sand from the 
creek and the inlet, and covering it with 
top soil, on which it is proposed to sow 
grass seed. 

3. Buildings — There have been con- 
structed on the property on the part marked 
"First Battalion" (see blue-print), Build- 
ings Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, and the 
12-foot wide board runway. The timber 
for the erection of Building No. 7 is on the 
premises. On the part marked "Second 
Battalion" (see blue-print), Buildings Nos. 
1, 2, 6, 10, Dock No. 3 and Crane No. 4 
have been constructed. These buildings, 
etc., have been built by private subscription, 
and an appraisal of same is being held with 
a view of asking the Navy Denartment to 
purchase same, in order that all the build- 
ings on the camp site may be Government 
property. There are also about ten tents 
on the property. 

(a) These buildings were started before 
war was declared and when it was proposed 
to have merely the State Camp at this place. 
Now that the property has been made a 
Federal camp, it is proposed in case the 
Government refunds the money expended 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



155 



from private subscription to remodel the 
buildings, excepting- the three hangars, and 
erect new buildings, if necessary, for gen- 
eral use of the camp, as follows : 

Office building 

Hospital 

Isolation building 

Guard house 

Store house 

Repair shop 

Oil house 

(b) There has been subscribed $1000, 
which is being held in hand by the National 
Special Aid Society for a hospital. Requi- 
sitions covering remodeling or erection of 
all these buildings have been prepared, and 
will be forwarded. 

4. Winds and Flying Course — The pre- 
vailing winds at this station in the sum- 
mer season are from the southwest. A cir- 
cular flying course has been laid out in the 
Great South Bay, having a diameter of 
about three miles and a depth of water from 
7 to 9 feet. 

5. Flyiyig Machines — There are at the 
camp at the present time the following fly- 
ing machines : 

2 Burgess-Dunn Flying Boats. 
1 Curtis Flying Boat. 
1 Curtis N-9. 

6. Boats — There should be sent to the 
camp two suitable working boats, and at 
least three fast boats. There is a small 
power dory at the camp now, but it is pri- 
vately owned. It can be used until proper 
working boats are available. For use in 
case of emergencies, the three speed boats 
should be sent as soon as possible. It is 
understood that one speed boat called the 
"Highball" will be ready for Bay Shore 
within the next ten days, and other boats 
are being inspected and will be recom- 
mended for purchase if found suitable. 

7. Water Supply — Water has been piped 
in from the town of Bay Shore. It has three 
outlets in camp, and more can be made if 
necessary. Three shower baths are being 
donated to the camp, small buildings neces- 
sary for which have been erected. 

8. Electric Light and Poiver — Wires are 
now up, and there is alternating current of 
110 volts available for the camp. 

9. Fire Apparatus — There are now pat- 
ent fire extinguishers in the frame buildings 
in the camp and six fire buckets. There 
should be at least one dozen more of these, 
and they were requisitioned for under date 
of May 12, 1917, but have not yet been sup- 
plied. 



10. Sanitation — The sanitation of the 
camp is looked after by Surgeon J. C. Mac- 
Evitt, and his report of the sanitary con- 
dition is enclosed herewith. 

11. Personnel — Lieut. Commander F. R. 
Lackey is in charge of the camp as the per- 
sonal representative of Admiral Usher, but 
his duties are not in connection with avia- 
tion training. In addition to Lieut. Com- 
mander Lackey, there are 6 officers and 89 
men now in camp for aviation duties, and 
it is expected there will ultimately be about 
140 men stationed there for this purpose 
when all of the aviation details of New York 
State are ordered to this camp. 

12. Camp Guards — It is believed that 
there should ultimately be a camp guard of 
at least 25 enlisted men for the performance 
of guard duty at the camp and for watch 
and fire patrol duty at the Hotel Linwood, 
if this hotel is leased for the housing of the 
personnel. This camp guard will be rein- 
forced for certain specific duties, such as 
boat work, with which it is believed the 
aviation members should be familiar; but, in 
general, it is thought that the men attached 
to the aviation sections should be relieved, 
as far as possible, from the details of guard 
work. 

13. Instruction — Of the officers now in 
camp, the following are available for in- 
struction : 

Lieut. Lee H. Harris. 

Lieut, (j.g.) Charles H. Ruttan. 

Ensign Samuel S. Pierce. 

When the Aviation Section of the 4th 
Battalion is ordered to Camp, Ensign J. B. 
R. Verplanck will be available as an in- 
structor. There are six other officers or 
men in camp who it is expected to use as 
instructors within a week after they begin 
flying, as most of these men now have li- 
censes. At the suggestion of Capt. Irwin, 
I am enclosing a list of the first class of in- 
struction at this camp. The second class is 
being selected by the aviation officers in the 
camp, and as soon as a man is qualified in 
the first class, one of the second class will be 
moved up into his place. Schools of in- 
struction are being planned, and all men 
who came to camp expecting to become fly- 
ers will receive instruction as mechanicians 
while they are awaiting their course in fly- 
ing. It is hoped that with the machines 
(10) that the Department will deliver be- 
tween now and the first of August, 40 men 
will be qualified as fiyers before the flying 
season ends at this camp. 

14. Navy Aviator and Skilled Mechanics 
— It is recommended that the suggestion of 



156 



WAR RECORD OF 



Lieut. Towers that a regular navy aviator 
and a corps of from four to six skilled me- 
chanics be sent to this camp be adopted, and 
that these men — particularly the aviator — 
be sent at the earliest possible date. 
* * * 

Historical Data of the United States 

Naval Air Station, Bay Shore, Long 

Island, New York 

May 1, 1919. 

The United States Naval Air Station, 
Bay Shore, Long Island, New York, was 
organized by the Naval Militia of the 
State of New York, Second Battalion, some 
time around May, 1916. It was organ- 
ized for the purpose of training national 
naval volunteer men for flying and aviation 
work. At the time this station was first 
organized it consisted mainly of national 
naval volunteer officers and men who origin- 
ally planned and built the station. It was 
not until war was declared that this station 
was to act as a patrol station to operate in 
certain designated areas, which of course 
was done by means of seaplane patrols. 
Very little experimental work was per- 
formed at this station. Of course since the 
inception of the station various experi- 
mental tests were made by the officers and 
men of the above mentioned organization in 
the line of flying machines and minor tests. 
These included the tests on the Loening sea- 
plane, which took place after the station 
was officially taken over by the Department 
about August, 1917. The experimental work 
on the Loening seaplane was performed by 
outside interests, with the sanction of the 
Navy Department. 

The station is located about a mile and a 
half from the Long Island Railroad station, 
and is reached by automobile. The site is 
well located, being about a mile from the 
town proper. The land is very level, but 
is rather sandy, evidently being filled-in 
ground, which is apt to cause the buildings 
to settle somewhat. 

The construction work was begun, as 
above stated, as far back as the spring of 
1917. At that time the station consisted of 
four single hangars, and one large hangar, 
which was under construction, capable of 
housing six seaplanes. The actual construc- 
tion did not begin until about October or 
November, 1917, and was stopped about 
December, 1918. 

The station is neatly laid out, being so 
arranged that the hangars, machine shop, 
blacksmith shop, etc., are all near the beach. 
The hangars are large and roomy, provid- 



ing ample space for the housing of sea- 
planes, and if necessary, wings, motors, etc. 
The carpenter, paint and wing doping shops 
are exceptionally large, providing plenty of 
air and light. This station has grown fromi 
a few small shacks to fifty modern up to 
date buildings with all improvements, such 
as light, heat, etc., as follows : 

Administration building, known as Build- 
ing No. 1. 

Hangar No. 4, known as Building No. 2. 

Hangar No. 5, knowm as Building No. 3. 

Boat house, known as Building No. 4. 

Lumber storage, known as Building No. 
5. 

Motor testing shed, known as Building 
No. 6. 

Oil reclaiming plant, known as Building 
No. 7. 

Wing doping and carpenter shop, known 
as Building No. 8. 

Machine shop, known as Building No. 9. 

Aviation store room, known as Building 
No. 10. 

Hangar Nos. 1, 2 and 3, known as Build- 
ing No. 11. 

General store house, known as Building 
No. 12. 

Transformer house, known as Building 
No. 13. 

Boiler house, known as Building No. 14. 

Pipe shop, known as Building No. 15. 

Sump house, known as Building No. 16. 

Garage, known as Building No. 17. 

Clothing and small store, known as Build- 
ing No. 18. 

Garbage house, known as Building No. 19. 

Electrical shop, known as Building No. 
20 and 21. 

Commissary store room, known as Build- 
ing No. 22. 

Men's quarters No. 4, known as Building 
No. 23. 

Wash house (south), known as Building 
No. 24. 

Men's quarters No. 2, known as Building 
No. 25. 

Mess hall, known as Building No. 26. 

Men's quarters No. 1, known as Building 
No. 27. 

Wash house (north), known as Building 
No. 28. 

Men's quarters No. 3, known as Building 
No. 29. 

Public works office, known as Building 
No. 30. 

Copper and blacksmith shop, known as 
Building No. 31. 

Officers' quarters, known as Building No. 
32. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



157 



25-yd. target range, known as Building 
No. 33. 

Ordnance Building, known as Building 
No. 34. 

Bomb house, known as Building No. 35. 

Tool shed P. W. D., known as Building 
No. 36. 

Hospital, known as Building No. 37. 

Isolation ward, known as Building No. 38. 

Pigeon house, known as Building No. 39. 

Y. M. C. A., known as Building No. 40. 

Guard house, known as Building No. 41. 

Officers' Club, known as Building No. 42. 

Incinerator, known as Building No. 43 
and 44. 

Magneto shop, known as Building No. 45. 

Barrack, known as Building No. 46. 

At the time the station was started it had 
a complement of about seven officers and one 
hundred men, and at the time of the sign- 
ing of the armistice had a complement of 
about eight hundred men and fifty-five offi- 
cers. 

As regards the seaplane complement, it 
has grown from a complement of less than 
one half dozen machines to more than forty- 
six machines. The machines consisted of 
aeromarines, R'6's, N'9's, "H" boats and 
"F" boats. 

Wonderful progress was made here dur- 
ing the war, as is evidenced by the records 
on file with the Department, in spite of the 
fact that many handicaps existed, such as 
bad working facilities, construction work 
being carried on, etc. The complement was 
divided into two squadrons, consisting of 
the 13th and 14th Squadrons, and was made 
up as elementary training station for stu- 
dents undergoing the usual training neces- 
sary to qualify for naval aviators. Ground 
school work was conducted as gunnery, 
semaphore, etc. As high as 1000 men were 
trained. These men went through the Avia- 
tion School, which classes consisted of a 
class for machinists' mates, quartermasters, 
carpenters' mates, coppersmiths and black- 
smiths. These classes usually lasted about 
one month, at the end of which period exam- 
inations were held and those who completed 
their examinations were detached or used 
wherever needed. Most of these men, as 
well as the students, were transferred to the 
U. S. Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida. 
Some were transferred abroad, others for 
domestic service and a number retained on 
this station for duty. 

The results attained by reason of these 
examinations were entirely satisfactory. 
The men of the mechanical classes after be- 
ing assigned to the machine shop and beach, 



developed into capable and efficient me- 
chanics. As far as the student flyers were 
concerned, their record while at Pensacola, 
Florida, undergoing advanced training, 
speaks for itself, not only as regards flying, 
but also to the other necessary qualifications 
in order to successfully pass the examina- 
tion for a commission. The student flyers 
after receiving the theoretical course at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, were given the actual 
training here, which enabled them to 
qualify. 

But three deaths occurred at this station 
during the flying season due to crashes. A 
notable rescue occurred in the latter part 
of the summer of 1918. A student went 
into a nose dive at 4000 feet; at 2000 feet 
the machine started to go on its back, the 
position in which it landed, striking the 
water with terrific speed at an angle of 
about fifteen degrees, upside down. The 
crew of the speed boat had observed the ac- 
cident and shoved off. The speed boat was 
200 yards from the dock and under full 
speed when the plane hit the water. The stu- 
dent was removed from the wreck in exactly 
one minute from the time the plane hit, hav- 
ing suffered more from shock than anything 
else. From 15 April, 1918, to 1 December, 
1918, 18,862 hours' and 30 minutes' flying 
time was put in. Considering the fact that 
at no one time were there more than sixty- 
four machines on the station, this appears 
to be quite a record. This station used 
mostly aeromarine planes ; in fact, they 
were the only planes used for elementary 
training. This fact makes the time record 
even better than it appears, for no other sta- 
tion used this type of plane. Most stations 
condemned this type of machine. This sta- 
tion also conducted a Board of Investiga- 
tion, which board passed upon students who 
were under consideration for disenrollment, 
transfer back to general service or transfer 
to training for ground officers. The afore- 
said board was only used for men who were 
found inapt for flying duty. Four or five 
fires occurred at this station, two of these 
being in different hangars, due to gasoline 
fumes coming in contact with lighted 
matches. Had it not been for the efficient 
work of the officers and men of the station, 
serious results would have resulted. A num- 
ber of officers of the station were com- 
mended for the efficient way in which the 
fires were handled. At the time of the two 
hangar fires, the men of the station ex- 
tinguished them before the arrival of the 
Bay Shore Fire Department. This station 



158 



WAR RECORD OF 



was also commended for the good work 
done during the time of the stranding of the 
U. S. S. Northern Pacific on Fire Island in 
January, 1919, this station being con- 
stantly in touch with that place by boat and 
seaplane. The planes delivered the mail to 
Fire Island, while the boats were kept in 
constant touch with the island. Troops were 
housed here and Red Cross goods and Army 
nurses were transferred from here to Fire 
Island. A number of wounded troops were 
also taken care of while being temporarily 
held here, and they were later transferred 
to New York by means of ambulances. 

During last year's flying season this sta- 
tion held the record numerous times for 
high flying time. The record time made 
here for a lone flight was made by an in- 
structor who put in ten (10) hours and 26 
minutes in one day. 



Digest of History of Naval Air Station, 
Bay Shore, Long Island, N. Y. 

Established— May, 1916, by N. Y. Naval 
Mihtia to train N. N. V. air pilots. 

Construction — Begun by Navy, spring, 
1917. 46 buildings completed. 

The construction work was begun, as 
above stated, as far back as the spring of 
1917. At that time the station consisted of 
four single hangars, and one large hangar, 
which was under construction, capable of 
housing six seaplanes. The actual construc- 
tion did not begin until about October or 
November, 1917, and was stopped about 
December, 1918. 

The station is neatly laid out, being so 
arranged that the hangars, machine shop, 
blacksmith shop, etc., are all near the beach. 
The hangars are large and roomy, provid- 
ing ample space for the housing of sea- 
planes, and if necessary, wings, motors, etc. 
The carpenter, paint and wing doping shops 
are exceptionally large, providing plenty of 
air and light. This station has grown from 
a few small shacks to fifty modern up-to- 
date buildings with all improvements, such 
as light, heat, etc., as follows : 

Administration Building, known as Build- 
ing No. 1. 

Hangar No. 4, known as Building No. 2. 

Hangar No. 5, known as Building No. 3. 

Boat house, known as Building No. 4. 

Lumber storage, known as Building No. 
5. 

Motor testing shed, known as Building 
No. 6. 



Oil reclaiming plant, known as Building 
No. 7. 

Wing doping and carpenter shop, known 
as Building No. 8. 

Machine shop, known as Building No. 9. 

Aviation store room, known as Building 
No. 10. 

Hangar Nos. 1, 2, and 3, known as Build- 
ing No. 11. 

General store house, known as Building 
No. 12. 

Transformer house, known as Building 
No. 13. 

Boiler house, known as Building No. 14. 

Pipe shop, known as Building No. 15. 

Sump house, known as Building No. 16. 

Garage, known as Building No. 17. 

Clothing and small stores, known as 
Building No. 18. 

Garbage house, known as Building No. 19. 

Electrical shop, known as Building No. 
20 and 21. 

Commissary store room, known as Build- 
ing No. 22. 

Men's quarters No. 4, known as Building 
No. 23. 

