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0. S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE 
NATIONAL ASHiCoLTUM LIBERT 

FEB 1 5 1965 

PmXi SERIAL RECORDS 



RODUCTION AND TRA 



TTa 



Statistical Report 



1 



CONTENTS 
JANUARY 1965 

WORLD SUMMARIES Page 
Production: 

Crop Production in 1964-65 Up Slightly 3 

Production of Oils and Fats Forecast at New High in 1965 5 

Trade: 

International Dry Pea Trade in 1963 Similar to Previous Year ...... 10 

International Dry Bean Trade Up Sharply in 1963 13 

COUNTRY SUMMARIES 

U.S. Rice Exports Up Slightly in First Four Months 13 

Argentine Grain Exports Up 88 Percent 16 

U.S. Feed Grain Exports Increase 17 Percent 18 

U.S. Exports of Wheat and Flour Slightly Higher 22 

Canadian Exports of Barley and Oats Up 27 Percent 23 

Canadian Wheat & Flour Exports Up 24 Percent 28 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE 



NEW PUBinCATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 



Single copies free to persons in the United States 
from the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du-8-2*4*45 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars 

FC 19-6*4 World Cotton Trade to Continue at High Level in 196*4-65 

FC I-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles I and VI, 
Public Law hQO 

FD I-65 Slight Increase in World Milk Production in 196*4 
FVF 3-6*4- World Jute Production up in 196*4- 

FFO I-65 World Olive Oil Production Down Sharply in 196*4-65 
FG 10-6*4- Another Large World Corn Crop Forecast 
FR *4--6*4- World Rice Production May Set New Record in 196*4-65 
FT 8-6*4- World Tobacco Production at Record High 

FFVS I-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. exports, October 196*4, with 
comparisons 



WORLD CROP PRODUCTION 
IN 196^-65 UP SLIGHTLY 



223397 



Aggregate world production of major crops in I96U-65 was about 1 per- 
cent above 1963-6^. This is a somewhat smaller gain than in each of the 
two previous years. Increases in world production since 1955-59 have been 
slightly less than the increases in population during this period. 

The output of bread grains in 196^-65 was 9 percent above 1963-6^ 
primarily because of a record wheat crop of 9«2 billion bushels. The 
previous record wheat crop was 8.8 billion in 1962-63. USSR wheat pro- 
duction was 5C0 million bushels above the poor 1963-6^ crop. World stocks 
of wheat in the major exporting countries on July 1, 196k-, were about 
225 million bushels below the mid-1963 level. Rye production was up 
slightly in I96U-65. 

The world production of rough rice in 196^-65, excluding Communist 
Asia, was estimated at a record l6h million metric tons, slightly above 
the 1963-6^- crop. Increases in rice production are still not keeping up 
with the rapidly growing populations in the rice consuming countries of 
the world. 

The 196^-65 combined output of major feed grains was down 5 percent 
from I963-6U. This reflects a smaller corn crop—largely because of the 
drought -reduced United States crop — and a continued decline in world oat 
production. The 196^-65 world barley crop, K.2 billion bushels, set a 
new record. Feed grain stocks in the major exporting countries on July 1, 
196k } were above the mid-1963 level. 

The world sugar situation is changing. For several years prior to 
196^-65, production lagged behind consumption, reflecting several poor 
crops in Europe and a substantial reduction in Cuban production. However, 
in response to high prices and favorable market outlooks, producers in 
many countries increased production. Weather conditions were very favor- 
able for sugar in key producing countries in 196^-65. This year's pro- 
duction of centrifugal sugar, 65.5 million short tons, was an alltime 
record, exceeding the previous record of 60.I million tons in 1960-61, 
Ample world supplies are now in prospect and prices have declined signifi- 
cantly from the high level of 1963 and the first half of 196^. 

Production of the major fruit items, citrus, apples, pears and 
raisins, was about the same as last year. Prune production was sub- 
stantially above the short crop of last year, but only slightly above 
other recent years. Tree nuts were above last year and much larger 
than average. 

Potato production was below last year. While the crop in Europe was 
much smaller, it was adequate for food needs and probably reflects the 
downward trend in food consumption of potatoes. Hop production was slightly 
below last year, but well above average. 



-3- 



Estimated world production of selected agricultural commodities, 
average 1955/56-1959/60, annual 1961/62 - 1964/65 



Commodity 


Unit : 


Average : 
1955/56- : 
1959/60 : 


1961/62 : 


1962/63 : 


1963/64 II: 


1964/65 1/: 


Percentage 
change 
1964/65 

over 
1963/64 


Whe a. t 


Mil hn^Vifl * 

i 1 1 i o UUcllC 1 • • • • 


7,965 : 


7,880 


8,760 : 


8,335 : 


9,170 : 


10 






1,440 : 


1,340 


1,245 : 


1,185 : 


1,225 


3 




■Mil. M.T : 


132 : 


153 


151 


163 : 


164 


1 




Mi 1 . bushe 1 . . . : 


6,480 


7,460 


7,510 


8,055 


7,755 


-4 






3,255 


3,455 


3,910 


4,070 


4,210 


3 






4,080 


3,410 


3,375 


3,200 


2,970 


-7 


Molasses, industrial...... 


:Mi 1 . gal Ion. . . : 


2,440 


2,942 


2,831 


2,994 


3,000 


0 


Sugar, centrifugal 3/..... 


:Mil. s.t : 


49.7 


57.1 


54.9 


59.3 


65.5 


10 






7.3 


6.8 


6.9 


7.8 


7.7 


-1 






4/ 16.0 


18.4 


16.7 


18.0 


18.0 


0 


Ann 1 o c q i-i (H noa rc ^ / 


•Mil hit^Vipl * 


603 


684 


768 


794 


800 


1 




:Thou. s.t : 


197 


213 


217 


187 


237 


27 






515 


567 


569 


556 


560 


1 


Walnuts, unshelled 6/ 


:....do .: 


150 


144 


182 


170 


174 


2 






164 


163 


175 


181 


238 


31 




: ... .do : 


92.6 


156 


101 


124 


131 


6 


Potatoes l_l .............. . 


:Mi 1 . cwt : 


5,303 


5,304 


4,784 


5,263 


4,964 


-6 


Dry beans 8/..... 


: . . . .do : 


88.5 


101 


99.6 


111 


99.6 


: -10 






13.3 


10.6 


12.9 


12.8 


13.4 


5 




:Mil. pounds. . . : 


157 


150 


177 


203 


195 


-4 




:Mil. bushel... 


894 


1,047 


1,031 


1,063 


1,088 


: 2 






14.6 


15.1 


15.8 


16.4 


17.6 


: 7 




'Mil. bushel. .. 


132 


117 


134 


L28 


: 116 


: -9 




:Mil. s.t 


21.2 


22. 1 


23.2 


: 24.0 


: 24.9 


: 4 




:Thou. s.t 


1,612 


1,668 


1,673 


1,627 


1,656 


: 2 






548 


616 


654 


: 667 


: 741 


: 11 






5,654 


7,085 


7,455 


6,599 


7,240 


: 10 


Rapeseedo 


• ... .do. 


3 839 


4, 185 


4, 1 17 


3,807 


: 3,735 


: -2 






11/1,092 


1,451 


: 1,034 


: 1,825 


: 1,200 


: -34 






1,394 


1,410 


: 1,365 


: 1,390 


: 1,395 


: 0 






447 


: 440 


: 405 


: 410 


: 420 


: 2 






2,286 


: 2,395 


: 2,325 


: 2,445 


: 2,410 


: -2 




:Mil. pounds... 


8,518 


: 7,723 


: 8,679 


: 9,520 


: 9,727 


: 2 




:Mil. bags 12/. 


58.4 


: 72.0 


: 67.7 


: 68.1 


: 51.9 


: -24 




:Mil. pounds... 


1,909 


: 2,231 


: 2,258 


: 2,271 


: 2,326 


: 2 






886 


: 1,129 


: 1,157 


: 1,233 


: 1,270 


: 3 


Pepper, black & white 13/ . 


:Mil. pounds... 


144 


: 151 


: 147 


: 165 


: 174 


: 5 


Cotton. . .................. 


:Mil. bales 14/ 


43.7 


: 45.1 


: 47.7 


: 50.2 


: 51.8 


: 3 




:Mi 1 . pounds . . . 


4,400 


: 5,500 


: 5,052 


: 5,005 


: 5,095 


: 2 






1,173 


: 1,313 


: 1,405 


: 1,440 


: 1,446 


: 0 






298 


: 376 


: 369 


: 330 


: 362 


: 10 






259 


: 194 


: 222 


: 260 


: 254 


: -2 



Note: Revised January 1965. Data are largely from World Summaries issued on individual crops but some have been 
revised to include latest estimates. For tobacco, oils (except olive oil) and oilseeds, tea and hard fibers, the 
data relate to the calendar year of the first year shown; for other commodities, harvests in northern countries in 
the first year shown are combined with those in the Southern Hemisphere which immediately follow. 
1/ Preliminary. 2/ Excludes Communist Asia and U.S.S.R. 3/ Selected countries only. 4/ 1956-60 average. 
5/ Dessert and cooking, 20 countries. 6/ Commercial crop only. l_l 32 countries. 8/ 30 countries. 9/ 19 
countries. 10/ 24 countries. 11/ 1954/55-1957/58 average. 12/ 60 kg. bags of 132 lbs. 13/ Major exporting 
countries only. 14 / 480 lb. net bale. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. 



- 4 - 



Production of vegetable oils in 196*4-65 was only slightly greater 
than in the previous year, and nearly one -fourth above average. Of the 
edible oils, a highlight was a reduction of about one-third from last 
year in the production of olive oil, virtually all in the Mediterranean 
Basin. There were fairly substantial increases in the production of 
peanuts and sunflowerseed, with less expansion of both cottonseed and 
soybeans. Essentially no changes occurred in the production of the 
palm oils. Of the industrial oilseeds, flaxseed output declined 9 per- 
cent, whereas castorbean production rose 11 percent owing chiefly to the 
record output in Brazil. 

World tobacco production set a new record of 9*7 billion pounds in 
196*4—65. This was 2 percent above 1963-6*4-, the previous record. 

Regarding beverages, tea and cocoa increased to new alltime records 
but coffee declined 2k percent because of the sharp reduction in Brazil 
where a combination of severe droughts, frosts, and fires seriously 
affected coffee trees and outturn. Despite the bad weather in Brazil, 
coffee supplies, including quality coffees, are still fully adequate to 
meet any foreseeable import requirements. 

The upward trend in cotton production continues, reaching an alltime 
record in 196*4—65 of 51*8 million bales, 3 percent above 1963-6*4-. A 
significant increase occurred in cotton production in Communist China. 
Despite continued increases in consumption, cotton production is still 
exceeding consumption with world stocks continuing to grow. Henequen 
production was up with little change occurring in the production of 
jute, abaca and sisal. 



WORLD PRODUCTION OF OILS AND FATS 
FORECAST AT NEW HIGH IN I965 

World production of oils and fats in 1965 is forecast at a record 
35 • 8 million short tons, slightly larger than the previous record of 
196*1- but one-fifth above the 1955-59 average. The estimated 400,000 
ton expansion from 196*4- is accounted for entirely by indicated increases 
in edible oils and animal fats. 

Highlighting the entire production pattern will be the decline of 
an estimated one-third from 196*4- in Mediterranean Basin olive oil pro- 
duction, most of it being in Spain, Italy, Greece and Portugal. Of 
notable significance also, however, is the expected increases in the 
production of oils from U.S. soybeans, from peanuts produced in Nigeria, 
Senegal, India, and Mainland China, from soybeans in Mainland China and 
from sunflowerseed in the USSR. The U.S. share of total world produc- 
tion may approach one -third this year compared with somewhat more than 
one-fourth in the last decade. 