Wash house (south), known as Building 
No 24. 

Men's quarters No. 2. known as Building 
No. 25. 

Mess hall, known as Building No. 26. 

Men's quarters No. 1, known as Building 
No. 27. 

Wash house (north), known as Building 
No. 28. 

Men's quarters No. 3, known as Building 
No. 29. 

Public works office, known as Building 
No. 30. 

Copper and blacksmith shop, known as 
Building No. 31. 

OflRcers' quarters, known as Building No. 
32. 

25-yd. target range, known as Building 
No. 33. 

Ordnance building, known as Building 
No. 34. 

Bomb house, known as Building No. 35. 

Tool shed P. W. D,, known as Building 
No. 36. 

Hospital, known as Building No. 37. 

Isolation ward, known as Building No. 38. 

Pigeon house, known as Building No. 39. 

Y. M. C. A., known as Building No. 40. 

Guard house, known as Building No. 41. 

Officers' Clulb, known as Building No. 42. 

Incinerator, known as Building No. 43-44. 

Magneto shop, known as Building No. 45. 

Barrack, known as Building No. 46. 

Commissioned — Spring of 1917. 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



159 



Complement — Spring of 1917: 7 officers, 
100 men, 12 planes. November 11, 1918: 
55 officers, 800 men, 46 planes. 

Purpose — Training student aviators. En- 
listed men as aviation mechanics. 

Training — Pilots given elementary train- 
ing: 1000. Fatalities: 3. Total time in 
1918: 18,862 hours. 



Letter From Commander Read 
U. S. Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla. 

The flying station at Bay Shore was offi- 
cially established as a naval air station upon 
my arrival about June 6, 1917. This date 
did not mark the beginning of the station, 
but the assignment of an officer of the Regu- 
lar Navy to Bay Shore marked its transi- 
tion from the supervision of the Naval 
Militia of New York to the direct control of 
the Navy Department. 

The station was already a going concern 
on the date of June 6, thanks to the efforts 
of the Naval Militia officers, from the Com- 
modore down, and to the patriotism, en- 
thusiasm, and even in many cases, the hard 
manual labor of the members of the aviation 
branch, together with the hearty moral and 
practical support and backing of interested 
civilian organizations and individuals. 

It only remained to consolidate the bat- 
talions, the personnel of which possessed 
the natural and thoroughly American spirit 
of competition, but which had in some cases 
engendered a feeling of jealousy and fric- 
tion ; to create an organization along naval 
lines, and to endeavor to inculcate in the 
personnel the SPIRIT of the Navy. 

Teaching them to fly was at first decidedly 
a side issue. One seaplane only was avail- 
able. But with the NAVY AT WAR behind 
the project it was but a matter of time and 
the proper representation of our needs be- 
fore the necessary facilities were obtained ; 
the truly remarkable high average of in- 
telligence and desire to excel possessed by 
the men did the rest. 

To one coming direct from a capital ship 
of the Navy, where the lines are sharply 
drawn regarding the respective duties, 
rights and privileges of the commissioned 
officer and the enlisted man. and where the 
etiquette of the service is rigidly observed, 
it was nothing less than a jolt to suddenly 
face a situation where officers and men pos- 
sessed a like degree of education and cul- 
ture, were invited to the same social gather- 



ings and called each other by their first 
names. 

It is always difficult to convince the civi- 
lian (and the Bay Shore men had only re- 
cently donned their uniforms) of the neces- 
sity of observing the many forms of respect 
required to be shown to superiors. His in- 
ference is to the effect that such observance 
constitutes a recognition of superiority in 
all respects — character, manly qualities, and 
so on, a fact which he disputes both on 
general principles and in specific cases in 
particular. He does not realize that where 
men act as a body, especially in military 
operations, unity of purpose and in the ex- 
ecution of orders are paramount for maxi- 
mum efficiency ; that to achieve such unity 
instant and unquestioned obedience must be 
accorded the leader, and finally, to attain 
this end in the heat of battle and in the ex- 
citement attending any emergency or un- 
usual situation, it becomes absolutely es- 
sential in the normal daily routine of a 
peaceful station far removed from the war 
zone, that the men be constantly and for- 
ever reminded of the superiority of those 
placed above them — superiority not neces- 
sarily in character nor yet in birth or edu- 
cation, but superiority in knowledge and 
training in the science of war. With this 
end in view during innumerable years a 
thousand and one forms of etiquette have 
gradually come into use and have been 
adopted, some by regulation, some merely 
by custom, and as long as these exist they 
must be punctiliously observed by all, from 
the highest in command down to the last 
gob in the organization. 

To indoctrinate this excellent but un- 
trained body of men with naval discipline in 
the shortest possible time without produc- 
ing a feeling of discontent or an impression 
that they were expected to forget their 
friends of lower rank, and of similar mani- 
festations of snobbery was the most deli- 
cate, the most important and, at the same 
time, the most interesting problem that Bay 
Shore produced. 

The definite accomplishments during the 
short period of my command cannot be de- 
termined, but from the enviable records 
made later on by the original Bay Shore 
group it is certain that somewhere they 
caught the idea and worked harmoniously 
and efficiently in true Navy style. 

There is just one other feature of my 
tour of duty at Bay Shore that I wish to 
mention particularly, the pleasant memo- 
ries of which never have and nevej will be 



160 



WAR RECORD OF 



forgotten. I am referring to the unusual 
attitude of friendliness, cordiality and co- 
operation of the civilian residents of the city 
and certain civilian organizations. I re- 
gret the necessity of saying "unusual," but 
it is a fact that communities in the vicinity 
of naval stations regard them, as a rule, as 
necessary evils, the merchants furnishing 
the exception to prove that rule. But at 
Bay Shore it was quite different. The at- 
titude of treating the personnel as men of 
honor, defenders of our country, and the 
intense interest displayed along practical 
lines benefited the station immeasurably, 
not only in material matters, such as the 
building and equipping of a fine dispensary, 



as a single illustration, but in improving the 
morale of the whole station. 

I have often feared since leaving Bay 
Shore that in the rush of official duties I 
neglected to express my feeling in regard 
to this matter. It is a great pleasure to be 
afforded this opportunity to assure those 
patriotic citizens who labored to improve 
conditions at the Air Station that the re- 
sults of their efforts were of inestimable 
value, that I as commanding officer greatly 
appreciate them, and that now, in my own 
behalf and as a representative of our great 
Navy, I desire to extend them heartfelt 
thanks — belated, but none the less sincere. 

(s) A. C. READ. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



161 



SECTION BASE No. 5 



Third Naval District, N. Y., Sayville, L. I. 

By Lieutenant (j. g.) Walter L. Suydam, Jr., U. S. N, R F, 



4 BOUT the 1st of April, 1917, the work 
/A of organizing Section Base No. 5 at 
Sayville, L. I., was begun and Lieu- 
tenant R. B. Roosevelt was designated as 
the Commanding Officer. On April 9th of 
the same year I received orders to report 
for duty in connection with the organiza- 
tion of the Section, and a patrol of Fire 
Island Inlet, which the Chief of Staff of 
the Third Naval District desired to have in 
operation at the earliest possible date. 

In the latter part of April, 1917, the first 
patrol of the Inlet was made by the U. S. S. 
Nemesis, S. P. 343, with a crew made up 
mostly of men from Islip Town. These men 
have the distinction, I believe, of being 
among the very first to respond to the call 
to duty from the Town of Islip and vicinity, 
and hence I give their names : 

Ivanhoe Stein, M. M. 2c. 

Frank Orr, B. M. 2c. 

Jonathan Thompson, M. M. 2c. 

Ralph Robinson, S. C. 3c. 

Walter L. Suydam, Jr., Ensign, Com- 
manding. 

The purpose of the patrol was to prevent 
the running of supplies to enemy subma- 
rines and general observation and police 
duty in addition to assisting the Naval Avi- 
ation Forces and Coast Guard. 

Besides duty afloat Section Base No. 5 
had various land duties, one of which was 
the prevention of unauthorized wireless ac- 
tivity and the confiscation of apparatus un- 
sealed or in use. Also the investigation of 
all persons considered or reported to be dis- 
loyal or suspicious. 

As an illustration of the Naval Opera- 
tions in this vicinity I will attempt to de- 
scribe briefly two incidents, one of which 
was "contact with the enemy," and the 
writer must plead indulgence of his readers 
if the narrative is related in the first per- 
son. Owing to the fact that he was so in- 
timately connected with the events to deal 
with it otherwise would be almost im- 
- possible. 



Enemy Lines 



On the night of , 1918, a German 

submarine approached the Long Island 
coast and, not far from Fire Island Light- 
ship, laid a string of mines. As soon as 
this was known the Mine Sweepers went 
over the territory in question, and while 
they were successful in breaking the mines 
from their moorings they did not actually 
get the mines out of the water. Mines float 
low and are difficult to observe, and it was 
then "up to all forces" to keep strict watch. 
In this connection I desire to compliment 
the Coast Guard for their alertness and the 
co-operation we received. 

Within a short time two of the mines 
had been retrieved and gotten up on the 
beach without accident, and about ten days 
later a third. Then came the dangerous 
undertaking of taking them apart. Little 
was known of enemy mines and informa- 
tion as to their construction was much 
desired. 

I had the honor of assisting Lieutenant 
Commander Keen and Lieutenant Menan- 
der, the Mine Sweeping Division, in this 
work. We were accompanied by one ma- 
chinist, and thanks to the skill of these two 
officers we dissected the mines at different 
points on the beach, sometimes late at night, 
without casualty. In one instance we 
burned out some 300 lbs. of T.N.T. without 
accident. I am not permitted to describe the 
mines, but the reader can imagine from the 
size of the charge that they were formida- 
ble engines of destruction. 

The writer feels that the ofl^cers and men 
of Section Base 5 may properly be proud 
of their station, as I am informed that more 
mines were retrieved in that Section than 
in any other one Section on this side of the 
Atlantic. 

Sinking of U. S. S. San Diego 
One day in the summer of 1918 I was in 
charge of the Section, as Lieutenant Roose- 
velt was away. The weather was hazy and 



162 



WAR RECORD OF 



vision was only possible on the water for 
about two miles. 

In the early afternoon I received infor- 
mation that something unusual was hap- 
pening off Point-o'-Woods, and it was 
thought that some sort of an explosion had 
taken place. Investigation was at once 
made, and it was found that the Cruiser 
San Diego had been blown up ; how, I am 
not permitted to relate. Our station was 
the first to inform District Headquarters in 
New York. 

The three largest boats that we had were 
sent to the position indicated, and I pro- 
ceeded with the despatch boat and a few 
men to Point-o'-Woods to establish com- 
munications and direct operations from 
that point. 

Upon arrival I found thirty-one officers 
and men from the San Diego who had suc- 
ceeded in reaching the beach in two small 
boats and bringing safely the ship's flag. 



These men were taken to the Section 
Base, where they were given supper and 
such clothing as they required, and later 
sent to New York by automobile. 

Our boats patrolled throughout the night 
and, among other things, picked up and 
took on board one aviator whose plane had 
been disabled, and salvaged the plane. 

I could continue to tell of activities which 
were participated in by Section Base No. 5 ; 
but I have been requested to write a brief 
article. It is hoped that the two incidents 
which I have described will serve to illus- 
trate the type of work engaged in by the 
local station. 

In closing I desire to thank the civil au- 
thorities and the many civilians involved 
for the valuable co-operation rendered to a 
certain branch of Naval Operations in this 
District, which was under my command and 
the work of which cannot be made public at 
this time. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



163 



THE WIRELESS STATION AT SAYVILLE 



By Lewis H. Noe 



A SIGNIFICANT event in the history of 
/\ Wireless Communication occurred on 
Wednesday, Feb. 11, 1914, when 
the first complete message was sent from 
the Sayville Radio Station to Berlin, Ger- 
many. Although the distance between the 
two stations is something more than four 
thousand (4000) miles, over two hundred 
and fifty (250) words v/ere transmitted 
with ease and the Sayville operator missed 
only nine words out of the entire number. 
The success of the attempt is regarded as 
signalizing a new era, commercially and in- 
tellectually, for the relationship of the two 
nations. The report of this achievement 
was the first official notice that at least reg- 
ular communication has been attained with 
the greatest city in Germany. 

A message was sent from the newspapers 
of New York to His Majesty, the German 
Emperor, by the Sayville Wireless. As an 
indication of the advance which the wire- 
less means in the official relations of the 
countries and a proof of the cordiality 
which the American people entertain to- 
ward the Kaiser himself. The message 
read as follows : 

"The newspapers of New York send 
Greetings to His Majesty the Emperor by 
the new wireless, which has brought into 
touch the great German Nation and the 
United States." 

Greetings were also sent to Ambassador 
James W. Gerard and to the "Taeglische 
Rundschau" of Berlin. The messages were 
sent from the Sayville Station, the prop- 
erty of the Atlantic Communication Com- 
pany, "Bob" Prendergast, the operator. 

The messages were sent under the direc- 
tion of H. 0. Boehme, the chief inspector 
for the Atlantic Communication Company 
in the United States, and were received at 
Nauen, Germany, by Paul Pichon, chief en- 
gineer of the company in Berlin. 

A few weeks later a Washington report 
read as follows : 

"The Department of Commerce and La- 
bor's report from an inspector detailed to 
investigate the Telefunken wireless tower 
at Sayville, Long Island, declares that it is 
'backed by German capital, that all the ap- 



paratus is of German manufacture, and 
that the large set of instruments is intended 
to work with the wireless station at Nauen, 
3400 miles away.' " 

Neither the state nor the navy depart- 
ment would say anything to-day regarding 
the probable attitude of this Government 
toward the affair in view of the Lodge reso- 
lution, which declared that the United 
States would regard with grave concern 
any acquisition of territory of strategic 
value on the American Continent by any 
interests which might be under foreign 
influence. 

The official report of the investigation of 
the Sayville station says that the new sta- 
tion will be the property of the Atlantic 
Communication Company of New York, 
whose directorate includes a Mr. Stallwerk, 
a Dr. Frank and a Mr. Hulse, a consulting 
engineer, with A. E. Seelig, as manager. It 
will occupy 100 acres adjoining the Long 
Island Railroad, will have a double set of 
instruments, the smaller ranging 800 to 900 
miles, the larger being the old Nauen set of 
high power. They are to be 393 and 100 
feet high, respectively, and two sets of in- 
struments always will be in use. 

Commissioner of Navigation Chamber- 
lain, whose bureau has jurisdiction over 
radio communication affecting navigation, 
said that he did not regard Sayville station 
as likely to lead to any international com- 
plications. 

"The Radio Communication Bill prohibit- 
ing the establishment of private wireless 
stations within fifteen miles of certain Gov- 
ernment stations fully protects the rights 
of the United States," he said. "It does 
not prevent the establishment of the Say- 
ville Wireless stations, which is fifty-two 
miles from New York City, and it should 
not. The station, however, will be subject 
to Government supervision at all times. 

A few months later, as the world war 
cloud was threatening, the United States 
Government took over absolute control of 
the Sayville Wireless Station, which soon 
became an instrument in aiding the Allied 
Nations against the then acknowledged 
world's common foe during the ensuing 



164 



WAR RECORD OF 



war, the greatest in the history of the 
world. As it is written, "and they shall 
fall by their own sword." 

The above data was furnished by Lewis 



H. Noe, a newspaper reporter of forty 
years repertorial experience, whose home 
has been at Sayville, Long Island for 72 
years. 



THE WOMEN SPEAK 

By Theodosia Garrison 

The young women who were called to take the places of the men, often 
in heavy and responsible labor, were perhaps "girls." They have had no 
coddling, no huts and no triumphal processions, but they show how truly 
tjiey deserve to be recognized as women bv the conduct and bearing of 
those, for example, who, the other day cheerfully surrendered their places 
to the returning soldiers at Bayonne, N. J., to whom the Standard Oil Co. 
had promised their situations should be restored when they enlisted. This 
little poem, by Theodosia Garrison, was printed in connection with the 
report of their cheerful acceptance of their dismissal. 