-5- 



For the fifth successive year world production of edible vegetable oils 
in 1965 — processed mainly from oilseed crops harvested in 196^- -is expected 
to increase from a year earlier. Outturn is forecast at an alltime high of 
16.2 million tons, 2 percent above that of 196k. The increase reflects 
expansion in virtually all oils except olive oil, with the most significant 
gains, both absolute and relative, foreseen in peanut, soybean, sunflower 
and rapeseed oils. A major portion of the gain, however, will be offset by 
the loss foreseen in olive oil output. The edible vegetable oils group ac- 
counts for almost three-fourths of the total world supply of vegetable oils 
and almost 1+5 percent of the total production of all major oils and fats. 

Production of cottonseed oil in 1965 probably will be slightly larger 
than that of last year. World cottonseed production in the U.S. marketing 
year beginning August 1, 196^ was estimated at h percent above the previous 
record high of a year earlier. Major increases were expected in Mainland 
China, the United States, Central America, Argentina, the Sudan, Syria, and 
Turkey. However, partially offsetting these increases were decreases fore- 
seen in Pakistan, Greece, Spain, and Iran. U.S. cottonseed oil production 
represents about h-0 percent of the estimated world total. 

A record tonnage of peanut oil likely will be produced in 1965 from the 
estimated record peanut outturn of 196^. Exceeding the previous year's all- 
time high by an estimated 7 percent, the 196^ peanut crop was characterized 
by increases in all of the 5 major producing countries — India, Mainland 
China, Nigeria, the United States, and Senegal. Moreover, larger crops than 
in the previous year also were produced in the Sudan, Argentina, Burma and a 
number of other countries, with declines in only a few countries, including 
Brazil and South Africa. 

A substantial increase to an alltime high also is foreseen in soybean 
oil, reflecting the record world soybean crop of 196^ and the somewhat larger 
carryover of old-crop beans in the United States. Virtually all of the 
relatively small net gain in world soybean production from a year earlier is 
attributed to the increased production that is believed to have occurred in 
Mainland China. Production in the United States was virtually the same as a 
year earlier; in Brazil production was down almost 3 million bushels and in 
Japan 2 million bushels. Soybeans are by far the major single source of 
vegetable oils, accounting for one -fifth of the world total and for over 10 
percent of the estimated total world production of all fats and oils. 

Production in I965 of sunflowerseed oil, which had declined substantially 
in I96I+ because of reduced Soviet seed production, is expected to approach a 
record level. This year T s expected gain primarily reflects greater yields as 
well as expanded acreage of sunflowerseed in the Soviet Union. Production of 
oil in Europe will increase somewhat from 196^ due to sunflower acreage 
expansion and increased yields in Yugoslavia while outturn in both Rumania 
and Bulgaria will approximate the levels attained in 196^. In South America, 
oil production from seed harvested in 196^ is expected to decline, reflecting 
a reduced output in Uruguay. Production in Argentina and Chile is expected 
to approximate the levels of last year. Turkish production will increase 
sharply reflecting introduction of the higher yielding Orobanche -resistant 
varieties. 



-6- 



World production of rapeseed oil in 19^5 > extracted primarily from the 
crops to be harvested in 1965, probably will be significantly above the low- 
level of last year. India's production, sharply reduced in I96U because of 
inadequate moisture, is expected to recover substantially. Mainland China's 
196^ production was estimated at a level significantly above production of 
each of the 3 previous years, reflecting expanded acreage as well as higher 
yields. Production in 19^5 likely will range considerably above the I96I-63 
average though sharply below the 1955-59 average. Major exporting countries 
of Canada, Sweden, France, Denmark and West Germany will probably continue to 
give strong emphasis to production of rapeseed. Pakistan, the third largest 
producer, is likely to show a significant gain from last year's sharply 
reduced production, pending normal climatic conditions. 

No significant change in sesameseed oil production is indicated this year. 
Increased seed production in India, Sudan, Colombia and Venezuela more than 
offset declines in the Mexican and Burmese crops. Production of saf flower- 
seed oil in I965 is expected to be somewhat smaller than in the previous year 
in view of the smaller crop anticipated in the United States. 

Olive oil production, primarily in the Mediterranean Basin, will decline 
about one -third in I965 > reflecting the reduced olive crop in I96U. Major 
factors in the decline from last year's high level include overall cyclical 
off-year production declines in the major producing countries of Southern 
Europe, markedly lower production in Spain accentuated by inadequate moisture, 
reduced Italian production reflecting damage from heavy rains in the pre- 
harvest period, a sharp drop in Greek production because of olive kernel borer 
and dacus fly infestations, and a severe decline in Portuguese production due 
to adverse weather. 

Corn oil production in I965 will continue the long-time upward trend 
mainly because of the increase expected in the United States, presently the 
source of about 85 percent of the world total. Production in other countries, 
largely Italy, the Netherlands, Brazil and Mexico, varies but little from 
year to year. 

World production of the palm oils in I965 is expected to be below the 
level of the previous year. Rainfall in the main coconut producing areas 
of the Philippines was, in general, more favorable to an increase in potential 
availabilities during the first half of I965. A resumption of the uptrend 
in coconut output may be offset by typhoon damage to the coconut crop in the 
second half of I96U. 

The decline in palm oil and palm kernel oil production this year reflects 
the disruption of production in the Congo (Leopoldville) . Much of the major 
palm producing areas continues to be under complete or partial rebel control. 
No appreciable change in production of palm produce is foreseen in Nigeria 
and continued increases in production are likely for Malaysia. 

A slight decline may occur in the production of industrial oils in I965. 
It now appears that linseed oil outturn may be smaller than expected earlier 
and castor oil production may not reach the high level of I96U. 



-7- 



World production of flaxseed in I96J+ was the smallest in the last decade, 
reflecting reduced crops from a year earlier in all four of the major pro- 
ducing countries, the United States, Canada, Argentina, and India. The 
release of the first estimate of the Argentine crop and the sharp reduction 
in the final estimate of the U.S. crop caused the estimate of world production 
to be considerably smaller than foreseen earlier. The decline in oil pro- 
duction may not fully reflect the sharp decline in flaxseed production because 
the latter will be tempered by the large carry-in stocks in the United States, 
Canada and Argentina. 

Castor oil production from 1965-crop beans may not reach the record out- 
turn of I96U. The new castor crop in India is expected to increase moderately 
from last year's, but in Brazil an expansion comparable to that of 196^ 
appears highly unlikely. 

Tung oil production in 196^-65 is expected to approximate that of last 
year, possibly gaining slightly. A sharp rise in U.S. output will be largely 
offset by a smaller outturn in both Argentina and Paraguay. Currently there 
is no indication of any significant change in Mainland China's I96U- 65 out- 
put. Recent price increases reflect reports of frost damage during 
September 196^ in Argentina and Paraguay to nuts which will be harvested in 
April-June, thus reducing prospective oil production in 1965-66. 

World aggregate production of animal fats in 19^5 is expected to increase 
slightly from last year's record reflecting largely a prospective increase in 
lard outturn as well as a probable new record outturn of tallow and greases. 

World butter output is expected to increase slightly in 1965. Butter 
prices continued to show strength throughout last year, and current market 
conditions continue to encourage a relatively high level of output during 
1965 > particularly in New Zealand, Denmark and Canada. 

During I965 lard production is expected to increase, possibly slightly 
exceeding the 1959 record. The increase will be due largely to a sizable 
gain in Soviet production reflecting larger feed supplies. Most of the gain 
will be recorded later this year as spring pigs reach market weights. 
Increased output in Eastern and Western Europe will be partly offset by 
reduced production in North America. World production of lard dropped slightly 
in 196^ primarily because of the sharp decline in the USSR following the poor 
feed crop production in 1963. In 196^- other areas including North America, 
South America and Eastern Europe recorded slight gains while production in 
West Europe approximated the previous year's level. 

World output of tallow and grease will probably continue to rise in 19&5, 
exceeding last year's record. The rise largely reflects anticipated further 
increases in Canada and the United States. In Australia and New Zealand pro- 
duction apparently was at a record in 196^ and further increases are likely 
this year. Output in Argentina is expected to continue at a relatively low 
level, and supplies for export will continue small. In Western Europe tallow 
output has remained relatively unchanged at high levels during the past 3 
years,- and no significant increase is expected this year. Production in the 
USSR, which was at a peak in 1963 and declined in 196^-, is likely to rise 
somewhat in I965. Supplies may continue short relative to requirements for 
soap manufacture and industrial needs. 

-8- 




- 9 - 



Production of marine oils in 1965 is currently expected to be 
below the level of the previous year. A further reduction in 
Antarctic baleen whale oil production is certain with the reduction 
in catch restrictions and the employment of less catch material. 
Early reports from the Antarctic confirm poor results. Although 
there was a slight increase in the world's productive capacity for 
fishmeal and oil during 196^, production in 1965 will be determined 
by the counteracting trends between the major producers in the size 
of the catch and oil yields. 



INTERNATIONAL DRY PEA TRADE 

IN I963 SIMILAR TO PREVIOUS YEAR 

International trade in dry peas of 18 reporting countries 
totaled 5*6 million bags of imports and 5*1 million bags of exports 
in the calendar year 1963* This was not much different from the 
international trade reported by these same countries in 1962. It 
is 25 to 30 percent more than the average of their trade in 1955-59* 

Excluded from the above is trade of non-reporting Communist 
and many small trading countries. This unreported trade could be 
substantial. For example , the United Kingdom and Germany, the 
world's two largest pea importers imported about 600,000 bags of 
peas from such non-reporting exporters as New Zealand, Australia, 
Communist East Europe, Africa, and India. This 600,000 bags should 
be added to the total exports in the table. 

The United States, the world's largest exporter, sent 13 per- 
cent of its total 1963-6^ exports to areas which do not report their 
international trade. These include 33 small importing countries in 
the Caribbean, Central America, Africa, and Asia. Together, these 
33 countries took approximately 300,000 bags out of a total U.S. 
export of 2,^00,000 bags in that marketing year. This 300,000 bags 
should be added to the total imports in the table. 

Of the 5*6 million tags of imports reported by the 18 countries 
in I963, 50 percent were taken by the United Kingdom and Germany. 
The largest of the other dozen reporting importers was the Nether- 
lands, with imports of 517,000 bags. These probably were for re- 
export as Dutch traders normally engage in this type of business. 
The Netherlands also is the world's second largest exporter of peas 
grown domestically. 

Of the 5*1 million bags of exports reported by the 18 countries, 
75 percent were provided by the United States and the Netherlands. 
The largest of the other 8 reporting exporters was Belgium which 
supplied i+57,000 bags in 1963. Belgium also is a sizable exporter 
of peas imported. 