Not with our prayers and tears 

We helped you win, — 
Not with vain doubts and fears 

Of death and sin, — 
But with valiant work of our hands 

With honest labor and true 
We turned us as one to war's demands 

To sharpen the sword for you. 

Have we not proved our faith 

Through stress and strain? 
You, come newly from death 

Trust us again, — 
Trust us to bring back ease and mirth 

And the heart's content you knew — 
You have given us back a storm-racked earth. 

We will make it fair for you. 



From the Financial Chronicle 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



165 



THE PATRIOTIC GARDENERS 



By Mrs. Irving J. Long 



WITHIN a few weeks after the United 
States declared war with Germany, 
under the direction and leadership 
of Mrs. Henry Nickle (Miss Virginia 
Norden) of Brightwaters and Mrs. Irving 
J. Long of Bay Shore, an organization of 
women and girls, numbering about one hun- 
dred, was formed. They ranged in age 
from middle life down to seven years. 

J. Sheridan Linn, then Principal of the 
Bay Shore Public Schools, suggested the 
name, Patriotic Gardeners,, which was 
adopted, because it had been planned to 
raise potatoes and beans to answer the 
Government call for all possible production 
of food. 

The activities of this organization in- 
cluded not only the planting, cultivating, 
digging and gathering of potatoes and beans, 
giving to families of service men and sell- 
ing said products as various conditions re- 
quired, but methods for raising money for 
many needs were adopted as time went on, 
such as giving brilliant entertainments by 
home talent, etc. The Gardeners presented 



every man, volunteer or drafted, going from 
the town of Islip, with small kits of toilet 
articles and smokes. They took those leav- 
ing Exemption Board, No. 2, to Camp Up- 
ton in cars loaned by citizens of Bay Shore, 
Brightwaters and Islip, stopping en route 
at Roe's Hotel, Patchogue for luncheon, 
paid for from the Gardeners' fund. They 
corresponded with the boys when occasion 
required, even while those boys were in 
France; when their families needed Red 
Cross assistance, such cases were properly 
reported, an office and secretary were kept 
for such purposes. They helped at the local 
canteen ; marched in parades ; took charge 
of the Women's Committee of all but the 
first Liberty Bond drive, helping to put Bay 
Shore's quota over the top each time, main- 
taining a booth for the purpose. 

Finally, through the suggestion of the 
leaders, the movement was started for the 
erection of the Memorial building in Bay 
Shore, and their last $300 was turned over 
toward the purchase of the bronze tablet 
on which are the names of the boys who 
left all to do their bit. 



166 



WAR RECORD OF 



RED CROSS RECORD OF ISLIP TOWNSHIP 

From 1905 to 1919 
By Frances Pusey Gooch 



THE response of America's women to the 
call of the Red Cross refutes for all 
time the amazing declaration that the 
United States entered the World War from 
motives of fear and selfishness. 

As the maternal pulse reflects embryonic 
vitality so did this response of American 
mothers, wives, sisters, daughters and 
sweethearts foreshadow the heroes and 
martyrs, military, naval and civilian, to be 
born in the travail of our country's eflfort 
to help save civilization. 

Statistics of Islip Township's Red Cross 
contribution to that stupendous and multi- 
form effort are commonplacely relative in 
kind and amount, but they serve as a local 
barometer by which to gage the storm of 
emotion that brewed and broke over our 
land from the Atlantic to the Pacific and 
from Canada to the Gulf, washing from 
cleansible minds any belief that American 
manhood and womanhood, in the fateful 
year of 1917, reacted to other than instincts 
of righteousness and humanity. 

While local work was but an infinitesimal 
part of a marvelous whole, there were indi- 
vidualizing features in connection with the 
Red Cross branches of Islip Township that 
make pages worthy of community history. 

In the year 1905 Mrs. L. K. Wilmerding 
and a few other women of vision organized 
the Islip Township Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross, thus providing a nucleus 
for the South Suffolk County Chapter when 
the needs of 1917 made Red Cross work 
everybody's "bit" instead of the benevo- 
lence of the earnest few. Furthermore, it 
served as a training camp of preparedness 
and inspiration for the women who were 
to officer, in cooperation with patriotic men, 
the larger organization. 

The Islip Township Chapter — embracing 
the villages of Islip, Bay Shore, Bright- 
waters, Brentwood, Central Islip, Great 
River and Sayville, and covering the years 
1905-17 — had the twofold distinction of 
being the first rural Chapter formed in 
the State of New York and of originating 
the idea of employing a District Visiting 
Nurse as a Red Cross activity. With com- 
mendation and permission from National 
Headquarters, the Islip Nursing Service 



was established in 1909 and four years 
later served as model for the Town and 
County Nursing Service of the American 
Red Cross. Whether or not it subsequently 
suggested the Department of Nursing and 
Teaching among the varied and ever- 
increasing Red Cross activities, it assuredly 
lighted the way for those who struggled 
through the dark year of the influenza with 
whatever of semi- and non-professional ser- 
vice was available. 

When, in July of 1917, the smaller Chap- 
ter was consolidated with other similar 
organizations to form the South Suft'olk 
County Chapter, with headquarters at Islip, 
there was a goodly company of veterans, 
equipped and uniformed literally cap-a-pie, 
to "carry on" in rented, donated or com- 
mandeered quarters even more zealously 
and resultfully than they had been doing 
in church parlors and the beautiful homes 
of patriotic women. No longer was there 
a foreign-missionary atmosphere in the 
workrooms or a feeling of detachment in 
minds beneath the headdress and hearts 
beneath the apron of Red Cross insignia. 
Boys were going out from homes humble 
and homes palatial, and women were com- 
ing together in the workroom from homes 
running a like gamut from poverty to 
wealth, hearing in the bugle-call to service 
a note new to many and to others dimly 
reminiscent of music that heralded Him 
who taught the brotherhood and sisterhood 
of humanity. Statistics of almost incredi- 
ble magnitude reveal the Martha side of 
American womanhood during those tense 
two years, but the Mary side also devel- 
oped and, appearances all too many to the 
contrary, retained much of the character- 
building wrought by the leveling process 
of universal service in which mountains of 
false pride were laid low and valleys of 
false humility uplifted. 

Only approximately can the part Islip 
Township played in the general war activi- 
ties of the South Suffolk County Chapter 
be separated from the massed statistics of 
a territory covering almost three hundred 
square miles ; but, in the words of the 
Chapter's historians, the township also 
"prides itself upon having never failed to 
meet a call for work or fallen short of its 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



167 



quota of production" — words applicable not 
only to the workroom and home output of 
knitting, sewing, and surgical dressings, 
but also to its share in all special committee 
work cheerfully, ably, and self-sacrificingly 
performed in the war fund campaigns, 
membership drives, old clothes drives, linen 
showers, and very especially in the influ- 
enza epidemic. To the Committee on In- 
fluenza the History of South Suffolk County 
Chapter, A. R. C, pays this tribute : 

"The committee worked most effectively 
in cooperation with the town health authori- 
ties in checking the spread of the dreaded 
influenza. Motor cars were pressed into 
service day and night for the transporta- 
tion of nurses and doctors, and to take the 
patients to the hospitals. A special food 
service was inaugurated which provided 
the sick with broths, fresh eggs, milk, and 
other necessities, practically all of which 
was contributed by residents. Very often 
the acts of those on the committee, or those 
volunteering their services under its direc- 
tion, entailed distinct personal sacrifice and, 
in some instances, dangerous exposure. 
Too much cannot be said in their praise." 

Then there was the many-angled and 
far-reaching work of the Home Service 
Department, of whose personnel it like- 
wise may be claimed that "too much cannot 
be said in their praise." Also Junior Ac- 
tivities made a proud and praiseworthy 
showing under zealous and patient guid- 
ance. But it was in disaster and relief that 
Islip Township individualized its Red Cross 
work for a third time — the first rural Chap- 
ter in the State of New York, the first 
District Nursing Service in connection with 
the American Red Cross, and the first to 
be appealed to for aid in a marine disaster 
that made a nation mourn. 

In the early morning of New Year's Day, 
1919, there came from the U. S. Naval Air 
Station at Bay Shore to the local branch of 
the Red Cross this appalling and impera- 
tive message : "The United States Trans- 
port Northern Pacific has gone aground off 
Fire Island beach with five thousand sol- 
diers, mostly wounded, to be debarked 
through Bay Shore. Put in motion every 
relief agency from Babylon to Islip." 

Though a later message reduced the 
number aboard by half, the proportion of 
wounded and the desperate nature of some 
of the wounds were perhaps not again 
equaled on any home-bringing vessel dur- 
ing the remainder of the war. 

The response to this appeal was instant 
'and coordinated. The local canteen volun- 



teered its quarters and entire working 
force and equipment. A volunteer motor 
corps was organized. Volunteer beds and 
cots in private homes were listed, and food 
supplies promised. A bureau of informa- 
tion was kept open for long-distance in- 
quiries, sane and otherwise, and shelves of 
workrooms were emptied of sweaters, socks, 
and whatever could ameliorate conditions 
on a blizzard-swept coast, while oil-stoves 
and hot-water bottles were collected in a 
bewildering mass. 

Unquestionably the community arose to 
the occasion, but the Red Cross is not a 
localized organization, and the New York 
County Chapter rushed out a trainload of 
experts and professionals, a motor corps 
intact, and hospital and kitchen with every- 
thing but a roof, and thenceforth local 
preparations were utilized mainly in caring 
for the visitors and facilitating their work. 
To quote again from the History of the 
South Suffolk County Chapter, A. R. C. : 
"The work of the (local) Red Cross on this 
occasion was officially recognized by Ad- 
miral Usher in a letter to the Chapter, and 
by Captain R. W. C. Francis, M.C., in his 
report to the surgeon of the Port of Em- 
barkation, Hoboken, N. J." 

In the meantime debarkation through 
Bay Shore had been discontinued because 
of the weather, hardships to the wounded, 
and the discovery that the transport was 
a safe refuge till all could be transferred 
to other steamers and the journey com- 
pleted by water. 

The tragic incident gave a new impetus 
to Red Cross work, and the Armistice found 
this community a type of the entire nation 
which was "carrying on" at a pace that 
was enough in itself to break the morale 
of a frugal and efficient enemy. Will any 
but a dollar-mark posterity cavil at our 
Government's having made a Niagara of 
money instead of blood to sweep into its 
whirlpool the forces of destruction which 
an outraged world was striving to dam, 
daze, and exhaust? 

Man seems slow and hesitant about beat- 
ing cannon into ploughshare and pruning- 
hook, but women have turned the Red Cross 
apron into a badge of home service varied, 
unfamiliar, and psychologically ennobled 
through association with a time when the 
measure of a "lady" was what she could and 
not what she could not do. 

Statistics of Production 

Hospital Surg-ical Knitted Refugee Miscellaneous 
Garments Dressings Articles Garments Articles 

19,807 211,233 11,278 3,165 3,048 



168 



WAR RECORD OF 



Loretta Macdonald 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the American Red Cross 
and Army Nurse Corps in May, 1918, and trained 
for overseas work at Camp Devens, Massachusetts. 
She served overseas from Aug. 1, 1918, to July 19, 
1919, during vv^hich time she was attached to Base 
Hospitals 48, 50, 53, 54 and 67. Miss Macdonald 
received a French "Nuit" Citation at Base Hospital 
53 on March, 1919. 



sex. Her perseverance, zeal and constant cheer 
combined with what was almost genius for under- 
standing the wants and needs of the men in uni- 
form, made her a most popular member of the 
organization. Bay Shore may well take pride in 
having had such a splendid representative in the 
Motor Corps, for all over the land, some boy has 
told his mother, sister or sweetheart that in those 
historic days there was in New York a woman who 
understood. 



Hattie Vollbracht 

of East Islip, enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps 
and trained for war work at Camp Wheeler, 
Georgia. She served in this capacity during the 
war and received an honorable discharge from 
service at Camp Wheeler on Jan. 16, 1919. 



Louise A. Machacek 

of Babylon, enlisted in the United States Navy on 
Sept. 4, 1918, at Brooklyn Navy Yard, and served 
as a Yeoman F, 1st Class, until July 31, 1919, when 
she received an honorable discharge from service. 



Josephine Anna Kabatnik 

of Bay Shore, enlisted in the Army Reserve Nurse 
Corps and was assigned to camp Upton, Long 
Island, on Aug. 6, 1918. She remained at this camp 
until the date of her discharge from service, June 
21, 1919. 



rrace 



Ellis 



of Bay Shore, served as a Lieutenant on Head- 
quarters Staff, American Red Cross Motor Corps, 
organized for military relief and the transportation 
of the sick and wounded. She rose from the ranks 
and as one of several hundred women who par- 
ticipated in that branch of the service, she was 
within a remarkably short time commissioned Lieu- 
tenant. As aide to the commander of the division. 
Miss Ellis met every incoming ship, visited hospi- 
tals and performed innumerable other duties, with 
a willingness that marks the real soldier of eithei' 



Ruth Rossuck 

(See article on page 175). 



Annie Mitchell Hall 

of Bay Shore, New York, enlisted in Red Cross 
on Aug. 1, 1918, and was sent to hospital at 
Flattsburgh Barracks, New York. In September 
she was transferred to Base Hospital at Camp 
Devens, Mass., with an emergency unit, to aid in 
the "Flu" epidemic. On Oct. 29th she was sent 
to New York, from where she sailed for France. 
In France she served at Erac Hospital No. 24, 
Base Sector No. 2, Bordeaux, Base Hospital No. 
121, and in a unit of five nurses sent to town of 
Cadillac to care for the boys of the 348th Infantry 
who were ill with the "Flu." From there she went 
to St. Andre and Ambaus Will. Later she was 
stationed at Camp Hospital No. 79, near St. Andre. 
On July 7th she sailed from Brest and upon her 
return to the United States was honorably dis- 
charged from service Aug. 2, 1919. 



(^, 



THE TOWN OF I SLIP 



169 



■ii»^yi|wiifi|ifww«y|ij<fjip 




170 



WAR RECORD OF 



BAY SHORE IN THE LIBERTY LOANS 



By AcosTA Nichols 



WHEN the United States entered the 
Great War and started to mobilize 
its resources, the question of finan- 
cial preparation came immediately to the 
front. The nation was inexperienced in the 
flotation of large Government loans, and 
the method of procedure had to be carefully 
felt out. 

Fortunately, our Federal Reserve bank- 
ing system had been well established, and 
the Treasury Department decided that the 
appeal to the country should be made 
through this agency. The First Loan 
seemed simple, but it was early recognized 
that the amount was so large that the usual 
banking and investment channels would not 
supply the sum needed, and the banking 
institutions in the various communities 
were asked to help. 

I had the good fortune to be placed in 
charge of Long Island at the outset, and my 
first duty was to make a tour of the banks 
of the Long Island cities and towns in order 
to see if they were putting forth proper ef- 
forts to secure local subscriptions in re- 
sponse to the circular of instructions that 
had been sent out by the Federal Reserve 
Bank. For the most part surprising apathy 
was shown in the First Loan. There was 
the general opinion that all that was needed 
was for the banks to advertise that they 
would receive subscriptions and the rest of 
the work would take care of itself. Not so 
with Bayshore ! 

Late on a beautiful afternoon in April 
an attempt to find the President of the 
South Side Bank resulted in my being di- 
rected to the Harbor, where Mr. Wicks was 
busily engaged in repairing his boat after 
the ravages of winter. A short talk with 
him soon proved that nothing was needed 
to stimulate the general activities of Bay- 
shore in aid of the First Liberty Loan. Al- 
ready the matter had been taken up with 
various prominent citizens ; the co-operation 
of the Home Defence had been requested 
and obtained, and plans had been discussed 
whereby the beginning of that public in- 
terest which was so soon to turn into a 
mighty, irresistible force was made mani- 
fest. 

Various plans were talked over and the 



interview closed with the feeling of assur- 
ance that whatever other town in Long 
Island might fall behind, Bay Shore at least 
was awake to its full sense of responsibility. 

No quotas were assigned for the First 
Loan, but gradually as the importance of 
the financial task was realized, it was de- 
termined that plans must be formulated in 
a comprehensive way whereby each com- 
munity should do its full duty. In all sub- 
sequent loans quotas were assigned propor- 
tioned to the banking resources of each 
district. 

Developments proceeded at a rapid rate 
and afforded a highly interesting psycho- 
logical experiment. While the banks con- 
tinued to handle subscriptions, committees 
were formed in the various centres quite 
without regard to the banks as such. The 
leading members of the community were 
pressed into service, and with each succes- 
sive loan the committee organization be- 
came more intensive. 

Patriotic feeling alone would not have 
sufficed to bring results. It was necessary 
to have a machine working at top speed, 
and this machine had to be built from the 
ground up. The keynote of the committee 
work was Personal Service, and this slogan 
was used throughout the island with con- 
stantly increasing effect. More and more 
the importance of individual effort was im- 
pressed upon the workers, with the effect 
that districts were gradually plotted out, a 
house to house canvass instituted, and all 
men and women in the community had 
brought home to them their direct share of 
personal responsibility for the success of 
the Loan. 

Bay Shore responded patriotically to every 
suggestion that was made along the line of 
increasing the efficiency of their organiza- 
tion. Under the capable leadership of Mr. 
Wicks a committee of splendid energy and 
ability directed the efforts of the commu- 
nity, and in each loan carried their work to 
a triumphant conclusion. Mr. Wicks gave 
his time and energy with untiring devotion 
to the cause and proved to be a tower of 
resourcefulness and strength. 

The actual figures of each campaign will 
be shown in a separate statement, but there 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



171 



was no case where the necessary quotas 
were not far exceeded both in Bay Shore 
and in the surrounding towns. 

The immediate direction of the southern 
part of Suffolk County was under the su- 
pervision of Mr. Harry B. Hollins, Jr., and 
too much credit cannot be given to him for 
his untiring and patriotic zeal. 

The whole community contributed to the 
Loans so generally that it is difficult to 
single out individuals, but a special word 
must be said in behalf of the work and the 
self-sacrificing patriotism of the women. I 
think I am not putting it too strongly to 
say that the most important instrument in 
the development of the psychology that 
brought success was the part that the 
women played in influencing public sen- 
timent. 

The days of the war have passed into his- 
tory, but the memories of the experiences 
of those days of effort and of tribulation 
are still strong. Never was there a better 
illustration of what can be accomplished 
by united effort than the Liberty Loan cam- 
paigns. It would be a pity if the lessons 
we learned then cannot be turned to good 
account and if we cannot remember what 
they taught to us in our time of emergency. 
Surely there are many directions in which 
our communities can be helped and many 
directions in which our public life can be 
benefited by the force that comes through 
organization and a common determination 
to triumph over difficulties. May we not 
forget ! 



Figures of the Liberty Loans, Town of 

ISLIP 

The total subscriptions of the Bay Shore 
District, which included Brightwaters and 
Brentwood, in the five Liberty Loan drives 
amounted to $1,185,250. I could not get an 
accurate statement of all the loans in the 
Islip and Sayville districts. 

As I have the final figure from the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank of the Fourth Loan, I 
have given below statistics which will prove 
that every section of the town exceeded its 
quota. 

Quota Subscription Per Cent 

Bay Shore $226,300 $426,850 189 

Brightwaters 56,600 110,350 195 

Brentwood 11,300 37,000 327 



Quota Subscription Per Cent 

Islip $171,000 $385,200 225 

Central Islip 15,400 33,950 220 

East Islip 37,600 105,650 281 

Great River 3,400 9,750 287 

Sayville 133,400 234,950 176 

Bayport 25,300 55,950 221 

West Sayville 20,000 26,850 134 

Oakdale 8,000 32.950 412 

Bohemia and Holbrook 16,000 9,900 62 

Perry S. Wicks, 
Chairman, Bay Shore District. 

* * * 

Bay Shore, N. Y., Oct. 30, 1917. 
Mr. Acosta Nichols, 

Chairman of L. L. Com., 
120 Broadway, N. Y. 
Dear Sir: 

Of the total amount subscribed for this 
loan, the women's committee, under the ef- 
ficient management of Mrs. Henry A. 
Nickel (Miss Virginia Norden) turned in 
about $60,000, but this is only a part of 
what they did. A large amount of the sub- 
scriptions that came to the banks were the 
direct result of their advertising. Last 
spring when the call was to agriculture, 
Miss Norden organized "the Patriotic Gar- 
deners," composed of young ladies and 
school girls of Bay Shore and Brightwaters. 
They raised and sold a quantity of potatoes 
and beans, devoting the proceeds to war 
charities. This organization assisted in the 
sale of the bonds. They had a booth in the 
center of the village, which was open every 
day as soon as the banks closed and kept 
open until 9 o'clock. They as well as other 
committees of ladies made a thorough can- 
vass of all our district. I do not think a 
better plan could be devised for a country 
village. 

The officers and employees of the banks 
did all they could, loaning money on the 
security of the bonds at 4 per cent wher- 
ever it would help. As to expense, we had 
none. Used our own automobiles. The car- 
penter who put up the booth loaned the lum- 
ber and donated the work. 

I can give no figures of what the school 
children did, as the girls worked with the 
women's committee. 

The Boy Scouts sold 56 bonds, amounting 
to $2,800. 

Very truly yours, 

P. S. Wicks, 

Chairman. 



172 



WAR RECORD OF 



THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 



By R. A. Bachia 



IN the month of December, 1917, some 
300 men, mostly from New England 
States, arrived at Bay Shore, to take 
up their required occupations at the avia- 
tion camp. The camp and barracks being 
in course of completion, the necessary 
housing quarters for such a number of sail- 
ors had not been provided for. 

Realizing the peculiar situation, Pena- 
taquit Council No. 564 called at once an 
impromptu meeting, and appointed a com- 
mittee of five to act with instructions to do 
everything possible to provide for the ma- 
terial wants of the men. In less than four- 
teen hours living accommodations were se- 
cured for all, a large number being lodged 
at the Council rooms on Second Avenue. 

To provide for their recreation and en- 
joyment, two adjoining stores on Main 
Street were rented, made into one large 
room by the removal of partitions, and by 
the installation of billiard and pool tables, 
card tables, piano, victrola, and a full sup- 
ply of writing material, the headquarters at 
once became a popular meeting place of the 
"boys," owing to the friendly atmosphere 
and the hearty greeting of the Knights' 
"everybody welcome !" 

In a few months these quarters proved 
inadequate to the demand, and on May 1, 
1918, the property of the Community Club 
was leased, and a secretary placed in 
charge. Here the Council's forces were 
joined for mutual co-operation by a num- 
ber of ladies, prominent in Bay Shore's best 
social circles, who assumed the difficult 
task of conducting a canteen service, and 
furnishing food and refreshments at a 
nominal price. This additional service, in 
connection with the superior accommoda- 
tions afforded by the new quarters, so at- 
tractively situated on the main thorough- 
fare of Long Island's south shore, added 
greatly to its popularity, and the generous 
treatment accorded all made the recreation 
center quickly known from coast to coast, 
and many a soldier and sailor found there 
a homelike atmosphere that greatly helped 
to soften their absence from their own fire- 
sides, until the query: "Have you visited 
the recreation center in Bay Shore?" be- 



came a greeting question afterward with 
many in the service of Uncle Sam. 

The event of the flag-raising on Inde- 
pendence Day, 1918, assembled the largest 
gathering ever held in Bay Shore. Attend- 
ing was noted, Co. G, Sixth Battalion In- 
fantry, N. Y. Guard ; a large delegation of 
sailors from the aviation camp, in charge 
of their commanding officer; Red Cross 
representatives, Boy Scouts, etc. These, 
combined with over sixty ladies of the Can- 
teen Service, attired in their attractive uni- 
form of blue and white, made an ensemble 
of beauty and color, and a vivid picture that 
remained in the memory of all present for 
months afterward. 

The program was arranged and con- 
ducted by the chairman of the meeting, the 
Rev. William J. McKenna, pastor of St. 
Patrick's Church, Bay Shore, a forceful 
orator, and addresses appropriate to the oc- 
casion were made by citizens of Bay Shore. 

That the significant meaning of K. of C. 
activities is "get busy at once" is exempli- 
fied by the following incident: In the 
month of January, the transport Northern 
Pacific returning from overseas with over 
three thousand soldiers, a number of 
them wounded, ran ashore on Fire Island. 
Immediately after the mishap, the Major 
in charge asked the Knights for assist- 
ance for these men. A special commit- 
tee was organized in ten minutes and 
an abundant supply of "smokes," chocolate 
and cakes sent to the shore where the sol- 
diers were being landed ; neither were 
those forgotten who on account of the rough 
sea had to remain on board. A special 
train of Red Cross nurses arrived at night- 
fall, and the K. of C. recreation center was 
given over to them for sleeping quarters. 
The day following the Knights were called 
on to furnish dry socks for the sick and 
wounded being brought ashore, and at once 
all the stock in town of this description was 
bought and given. During the day the 
Knights' district deputy visited the soldiers, 
pencil and pad in hand, taking down tele- 
grams, night letters, and telephone mes- 
sages that the "boys" desired sent to rela- 
tives or friends. Afterward the Knights 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



173 



received highly commendatory letters from 
the Government's representative, also Red 
Cross officials, as being the one organiza- 
tion "on the job" and for doing everything 
w^ithout pay. 

The recreation center was maintained 
until May, 1919, the activities having been 
brought to a close with a reception given 
by the Knights to the ladies of the Canteen 



Service, in recognition of their untiring ef- 
forts, as unquestionably many of them had 
made great sacrifices in their devotion to 
the cause. 

Penataquit Council carries thirty - one 
names on its Honor Roll, and the Council's 
work and deeds are part of the history of 
the activities of this great organization in 
the World War. 



174 



WAR RECORD OF 



THE Y. W. C. A. HOSTESS HOUSES 



THE original Hostess House idea was 
embodied at Camp Upton in a tent, but 
the three houses that sprang up that 
first winter with the mushroom rapidity 
peculiar to camps were barely adequate to 
meet the demands put upon them. 

Two trains and countless taxis brought 
a daily flood of visitors to the camp ; visit- 
ors already discouraged by the long jour- 
ney from the city, and completely at a loss 
as to where to go next. Most of these 
visitors were women, and each was looking 
for her particular soldier, a hopeless task 
amid the bewildering sameness of khaki 
streets, buildings and men. 

Here the Y. W. C. A. came to the fore, 
and the Hostess Houses proved oases in 
the desert, where information, rest and food 
were obtainable, and where one might wait 
in comparative peace while the man was lo- 
cated and sent for. 

Sometimes he met her at the train ; here 
again the Hostess House came in as a pleas- 
ant place to spend the day together. 

Of course the wives, mothers, sweet- 
hearts, children and aged fathers were our 
first care and consideration, but numerous 
as these visitors were, it was sometimes 
hard to find them in the mob of soldiers 
that made the Hostess Houses their own. 
Some said the comfortable chairs were what 
"got" them, others were attracted by the 



goodness and cheapness of the food, and 
some frankly admitted that they liked to 
see the "other fellows' folks." Like all wel- 
fare organizations, the Hostess Houses got 
their share of compliments. Perhaps the 
most frequent, as it was the most gratify- 
ing, was: "This is the nearest thing to 

home I've struck in ," a varying number 

of miles, depending on whether it was a 
"clam-digger" who spoke, or a "prune- 
picker" from the Pacific Slope. 

A local volunteer usually served as a 
"filler-in," and in such capacity had a chance 
to try her hand at every sort of hostess 
house job. There was always plenty to be 
done. What with answering questions, tele- 
phoning telegrams, checking bundles, sew- 
ing on buttons, reassuring the anxious, con- 
gratulating the reunited, answering more 
questions, trying to find out from Mrs. 
Jones the number of her Johnny's regiment 
(having given up hope of getting the com- 
pany letter), and generally making one's 
self agreeable, one was seldom idle. The 
writer has tried everything, from scoop- 
ing ice cream in the cafeteria to holding the 
baby, and knows. 

Wars have been won without hostess 
houses, but if they helped the people who 
did the winning, they did not work in vain. 

E. T. W. 



THE TOW N OF I SLIP 



175 



ENTERTAINING OUR BOYS IN FRANCE 



By Miss Ruth Rossuck, of Bay Shore 



DURING the war the Y. M. C. A. needed 
some entertainers to spread sunshine 
among the wounded boys. Fortunately 
for me I was chosen as accompanist for 
a very popular singer and violinist. We 
sailed for France on the Niew Amsterdam 
and landed at La Havre. In Paris our unit 
consisted of four and was known as the 
Y's Four. We entertained in the hospitals 
and the Y. M. C. A. huts and at the Palace de 
Glace Theatres, Champs Elysees and the 
Albert Theatres in Paris. We also gave our 
shows in Bordeaux and in hospitals at Gene- 
car and Bassans and Croix D'hium at 
Langres, Nevers, Gievres, Lyons, Nancy, 
Tours, Brussels, Antwerp, Rotterdam and 
The Hague; also at Chateau Thierry and 
Rheims — the two names that are engraved 
on every American heart — for it was at 
Chateau Thierry that our boys made their 
first big stand and showed the Allies, as well 
as the Germans, what real fighters Uncle 
Sam had sent over there. We motored to 
Belleau Woods and spent a few hours tramp- 
ing over the battle scarred hills. These 
hillsides seemed as if they were weeping; 
the trees all out or falling, and just at the 
foot of the hill an American cemetery. 
These boys gave their all, and I felt a little 
proud, standing there, to feel that though it 
was late, I was there to be a small cog in 
one of the million wheels that was started 
in the great machine of war. 

We drove out to Fort Pompelle — known 
as Dead Man's Hill. Before the war this 
was a dense forest and to-day not one tree 
stands and the hills look like a honey-comb, 
so torn is it by shell holes. 

I also played at Bourges and Mehuns. 
Oh, it was wonderful to play for those poor 
wounded boys. Most of the time I had to 
play on the so-called trench piano, a little 
folded organ. In Romorantin we played for 



the aero boys in a balloon shed that seated 
five thousand (5000). We had eighteen 
huts to play in at Gievres. 

We had a chance to get up in the Ar- 
gonne Forest sector. All along the road 
pulverized heaps of stone showed the places 
where four years ago peaceful little villages 
stood. Roads were ploughed with shells; 
nothing remained. In Verdun the old refu- 
gees were returning. They lived in cellars 
and some in places where only two walls 
were left of a house and a canvas was 
stretched over this and they called it 
"home." We cried with the old women as 
they related the terrible stories of the war. 
This was quite near the famous Hinden- 
burg line. At La Romagne we played for 
eight thousand (8000) boys who were dig- 
ging the graves and burying the dead. 

At Montformont the boys were in the 
thickest of the fight. Though I had seen 
many war-ravished towns and villages in 
Belgium, I had never seen anything like 
this. In this sector the very ground they 
were built on was harrowed and the houses 
were blown to nothing. I can't tell one-half 
of my great experience, for the incidents 
are endless in number. 

We were fortunate enough to get up in 
the Pyrenees Mountains and to Biarritz and 
to Nice on our two weeks' vacation. 

Returning to America in September 
aboard the George Washington, we enter- 
tained the wounded boys on board, and I 
played the same trench piano that Miss 
Margaret Wilson used when coming back 
on that ship. 

All in all, I can consider myself a very 
lucky girl, for when we would see the boys' 
faces brighten with our music, we felt a 
thrill and we thanked God that He had 
given us our blessed gift to entertain. 



176 



WAR RECORD OF 



FOUR MINUTE MEN 



By H. M. Brewster 



THROUGHOUT the war Bay Shore had 
an organization of Four Minute Men 
operating- under the Committee of 
Public Information. The members were 
Roy B. Davis, Rev. Henry W. Medd, Dr. 
Edwin S. Moore, Rev. C. S. MacDowell, 
Sheridan Linn, Rhey T. Snodgrass, Rev. 
William R. Watson, and Harry M. Brew- 
ster, chairman. These men were appointed 
because of their unquestioned loyalty, pat- 
riotism and ability as public speakers. The 
chairman was commissioned by the Govern- 
ment. 