-10- 



Principal destinations of the major exporting countries in 1963 were as 
follows: 



PEAS: Destinations of exports from major exporting countries, 1963 



Destination 


United 


States 


Netherlands 


: Belgium 






: Percent 




rcl tcUli 








: 1,000 


of 


: 1,000 


of 


1,000 


of 




bags 


total 


: bags 


total 


bags 


total 


United Kingdom : 


865 


36.6 


403 : 


28.5 


38 


8.3 


West Germany 


299 : 


12.7 


450 


31.8 


83 


18.2 


Venezuela 


291 


: 12.3 










Netherlands : 


148 


6.3 






258 : 


56.5 


Canada 


146 


6.2 










Other 


614 


25.9 


563 


: 39.7 


78 


17.0 


Total 


2,363 


100.0 : 


1,416 : 


100.0 


457 


100.0 



Principal sources of imports of the major importing countries in 1963 
were as follows: 



PEAS: Source of imports of major importing countries in 1963 



Source 


United Kingdom 


Germany 


Netherlands 






Percent 




Percent 




: Percent 




1,000 


of 


: 1,000 


of 


: 1,000 


: of 




: bags 


: total 


: bags 


total 


bags 


: total 


United States : 


857 


46.9 


176 ■ 


16.9 


43 


: 8.3 


Netherlands 


398 : 


21.8 


423 : 


40.6 ■ 






New Zealand : 


177 


9.7 










Australia „. 


: 87 


4.8 










Canada 


65 : 


3.6 










Benelux . 






97 


9.3 : 


253 


48.9 


Morocco ............. 






: 55 : 


5.3 : 


96 


18.6 


Other .... o ........ . 


244 


13.2 


291 


27.9 




24.2 


Total 


1,828 


100.0 


1,042 : 


100.0 


517 


: 100.0 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of 
official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source 
materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 11 - 



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- 12 - 



INTERNATIONAL DRY BEAN TRADE 
UP SHARPLY IN I963 

Dry "bean exports from 35 reporting free world countries totaled "J.Q 
million bags in calendar year 1963. This was h6 percent more than these 
same countries exported in 1962 and 39 percent more than the 1955-59 
average of their exports. 

A sizable part of the world's international trade in Deans is not 
reported; for example, the very considerable exports that normally move 
from Communist China and Burma to Japan. Most of this, however, is not 
the kind of "beans traded in the Western Hemisphere. Much of China's 
export is azuki and broad beans, and much of Burma's export is a type of 
lima bean and miscellaneous pulses similar to and including mung beans. 

The United States was the world's largest exporter in I963, supplying 
59 percent of the total of the 35 countries. In 1962, the United States 
supplied kO percent, and in 1955-59 supplied k"] percent. 

The second largest exporter was Mexico which supplied almost 700*000 
bags or 13 times as many as in 1962 and unquestionably a record for that 
country. A decade ago, Mexico was second largest importer from the United 
States. Mexico imported 1.2 million bags from the United in 1952-53* and 
191,000 bags in 1963-6^, according to U.S. export data. Mexican bean pro- 
duction has increased rapidly in the last few years making Mexico the 
Free World's third largest producer -- exceeded by Brazil and the United 
States only. 

U.S. exports in calendar year 1963 included 106,000 bags donated to 
foreign charity, and M+0,000 bags under other titles of P.L. U80. Of the 
i+.5 million bags exported, exclusive of charity, 31 percent went to Britain, 
27 percent to EEC Europe, h percent to the Caribbean, 7 percent to Venezuela, 
5 percent to Spain and k percent to Australia and Japan in about equal 
quantities . 

Mexico's exports went 56 percent to Switzerland and 38 percent to the 
Netherlands, obviously for re-export. The Dutch and Swiss import figures 
for I963 and the Dutch figures for the first half of I96U do not include 
any beans from Mexico . This does not mean that the Mexican reports are 
incorrect. The shipments could have been, and probably were, diverted. 

The largest importers in I963 were the United Kingdom, Japan, and West 
Germany, in that order of quantity. Together they imported 5 4 percent of 
the total of the 35 countries. The U.K. imports were up k-2 percent from 
I962, Japan's were up ^5 percent and Germany down one percent. All three 
were above their respective 1955-59 averages. 

U.S. RICE EXPORTS UP SLIGHTLY 
IN FIRST FOUR MONTHS 

United States rice exports in the first four months (August -November) 
of the current marketing year were 267,800 metric tons in terms of milled 
rice. This was 1 percent more than the 26U,800 tons exported in the same 
months of the preceding year. (Continued on page 16) 

-13- 



The major sources of these countries' imports in 1963 were: 



Beans: Imports by major source for 3 major importing 
countries in calendar year 1963 



Source 


•United Kingdom l/ 


: Japan 


: Germany, West 2/ 




: 1,000 


: Percent 


: 1,000 


: Percent 


: 1,000 


: Percent 




metric 


of 


metric 


of 


metric 


I of 


: tons 


: total 


tons 


: total 


tons 


total 


United States 


3/65.8 


75.0 


\ 7.9 


16.8 : 


7.5 : 


25.8 


Canada ............. 


: 12.5 : 


14.2 










United Kingdom 










6.1 


21.0 


Netherlands ........ 










3.6 


i 12.3 




0.2 


0.2 






8.7 i 


29.9 


Chile ....... ... 








2.5 


8.6 


Burma .............. 






36.4 


77.5 




Argentina : 






1.7 


3.6 






Madagascar ......... 


1/ 4.2 ! 


4.8 - 












0.7 


0.8 : 










Other 


4.4 s 


5.0 : 


1.0 


2.1 : 


0.7 


2.4 


Total 


■ 87.8 


100.0 


47.0 : 


100.0 


29.1 


100.0 



l/ White and lima beans only. 

2/ Excludes 24,900 tons of low-value beans assumed to be for feed. 
3/ Includes 2800 tons of lima beans. 
4/ Butter beans. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of 
official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, 
reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, 
results of office research and related- information. 



- 14 - 



BEANS, DRY EDIBLE: International Trade, average 1955-59, annual 1961-1963 



Continent and country 


.' Average 1955-59 


! 1961 


1962 


, 1963 




















. Exports 


. Imports 


. Exports 


. Imports 


. Exports 


Imports 


. Exports 


. Imports 




: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




: bags l/ 


bags l/ 


: bags \J 


bags l/ 


bags \J 


bags l/ 


bags l/ 
=1- 


bags l/ 


North America: 

























: 104 


8 ! ! 


340 


67 


296 


68 


Costa Hica , , , . ., 


: 6 


: 50 










39 


2 






93 


: 1 


277 


: -- 


343 
6 


13 


320 


Guatemala ............. 


— 


24 


19 


1 


5 


8 


19 


Mexico .................. 


89 


: 378 


-- 


109 


: 53 


72 


697 


191 




39 


14 

: 9 


10 


: 


80 


— 


22 


— 




: 2/ 


— 


37 


: 


37 


— 


31 




2,610 


141 


1,637 


122 


2,146 


53 


4,608 


2 


Total 


2,744 


709 


1,771 


636 


2,624 


579 


5,681 


633 


South America: 


















Argentina ■ Ba «»«« 0 *oooo<ooe*o*o* 


35 




94 




210 




216 




Brazil O ooo<. 0 .o.o o . . <> o . 9 . o • 









5 




87 




23 


Chile O o,oo 0 ., ooe .. 0 0 


496 




551 




419 




347 




Colombia 0 • 0 . „ „ 0 




133 




29 










Peru oe .. OOOD , 0fl « 1( ,o ( .oo oo 




g 


4 


15 


g 


18 


7 


4 


Venezuela , „ 0 


__ 


34 




40 




268 




348 


Total 


531 


173 


649 


89 


635 


373 


570 


375 


Europe ; 




















99 


241 


42 


108 


83 


268 


110 


310 


France oeooo . B . 0 <> • 


139 


399 


171 


365 


92 


680 


54 


811 


Germany , West B ••••••• • » 


14 


589 


42 


718 


54 


1,204 


48 


1 , 193 


Greece 


3 


179 


15 


23 


115 


18 


8 


106 


Italy 


142 


149 


243 


25 


: 186 


46 


58 


274 




258 


281 


357 


4.91 


99*} 
(LOO 






ouo 


Portugal co..................... 


80 


81 


129 


25 


201 


7 


60 


Spain , . . 


2 


37 


12 


11 


55 


27 


15 • 


285 


Sweden . . . , . . 


— 


57 


— 


31 


— 


39 


— 


53 




2/ 


73 





87 


— 


90 


— 


67 






1,520 





1,299 




1,449 




2,063 




140 


69 


226 


— 


18 


— 


7 • 


69 


Total ...... ............. 


877 


3,675 


1,237 


3,113 


1,037 


4,162 


565 


5,794 


Asia: 


















Burma ■ 


545 


__ 


458 





441 





444 







115 : 

— 


624 • 

— 


336 


349 : 


58 

: 


899 • 


11 

— 


1,307 


Lebanon 


4 


24 


24 


51 


Malaysia 


— 


— 


— 


273 • 


— 


314 


: 22 


291 




193 


— 


63 


-- 


19 


: 


21 : 


— 


Total ....................... 


853 


624 


861 


646 


518 


1,237 : 


498 


1,649 


Africa: 


















Angola ooa 


266 


u 


209 : 




224 




243 


11 


Madagascar ..................... 


312 : 




342 




269 : 




206 




Morocco ........................ 


8 : 


2 


38 


13 


17 


4 


6 


16 


Total .: 


586 


2 


589 


13 


510 ■ 


4 


455 


27 


Grand total 


5,591 


5,183 


5,107 


4,497 


5,324 ■ 


6,355 


7,769 


8,478 



l/ 100 pound bags. ~2j Less than 500 bags. 3/ Azuki and kidney beans only. 

or estimated 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared/on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign 
source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research 
and related information. 



- 15 - 



Prounced increases in shipments to several African countries, new large 
exports to the Philippine Republic, and increased quantities to Western Europe 
more than offset declines in exports to some countries to which rice was 
exported in I963. 

During the four months, exports to Western Europe show the largest per- 
centage increase — 73 percent — as compared with the August -November 1963 period. 
While the principal increase occurred in exports to West Germany, moderate 
advances were also registered in exports to several other European countries. 

Major decreases were as follows, with August -November I963 exports in 
parentheses in tons: Indonesia, 0 (k2,kGC); India, 68,^00 (88,700); Dominican 
Republic, 100 ( 10,500); Saudi Arabia, 11,200 (17,400), and Poland, 0 (k,200) , 

November exports totaled 68,500 metric tons, a 26 percent decrease from 
shipments of November 19^3 . This decrease was due mainly to reduced exports 
to India and Indonesia. Shipments to these countries were 20,000 tons as com- 
pared to 52,900 tons the same month in 1963. (Table on page 17) 

ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORTS 
UP 88 PERCENT 

Argentina exported 3*8 million metric tons of grain during July-November 
196^. This represents an increase of 88 percent over the exports during the 
same period last year. Exports of all grains continue to run substantially 
above shipments for the comparable period in 1963. Production of all grains 
for the I963 crop was high, thus resulting in larger exports during the year. 
Prospects for another large crop in grains is expected for I96U. Planting of 
corn and grain sorghums is nearing completion under favorable conditions. 
Corn and wheat are the leading grains exported and are ^7 a^d 31 percent 
respectively of the total grains exported. 

Wheat exports totaled 1.2 million tons and more than doubled the 572,000 
tons shipped during July-November 1963. Shipments to Brazil, all countries of 
the Common Market, and the United Kingdom showed substantial increases. The 
Argentine Government is working hard to find markets for as much wheat as 
possible, which may be the largest exportable surplus that the country has had 
in many years. Exports to Colombia, Uruguay, Venezuela, East Germany, Norway, 
Communist China, and Republic of South Africa totaled 207,000 tons compared 
with none last year. Czechoslovakia and Portugal received shipments during 
July -November 1963 compared to none this year. 