When on April 6, 1917, the Congress rec- 
ognized the existence of a state of war 
between the Imperial German Government 
and the people of the United States, it be- 
came necessary immediately to mobilize not 
only the physical, but also the mental and 
spiritual powers of America. 

Following closely upon the declaration of 
war the advisability of passing a selective- 
service law was taken under consideration 
by the Congress. This was a radical change 
for the people of the United States, and it 
was necessary that the public be educated to 
these questions. 

The selective - service law was enacted 
by Congress on May 18, 1917, and was un- 
equivocal in its terms. It boldly recited the 
military obligations of citizenship, and, 
made absolutely necessary by the exigency 
of the situation, was presented to the people 
of America practically without preparation 
at a time when many of them were still 
debating the necessity for joining in the 



struggle at all. And both before and after 
the law passed the need for a nation-wide 
campaign of war education became appar- 
ent. 

It was at this point in the affairs of the 
nation that the Four Minute Men began 
their work for the Government. The men 
were authorized to speak in theatres, 
churches and other meetings, the addresses 
not to exceed four minutes, upon topics an- 
nounced by Government bulletins issued as 
often as need be, which was about every 
two weeks. 

It was a very effective work, presenting 
as it did the Government's various propa- 
ganda before audiences of all kinds of 
people. The several speakers soon became 
experts in making a finished address in four 
minutes, and these speeches were popular 
and instructive features of many entertain- 
ments. 

Quoting from a letter of President Wil- 
son, dated November 29, 1918, he pays this 
tribute to the Four Minute Men : "It is a 
remarkable record of patriotic accomplish- 
ment that an organization of seventy-five 
thousand speakers should have carried on 
so extensive a work at a cost to the Govern- 
ment of little more than one hundred thou- 
sand dollars for the eighteen months' period 
— less than one dollar yearly on an indi- 
vidual basis." 

Their activities continued for a few 
months after war ceased, helping in the re- 
adjustment, and they were finally dis- 
charged with certificates of honorable serv- 
ice. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



177 



WAR FROM A SOLDIER'S STANDPOINT 



Speech of an Australian Soldier 



When our boys returned from overseas, 
ive expected them to tell us of their experi- 
ences in the tvar. But their lips tuere 
sealed. They were unwilling to give any 
i7iformation. As an illustration of this reti- 
cence, I recall a story that I read: 

"A boy whose company had been almost 
annihilated returned to his home, arriv- 
ing just in time for the evening meal. After 
the greetings were over, his mother said: 
'Come in to supper and then tell us all about 
the tvar!' His anstver was brief: 'What 
war?' " 

The next day a friend of his called to 
take him for a ride and incidently find out 
all of his experiences abroad. After several 
leading questions that brought no results, 
except a feiv narrow escapes from collisions 
with another car — his attention being more 
on "pumping" than steering — he finally 
asked: "Were there not times ivhen you 
were in immediate danger of being killed?" 
"Never as great as on this ride!" 

That we might present something of the 
tvar from a soldier's standpoint, we have 
selected the following speech, delivered be- 
fore the America7i Bankers' Association in 
August, 1918, during the Ath Liberty Loan 
Drive. — The Editor. 

Mr. Chapman : Now I am going to give 
the rest of my time to the next speaker. May 
I introduce him, Mr. President? 

President Cox : Certainly. 

Mr. Chapman: The other night I had 
the pleasure of introducing the young man 
I am going to introduce to you. He is a 
young Australian. This young man, at the 
age of eighteen, enlisted with the Austra- 
lian troops. He has fought in Egypt, Italy, 
France, Flanders and at Gallipoli. He was 
wounded twice, bayonetted, and blinded. I 
am going to introduce you now to the finest 
orator and one of the best poets that this 
war has produced. I take great pleasure 
in presenting to you Signaller Tom Skeyhill 
of the Australian Army. (Cheers and tre- 
mendous applause.) 

Remarks of Signaller Tom Skeyhill 

Mr. President, ladies and gentlemen: I 
thank you for this wonderful reception, but 
I am not vain enough, nor would it become 



me as a soldier, to selfishly accept it for my- 
self. Rather would I take your reception 
as an American appreciation of what my 
country. Great Britain, has done in the war. 
(Prolonged applause.) It is always a great 
pleasure, privilege and honor to address 
an American audience, and I always appre- 
ciate it to the full. For were I the greatest 
poet that ever wooed, or were I the greatest 
author this world has ever known, no songs 
that I could sing, and no phrases that I 
could coin, could adequately express my love 
and admiration for the people of America. 
(Applause.) For more than two years I 
have "followed the gleam, over land and 
stream" along the red horizon of battle. I 
followed it from north to south, from east 
to west, on five diff'erent fronts, until, twice 
wounded, blinded, I could follow it no 
longer; and so I staggered back from the 
gates of hell, until at last I came to the 
Golden Gate of your great democracy, to 
tell you of the soul of war. And in that 
soul of war. self-sacrifice plays a conspicu- 
ous part. This afternoon I bring you a mes- 
sage from across the sea, a message of good- 
fellowship from the people of Great Britain. 
I can assure you that it thrills and inspires 
all true Britishers to think that in the near 
future, marching side by side, shoulder to 
shoulder and blade to blade, united, Britain 
and America together will follow the bloody 
trail of battle, fighting on and on and on 
until the enemy is beaten, the war is won, 
and our soldier boys are back home again. 
(Prolonged applause.) 

Gentlemen, the greater our sacrifices and 
the closer we are united, the sooner victory 
will be ours. I want you all to understand 
this afternoon that I saw with the eyes of 
the poet. I saw not its horrors or its hatred, 
but its duty and its wonder, and sometimes 
its humor. I deal not with the horrors, I 
steep not your souls in any gruesome word 
picture. The war is bad enough without 
throwing it up at American audiences. And 
then again, gentlemen, I sing no song of 
hate. Do not misunderstand me; I have 
more cause to hate the Boche than you have. 
They treacherously shot me, wounded me 
and blinded me, and yet I sing no song of 
hate. I do not believe in it. If we give vent 



178 



WAR RECORD OF 



to our spleen, if we curse the Germans 
every time we take the platform, then surely 
we are only descending to their own level 
and the sordid depths of their own kultur. 
(Applause.) 

Let us win the war, by all means, let us 
lick the Boche and kill Prussian autocracy 
forever, but in so doing, please God, let us 
keep our hands, our hearts and our tongues 
clean. (Applause.) Now, war is a man's 
medicine ; it broadens the understanding ; 
it sharpens the faculties ; it develops the 
sense of humor, and I tell you, gentlemen, 
that no man living today enjoys life more or 
is quicker to see the humorous side of situa- 
tions than the man "over there." The sol- 
dier boys are never sad or sorrowful ; they 
are always smiling, joking and singing, 
singing, singing. First of all, the soldier 
boy over there knows that he is fighting 
for the cause of righteousness. Secondly, 
the soldier boy knows in his heart that if 
necessary his country will stand behind him 
to the last man and the last dollar. And, 
thirdly, all soldiers are fatalists. "What is 
to be, will be," is the doctrine of the soldiers 
"over there." 

When the soldier boy signs the script he 
knows it is going to be one of two things, 
and that is absolutely certain : he has got 
to stay here or he has got to go over there. 
Well, if he has got to stay here, he is all 
right and he need not worry. If he goes 
over there, he knows it is going to be one of 
two things: he has got to stay behind the 
scenes and work or he has got to go into the 
line and fight. Well, if he stays behind the 
scenes and works he will get good pay, he 
will have a safe position, and all the pretty 
girls will call him a hero, and again he need 
not worry. If he goes into the trenches to 
fight, again the soldier boy knows it is go- 
ing to be one of two things : he is going 
to be wounded or he is not going to be 
wounded. Well, if he is not going to be 
wounded, again he need not worry. If he 
is going to be wounded he knows it will be 
one of two things : he is going to be seri- 
ously wounded or slightly wounded. Well, if 
he is only slightly wounded he is going to be 
given a good holiday, and a pretty nurse will 
tuck him into bed every night. Why 
worry? (Laughter and applause.) If he is 
seriously wounded he also knows it is go- 
ing to be one of two things : he is going to 
die or he is not going to die. Well, if he is 
not going to die, it is no need worrying; if 
he is going to die, it is no dam good worry- 
ing. (Laughter and applause.) 

And that is why the soldier boys over 



there are always happy. When the Yanks 
arrived in the trenches they caused a sensa- 
tion. For the first time since the com- 
mencement of the war the Germ.ans saw the 
backs of the Australians ; the boys turned 
around to have a look at the Yanks coming 
up. (Applause and laughter.) 

Two of our boys were in the front line at 
the Somme. When the Yanks took over the 
right flank one of these boys in our line was 
an old veteran who had been four years in 
the trenches. The other was a rookie. A 
rookie is a new soldier, and as you can 
imagine, new soldiers when first in the 
trenches are frightened. This rookie was 
decidedly frightened. Suddenly he called to 
the sergeant and said, "For God's sake, send 
more men ; the Boche are attacking us ! 
Can't you hear them splish - splashing 
through the mud in No Man's Land?" The 
old sergeant replied : "Go on ! What are 
you giving us? That ain't the Boche splash- 
ing through the mud of No Man's Land ; 
that is the Yanks; they have just got their 
chewing gum rations!" (Applause and 
laughter.) 

I met an American soldier in this hotel 
a couple of days ago. I said, "Are you go- 
ing to the front, James?" He said, "Sure." 
I says, "Are you going to France?" He 
says, "No, I am going to Berlin, but I may 
stop in France a couple of weeks on the 
way." 

Even out on Gallipoli, where the fighting 
was hardest and the horrors greatest, the 
boys were still singing and joking. We 
found the Turk, to our surprise, a chivalrous 
fighter, but we had one thing on the Turk ; 
the Turk could never surprise us ; we could 
always smell him coming. (Laughter.) A 
live Turk is no bunch of violets ; a dead 
Turk can beat a field of garlic. There was 
also another awful odor on Gallipoli; the 
Indian Mohammedan troops would not eat 
our meat, and they brought goats, and be- 
lieve me, those goats smell like a chloride 
gas attack. The boys were always arguing 
the point which smelled the worse, goats or 
Turks. Up and down the front line, down 
the communication trenches, into the sup- 
ports and even into the battle, the argument 
was running, which smells the worse, goats 
or Turks. General Hamilton heard of it and 
he said, "Why, this ridiculous argument is 
demoralizing my men. It is breaking the 
morale of my army. I will have to settle it. 
Bring me one of each, a goat and a Turk. 
I will smell them and give my decision." 
First of all they brought up a goat. Gen- 
eral Hamilton went up and smelled the goat 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



179 



and then fainted. Then they brought up the 
Turk, and the goat fainted. (Applause and 
laughter.) 

Gentlemen, this will show you that there 
is even humor in war. I could tell you 
many, many more stories, but rather would 
I, now that I have told you how we jested 
with death, tell you how death jested with 
us. I am not going to tell you about the 
western front fighting. I could do so, but 
you have had that driven into you time and 
time again, and you will get it again in the 
future, so I will stay out at Gallipoli where 
the fighting is fiercest and the hardships 
greatest. 

A bayonet charge in this war should not 
be more than eighty or ninety yards. Out 
there things were different. We violated 
all the rules of the text books. One charge 
was 800 yards long. I will tell you about it, 
but it is very, very hard for any man to 
paint a picture of a bayonet charge. After 
the first battle of Gallipoli had ended in 
favor of the Allies, things practically got 
into stalemate trench warfare for a long 
while, until in August of the same year we 
determined to make another attempt to get 
through to the narrows of the Dardanelles. 
My battalion was given a week's spell be- 
hind the lines, and on Saturday, August 6, 
we received our marching orders. We were 
told to advance to the Anglo-French lines 
two miles away, marching in what is known 
as artillery formation, that is, in platoons 
of sixty men with sixty yards' interval be- 
tween each platoon so as to disperse the 
enemy artillery fire. We started and reached 
a point a mile behind the trenches where 
we were told to dig in, and as it was broad 
daylight and we were in full view of the 
Turks, under machine gun fire, I can assure 
you we lost no time in digging in. We re- 
mained in these dugouts for the best part of 
the afternoon and at 5 o'clock in the eve- 
ning, just as we were cooking our dinner, 
the order came through, "Anzacs advance 
to the Anglo-French lines a mile away." 
Experienced officers and old veterans 
blanched, but not with fear. "Surely," they 
said, "there must be some m.istake. Surely, 
in broad daylight, in full view of the Turks, 
they do not expect troops to advance. Why 
can't they wait until it is dark?" But the 
order came back, "Advance to the Anglo- 
French line a mile away." 

Quickly we buckled on our equipment, 
fastened our shoulder straps, got hold of 
our rifles and picks or spades, got out of our 
dugouts and dashed forward. But the 
Turks were ready for us and met us with 



volley after volley, and many a brave sol- 
dier boy sank back in his dugout dead or 
mortally wounded. With our right flank 
leading, we dashed across that plateau; it 
was in broad daylight ; we were in full view 
of the Turks, and the ground was as flat 
as a bowling green for a mile. It seemed 
to us as we raced along every machine gun, 
rifle and cannon on Gallipoli was concen- 
trated upon us. Men fell in dozens ; whole 
platoons of sixty men faded away, but the 
gaps were made up by reinforcements, and 
on and on we went, in open order, for the 
Anglo-French line a mile away; over an 
empty trench and over the field, through 
another empty trench, over and through 
barbed wire, with shrapnel shrieking over- 
head, bullets kicking up the dust and leav- 
ing a trail of dead and wounded in our wake, 
we made a terrific dash, and finally flung 
ourselves down in the Anglo-French line. 
We had just come a mile at full speed with 
80 pounds on our backs, had lost over a 
thousand men, and we were absolutely done. 
We collapsed in the bottom of the British 
trench and panted and panted and panted. 
Our clothing was saturated with perspira- 
tion ; we were covered with dust, and we 
hadn't enough wind to speak to the English 
and French beside us. Yet we were there 
only twenty seconds when the order was 
passed along, "This section on the whole 
trench over the top, and advance on the 
Turkish trenches !" 

Our leader, with a cry, "Come on, boys, 
come on !" went over the top, and nobody 
held back. It was our chance at last to get 
the cold steel into the Turk, and quickly 
we fixed bayonets, cleared the parapet and 
went for the trenches like a whirlwind. 
Sixty thousand troops in the Turkish 
trenches centered their artillery on us. They 
were 800 yards in front of us, and in that di- 
rection we dashed, 800 yards through the 
depths of hell, the Turks in front playing 
their machine guns and rifles upon us, cut- 
ting us to ribbons. Their cannon were 
breaking down wave after wave, but on 
through all that we plunged ; bayonets fixed, 
we made our way. The noise was terrible. 
The shrieking of the shrapnel, of the meow- 
ing and the hissing of the bullets, the thun- 
der of the big guns, the cursing and yell- 
ing of the chargers and the moaning and 
groaning of the dying. The sights were 
awe-inspiring; see the bullets kicking up 
the dust, see the machine guns mowing the 
waves down like corn before the reaper's 
blade, the cannon tearing great big gaps 
through our lines, on we went, men falling 



180 



WAR RECORD OF 



wounded and dead by the thousands; men 
you would be speaking to a minute before 
lying there dead, dead, on their backs, on 
their sides, on their faces, kneeling and 
sitting down ; dead, with their rifles to their 
shoulder, their trench tools in their hands, 
dead ; see the wounded men staggering back 
into the trenches leaving a trail of blood be- 
hind and then another bullet would hit them 
and they would fall to rise no more ; the seri- 
ously wounded, unable to help themselves, 
their hands over their eyes to shut out the 
terrible sight ; the cripples, shot through the 
leg, shot in the back, unable to get clear, 
lying there or looking for a hole to lie in 
until the charge is over. Past them we 
went, tripping and stumbling over our own 
dead and wounded comrades ; we staggered 
through that hell of shot and shell, racing 
through, a race with death, choked, blinded, 
on to the barbed wire, thick as your thumb, 
twenty feet wide and eight feet high ; like 
wild things we tore upon it, slashing and 
tearing with bare hands, until by the im- 
petus of our attack we made our way 
through it and beyond it. Wave after wave 
we went. Wave after wave mowed down 
and wave after wave took their places, on, 
on, on, in that terrible mad dash, we reached 
the Turkish parapet, stopped there a mo- 
ment, then down into the trench below. The 
Turks were waiting for us, hand to steel. 
All that terrible night we fought it out. It 
was kill or be killed. You could not tell 
friend from foe, but kill, kill, kill. We drove 
the Turks out; they countered back and 
drove us out. We drove them out again 
with cold steel; then they blew us up. We 
got in again and still we fought them hand 
to hand, steel to steel, knife to knife, bomb 
to bomb. All through the night the boys 
fought, the killing went on, and when 
morning came we were still there, crowded 
in swarms, and more beautiful than Grecian 
gods, in the Turkish trenches, 800 yards in 
front of any other troops on the Gallipoli 
peninsula. (Applause.) 

Now, gentlemen, what about yourselves? 
You represent the wealth of America. Very 
well, I am not going to dictate, but I am 
going to put in a plea for the boys "over 
there." Gentlemen, our failures in the past 
have been no fault of the soldiers. I am 
here to give an account of the boys over 
there, and I tell you they played their part 
and played it well. Time and time again we 
soldier boys, by deeds of daring, bravery 
and resourcefulness unparalleled in the an- 
nals of military history, wooed the gods of 
Success. Time and time again our Govern- 



ments backed us up right nobly, and time 
and time again in the early months of the 
war the people behind the scenes, the civi- 
lians, not wilfully, but in their ignorance, 
underestimated the enemy, believed in the 
infallibility of the Anglo-French Army, and 
lived in a fool's paradise, a land of lethargy. 
They had the idea that the Germans would 
soon be beaten. They underestimated the 
war, vitally underestimated it, and when 
asked to give, they only gave meagerly. 
While the boys at the front were pouring 
their red blood of youth in the righteous 
cause the people behind the scenes at home 
hindered our progress and jeopardized our 
safety. This is not only a soldiers' war, 
but it is also a civilians' war. A soldier 
is not a machine, nor is he superhuman; 
he is only human like unto you. He is only 
made of flesh and blood and bone, even as 
you and I ; and I warn you, representative 
gentlemen of America, that until there is 
complete harmony between soldier and 
civilian, success in this war is impossible. 
Harmony was far from perfect in the ear- 
lier stages of the war, and today we find 
that after four years of red, red war, we 
have failed to stand on German soil except- 
ing in Alsace-Lorraine ; we have failed to 
puncture the enemy's lines to any great 
depth on any important front. The Ger- 
man civilian population have not even seen 
an enemy soldier marching on their soil un- 
less he has been a prisoner of war. Gen- 
tlemen, these things are bitter pills to swal- 
low, but they are true, true, true. And what 
have the enemy done in four years? Yes, 
gentlemen, what have the enemy done in 
four years? Montenegro, Serbia, Belgium, 
Roumania — where are they this afternoon? 
Either the vassals of Germany or almost 
wiped off the face of God's earth, and only 
of minor military importance. Russia, yes, 
Russia, with her vaunted millions, her un- 
limited resources; where is she this after- 
noon? Down on her knees, bleeding to 
death; she has violated her pledges and 
signed a separate peace treaty. 

Italy is faced with another Austro-Ger- 
man drive. Even if they repulse this drive, 
owing to tremendous geographical disad- 
vantages, Italy will never be secure and will 
always have to be taken care of by the 
Allies. Britain, with men fighting on seven- 
teen different fronts, supplying 70 per cent, 
of the naval effectiveness and knocking at 
the walls of St. Quentin, has her hands 
full. And France, wonderful, beautiful 
France, exhausted by her efforts on the 
Marne, and on the Aisne, when in the earli- 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



181 



est stages of this war she held the mighty 
German army back while Britain was pre- 
paring, stands today the same wonderful, 
beautiful France, proud and chivalrous as 
ever, determined, if necessary to fight on 
until Armageddon, but bled white and ab- 
solutely unable to adopt and maintain any 
rigorous offensive campaign in this war 
until she gets outside help. 

Gentlemen, their outside help cannot 
come from smaller nations ; their help can- 
not come from Russia ; why, the Slavs can- 
not even help themselves. Outside help 
cannot come from Italy ; it cannot in fair 
play be expected to come from Great 
Britain. Who is it going to come from? 
Supposing the Germans strike again ! Many 
of you think Prussia is beaten ; many of you 
think Germany is on retreat to Berlin. I, 
as a soldier, know different. That is ridi- 
culous ; Germany is not beaten ; her morale 
is not iaroken ; her man-power and reserves 
are not exhausted. They say the west front 
is elastic ; they give today, they spring back 
tomorrow, and it is absolutely certain that 
Germany in the future will make one more 
terrific effort to smash France. Who is go- 
ing to stand behind France? You gentle- 
men cannot deny that for four years France 
has borne the brunt of the burden. For four 
years she has fought for our common ideals ; 
for four years, it is true, she has fought 
for herself, but isn't self preservation the 
law of Nature? And yet, in her great un- 
selfishness for four years she fought for 
Russia and Italy, for four years she fought 
for Belgium and for Britain, and for four 
years, whether America was in the war or 
not, as sure as the skies are above you, 
France was fighting for America. (Ap- 
plause.) And now, as there is a God in the 
heavens, America must arise in her might 
and fight for France. (Applause.) 

Different authorities have different theo- 
ries as to how the war will end. I cannot 
go into these theories this afternoon, but 
the war is not going to be won by the sub- 
marines, thanks to the loyalty of our work- 
ers, for in the near future ship production 
will exceed Germany's U-boat destruction. 
The war will not end by a naval victory. 
Germany's fleet came out, it was badly 
beaten and bottled up. Since then we have 
been reinforced by the American navy, and 
today it is more than certain that never, 
never, never will Germany again dare dis- 
pute the fact that the Allies hold the seas. 
The war will not end by getting to Berlin. 
That is the popular belief in America, but 
it is wrong. Capitals are no longer decid- 



ing factors ; they are only barren trophies 
for the victor. In the old days, if the capital 
was threatened, the army was locked up in 
the capital and tried to save the capital at 
the expense of the last man. So in the 
Franco-Prussian war, Paris was threatened 
and the French army got into Paris and 
Germany laid siege to Paris and Germany 
won the war. But had Paris fallen this 
year, would France have been beaten? I 
think not. Was Belgium beaten when Brus- 
sels fell? Was Roumania beaten when 
Bucharest fell? No, gentlemen capitals are 
only barren trophies for the victor. We 
may get to Berlin ; I hope we do ; I think we 
will, but that will not win the war. It does 
not matter how many capitals we raze to 
the ground ; it does not matter how much 
land we overrun ; we might raze Germany's 
greatest cities to the ground ; we may over- 
run Prussia, but while the German army 
exists the Kaiser and his crew will fight on. 
To win the war we have got to annihilate 
the Prussian army. (Applause.) 

We can only do it as Foch is doing now, 
by putting the pressure on the maintaining 
at all costs the process of attrition. Gentle- 
men, this is a war of attrition, a war of 
self-sacrifice, of lasting qualities and wear- 
ing away properties. The side that puts the 
biggest army into the field and makes the 
greatest sacrifice to maintain that army 
is the side that must predominate in the 
long run. Gentlemen, we are going to be 
that side ; we are going to win the war, of 
course ; we are going to annihilate the Prus- 
sian army, of course. That is certain. But 
we want to do it quickly and with minimum 
casualties. We can only do so by being 
thoroughly prepared. We are only thor- 
oughly prepared when everybody is doing 
their part. If you want to wear out a little 
piece of steel, rub it with harder steel. If 
you want to wear out a piece of stone, rub 
it with harder stone. If you want to wear 
out the German soldier, very well, rub him 
with harder soldiers. You haven't got the 
harder soldier here, but you have got the 
raw material. Therefore, it is your sacred 
duty to lend a hand in moulding that raw 
material into the harder soldier. It doesn't 
matter what your creed is; it doesn't mat- 
ter what your color is; it doesn't matter 
what your following is, or what your poli- 
tical views are ; you are in the war and you 
have got to get out of it nobly, and Catholic 
or Protestant, Jew or Gentile, saint or sin- 
ner, black or white, brown, blue or pink, 
banker or soldier, or sailor. Republican or 
Democrat, these things matter not. Put 



182 



WAR RECORD OF 



them in the melting pot and prove your red- 
bloodedness, prove your Americanism, re- 
gardless of all these things. Stand behind 
President Wilson and help him bring this 
war to a victorious conclusion. (Applause.) 

Help the President to get the boys trained 
and across the seas and when you get them 
over there, lend a hand again in keeping 
them warm, in providing them with warm 
clothing and wholesome food in abundance. 
When they go forward to the attack, as 
members of the army behind the army, go 
forward behind them and then your sacri- 
fice will give that impetus and inspiration 
that will turn a mere attack into a glorious 
victory. See that their munitions are piled 
up sky high. Send them wave after wave of 
reinforcements. Then, when they have 
taken their objectives, pull them out of the 
trenches and give them a breathing spell, 
when they are sick, wounded or exhausted, 
give them the best of everything, get them 
convalescent and back into the trenches 
again. Gentlemen, this harmony between 
soldier and civilian, this understanding be- 
tween the different branches of the Allies, 
this quality of sacrifice is the soul of war. 
It is the secret of success and the key to 
victory. Don't underestimate the Germans ; 
don't think that this war can be easily won, 
but remember that victory can only be won 
over the bodies of our fallen braves, over 
the blood of our glorious martyrs. Along 
the winding road of sacrifice is victory. Go 
and search it, search it with preparation in 
one hand and sacrifice in the other and you 
will win out. 

You gentlemen want the war over, I 



know. Help to get it over if possible by 
redoubling your eff'orts. You financial men 
of America have done well. You are to be 
congratulated. You have done more in the 
time you have been in than any other men 
in this world. I congratulate you upon it, 
but still, you can do more in the future. 
The Fourth Liberty Loan drive has started 
and you gentlemen are the nerves of that 
drive. The call has been made from over 
there; it rings from the Canadian frontier 
to Mexico and from the Golden Gate to the 
Hudson, the call from the trenches passed 
on by the President. Help ! Help ! Help ! 
Munitions and comforts and things for the 
boys over there. Think of these things, 
gentlemen, and make up your minds to go 
to your limit. Think of the boys over there, 
flesh of your flesh, blood of your blood, bone 
of your bone — they are fighting over there, 
proving the doctrine of sacrifice, and if you 
want the war won, arise. Arise, ye sons of 
America ! The foe is at the gate ; the crisis 
in this war is rapidly approaching. On, 
the enemy is coming, coming, coming, and 
the flower of your American manhood over 
there is locked hand to hand, steel to steel 
in mortal combat, with a cruel enemy; the 
wounded, the sick and the exhausted at this 
moment, like a mountain torrent, are pour- 
ing back to hospital, and many, many mu- 
nitions are urgently and imperatively 
needed for victory. So realize these things, 
ye men of America, and prepare. Yes, if 
you want the war won, prepare. Prepare! 
All of you arise and prepare, because Amer- 
ica prepared means Germany defeated. 
(Applause and cheers.) 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



183 



A SOLDIER BOY'S DEATH 



(A pathetic incident related by Hon. 
Frank Reavis, a member of Congress from 
Nebraska, who had recently returned from 
a visit to France.) 

IT is not all glorious over there. I stood 
in Base Hospital No. 1 in Paris one Mon- 
day afternoon. It was crowded with 
American boys ; 2,000 were brought in that 
day. The hallways and the courtyard were 
full. I walked down the hallway and was 
attracted to a boy lying on a cot because 
his hair was red and his face was gray. 
The freckles stood out on his ghastly skin 
like they were painted there. I said, 
"Where are you from?" He replied in a 
whisper, "I am from Michigan." I said, 
"Where are you hurt?" He said, "I am 
gassed, and I have been shot twice in the 
back." I said, "How do you feel?" He 
said, "I am faint and my back is bleeding 
badly." I said, "When were you hurt?" He 
said, "Last Thursday morning," and this 
was Monday afternoon. I said, "Great God, 
boy! hasn't anybody cared for you?" He 
said, "I was in No Man's Land for 50 hours ; 
they are doing the best they can ; they will 
get to me pretty soon." No complaint. 

I went to the Colonel and said, "Colonel, 
there is a boy out here in the hallway that 
is pretty close to the Everlasting. I wish 
you would take him in." He said, "Have 



you any interest in him?" I said, "No, noth- 
ing except that he is red-headed," because 
of the million boys who have donned the 
uniform of their country and marched 
down the sad and solemn road that leads to 
war, my eyes are lingering on two red- 
headed boys — they are all I have got— and 
the thought came to me that there might 
come a time when another red-headed boy 
would be lying in a hospital hallway far 
from those who cared or who understood, 
and he might be faint and his back might 
be bleeding, and somebody might walk that 
way that would speak kindly and gently to 
him. 

I went back to the hospital that night and 
found my red-headed boy. There was a 
Red Cross nurse holding his hand as though 
she were leading him to the gathering shad- 
ows of the night, for his night was very 
near. I was glad when the cords of his 
neck became normal; I was glad when the 
ugly burns on his face were white ; I was 
glad when the distressing sounds he made 
as he sought to suck air into air cells that 
had been burned away were silent, for I 
stood in the gloom of that hospital, full of 
stifling odors, and heard the moans that 
would not be denied, and saw the son of 
an American mother pay the price supreme 
to prove ideals of life are worth more than 
life itself. 



184 



AR RECORD OF 



THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC 



THE year of 1918 was remarkably sad, 
not alone on account of the war, but 
because of an epidemic of influenza of 
a very virulent type which was a cause of 
anxiety to our soldiers, for their loved ones 
at home. While the actual facts were very 
alarming, they reached our boys through de- 
layed correspondence and distorted rumors 
which made it appear much worse than it 
really was. At home the relatives and 
friends of those who were there in service 
were saddened for fear of this scourge 
which seemed to choose its victims among 
those in early manhood and womanhood. 

In an office in Bay Shore, employing five, 
two, a brother and sister, died of this dread 
disease. At the Naval Air Station, there 
were many deaths. Three times in one day 
the band of this station, with an escort, 
marched to the railroad station with bodies 
to be sent home. There were 56 deaths from 
this disease in 1918 in Islip township. 

All the men at the station were required 
to wear a muslin mask over their nose and 
mouths when assembled indoors — to pre- 
vent contagion. 

An account of one voyage of the transport 
Leviathan will be of interest in this connec- 
tion. 

The Leviathan 

As the Leviathan transported nearly one 
hundred and twenty thousand men to Eu- 
rope during the war, and has brought back 
nearly as many since, it requires no active 
imagination to realize that the medical de- 
partment has had its hands full. The per- 
centage of sickness bound to occur among 
thirteen thousand men was enough to keep 
nine doctors busy, and this was only a small 
part of their work. Sanitation on such a 
huge ship was in itself a problem. Samples 
of food and water had to be examined and 
accepted or rejected. Troop compartments 
and every nook and corner of the ship were 
inspected daily and a high sanitary stan- 
dard maintained. Qualitative examinations 
of the air in the troop spaces were made at 
different hours of both day and night to 
determine the temperature, humidity and 
amount of carbon dioxide in these places. 
These observations were made the subjects 
of various reports and resulted in the in- 
stallation of new ventilating systems and 



correction of those already in operation. 
During threatened epidemics of infectious 
diseases, it was often necessary to take cul- 
tures and do other laboratory work among 
hundreds of men. In July, 1918, the Levia- 
than began transporting wounded men and 
has carried a large number of them to date. 
The wounded required much attention and 
the manner in which they have been cared 
for on board this vessel reflects great credit 
upon the medical department. 