Corn shipments totaled 1.8 million metric tons and showed an increase of 
60 percent over the 1.1 million tons shipped during the same period a year 
earlier. Increased shipments took place in most of the countries, particularly, 
Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Exports to Cuba, Uruguay, East Germany, 
Hungary, Yugoslavia, and Communist China totaled 113,000 tons compared with 
none during July -November I963. 



(Continued on page 18) 



RICE MILLED l/: U.S. exports to specified countries, November 1964 with comparisons 



August-November 



Destination 



1963 



1964 



October 



November 



1963 



1964 



1963 



: 1 , 000 

: m. t. 

Western Hemispheres s 

Canada : 10.3 

-Nicaragua : 2.5 

Bahamas 2.1 

Jamaica s 2.6 

Dominican Republic : 10.5 

Trinidad : 2/ 

Netherlands Antilles 1.6 

Venezuela : 0.7 

Peru : .3 

Chile 1.2 

Other countries : 1.9 

Total 33.7 

Western Europe: : 
EEC : 

Belgium-Luxembourg i 3.0 

France : .5 

Germany, West : 5.3 

Italy 2/ 

Netherlands : 4.2 

Total 13.0 

Other Western Europe: : 

Portugal 2/ 

Sweden : 1.3 

United Kingdom : 5.1 

Switzerland 1.1 

Other countries : 2.0 

Total : 9.5 

Eastern Europe: : 

Poland 4.2 t 

U.S.S.R 0 : 

Total : 4.2 

Total Europe : 26.7 

Asia: : 

Iraq .4 

Israel : 2.3 

Kuwait : 2.3 

Saudi Arabia : 17.4 

Aden : 1.6 

India 88.7 

Indonesia : 42.4 

Japan ; 2/ 

Malaysia : .1 

Nansei and Nanpo Islands n.e.c 12.6 

Philippines, Republic of : 2/ 

Other countries .6 

Total : 168.4 

Africa: : 

West Africa, n.e.c : .2 

Ghana : 8.1 

Liberia : 6.2 

Congo, Republic of 3.2 

South Africa, Republic of : 13.7 

Other countries : 1.8 

Total : 33.2 

Oceania: : 2.8 

: 

World total : 264.8 



1,000 
m. t. 

7.9 
1.8 
1.2 
3.1 
0.1 

2/ 
2.3 

2/ 
.5 
1.5 
2.2 



1,000 
m. t. 

3.2 

0 

0.4 
0.9 
2/ 
0 
.4 
.7 
2/ 
.2 
.1 



20.6 



5.9 



1,000 
m. t. 

2.2 
0.9 

.3 
1.0 

.1 

2/ 
.5 

2/ 
.1 

.4 
.5 



6.0 



1,000 
m. t. 

4.9 

2/ 
1.2 
0.6 

2/ 

2/ 
.3 

2/ 
.1 

.7 
.2 



8.0 



1.3 
2.0 
8.2 

2/ 
3.0 



.9 

0 
2.1 

0 
1.1 



14.5 : 



4.1 



0 
2.1 
6.5 : 
2.9 
4.9 



16.4 



30.9 



0 
.6 
1.7 
.2 
.6 



.5 

0 
1.3 



2.8 



1.7 
.2 
2.4 
0 
1.3 



5.6 



0 
.7 
2.1 
1.1 
1.6 



3.1 



7.2 



5.5 



0 
.1 
1.1 
.4 



2.4 : 



8.3 



1.6 
3.3 
2.3 

11.2 
2.6 

68.4 
0 

2/ 
.1 
12.2 
50.0 
1.3 



39 
15 



48 



1 

6 
5 
7 
3 
0 

2/ 
o 

5.9 

2/ 
♦ 2 



4.2 

0 



4.2 



12.2 



0 
1.1 
1.2 
5.5 
.4 
39.2 
13.7 

2/ 
0 

1.9 
0 
■ 1 



153.0 : 



68.4 : 



60.1 



10.1 
11.9 
11.3 

8.8 
12.9 

5.5 



60.5 



2/ 

2.5 
2.3 

0 

1.9 
.6 



63.1 



5.1 : 


.1 : 


5.1 


1.7 : 


2.9 » 


3.5 


2.8 : 


1.7 : 


2.8 


1.4 : 


0 : 


7.2 


4.3 : 


3.2 : 


3.6 


.8 : 


.5 : 


1.2 



7.3 



2.8 : 



16.1 : 



8.4 



267.8 



89.4 



96 .8 



23.4 



1.2 



92.0 



68.5 



1/ Includes small quantity of rough rice in milled equivalent. 
2/Less than 50 tons. 
Source: Bureau of Census 



- 17 - 



Sorghum exports totaled 391*000 tons compared with 297,000 tons 
shipped during the same period last year. This was a 32 percent increase 
and was attributed mainly to larger shipments to West Germany, Spain, 
Communist China, and Japan. However, this increase was partly offset by 
decreased exports of 119,000 tons to Belgium-Luxembourg, the Netherlands, 
Denmark, the United Kingdom, and Israel. 

Exports of rye, oats and barley totaled 402,000 tons during July- 
November I96U and showed a sharp increase over the 4-1,000 tons shipped 
during July -November 1963. Only Italy and West Germany received rye 
during the first five months of fiscal I963, while Brazil and Italy 
were the only markets receiving barley. These exports are now going to 
eight markets for rye and seven markets for barley with increased ship- 
ments of 219,000 tons. Exports of oats have increased more than five 
times the quantity shipped during the same period last year. 

U.S. FEED GRAIN EXPORTS 
INCREASE 17 PERCENT 

Exports of U.S. feed grains for July -November 1964- totaled 7*2 mil- 
lion metric tons - up 17 percent from the 6.1 million tons for July- 
November 1963. 

Table A shows exports of feed grains by country of destination, 
comparing July-November 1964 with July -November 1963. Shipments of 
feed grains to Canada include a substantial quantity for transhipment 
to other destinations. 

Table B shows the quantities and destination of feed grains inspected 
for export from Canadian ports, and exports from Table A adjusted to a 
new total which reflects transhipments during July-November 1964, as com- 
pared with July-November 1963* These inspections were 2 percent less than 
those during the same period a year ago. 

Corn shipments totaled 5*5 million metric tons and showed an increase 
of 20 percent over the 4.5 million tons shipped during July-November 1963. 
Greater shipments to Canada, (in part transhipments) all countries of the 
Common Market, the United Kingdom, and Japan showed substantial increases. 
This was partly offset by smaller shipments to Mexico, Greece, Ireland, 
East Germany, Hungary, and Israel. Exports to Yugoslavia decreased sub- 
stantially due to an estimated all-time record production. 

Exports of oats totaled 39,000 metric tons and showed a decrease of 
30 percent from the 55*000 tons shipped during July-November 1964. This 
decline occurred in all countries with the exception of Belgium-Luxembourg 
and West Germany which showed substantial increases. Increases in all 
coarse grains for West Germany may be expected for use in feed mainly 
because of the record hog population and, to a smaller degree, because of 
a certain shortage of roughage and potatoes. It appears also almost cer- 
tain that the industrial use of brewing barley will increase. Because of 
these larger requirements we anticipate increased imports of coarse grain 
notwithstanding the larger crop and reduced export possibilities. 
(Continued on page 22) 



-18- 



GRAIN: Argentine exports by country of destination, July-November 1963 and July-November 1964. 



Destination : Wheat 



: Metric 

: tons 

July-November 1963: : 

United States : 

Canada : — 

Barbados : — 

Bolivia : 2,000 

Brazil : 254,385 

Paraguay : 1,800 

Peru : 100, 444 

EEC: 

Belgium-Luxembourg : 6,654- 

France : 17,117 

Germany, West : 17,069 

Italy ....: 105,030 

Netherlands 29.630 

EEC subtotal 175 .500 

Austria : 

Czechoslovakia : 18,054 

Denmark : — 

Spain : — 

Sweden : — 

Switzerland : — 

Portugal : 11,176 

United Kingdom 8,598 

Yugoslavia : — 

Israel : — 

Japan : — 

Total 571.957 

July-November 1964: : 

United States : 

Canada : — 

Barbados : — 

Brazil : 408,111 

Colombia : 21,855 

Cuba : — 

Ecuador : 100 

Paraguay : 18,189 

Peru : 133,304 

Trinidad : — 

Uruguay : 21,450 

Venezuela : 10,160 

EEC: : 

Belgium-Luxembourg : 36,111 

France 102,929 

Germany, West : 10,570 

Italy : 50, 544. 

Netherlands 169.198 

Total EEC 369.352 

Austria : 

Denmark ....: — 

Finland : — 

Germany, East : 54,466 

Hungary : — 

Norway : 11,833 

Spain : 384 

Sweden : — 

Switzerland : — 

United Kingdom 108,668 

Yugoslavia : 

China, Mainland : 53,681 

China, Naturalist : — 

Japan : — 

Singapore : — 

South Africa, Republic of....; 11.989 

Total 1,223,542 



Rye 



Metric 
tons 



165 
2,724 



2.889 



2J 



3,489 

850 
913 
23.426 



28.678 



2,080 

5,468 
3,400 
40 



Com 



Metric 
tons 



4., 262 
250 



91,94-3 
1,903 

32,285 
803 ,044. 
151.424 



1.080.599 



499 

50 
2,089 

9,973 

29,621 

6.998 



1.134,341 



4,455 
800 

35,763 



167 
27,771 



100,816 
12,865 
59,455 
1,239,649 
140.512 



1,553,297 



4,080 
58 

1,634 
11,90a 
508 
68,607 

8,281 
56,131 

1,962 
33,616 

9,886 



39,666 :1, 818,920 



Oats 



Metric 
tons 



7,605 

1,000 
22,414 



23.414 



2,000 
600 



33.619 



6,912 



900 



2,400 

19,593 
71,012 
57.707 



150.712 



10,542 



6,290 



175,356 



Barley 



Metric 
tons 



2,490 



2,100 



2.100 



4.590 



7,141 



1,050 



500 

8,252 
152,438 
7,45 2 



168.642 



9,652 



186,485 



Sorghums 



Metric 
tons 



70 
353 



34,508 
600 
44,095 
4,564- 
55.620 



29,925 

27 
700 

76,948 
483 
28,750 
20-596 



297.239 



75 
764 



200 
500 



19,596 
520 
89,365 
9,733 
30.909 



19,419 
40 

46,358 
950 
14,172 

158,146 

500 



391,247 



Total 



Metric 
tons 

4,262 
70 
603 
2,000 
264,480 
1,800 
100, 444 

134,105 
19,620 
93,614 
939,876 
236.674 



1 .423.889 



499 
18,054 
31,975 
2,089 
27 

11,273 
11,176 
115,167 
483 
28,750 
27,5?4 



2,044,635 



4,455 
75 
1,564- 
422,164- 
21,855 
35,763 
100 
18,189 
133,304 
367 
51,671 
10,160 

162,912 
116,314 
188,085 
1, 52^,289 
429.204 



2.420.804 



4,080 
10,600 
2,080 
56,100 
11,904 
17,809 
88,410 
3,440 
14,571 
211,197 
2,912 
101,469 
9,652 
168,032 
500 
11-989 



3,835,216 



Compiled from 71 Cerealista. 



- 19 - 



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- 21 - 



Barley exports totaled 609,000 metric tons compared with 
^95,000 tons last year and showed an increase of 23 percent. Larger 
shipments went to all countries with the exception of East Germany, 
Yugoslavia, Israel, and the Republic of Korea. 

Sorghum shipments totaled 1.1 million tons and showed a slight 
increase of 2 percent over the same period a year ago. Shipments 
were considerably larger to Belgium-Luxembourg, the Netherlands, 
and the United Kingdom. However, shipments to Switzerland, Poland, 
Israel, and Japan were much smaller. 

Preliminary forecast for July -November 196^ indicates that 
total feed grain exports will be approximately 8.6 million tons - 
7 percent higher than the 8.0 million tons exported during the 
first six months of fiscal year 1963-6^. 



UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF WHEAT 
AND FLOUR SLIGHTLY HIGHER 

United States exports of wheat and flour (grain equivalent) 
between July 1 and November 30, 196k, were slightly higher than for 
the same period last year, but are by no means following the same 
sharp curve upward which has been evidenced for the past year. By 
July -November 1963, U.S. exports were already U3 percent higher 
than the previous year or the highest since World War II. Total 
exports for the current July -November period amount to 315 million 
bushels, or less than 2 percent over July -November 1963. 

Much of this is due, of course, to the decreasing need in 
Western Europe for importing wheat. A near record harvest of wheat 
was reported in all countries of Western Europe except Portugal and 
Spain, with particular gains in France, Greece, the United Kingdom, 
and Italy. Consequently exports of wheat and flour to this area 
which amounted to k-5 million bushels in the first five months of 
196^ fiscal year only reached a total of 17 million bushels during 
the first five months of this fiscal year. 

Exports to countries in Eastern Europe, however, doubled 
during this period with almost all of the 13 million bushels going 
to Yugoslavia. No influx of the large shipments to the USSR were 
evidenced until January 196^. 

Over 56 percent of all wheat and flour shipments, 177 million 
bushels, went to the Asiatic countries. This was 9 percent more 
than was shipped to this area in the July -November I963 period. 
Exports of wheat and flour to India alone totalled 97 million 
bushels or 31 percent of all U.S. exports for the period. Another 
15 percent went to Pakistan and Japan. 



-22- 



Approximately "J2 percent of the shipments to African countries went 
to the United Arab Republic. Thirty million bushels was destined for 
this country out of kl million bushels to the African continent. 

Grain shipments to date in this fiscal year dropped almost 2 percent 
under those for the same period last year. Out of 2'jk million bushels 
exported, 35 percent was destined for India, 13 percent to Brazil, and 
11 percent to Pakistan. Shipments to Brazil also denoted an increase of 
almost 100 percent over those to that country during July-November 1963. 
A poor crop has made wheat a major deficit food item in Brazil which is 
reflected in the huge grain exports to that country from the United 
States . 

Flour exports, on the other hand, increased 13 percent during July- 
November 196^ as compared with July -November 1963. Out of ho million 
bushels, 33 percent or 13 million bushels were exported to the United 
Arab Republic. 

Table A shows exports of wheat and flour by country of destination 
comparing the July-November 196^ period with July -November 196^. Ship- 
ments of wheat to Canada are predominantly for transhipment to other 
destinations. 

Table B shows the quantities and destination of wheat inspected for 
export from Canadian ports and exports from Table A adjusted to a new 
total which reflects transhipments during July-November 196^ compared 
with the same period a year earlier. These inspections amounted to less 
than one-third of those reported in the first five months of the 1963-6^ 
fiscal year. 

Exports of U.S. wheat and flour are expected to reach 386 million 
bushels by December 31 > 196^, as compared with 38if million bushels in the 
first six months of the I963-6U fiscal year. 

CANADIAN EXPORTS OF BARLEY 
AND OATS UP 27 PERCENT 

Canadian exports of barley and oats totaled 258,000 metric tons 
during July-October 196^ — 27 percent more than the 203,000 tons shipped 
during a similar period last year. Barley shipments accounted for the 
substantial increase, while exports of oats declined considerably. 

Barley exports for July-October 196^ totaled 238,000 tons and showed 
a gain of 66 percent over the lifif,000 tons shipped during the same period 
a year earlier. About two -fifths of the total barley exports went to the 
United States. Shipments to Communist China, Italy and Peru totaled 
66,000 tons compared with none during July-October I963. However, this 
was partly offset by decreased shipments to the United Kingdom and the 
Republic of Korea. 

Exports of oats totaled 19,000 tons — a decrease of 67 percent from 
the 59>000 tons shipped during July-October 1963. All major markets showed 
a marked decline with the exception of the United Kingdom which increased 
by if 7 percent. (Table on page 27) 

-23- 



Table A. — WHEAT AND FLOUR l/: U.S. exports by country of destination, 
July-November 1963 and July-November 1964 



July-November 1963 



Destination 



Wheat 



Flour 2/ 



Total 



Julv-November 1964 



Wheat : Flour 2/ 



: 1 ,000 

: bushels 

Western Hemisphere: : 

Canada _3_/ : 22,541 

Mexico : ij 

British Honduras : — 

Canal Zone : — 

Costa Rica : 2 

El Salvador : 566 

Guatemala : 920 

Honduras : 251 

Nicaragua : 118 

Panama, Republic of : 347 

Bahamas : ij 

Barbados : 20 

Dominican Republic : 586 

Haiti : 351 

Jamaica : 6 

Leeward and Windward Islands , : — 

Netherlands Antilles — 

Trinidad and Tobago : 2 

Bolivia : — 

Brazil : 17,670 

British Guiana : — 

Chile : 984 

Colombia : 2,101 

Ecuador : 277 

Paraquay : 155 

Peru : 1,938 

Surinam : — 

Uruguay : — 

Venezuela A. 175 

Total 53.010 

Western Europe: : 
EEC : 

Belgium-Luxembourg : 2,738 

France : 5,725 

Italy 2,348 

Netherlands : 6,932 

West Germany : 4.560 

Total : 22.303 

Other Western Europe: : 

Azores _ : — 

Cyprus : 377 

Denmark : 19 

Finland : — 

Gibraltar : 

Greece : 446 

Iceland : 6 

Ireland .: 41 

Malta : — 

Norway : 967 

Portugal : 799 

Spain : 2,915 

Sweden : 438 

Switzerland 3,864 

Turkey 4,542 

United Kingdom : 5.212 

Total 19.626 

Eastern Europe: : 

Hungary : 110 

Poland : 3,028 

Rumania : 

Yugoslavia 1.902 

Total : 5.040 

Total Europe : 46.969~ 



1,000 
bushels 

111 

594 
95 
2 

304 
47 
33 
51 
95 
143 
13 
29 
70 
48 
217 
27 
115 
485 
1,584 
143 
371 
299 
336 
3 

126 
121 
138 
21 
J^7_ 



5,768 



1,000 
bushels 

22,652 
594 
95 
2 

306 
613 
953 
302 
213 
490 
13 
49 
656 
399 
223 
27 
115 
487 
1,584 
17,813 
371 
1,283 
2,437 
280 
281 
2,059 
138 
21 
4,3?2 



1,000 
bushels 

8,007 
19 



2 

214 
914 
331 
255 
297 



58.778 



9 
360 
883 



1 

35,101 
11 
3,957 
1,976 
396 
392 
1,211 



4,612 



58.948 



11 

1,162 

570 



1.751 



2,749 
5,725 
3,510 
7,502 
A-568 



24.054 



11 

~U 

2 

871 
175 



9 
333 



152 
J2. 



1.638 



392 
642 



1*234 



A, 423 



388 
19 

U 
2 

1,317 
181 
41 

976 
1,132 
2,915 

444 
3,864 
4,694 
5.291 



226 
811 
2,316 
4,431 
_219_ 



8-703 



232 



1,000 
bushels 

90 
577 
98 
5 

304 
43 
53 
45 
52 
100 
10 
49 
76 
49 
523 
30 
133 
491 
2,840 
403 
525 
763 
154 
73 
2 

181 
163 
20 
126 



7. 978 



3 
3 

690 
344 : 
A 



1.044 



21.264 



2,229 

20 
455 
1,978 
740 



110 

3,420 

2 ,544 



6.074 



51 .392 



5.658 



913 
41 
11,455 



12.409 



26.770 



U 
1 

3 

315 
163 

18 

482 
120 
4 

79 
_12J_ 



1.308 



91 



JUL 



2.567 



- 24 - 



Table A. — WHEAT AND FLOOR 1/: U.S. Exports by Country of Destination, 
July-November 1963 and July-November 1964 (Continued) 



July-November 1963 



July-November 1964. 



Destination 



: Whe^at 


• Flour 2/ 


Total 


Wheat 


Flour 2/ 


Total 


: '1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


: bushel s 


bushels 


bushels 


bushel s 


bushels 


bushels 











14 


14 


1,286 


78 


1,364 


40 


1 


41 


i 110 


26 


136 




60 


60 




144 
8 


144 

8 





215 


215 




444 


444 





628 


628 


64,383 


81 


64,464 


96,679 


165 


96,844 




/|/<4 


444 




3 


3 


l 95 


303 


398 


3,488 


95 


3,583 


1,847 


19 


1,866 


29 


431 


460 


4,086 


s . 34 


4,120 


3,902 


50 


3,952 


! 539 


'1,635 


2,174 




1,630 


1,630 


: 4 


421 


425 


22 


375 


397 


: 4 


49 


53 




20 


20 


r 45 


475 


: 520 





608 


608 




77 


77 




57 


57 


: 47 


i 78 


125 


36 


47 


1 83 


26,044 


17 


26,061 


28,910 


51 


28,961 


3,361 


125 


3,486 


2,212 


255 


2,467 


9 


1,121 


1,130 


76 


1,778 


1,854 










35 


. 35 


• 


: 20 


: 20 


* — — 


35 


35 


! 6 


1,022 


1,028 


95 


1,160 


1,255 


: 60 


: 324 


: 384 


i 101 


181 


I 282 


: 31,793 


1,178 


32,971 


18,785 


333 


19,118 


: 13,203 


: 505 


13,708 


5,690 


2,955 


8,645 


: 218 


i 274 


492 


298 


259 


557 


: 5,566 


588 


6.154 


5.222 


247 


5,469 


: 152.706 


9,490 


162.196 


165,585 


11.688 


177.273 


4,164 


i 425 


4,589 


2,796 


165 


2,961 




1 83 


: 83 




: 1 


1 


1,012 


1,236 


2,248 


: 75 


1,512 


1,587 


1,178 


1,352 


2,530 


1,047 


1 .424 
> * < 


2,471 


1,297 


88 


1 ,385 


382 


169 


> 551 


12,986 


9,812 


22,798 


16,366 


13,361 


29,727 


456 


36 


i 492 


471 


41 


512 




: 4 


4 




4 


4 


: — 


29 


29 


— 


35 


35 




5 


5 


449 




449 


66 


2,337 


2,403 


63 


1,001 


1 ,064 




7 


7 




4 


4 


4 


60 


64 




56 


: 56 




14 


14 




1 


1 


3 


37 


40 


1 


64 


65 


t 92 


32 


124 


! 275 


12 


287 


116 


60 


176 




3 


3 


839 


30 


869 


1,078 


10 


1,088 


6 




6 




49 


49 








a/ 


15 


15 


239 




239 




1 


1 


63 


353 


416 




11 


11 




17 


17 





23 


23 


7 


20 


27 




12 


12 




23 


23 


_ 


30 


30 








3 


3 


6 


2 


9 


11 


17 


9 


26 


123 


V 


123 




1 


1 


1 




1 




18 


18 


3 045 


32 


3,077 




1 




: 33 




33 


57 




57 


: 25.732 


16.101 


U.833 


23.080 


18 .036 


a. 116 




3 


3 




5 


5 




1 


1 




5 


5 




1 


1 




2 


2 




21 


21 




?4 


34 




26 


26 




46 


46 


• 278,417 


35,808 


314,225 


274,383 


40,315 


314,698 



Asia: 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Arabia Peninsula States 

Bahrein 

Cambodia 

Ceylon 



Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan 

Kuwait 

Laos 

Lebanon 

Macao 

Malaysia 

Pakistan : 26,044 

Philippines 

Saudi Arabia 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Hong Kong 

Japan 

Korea 

Nansei and Nanpo Islands 

Taiwan 



Total 152.706 

Africa: 

Algeria 

Libya 

Morocco 

Sudan , 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic ^ 

Angola 

Burundi and Rwanda 

Cameroon, Federal Republic of 

Canary Islands 

Congo (Leopoldville) 

Gabon 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Liberia 

Madeira Islands 

Mauritania 

British East Africa 

Nigeria 

Sierra Leone 

Senegal 

Togo 

Western Africa, n.e.c 

Western Portuguese .Africa 

Ethiopia 

French Somaliland 

Kenya 

Malagasy Republic 

Mozambique 

Somali Republic 

South Africa, Republic of 

North Rhodesia, South Rhodesia and Nyasaland . 