A new departure for ships of war was 
the Nurse Corps — the first nurses who ever 
did duty on a man-of-war. Their duties have 
been supervisory over the hospital corps 
and their training and experience as nurses 
have made them of invaluable assistance. 

The Influenza Epidemic 

The following are extracts from reports 
of the influenza epidemic submitted to the 
commanding oflficer by Lieutenant Com- 
mander H. A. May, M. C, October 11, 1918: 

There were 260 officers and 8,873 enlisted 
men of all grades reported as present when 
the ship left the dock in Hoboken. These 
made up the personnel of several organiza- 
tions: the 323d Field Signal Corps; the 
401st, 467th and 468th Engineers; the 
302nd Water Tank Train, a September 
Automatic Replacement Draft, the 57th 
Pioneer Infantry, and the 73rd Medical Re- 
placement Section. In addition there were 
191 members of the 60th and 62nd Units, 
Army Nurse Corps. 

The ship sailed on September 29. Be- 
cause troop space H-8 was deemed unfit for 
occupancy by reason of inadequate ventila- 
tion, troops quartered there were moved on 
the 30th to other compartments, causing 
congestion in many spaces. All available 
bunks in the sick bay were filled by army 
sick before the morning of the 30th. Ar- 
rangements were then made to empty F 
Room, section 3, port side, containing 200 
standees. These bunks were filled within 
a few minutes with sick men, picked up 
from the decks. When this space was found 
to be insufficient, E room, section 2, star- 
board side, 415 bunks, was vacated (on Oc- 
tober 1) and the occupants sent down to 
H-8, regardless of improper ventilation. On 
October 3, the port side of E room, section 
2, 463 bunks, was vacated by the army 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



185 



guard, those sick in F H S 3 were moved 
up to E R S 2 and the guard sent below to 
be scattered wherever they could find space. 
Thus, on the night of October 3, there was, 
beside the sick bay, a ward on E deck cap- 
able of bunking 878 men. As the bunks are 
arranged four in a tier, one above the other, 
the top bunk could not be used for the sick, 
except in emergencies, because nurses could 
not climb up to them nor could sick men 
climb down to go to toilets. 

The navy medical officers confined their 
efforts mostly to those in the sick bay 
spaces, while all the sick quarters below 
were turned over to the army medical offi- 
cers. The army chief surgeon. Colonel 
Decker, and two of his juniors became ill 
on October 1st, leaving but eleven army 
doctors to hold sick call, treat patients be- 
low, and care for about thirty nurses and 
twenty officers who were ill in rooms. The 
navy medical officers stood watches in E R S 
3 at such times as they could be spared from 
the sick bay work, and relays of army 
nurses were assigned to duty below, with 
the pneumonia cases in the isolation ward. 
With sick officers in the officers' ward, and 
with sick nurses and officers in staterooms. 
In fact, every available medical officer, 
nurse and hospital corpsman was utilized 
to the extreme of endurance. Below in the 
E deck ward, every possible appliance for 
the care of the sick was furnished to the 
army surgeons on duty. The commissary 
officer placed at our disposal stewards, 
cooks and mess men and furnished just the 
kind of food required in the best possible 
fashion. The medical department of the 
ship owes, and I wish here to acknowledge, 
a great debt of gratitude to the Commissary 
Department, and to Paymaster Farwell 
and Chief Commissary Steward Flowers, 
especially, for their co-operation in this 
matter, the success with which they gave 
comfort and aid to the sick, and removed 
from our shoulders the always worrisome 
burden of feeding men unable to eat regular 
diet. 

Course of the PJpidemic 

This was influenced materially by these 
main factors : 

First: The widespread infection of sev- 
eral organizations before they embarked, 
and their assignment to many different 
parts of the ship. 

Second: The type of men comprising the 
most heavily infected groups. These men 
were particularly liable to infection. 



Third: The absolute lassitude of those 
becoming ill caused them to lie in their 
bunks without complaint until their infec- 
tions had become profound and pneumonia 
had begun. The severe epistaxis which 
ushered in the disease in a very large pro- 
portion of the cases caused a lowering of 
resisting powers which was added to by 
fright, by the confined space, and the mo- 
tion of the ship. Where pneumonia set in, 
not one man was in condition to make a 
fight for life. 

As noted above, the sick bay was filled 
in a few hours after leaving Hoboken. All 
pneumonia cases were placed in one isola- 
tion ward at the beginning, and another 
isolation unit was set aside for measles and 
mumps, both of which diseases were present 
among the troops. The other isolation units 
were first filled with influenza cases and 
later with pneumonias. Until the fifth day 
of the voyage few patients could be sent to 
duty because of great weakness following 
the drop in temperature as they grew bet- 
ter. Only the worst cases in E deck ward 
were sent to sick bay at any time, and all 
were potentially pneumonias. The E deck 
ward was more than full all the time and 
there were many ill men in various troop 
spaces in other parts of the ship. 

There are no means of knowing the ac- 
tual number of sick at any one time, but 
it is estimated that fully 700 cases had de- 
veloped by the night of September 30. They 
were brought to the sick bay from all parts 
of the ship in a continuous stream, only 
to be turned away because all beds were 
occupied. Most of them then lay down on the 
deck, inside and out, and made no effort to 
reach the compartments where they be- 
longed. In fact, practically no one had the 
slightest idea where he did belong, and he 
left his blankets, clothing, kit and all his 
possessions to be salvaged at the end of the 
voyage. 

During October 1, every effort was made 
to increase hospital space below, as noted 
above. The heretofore satisfactory arrange- 
ments for army sick call were not adhered 
to by the army medical officers, and hun- 
dreds of men applied for treatment at the 
E deck ward instead of going to the twelve 
(12) outlying sick call stations. On this 
day. Colonel Decker, Chief Army Surgeon, 
became ill. As he was the only army medi- 
cal officer who had had army experience in 
administrative matters, there was now no 
competent head to the army organization. 
Twa other medical officers also became ill 



186 



WAR RECORD OF 



and remained in their rooms to the end of 
the voyage. 

Late in the evening of this day the E deck 
ward was opened on the starboard side and 
was filled before morning. Twenty army 
nurses were detailed for duty during the 
night. When patients were brought up, 
their mates carefully left their blankets and 
clothing below and scouting parties sent 
through the compartments to gather up all 
loose blankets for use of the sick. For- 
tunately we had about 100 army blankets 
in the medical storeroom which had been 
salvaged on other voyages. These were 
used while they lasted. 

Horrors of War 

The conditions during this night cannot 
be visualized by anyone who has not actu- 
ally seen them. 

The morning of October 2 brought no re- 
lief. Things seemed to grow worse instead 
of better. Cleaning details were demanded 
of the army, but few men responded. Those 
who came would stay a while and wander 
away, never to be seen again. No N. C. O.'s 
were sent, and there was no organization 
for control. The nurses made a valiant ef- 
fort to clean up and the navy hospital corps- 
men did marvels of work, but always 
against tremendous odds. Only by constant 
patrolling between the bunks could any im- 
pression be made upon the litter, and finally 
our own sailors were put on the job. They 
took hold like veterans and the place was 
kept respectably clean thereafter. 

The first death from pneumonia occurred 
on this day, and the body was promptly em- 
balmed and encased in a navy standard 
casket. 

When evening came no impression had 
been made upon the great number of sick 
men about the decks and in their own bunks. 
So arrangements were made to enlarge the 
hospital space by including the port side 
of E R S 2. On October 3 this was accom- 
plished and from that time on to the end of 
the voyage, we had enough bunks to accom- 
modate practically all the worst cases. 
Three deaths occurred this day, and all were 
embalmed and encased. After going 
through the hospital and troop spaces that 
night, it was estimated that there were 
about 900 cases of influenza on the ship. In 
the wards we sent back to the bunks below 
all men whose temperature reached 99 and 
kept all bunks filled with cases of higher 
fever. 

On October 4, seven deaths during the 



day. The sea was rough and the ship rolled 
heavily. Hundreds of men were thoroughly 
miserable from seasickness and other hun- 
dreds who had been off the farm but a few 
weeks were miserable from terror of the 
strange surroundings and the ravages of 
the epidemics. Dozens of these men ap- 
plied at the wards for treatment and the in- 
experience of army doctors in the recog- 
nition of seasickness caused a great many 
needless admissions to the hospital. 

Many oflScers and nurses were ill in their 
rooms, and required the constant attention 
of a corps of well nurses, and an army med- 
ical officer to attend them. 

Each succeeding day of the voyage was 
like those preceding, a nightmare of weari- 
ness and anxiety on the part of nurses, doc- 
tors and hospital corpsmen. No one thought 
of bed for himself, and all hands worked 
night and day. On the 5th there were 10 
deaths, on the 6th there were 24, and on 
the 7th, the day of arrival at our destina- 
tion, the toll was 31. The army ambulance 
boat was promptly alongside, and debarka- 
tion of the sick began about noon. The 
sick bay was cleared first and we at once 
began to clean up in preparation for the 
wounded to be carried westbound. E-deck 
was then evacuated, but all the sick could 
not be handled before night, about 200 re- 
maining on board. 

On the 8th these were taken off^ by the 
army, but not before fourteen more deaths 
had occurred. Although on this day almost 
the entire personnel (army) had gone, the 
nurses remained until the last sick man was 
taken off. 

Pneumonia 

It is the opinion of myself and the other 
medical officers attached to the ship that 
there were full 2,000 cases of influenza on 
board. How many developed pneumonia 
there are no means of knowing. Over sev- 
enty-five (75) cases of the latter disease 
were admitted to the sick bay, most of them 
moribund. Of these, 3 improved so much 
that they went back to their compartments, 
29 were transferred to hospital ashore, and 
about 40 died. As the records required to 
transfer patients from the army to the 
navy medical officers were furnished in 
but few cases, and as my records embrace 
all the dead, I had no means of knowing 
how many died in the sick bay and how 
many in the E deck ward. Cases of pneu- 
monia were found dying in various parts of 
the ship and many died in the E deck ward 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



187 



a few minutes after admission. Owing to 
the public character of that ward, men 
passing would see a vacant bunk and lie 
down in it without applying to a medical 
officer at all. Records were impossible and 
even identification of patients was extreme- 
ly difficult, because hundreds of men had 
blank tags tied about their necks. Many 
were either delirious or too ill to know their 
own names. Nine hundred and sixty-six 
patients were removed by the army hospital 
authorities in France. 

Deaths 
Ninety-one deaths occurred among the 



army personnel, of whom one was an of- 
ficer, as follows : 

October 2 1 death 

October 3 3 deaths 

October 4 7 deaths 

October 5 10 deaths 

October 6 24 deaths 

October 7 31 deaths 

October 8 14 deaths 

October 10 1 death 

The sick officer was treated in the open 
air on B deck, had a special army nurse 
during the day and a navy hospital corps- 
man at night. 



188 



WAR RECORD OF 



OUR WAR ORPHAN 




THE AMERICAN LEGION 
NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 
MERIDAN LIFE BUILDING 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
GEORGE C. WHITE, JR., ADJUTANT, 
American Legion Post No. 365, 
Bay Shore, New York. 

My dear Mr. White: 

We wish to congratulate you on the success of your carnival and advise that Henri Oscar Dupire 
is the French War Orphan who has been assigned to your post; history and photographs are enclosed. 
We thank you for your interest in this work carried on by the American Legion and trust that 

prosperous New Year. 

Sincerely yours, (Signed) GERALD MURPHY, 

Gerald J. Murphy, Service Division. 
AMERICAN RED CROSS 
(CROIX ROUGE AMERICAINE) October 5th, 1920. 



you and your post will enjoy 



[COPY] 
HENRI OSCAR DUPIRE 
Child No. 783 

Adopted by American Legion Post No. 365, Bay Shore, N. Y. 
Mme. Vve. Dupire, Echire, (Deux-Sevres) 
The father, who had been a farmer in the north of France, was killed in the battle of Hangard, 
April 9th, 1918. The mother, refugee with her family from Houplines, (Nord), was forced to leave her 
own father dying in the Hospital. Now she is having difficulty supporting her children and has no rela- 
tives who can help, as they, too, were all from the invaded regions. 

HENRI OSCAR, eight years old, fair-haired and blue-eyed is going to school. It is difficult for him 
to get along as well as the others, as, at the time of the German invasion, he received a shock which 
deprived him of his power of speech. He is only just beginning to talk again. 

Marthe born February 18th, 1910 Henri Oscar born February 14th, 1912. 

Moise born July 25th, 1914 - 

Military pension 1 700 francs a year. 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



189 



AMERICAN LEGION 

Historical 

By Edwin B. Sonner 



ABOUT the time of the Lusitania sink- 
ing, when it appeared that America 
would be drawn into the war, there 
sprang up a spontaneous spirit for pre- 
paredness and vigilance against the despic- 
able activities of German agents within our 
midst. 

A gathering of prominent and loyal 
Americans suggested organization of the 
true blood of the country ; the call was 
heard, and the American Legion came into 
the light of day. 

This organization was strictly a civilian 
move and it gained great membership 
through publicity. 

When the American Expeditionary 
Forces had brought their European task to 
a close in 1918, a conference of officers was 
called in a small French town for the 
avowed purpose of forming an organization 
to solidify and perpetuate the remarkable 
spirit and achievements of the American 
armies in the field and to hold the war par- 
ticipants together in a common group after 
the armies had been demobilized. 

The thought of that little group was so 
favorably received that the A. E. F. Com- 
mander-in-Chief authorized a conference to 
be held at Paris to which the leading spirits 
of the movement were delegated, besides 
other able soldier representatives of the 
combat units in the field. 

At the Paris caucus there developed 
wonderful enthusiasm to push the plan to 
a strong and vigorous future in keeping 
with the glorious tradition of the Yankee 
soldier in battle. After the preliminaries 
had been worked out, the suggestions for 
a name were entertained and as the name 
"American Legion" was discussed favor- 
ably, and as it was supposed that the old 
civilian legion was swallowed up by the 
army upon the declaration of war, a cable 
was sent to the founders of the original or- 
ganization, their consent secured, and the 
new "American Legion" for ex-service men 
and women of the World War was launched. 

No better short description of its object 
and purposes can be given than that em- 
bodied in the preamble to its constitution, 
which is here given: 



"For God and Country, we associate our- 
selves together for the following purposes : 
To uphold and defend the Constitution of 
the United States of America ; to maintain 
law and order; to foster and perpetuate a 
one hundred per cent Americanism ; to pre- 
serve the memories and incidents of our 
association in the Great War; to inculcate 
a sense of individual obligation to the com- 
munity, state and nation; to combat the 
autocracy of both the classes and the 
masses ; to make right the master of might ; 
to promote peace and good will on earth; 
to safeguard and transmit to posterity the 
principles of justice, freedom and democ- 
racy; to consecrate and sanctify our com- 
radeship by our devotion to mutual help- 
fulness. — Preamble to the Constitution of 
The American Legion. 

The local posts, true to their declaration 
of devotion to mutual helpfulness, have 
raised money by various means and have 
thereby been enabled to carry on much 
needed relief work among disabled ex- 
service men, such as those mentally dis- 
abled by shell shock, of which there are sev- 
eral hundred, now confined in local state in- 
stitutions. Other forms of activity have 
been to take means to send tubercular men 
to favorable climate, provide for the com- 
fort of the hundreds of wounded Govern- 
ment students, who come to the local 
beaches for recuperation, provide for mili- 
tary burial of men killed in battle and other 
deceased comrades, carry on for better lo- 
cal civic activities, and for clean politics. 

Finally the legion, rank and file, is again 
true to its formulae in its desire to be 
known for its individual sense of obligation 
to the community, as well as to the state 
and nation. Here they stand among us, a 
great potential force for good, ever ready 
for the call to service. 

At present there are three (3) posts of 
the Legion — i. e., Bay Shore, Islip and Say- 
ville — with a total membership in excess of 
five hundred (500) in Islip Township. 

The National Membership to date is over 
1,300,000. 



190 



WAR RECORD OF 



LIST OF MEN IN THE COAST GUARD 



The United States maintained Life Saving Stations on many parts 
of its coast line at least fifty years ago. These stations were equipped 
with apparatus for saving life in case of shipwreck. Several of these 
stations tvere on the coast of Long Island. No crews were employed. 
Later they were manned and still later were amalgamated with the 
Revenue Cutter Service and are now known as the Coast Guard. The 
extent 'and importance of the Coast Guard is best shown by the fact 
that $10,^69,940 ivas appropriated for its maintenance in 1921. In 
the season of icebergs it patrols the (so-called) steamer lanes to re- 
port the proximity of bergs. 

To us who reside in the Town of Islip the tvork of the crews, whose 
names are listed beloiv, is best known, and ive can recall many cases 
of assistance rendered. The stations on our coast are about five miles 
apart. The crews are constantly on duty maintaining a night patrol 
of the whole coast. The stations are all connected by telephone tvith 
each other and tvith the wireless station at Fire Island. 

What a valuable outpost this service would have been to us had 
Germany been able to have brought the ivar to our shores! — The 
Editor. 



Station No. 81 

Maurice C. Baker 

Gerry J. Velsor No. 1 

Harold L. Carter No. 1 

William Leach 

Harry Crocker 

Walter G.Baker 

Matthew A. Bedell 

Walter H. Welcher 

Wilmot B. Halsey 

Louis A. Mass 

Ole M. Kolberg 

Clarence R. Howell 

Harry Sikkenga 

John J. Fink 

Carlton E. Chichester 

Rowland W. Smith 

William H. Washeim 



. . Keeper 
Surfman 
Surf man 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 
Surfman 



Station No. 82 



Charles W. Baker Keeper 

Fay F. Ocha Keeper 

James H. Hulse No. 1 Surfman 

Nicholas F. White Surfman 

Hugh Erickson Surfman 

Joseph W. Towns Surfman 



Sylvester Lawrence Surfman 

George E. Tourgee Surfman 

James S. Brown Surfman 

Herbert J. Bailey Surfman 

Arthur B. Chichester Surfman 

Allen J. Barnes Surfman 

Herbert R. Boyeson Surfman 

Raymond Pike Surfman 

Fred H. Page Surfman 

Station No. 83 

Harry F. Smith Keeper 

Albert Behonick No. 1 Surfman 

Orlando Peterson Surfman 

George F. Swamback Surfman 

Thomas Erickson Surfman 

Herbert Boyeson Surfman 

Royal P. Ketcham Surfman 

Marinus Veryser Surfman 

Clarence A. Young Surfman 

Eugene H. Rogers Surfman 

Herman Lecus Surfman 

Roger Smith Surfman 

William Slanec Surfman 

Frank W. Pike Surfman 

Harold B. Thurber Surfman 



Chester A. Lippincott Superi^itendent 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



191 



WAR'S EFFECT ON THE COST OF LIVING 



By Francis Hoag 



THE horrors of war, the suffering, dev- 
astation and distress, are not all of the 
battlefield. While the people of Amer- 
ica, because of their remoteness from the 
scene of actual conflict, suffered in lesser 
degree than those of any of the other allied 
nations involved in the World War, there 
was no village nor hamlet so isolated, nor 
man, woman nor child in all this broad land 
so remotely situated, but was made to feel 
the war's blighting affect. 

Because of the nation-wide and impartial 
operation of the selective draft, every little 
community sent its quota of men, the flower 
of the nation. Indeed, thousands of brave, 
adventurous spirits volunteered for service 
in the British and Canadian armies long be- 
fore the culmination of events forced us 
into the conflict; of these latter the Town 
of Islip sent a notable contingent, especially 
for enlistment with the Canadian Flying 
Corps, later known as the Royal Air Force. 
But without distinction as to rank or branch 
of the service, the boys of Long Island bore 
well their part, and were the envy of thou- 
sands who because of sex, age or other limi- 
tations were ineligible for service. 

For those who stayed at home, fathers, 
mothers, wives and sweethearts of the men 
at the front or at sea, there was dread un- 
certainty, anxiety and suffering, greater at 
times than the privations of actual warfare. 

Bent upon doing their share, the stay-at- 
home contingent organized for relief work 
and enrolled under the banner of the Red 
Cross and allied organizations. While the 
devoted women sewed or knitted, made 
surgical dressings or prepared delicacies 
for camp and hospital use, the men organ- 
ized "drives" for the various funds, and by 
systematic canvasses, through elaborate or- 
ganization, mass meetings, etc., secured 
contributions of many thousands of dollars 
for relief work. Later on, by similar meth- 
ods of organization, they were able to make 
a glorious record in subscriptions for the 
various issues of government bonds needed 
to finance the war. Every man and woman 
and even the child was made to feel indi- 
vidual responsibility for the success of this 
work. 

The absence of the men who had been 



drawn into the conflict, comprising a large 
proportion of the young, active and pro- 
gressive element in every community, was 
for two years a serious drawback to the 
prosperity of Long Island and of course to 
the whole country. This was especially ap- 
parent in social affairs of all kinds, in ath- 
letic sports, in the fire departments and in 
fraternal and church organizations every- 
where. Business was handicapped by the 
loss of skilled mechanics, farmers, boatmen, 
railroad men, experienced salesmen and 
leaders and highly essential employees in 
every industry. The prosperity of rural 
Long Island, which has comparatively few 
manufacturing industries, was still further 
affected by the removal of hundreds of 
workmen, lured to the metropolis, to the 
great manufacturing centres of New Eng- 
land and to more remote points, where 
wages of $5 to $8 per day for unskilled, and 
$10 per day and upward for skilled mechan- 
ics were offered for work in munitions 
factories. 

Work came almost to a standstill in the 
building trades here, except for govern- 
ment work in the camps and shipyards. 
Large numbers of men from the Eastern 
end of Islip Town found emergency em- 
ployment at Camp Upton, where structures 
to house and care for a city of 40,000 men 
were erected in four months' time in the 
summer of 1917. Carpenters, and indeed 
almost anyone who could swing a hammer 
or push a saw, found ready employment 
there at from $6 to $8 per day. Later on 
many of the same men were employed in 
the government shipyards at Port Jefferson. 

The resultant scarcity of labor in other 
industries seriously crippled many of them 
and staple articles of foodstuffs and wear- 
ing apparel became scarce and in some cases 
almost impossible to obtain. Prices in cer- 
tain lines advanced sharply ; in other cases 
there was a slower rise, but in a short time 
practically everything was being sold at a 
figure at least double the pre-war price. 

The transaction of all business was badly 
hampered by extraordinary loads placed 
upon all transportation lines and the war- 
time priorities accorded by the government. 
The movement of millions of men and of 



192 



WAR RECORD OF 



millions of tons of supplies for them, and 
of munitions with which to carry on the 
war, taxed the facilities of our railroads 
and steamboat lines as they had never been 
taxed before. All systems of communica- 
tion, mail, telegraph, telephone and wire- 
less felt the strain of the overload and fell 
far below their usual standards of effi- 
ciency. Not infrequently letters outstripped 
the telegraph, and on the other hand it 
often took a week for a letter to go from 
one Long Island village to another. Tele- 
phone equipment was poor and the service 
worse. The demands made upon the sys- 
tem were heavier than ever before and the 
service was in the hands of inexperienced 
operators, linemen and others hastily 
broken in for the emergency. 

Prices of drugs and chemicals, because 
of the urgent war needs, and especially be- 
cause of the blockade of German ports early 
in the war, advanced by leaps and bounds. 
Such as were obtainable at all were often 
priced at from ten to twenty times their 
former cost. Much of the dyestuff could 
not be duplicated by American manufac- 
turers. Potash, most of which had been 
supplied by Germany, prior to the war, 
could not be obtained in sufficient quantities 
until great plants had been erected in this 
country to produce it for home consump- 
tion. Fertilizers increased tremendously in 
cost, and the prices of farm products 
jumped proportionately. Suffolk County 
farmers, who a few years ago had sold their 
potatoes for 25 cents per bushel, were able 
to dispose of that staple for as much as 
$3 per bushel ; in many instances the farmer 
cleaned up the price of a good farm on one 
season's crop, despite the greatly increased 
cost of labor, fertilizer and other materials. 
Butter sold for 80 cents per pound and 
fresh eggs have quite recently been selling 
for $1.20 per dozen. 

Meats of all kinds sold during the war 
and for almost two years after the armis- 
tice at inordinately high prices. Steaks and 
chops often retailed at a dollar a pound, 
roasts at from 60 cents to 80 cents, and 
even soup meat cost as much as 40 cents. 
Long Island dairy and poultry farmers, few 
of whom grow their own grain and feed, 
were badly handicapped by the high cost of 
the latter. Not a few of them were forced 
out of business. Milk retailed at from 12 
to 18 cents per quart; chicken sold at 55 
cents per pound. 

Long Island duck farmers who had suf- 
ficient capital to continue in business 
through the period when feed was highest 



made money during the war and in the 
years immediately following it, because of 
the high prices of dressed beef and other 
products controlled by the packers. 

Fish, for the same reason, went to un- 
heard of prices and though the commission 
men in the cities took a heavy and unreas- 
onable toll, the local fishermen obtained 
good returns. Blue fish brought in local 
market as high as 45 cents per pound ; weak 
fish brought 35 cents, and eels as much as 
30 cents. 

Prices of oysters and clams had the same 
general tendency, though the former in 
lesser degree than most other food products, 
owing to the fact that the European mar- 
kets were closed during the war because of 
blockaded ports and the inability to obtain 
space on board ships. Freight embargos 
restricted the trade in this country and 
greatly increased freight, cartage and ex- 
press rates. Increased labor costs and the 
high price of barrels and other containers, 
all combined to raise the price of Blue Point 
Oysters, practically all of which are shipped 
from the eastern end of Islip Township. 
Oysters which formerly sold locally for 25 
cents for a quart, very liberally measured, 
retailed hereabouts during 1919 and 1920 
at from 60 cents to $1.00 per quart. The 
price to the wholesale trade have been from 
$2.50 to $2.75 per gallon and Blue Points 
in the shell, which before the war sold at 
from $4 to $5 per barrel have brought $10. 

Clams have been scarce and high and ex- 
perienced clammers had no difficulty in 
making from $10 to $12 for a day's work 
on the bay, and manv did much better than 
that. Clams sold as high as $20 to $25 
per barrel. 

Market gardeners and fruit growers on 
Long Island experienced the same difficulty 
as others in obtaining fertilizers and other 
supplies. They were handicapped in get- 
ting labor, for which the average price was 
from $5 to $6 per day, but they were re- 
warded with big prices and have shared in 
the general prosperity. 

An important and rapidly advancing in- 
dustry in the eastern end of the Town of 
Islip and western Brookhaven, is the grow- 
ing of cut flowers, especially carnations, for 
New York market, an industry which has 
netted wonderful returns. Greenhouses 
covering many acres are devoted to this 
business and many thousands of these 
blooms are shipped by express every morn- 
ing from Blue Point, Bayport and Sayville 
to New York and other cities within a ra- 
dius of a few hundred miles. The war 



THE TOWN OF ISLIP 



193 



time era of free spending and the demand 
for luxuries afforded an almost unlimited 
market for these flowers, which sometimes 
brought returns of 25 cents each ; as much 
or more than a dozen sold for before the 
war. There was another side to the pic- 
ture, however, for coal, a prime essential 
for heating the greenhouses, was exceed- 
ingly difficult to obtain and the carnation 
growers and others were often compelled 
to pay $15 per ton and glad to get it at that. 

As previously stated, many staple articles 
sold during the war and the two years im- 
mediately thereafter at just about double 
the pre-war prices ; a few were affected to 
a lesser extent and very many to a far 
greater degree. 

Wheat flour sold here as high as $16.50 
per barrel ; sugar was almost impossible to 
obtain for considerable periods of time, and 
was often of a very inferior quality. Local 
grocers, when they had any at all, doled it 
out in pound and half-pound packages to 
customers who waited in line for the privi- 
lege of paying 25 cents to 28 cents per 
pound for it. 

Shoes and leather goods doubled and 
quadrupled in cost and the value of cotton 
and woolen goods advanced in about the 



same ratio. Paper became scarce and in- 
creasingly expensive, and even the cheaper 
grades, such as wrapping and news paper, 
formerly procurable at 2>1, to 4 cents per 
pound, were sold as high as 15 cents and 
20 cents for a very inferior quality of a 
muddy yellow color, due to the scarcity of 
chlorine and other bleaching agencies. 

Not until the closing months of 1920, 
practically two years after the cessation of 
hostilities, did the production of manufac- 
tured goods begin to catch up with the de- 
mand, to a degree warranting a general 
lowering of prices. Even now, at the be- 
ginning of 1921, many luxuries and not a 
few staple articles are still held at prices 
three or four times their cost before the 
war; generally, moreover, the article is 
inferior. 

As time goes on, it becomes more and 
more apparent that aside from the loss of 
life, the sickness and wounds suffered by 
those directly involved in the conflict, the 
general lowering of the morale of the na- 
tion and the heavy burden of taxation 
which must be shared by our children, the 
malign influence of the great war will be 
felt in many ways by generations yet 
unborn. 



194 



WAR RECORD OF 



CIVIL WAR DATA 



It ivas our hope to get from the Town 
Records some interesting data of the Civil 
War, but the Toum Clerk could only find 
the follotving resolutions, passed at special 
town meetings: 

Passed by Town Meeting Held August 
19th, 1862 

44TTTHEREAS: the patriotic in- 
Y Y habitants of the Town of Islip are 
desirous that the quota of sol- 
diers requested by our Government from 
our Town should be furnished without re- 
sorting- to draft and that the families of 
such Volunteers should be properly cared 
for during the absence of such Volunteers at 
the seat of War." 

Resolved: That the sum of twenty thou- 
sand dollars ($20,000) (or such sum as may 
be necessary) — resolved that a portion of 
the above sum shall be expended in paying 
to each Volunteer if for three (3) years, 
or during the war — the sum of one hun- 
dred dollars ($100), and to the wife of 
each of such Volunteers and also to the wife 
of such persons as have already joined the 
army of Volunteers, the sum of two dollars 
($2.00) per week — and to each child of 
such Volunteers over the age of one and 
under the age of fourteen — the sum of two 
dollars ($2.00) per month of such period 
as the husband and father may remain in 
the army of the United States." 

Passed at Town Meeting Held 1st Tues- 
day IN April, 1863 

"Resolved: That the families of those 
Volunteers who have been recently killed 
or who have recently died — or who may 
hereafter be killed or die, while in the serv- 
ice — receive from this Town the same as- 
sistance as provided for by the resolution 
passed on August 19th, 1862 — during the 
war or pensioned by the Government." 



Passed at Town Meeting Held on Decem- 
ber 24TH, 1863 

"Resolved: That the town of Islip raise 
by a tax the sum of twelve thousand dollars 
($12,000) for the purpose of procuring 
thirty-nine (39) Volunteers to fill the 
quota of said town under the pending 
draft." 

PASSED AT Special Town Meeting Held 
ON March 31st, 1864 

"Resolved: That the town of Islip raise 
the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000) to 
be assessed upon the taxable inhabitants of 
the town for the purpose of paying bounties 
to the Volunteers necessary to be furnished 
by the said Town under the last call of the 
President for two hundred thousand (200,- 
000) men. And the premiums and inci- 
dental expenses connected therewith." 

Passed at Special Town Meeting Held 
ON October 1st, 1864 

"Resolved: That the sum of two hundred 
dollars ($200) be appropriated to all per- 
sons who are held to service under the last 
call of the President of the United States in 
addition to the sum of three hundred dollars 
($300) alreadv voted on July 19th and Sep- 
tember 10th, i864." 

Passed at Special Town Meeting Held 
ON December 24th, 1864 

"Resolved: That a committee of two for 
each school district be appointed by the 
chairman to solicit subscriptions to a fund 
for contingent expenses in raising the Vol- 
unteers and that each of these committees 
pay all money raised thus by them into the 
hands of the Supervisor." 



REMINISCENCES 



REMINISCENCES