Oceania: 

Australia 

British West Pacific Islands .. 

New Zealand 

Trust Territory of the Pacific 
Total 



World total : 278,417 



1/ Data includes shipments for relief or charity. 2/ Grain equivalent, 
ment to other destination - see Table B. Ij Less than 500 bushels. 



3_/ The bulk of exports to Canada are for tranship- 



- 25 - 



Table B. — WHEAT AND FLOUR: U.S. exports as adjusted for transhipment 
through Canadian ports, July-November 1963 and July-November 1964 



July-November 1963 



Wheat in- 
spected for 
exports from 

Canadian 
ports 



Adjusted 
totals for 
listed 
countries 



July-November 1964. 



Wheat in- 
spected for 
export from 
Canadian 
ports 



Adjusted 
totals for 
listed 
countries 



EEC: : 
Belgium-Luxembourg . . . : 

France : 

Germany, West : 

Italy . : 

Netherlands : 

Total :\ 

• 
• 

Venezuela : 

Brazil : 

United Kingdom : 

Ireland : 

Spain : 

Portugal : 

Yugoslavia : 

Poland : 

U.S.S.R : 

United Arab Republic . : 

Canary Islands : 

Nigeria : 

Madeira Islands : 

Mozambique : 

Total :" 



1,000 
bushels 

3,H6 
269 
552 

8 ,56? 



74.2 
108 
986 

194. 
230 
781 

1,363 

5,921 
708 
507 
331 

Ml. 



1,000 
bushels 

5,895 
5,994 
5,120 
3,510 
16.071 



?6, 59Q 



24,820 



5,064 
17,921 
22,250 
194 
3,339 
1,913 
2,544 
4,783 

28,719 
713 
1,376 
455 



1,000 
bushels 

38 

78 

£22_ 



584 
84 
1,023 

564 
2,820 

1,677 

436 



1,000 
bushels 

267 
814 
1,001 
3,006 



10.286 



4,738 
35,504 
1,447 
84 
1,143 
3,275 
14,399 
1,004 
1,677 
29,727 
2,562 
1,088 
287 
1 



126,397 



7,727 



107,222 



- 26 - 



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- 27 - 



CANADIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR 
EXPORTS UP 2k PERCENT 



Canada exported over 199 million bushels of wheat and flour to 
all destinations between July 1 and October 31, 196*4-. This amount 
represented an increase of 2k percent over the amount exported be- 
tween July 1 and October 13, 19&3- 

Over 63 percent of these shipments went to European countries. 
Out of a total of 126 million bushels exported to this area, 71 
million bushels or 57 percent was destined for Eastern European 
countries. Czechoslovakia and Poland have long-term agreements to 
buy Canadian wheat which is reflected in the tremendous increase in 
exports to these countries. East Germany and Czechoslovakia took 
10 times more wheat and flour in the first four months of this 
fiscal year as compared with the same period last year. Shipments 
to Poland more than doubled, and East Germany, not a market last 
year, has taken over 5 million bushels to date this year. Exports 
to the USSR, while representing the second largest amount from 
Canada, were 6 percent under those for the July-October 1963 period. 

Exports to Western European countries during July-October 196^ 
were generally less than in July-October 1963, particularly to the 
EEC. Those to the United Kingdom, while less than during July- 
October 1963, still represented the largest amount destined for any 
one country during July-October 196^ or 16 percent of the total 
Canadian exports for this period. 

Exports of wheat and flour to the Asiatic countries almost 
doubled those for the same period last year, largely because of 
shipments to Communist China which increased almost 300 percent, 
to India and Pakistan with 100 percent increases, and Japan with 
an increase of 27 percent. 

Over 75 percent of the k million bushels destined for Africa 
went to the Republic of South Africa. Canada also sent almost 
3 million bushels of wheat and flour to Cuba under USSR sponsorship. 

Approximately 9^ percent of Canada's exports of these com- 
modities were in the form of wheat grain. A trend to more markets 
for bulk grain and less in the form of flour is expected as more 
countries construct their own mills. The United Kingdom, the USSR 
and Communist China were the largest markets for wheat grain. 

Flour shipments amounted to 13 million bushels or ^5 percent 
more than during July-October 1963. United Kingdom received 
28 percent of the over-all total, the USSR 23 percent, and Cuba, 
17 percent. 



-28- 



WHEAT AND FLOUR: Canadian exports by country of destination, July-October 1963 and July-October 1964 



July-October 



Destination 



Wheat 



Flour 1/ 



Total 



July-October 1964 



'//heat 



Flour 1/ 



Total 



: 1,000 

: bushels 

Western Hemisphere: : 

United States : 206 

Miquelon and St. Pierre : — 

British Honduras — 

Costa Rica 

Honduras : — 

El Salvador : 300 

Guatemala : 100 

Nicaragua : — 

Panama . ' — 

Bahamas • • — 

Berbados : 

Bermuda : — 

Cuba 894 

Dominican Republic : 546 

French West Indies : — 

Haiti — 

Jamaica : 4 

Leeward and Windward Islands : — 

Netherlands Antilles : — 

Trinidad and Tobago : — 

British Guiana — 

Chile : — 

Colombia : 

Ecuador .....: 371 

Peru : 731 

Surinam : — 

Venezuela : 2.293 

Total : 5.445 

Western Europe: : 
EEC : 

Belgium-Luxembourg : 8 ,601 

France : 3,168 

Italy : 2,859 

Netherlands : 2,026 

West Germany : 15.745 

Total : 32.399 

Other Western Europe: : 

Austria : — 

Denmark : 21 

Gibraltar : — 

Greece : 

Iceland : — 

Ireland : 2,136 

Malta 281 

Norway : 1,667 

Portugal : — 

Spain : — 

Sweden 22 

Switzerland 3,473 

United Kingdom : 30.059 

Total : 37.659 

Eastern Europe: : 

Albania : — 

Bulgaria : — 

Czechoslovakia : 1,430 

Eastern Germany : — 

Poland : 7,300 

U.S.S.R : 30,548 

Yugoslavia 7.422 

Total : 46.703 

Total Europe : 116. ''58 



1,000 
bushels 

270 
5 

16 
165 

14 
4 

11 
220 
'74 
108 

52 

a 

37 
1 
30 
404 
356 
95 
530 
6 
5 



17 
22 



2,48? 



1,000 
bushel s 

476 

16 
165 

14 
304 
111 
220 

74 
108 

52 

a 

894 
583 
1 
30 
408 
356 
95 
530 
6 
5 

371 
748 
22 
2.293 



1,000 
bushels 



294 
100 
102 
78 



2/ 
,086 
617 



7.928 



444 
385 

L223 



8.103 



22 



26 



8,623 
3,168 
2,859 
2,030 
15,745 



5,106 
2,155 
2,004 
776 
8.629 



32,425 



18.670 



2 
12 
1 
2 



45 
1 

4.101 



4,164 



23 
12 
1 
2 

2,136 
281 
1,667 
45 

23 
3,473 
34.160 



41.823 



679 



452 
1,601 



11 
2,014 
27.520 



32.277 



1,430 

7,300 
30,548 
7.422 



2,147 
3,661 
16,006 
5,133 
15,323 
25,890 



4,190 



46.700 



120.948 



68.160 



1,000 
bushels 

275 
6 

12 
267 

13 

2/ 
5 
1 

32 
85 
54 
37 
2,218 
20 
1 
14 
476 
307 
70 
437 
11 
1 
1 

12 
18 



4,37? 



35 
2 



J2L 



23 
8 
1 



3-581 



3.621 



2,887 



119.107 



2.887 



1,000 
bushels 

275 
6 
12 
267 
13 
294 
105 
103 
110 
85 
54 
2,123 
2,835 
20 
1 

14 

480 
307 
70 
437 
11 
1 
.1 
444 
397 
18 
3-993 



12.476 



5,141 
2,155 
2,006 
776 
8.629 



18.707 



679 
1 

5 
2 

452 
1,601 
23 
8 
12 
2,014 
31.101 



35.898 



2,147 
3,661 
16,006 
5,133 
15,323 
28,777 



6 ,54? 



71.047' 



12 5,652 



- 29 - 



WHEAT AND FLOUR: Canadian exports by country of destination, July-October 1963 and July-October 1964 (Continued) 



July-October 1963 



Destination 



July-October 1964 



Wheat 


Flour 1/ : 


Total : 


Wheat : 


Flour 1/ : 


Total 


1,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1,000 


bushel s 


bushels : 


bushel s : 


bushels : 


bushels : 


bushels 




17 : 


17 : 


, 


13 : 


13 




1 ; 


1 : 


. 






79 


49 ' 


128 : 


. 


159 • 


159 




611 ! 


611 i 













, 


3,201 





3,201 




. 


, 




126 


126 





2 


2 • 





2 


2 


1 ,195 


5 


1,200 


1 ,065 





1,065 




1 


1 




2/ 


2/ 





8 


8 


_ 


11 


11 





20 


20 





257 


257 


i ?,3 


250 


433 


301 


172 


473 








1,837 





1,837 


3,268 





3,268 


2,717 





2,717 




6 


6 





2 


2 


704 


1 


705 


314 


3 


317 




107 


107 




141 


141 


6,507 




6,507 


25,728 




25,728 


511 





511 









246 


: 295 


541 


308 


270 


578 


15,683 


! 74 


15,757 


19,946 


! 19 


19,965 


— 

78 


: 3 
— 


: 3 
78 


— 

240 


: — 
— 


: 

240 


28.454 


s 1,450 


■ 29,904 


55,657 


! 1,17? 


: 56.832 




: 1 


! 1 


. _ 


: 2 


: 2 




i 224 


s 224 


! 


• 







— — 




i 


'■■ 2/ 


: 2/ 


— 


! 16 


! 16 


: — 


: 35 


: 35 










: 12 


i 12 




! 244 


: 244 




s 289 


t 289 




s u 


! 41 


, 


: a 


: 21 


219 


t 21 


I 240 


! 202 


: 1 


: 203 




: 27 


: 27 




: 26 


: 26 




, 


i 


. 


: 1 
! 227 


i 1 
i 227 




. 


■ 


. 


: 1 


: 1 




: 62 


• 62 


. 

■ 


: 52 


! 52 




188 


• 

: 10 


. 

: 198 


. 


: 3 
! 12 


1 3 
: 12 




: 2 


i 2 


; 


l 2 


: 2 








! 9 




: 9 




! 17 


: 17 




: 4 


: 4 


407 




■ £07 


: 2 870 




: 2 870 




: 




: ' 48 




' 48 


814 


: 665 


: 1.479 


s 3,129 


! 688 


: 3.817 





! 2 


: 2 


» 


: 1 


t 1 


— 

163 


! 1 
i 1 


: 1 
164 


: — 


! — 

: 2/ 


! — 
1 I?? 


163 


: 4 


s 167 


■ 153 


: 1 


: 154 


216 




• 216 


2 5 1 




■ 251 


151.850 


: 8.792 


. 160.642 


186.400 


: 12.782 


: 199.182 



Asia: 

Aden • 

Qater 

Burma 

Ceylon 

India , 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan . ... 

Philippines 

Portuguese Asia n.e.c 

Saudi Arabia 

Thailand 

Communist China 

Korea, Republic of t 

Hong Kong 

Japan 

British East Indies , 

Taiwan 

Total 

Africa: 

Angola 

British Africa n.e.c 

Cameroon 

Congo (Leopoldville) 

Gambia 

Ghana 

Liberia 

Nigeria 

Portuguese Africa n.e.c 

Guinea 

Sierra Leone , 

Ivory Coast : 

Togo ,, 

British East Africa 

Mozambique 

Tanganyika 

Northern Rhodesia , 

Nyasaland 

Republic of South Africa 

Southern Rhodesia 

Total 

Oceania: . 

Fiji 

French Oceania , 

United States Oceania , 

Total 



Unspecified 2/ 



World total : 151.850 



1/ Grain equivalent. 2/ Less than 50 bushels. 2/ Includes bagged seed wheat. 
Compiled from records of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada. 



- 30 - 



V 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WASHINGTON 25, D. C. 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



Official Business 



BTXCI 

If you no l onger ne ed this publication, 
check here / . "7 return this sheet, 
and your name will be dropped froa the 
sailing list. 

If your address should be changed, print 
or type the nev address on this sheet 
and return the whole sheet to: 

Foreign agricultural Service, Rm. 5918 
U. S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington 25, D. C. 




MAR 1 1 1965 

CURRENT SERIAL RECORDS 



CONTENTS 
FEBRUARY 1965 

WORLD SUMMARIES Page 
Production: 

Raisin Pack Above Average 3 

Stone Fruit Production Increases 5 

1964 World Dried Fig Pack Drops 10 

Currant Pack Below Average 12 

Record World Cocoa Bean Crop 14 

Lentil Production Slightly Down in 20 Countries 17 

Corn Crop Second of Record 19 

Garbanzo Production Down, Mainly in India 22 

Cotton Production Again at Record High 22 

Flaxseed Production Down Moderately 26 

Stocks: 

Sugar Stocks Change Little in 1963-64 26 

COUNTRY SUMMARIES 

U.S. Feed Grain Exports Continue Up 30 

United States Exports of Wheat and Flour Continue Slight Gain 32 

U.S. Rice Exports Below A Year Ago 33 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
FORIIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 



Single copies free to persons in the United States 
fr«m the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du-8-2^+5 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars 



FD 2-65 Per Capita Consumption of Dairy Products, I962 and 19^3 

FC 2-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles I 
and IV, Public Law k8o 

FCF I-65 Winter Citrus Prospects for Competition in Europe 

FDP I-65 World Dry Pea Production Up in 196k 

FDP 2-65 World Dry Bean Production Down in 196^ 

FG I-65 Exports of U.S. Coarse Grain Products Increase Over Last Year 

FG 2-65 Record 196^- World Bread Grain Crop Confirmed 

FG 3-65 U.S. Exports of Prepared and Mixed Feeds Drop From the High 
Level of 1962-63 

FFVS 2-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. exports, Nov. 196^4- with 
Comparisons 

FCOF I-65 196^-65 Coffee Estimates Down Slightly 
FTEA I-65 Larger World Pepper Crop in 196^ 



WORLD RAISIN PACK 
ABOVE AVERAGE 



The 196^ world raisin pack is now estimated at 560,900 short tons. 
Though slightly smaller than originally forecast, the I96U pack is nearly 
15,000 tons larger than the I963 pack and over 36,000 tons larger than 
average. The earlier 196^ estimate of 50,000 tons for Iran has been 
reduced by 10,000 tons, making it the shortest Iranian pack since 19^9* 
The estimate of the I963 Cyprus pack has been sharply reduced; that pack 
only totaled 2,000 tons according to official statistics. 



RAISINS: Estimated commercial production, 
average 1958-62, annual 1962-6^ 



Country 



Average 
1958-62 



1962 



1963 ; 196U 



Short tons - -- -- -- - 

Australia: : 

Lexias : 8,200 8,500 7,600 9,000 

Sultanas : 71,600 89,500 61,300 9^,200 

Cyprus : 9,200 12,000 2,000 2/ 9,200 

Greece : 61,600 96,500 59,000 75,000 

Iran : 60,600 55,000 65,000 1+0,000 

South Africa, Republic of : 7,100 7,700 7,700 8,200 

Spain : 13,000 9,^00 11,600 12,500 

Turkey : 88.800 99.000 66.COO 75.000 

Foreign total : 320,100 377, 6C0 280,200 323, ICO 

United States i 20^,U00 191,000 1/266,000 237,800 

Grand total : 32^,500 568,600 l/^6, 200 560,900 

1/ Includes 1+9,000 tons substandard rain-damaged raisins. 2/ 1958-62 
average; I96I+ estimate unavailable. 

Foreign production, at 323,100 tons in I96I+ was virtually the same as 
the 5 -year (1958-62) average but nearly 1+3,000 tons above the I963 level. 
Australia, Greece, South Africa, Spain, and Turkey all had larger crops than 
in I963. Australian I96I+ production was exceptionally heavy, the sultan 
pack of 9^,200 tons being the largest in Australian history. There is still 
some uncertainty about the size of the Turkish pack with some sources pre- 
dicting a lower outturn than 75,000 tons. 

The California pack of 237,800 tons is 33,^00 tons larger than average. 
Though it seems to be smaller than the 1963 pack of 266,000 tons, it is 
actually larger in terms of marketable raisins because 1+9,000 tons of the 
I963 pack were substandard due to rain damage and only 217,000 tons were of 
marketable quality. Excluding substandard California raisins, the world 
pack would total 1+97,200 tons for 1963 making the I96I+ pack nearly 61+, 000 
tons larger than the 1963 pack. 



As for current export availabilities, California has the largest stocks on 
hand, followed by Australia; modest tonnages are still held in Greece and Turkey, 
while Iranian supplies are extremely light. 



RAISINS: Exports from 8 leading producing countries, 
average 1958-62, annual I96O-63 seasons l/ 
7 I : Average : 7ZZ : 7ZZ : ~71 : Preliminary 

Countr y : 1958-62: 1960 : 1961 : 1962 : ngfrt 

: ________ Short tons ---------- 



Australia : 6U,000 ^8,300 56,900 7^,200 57,700 

Greece : 53,300 26,800 52,700 87,000 56,200 

Iran : 37,^00 33,000 ^2,000 3^,000 kk,000 

Turkey : 76,500 68,000 78,900 91,200 55,000 

Cyprus, S. Africa, Spain : 17,200 19,800 18,100 19,100 9,000 

Foreign total : 2^8,400 195,900 2U8,6C0 305,500 221,900 

United States i ^,900 6l ; 2QQ 6 ^ to ^5,000 56,100 

Grand total : 296,300 257,100 31^,000 350,500 278,000 

1/ Marketing season beginning August and September for Northern Hemisphere coun- 
tries and January for Southern Hemisphere countries. 

Based on current indications, world raisin exports in 196^-65 may approxi- 
mate 300,000 tons, representing a moderate increase, about 8 percent, over the 
subnormal 1963-6^ export volume of 278,000 tons. Exports averaged 296,300 tons 
in the 5 years 1958-62. 



The above export statistics do not include the relatively minor exports of 
Argentina and Chile (usually less than 2,000 tons annually) or those of 
Afghanistan which exports possibly 10,000 to 15,000 tons a year; however, com- 
plete data on Afghanistan's exports are not available. The sharp reduction in 
1963-6^ exports by the secondary producers (Cyprus, South Africa, and Spain) re- 
flects a drastic decline in Cyprus' exports. In the 1963-6^ season, Cyprus 
exported only 1,398 tons compared with 10,3^3 tons in 1962-63. In the k seasons, 
1959-60 through 1962-63, Cyprus' exports averaged 9,378 tons. 

U.S. raisin exports in the 1963-6^ season totaled 56,069 tons. U.S. exports 
for the 3 months September through November 196^ amounted to 25,817 tons, or just 
1,056 tons more than the 2k y r j6± tons exported in the same 3 months of 1963. 

Raisin prices have been strong this season and for most growths, i.e. Turkish 
Greek, Australian, and Iranian, quotations in london are somewhat higher now than 
when the season opened while those for U.S. raisins have been well maintained. 
January I965 prices for Turkey, Greece, and Iran were the highest in a number of 
years. While Australian and U.S. prices were higher in January I96U, their 
January 1965 levels were among the highest in recent years. Though U.S. raisins 
were still the highest priced, the price differential so far this crop year has 
been considerably smaller than in the past two years, except in comparison with 
Australian sultanas, the only growth that is lower-priced than a year ago. 



RAISINS: Prices, landed, duty paid London, 
average, January I96I-65 



January price 

Origin and type ' 

; 1961 ; 1962 ; 1963 ; 1964 ; 1965 



U.S. Cents per pound 

Turkey: 







1^.2 


12. k 


17.0 


17.^ 


TVTy-v ~\ r\ 










17.7 


Greece: 


• 












• 17.0 


1^.3 


13.1 


17.2 


Yf.k 




• I6.5 


13.9 


12.7 


17.0 


17.0 


Australia: 
















13.6 


12.8 


18.6 


17.6 




17.8 


lk.0 


13.2 


19.0 


17.9 


Iran: 
















12.3 


12.1 


13.* 


15. ^ 


California: 














16.6 


15.0 


19.8 


19. U 


18.8 



WORLD STONE FRUIT 
PRODUCTION INCREASES 

Apricots : Apricot production is about 12 percent below last year but 
26 percent above the 1955-59 average. 

Gains in North America and Asia during 196^ of 12 and 25 percent, respec- 
tively, are more than offset by a 32 percent decline in Europe. Production in 
France, largest European producer in I963, decreased by 8l percent due to un- 
favorable weather at blooming time. 

Cherries : Cherry production is about 20 percent above 1963 and J+6 percent 
above the 1955-59 average. 

Most of the increase in I96U is attributed to the U.S., with a crop double 
that of 1963* West Germany, Italy and France continue to be major producers, 
ranking second, third and fourth behind the U.S. 

Peaches : Production is slightly above last year with all major continents 
showing an increase making this year's crop 55 percent above the 1955-59 average. 

European production is more than double the 1955-59 average with Italy 
accounting for most of this increase. 

Plums and Prunes : Production is about 12 percent below last year but 
approximately 13 percent above the 1955-59 average. A decline of almost 50 per- 
cent in West Germany, which was the second largest producer in I963, more than 
offsets the 27 percent increase in the U.S. 



APRICOTS, FRESH: Production in specified countries, average 1955-59 

annual 1962-64 



Continent and country 

: 1,000 

: Short 

: tons 
North America : 

Canada : 4.8 

Mexico : 5.6 

United States ; 201-7 

Total : 212.1 

South America : 

Argentina : 12.7 

Chile : U.O 

Total ; 16.7 

Europe : 

Austria : 9.8 

France : 52 . 3 

Germany, West : 1.2 

Greece : 12.7 

Italy : 39.5 

Spain : 99.2 

Switzerland : 4.1 

Yugoslavia : 19.8 

Total : 238.6 

Africa : 

South Africa, Rep. of : .6 

Asia : 

Iran : 60.7 

Turkey ; 2/ 19-4 

Total 80.1 

Oceania : 

Australia : 35 • 3 

New Zealand : 3-8 

Total : 39.1 

Total specified countries 587.2 

1/ Preliminary. 

2/ Includes wild apricots. 



1962 



1,000 
Short 
tons 

7.7 
6.5 
166.2 



180.4 



14.8 
4.4 



19.2 



21.2 
60.6 
2.2 
17.6 

53.3 
120.0 
4.1 
27.2 



306.2 



.2 



74.4 
2/ 95.7 



170-1 



45.9 
5.0 



50.9 



727.0 



1963 



1,000 
Short 
tons 

2-5 
6.7 
260.3 



202,5. 



14.8 

4.5 



41.2 

179.7 

4.6 
12.8 
65-5 
118.9 
14.3 
21.2 



458.2 



.2 



22.0 
2/ 83.6 



105.6 



38.7 
4.0 



42.7 



835.5 



1964 1/ 



1,000 
Short 
tons 

7-0 

6.7 
221.0 



234.7 



15.1 
4.4 



20.0 
34.2 

26.4 
71.5 

111.3 
5.5 



310.8 



.2 



38.5 

2/ 93-7 



132.2 



36.I 
4.0 



4o.l 



737.5 



- 6 - 



CHERRIES, FRESH: Production in specified countries, average 1955-59 

annual 1962-64 



Continent and country 


• rive rage 


; 1962 


: 1963 


; 1964 1/ 




: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 




: Short 


: Short 


■ JUUi 0 






: tons 


: tons 


: tons 


: tons 


North America 


: 












: 15.9 


18.8 


: 27.7 




.: 216.4 


: 287.2 


151.2 


: 369.4 






303.1 


170.0 


397.1 


South America 














: 2.0 


; 2.1 


: 2.5 






3.6 


3-8 


3-9 






6.2 


5-9 


6.4 


Europe 


• 


: 36.9 










ll /-v 

41.2 


36.9 






33-7 : 


22.7 


27-6 






2/ 1.0 


2/2.0 


2/ 2.0 




D/-i £. 


109.3 : 


122 . 4 


114.6 






23^*0 


280.O 


293.9 




i-i 


14.8 : 


13.5 : 


I8.3 






238.5 : 


241.8 


253-5 






6.9 : 


7-7 : 


8.8 




1 o 


^•5 : 


4.8 : 


^•5 






48.4 : 


62.7 : 


63.4 






9-9 : 


12.1 : 


12.1 






60.6 : 


60.6 : 


57-3 






24.3 : 


lb. 4 : 


10. 0 




O-s 


101.7 : 


99.4 : 


99. 






925.3 : 


988.I : 


1,010.9 


Asia 












C T 


7«9 : 


7.7 : 


0.0 




.: 55-6 : 


68.2 : 


71.2 : 


77-° 










o_3 . 0 


Oceania 


• < 










.': 6.3 S 




7-5 : 


7-5 




.: .3 : 


.4 : 


• 5 : 


•5 




.: 6.6 : 


7.8 : 


8.0 : 


8.0 


Total specified countries . . . 


1,030.5 


1,318.5 : 


1,250.9 ! 


1,506.0 



1/ Preliminary. 

2/ Commercial production only. 



- 7 - 



PEACHES, FRESH: Production in specified countries, average 1955-59 



annual 1962-64 



: Million : Million : Million : Million 

: Bushels 2/ : Bushels 2/ : Bushels 2/ ; Bushels 2/ 

North America : : : : 

Canada : 2.6 : 2.3 : 2.k : 2.7 

Mexico : 2.6 : 3.3 : 3.4 : 3.4 

United States : 65.9 : 75.5 : 73.8 : 74-5 

Total : 71.1 : 8L.1 : 79-6 : 80.6 



South America : : : : 

Argentina : 5-7 : 8.6 : 7.3 : 10. 7 

Chile 1.7 ; 1.8 : 1.8 : 1£ 

Total : f.k t 10. k : 9.1 : 12.6 



Europe : : : : 

Austria : .2 : .3 : .k : .k 

France : 10.0 : Ik. 2 : 21.0 : id.k 

Germany, West : .9 : 1-7 : 1.1 : 1.6 

Greece : 1.6 : 3-2 : 2.6 : U.3 

Italy : 25-2 : V7.5 : 58.2 : 60.1 

Netherlands : .1 : .1 : .1 : .1 

Spain : 3-7 : k.9 : 6.0 : 6.9 

Yugoslavia : .8 : 1.6 : l.k 1^6 

Total : 42.5 : 73-5 : 90-8 ; 93-k 



Africa : : : : 

South Africa, Rep. of : .1 : .1 ; .1 : .1. 

Asia j j • t 

"Japan :' 5-7 : 8.7 : 9-1 : 9-3 

Turkey : 2.k ; 3.k ; 2.9 : 3-7 



Total : 8.1 : 12.1 : 12.0 : 13-0 



Oceania : : : : 

Australia : 2.6 : k.O : 4-3 : k.k 

New Zealand : »7 : *8 : .8 ._8 



Total : 3-3 ; k.3 : 5»1 5-2 



Total specif ied countries ... : 132-5 : 182.0 : 196-7 : 20k. 9 

1/ Preliminary. 
2/ kQ pounds. 



PLUMS AND PRUNES, FRESH: Production in specified countries, average 

1955-59, annual 1962-64 



Continent and country 



Average 
1955-59 



: 1,000 

: Short 

: tons 
North America : 

Canada : 16.0 

Mexico : 7-8 

United States : 535-5 

Plums : 90-5 

Prunes : 445 . 0 

Total : 559-3 

South America : 

Argentina : 43.8 

Chile : 21.9 

Total : 65.7 

Europe : 

Austria : 71.1 

Belgium-Luxembourg : 23 • 4 

France : 107 . 8 

Germany, West : 314.0 

Greece : 13-5 

Italy : 95-9 

Netherlands : 13 . 7 

Norway : 15-3 

Spain : 63.5 

Sweden : 18.8 

Switzerland : 32.5 

United Kingdom : 86.4 

Yugoslavia : 755-3 

Total : 1,611.2 

Africa : 

South Africa, Rep. of 3.1 

Asia : 

Japan : 47.5 

Turkey ; 79-8 

Total : 127.3 

Oceania : 

New Zealand : ' 4.2 

Total specified countries..: 2,370.8 

l/ Preliminary. 
2/ Belgium only. 



1962 



1,000 
Short 
tons 

12.2 
11.6 

546.8 
90.5 

^56.3 



570-6 



43.0 
25-3 



68.3 



51-9 
13.2 

255-7 
271.2 
10.6 
II8.5 
11-9 
14.7 

54.3 
17.6 
36.4 

76.5 
910.2 



1,842.7 



3A. 



48.8 
98.4 



147-2 



3-8 



2,635.7 



1963 



1,000 
Short 
tons 

17-5 
12.0 
488.8 
114.7 

37^1 



518.3 



47.4 



72.5 



106.2 

25.3 
172.0 

679-7 
10.3 

137.9 
14.9 
21.1 
67.2 
29.8 
55-1 
90.7 

855.4 



2,265.6 



3.8 



56.1 
106.7 



162.8 



3,026.7 



1964 1/ 



1,000 
Short 
tons 

16.3 
12.1 
619-9 
127-5 
492.4 



648.3 



45.0 
24.2 



89-5 
2/ 24.2 

110.2 

345.5 
13-5 

133-5 
13.2 
17.4 
66.1 
29.8 
44.1 
56.4 

870.8 



1,814.2 



4.0 



35-2 



134.4 



3-8 



2,673.9 



- 9 - 



I96J+ WORLD DRIED 
FIG PACK DROPS 



The 196^ commercial dried fig pack of the major producing countries, 
which is estimated at 133,500 short tons, showed a decline of lU,100 tons 
compared to the I963 pack and a decline of 11,1+00 tons compared to the 
1958-62 average. U.S. production, estimated at 19,^00 tons, was the only 
reported increase from the previous season. All of the remaining principal 
producers experienced decreases in production. Estimates on Spain, an 
important fig paste exporter since I96I, are not available. 

Exports of dried figs from Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Turkey in 
196^-65 are expected to reach 57,600 short tons --a decline of 5,600 tons 
from the 1963-6^ season. Compared to the I963-6U figures, exports from 
Greece, Portugal, and Turkey are all expected to decrease, while Italy 
may show a slight increase. 

Imports of all dried figs by the U.S. between September and November 
196^ totaled 3,600 short tons. Dried figs accounted for 2,387 tons; fig 
paste 1,089; and prepared or preserved figs 12^. Unofficial figures on 
imports into United States of fig paste show arrivals for the months 
August 196^ through January 1965 at 2,800 tons, a decrease of 1,300 tons 
compared with the same period in I963-6I+. Turkish shipments are much 
behind normal. The drop in Turkish shipments is believed due to the 
reluctance of Turkish packers to risk the unusually high rejections by 
U.S. Food and Drug which they experienced the past 2 seasons. The Turkish 
minimum export price has been raised to 15 cents per pound c.i.f. New York 
as against 11.5 cents last season because of higher costs in packing to 
prevent rejecti»ns. Portuguese prices, near 12 cents c.i.f. New York are 
about 3 cents higher than last year. 

FIGS, DRIED: Estimated commercial production in specified 
countries, average 1958-62, annual 1961-6^ 



Country | Av ejage : -^fa : : -^53 • 



: Short Short Short Short Short 
: tons tons tons tons tons 



Greece : 29,000 31,000 28,000 32,000 28,500 

Italy : 40,000 1+0,000 33,000 3^,000 30,000 

Portugal : 10,700 7,600 11,200 13,600 10,600 

Turkey : 1+5, 6C0 55,000 1+7,000 50,000 1+5,000 

Total foreign : 125,300 133, 6C0 119,200 129,600 11^ ,100 

United States ': 19,6CO 18,500 20,000 18,000 19,1+00 

Grand total : lM+,900 152,100 139,200 1^7, 600 133,500 



-10- 



FIGS, DRIED: Exports from specified countries 
average 1958-62, annual 1961-64 season beginning September 



Couptry , Averags : 19&1 , 1962 , 1963 :Foreca 



: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons tons 

Greece : 15,700 16,700 14,800 16,100 15,000 

Italy : 3,800 3,600 3,200 2,900 3,300 

Portugal : 6,1+00 4,900 6,300 8,200 6,300 

Turkey : 34,900 39,500 36,600 36,000 33,000 



Total : 60,800 64,700 60,900 63,200 57,600 



FIGS, DRIED: United States imports by country of origin, 
average 1958-62, annual 1961-64 year beginning September 1 



origin ; gggg ; 1961 ; 1962 ; 1963 ; 1964 1/ 



: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons tons 
Figs, dried : : 

Italy : 171 229 110 102 48 

Greece : 1,942 2,111 2,l62 2,128 2,140 

Portugal ; 89 29 36 44 20 

Spain : 1 — — — — 

Turkey : 221 215 298 262 174 

Others : --- 3 — 24 5 



Total : 2,424 2,587 2,6o6 2,560 2,387 

Fig paste : : 

Belgium- Luxembourg. . . : — - — 1 2 — 

Italy : 20 100 

Greece : 89 238 74 442 57 

Portugal : 2,987 2,230 2,229 5,404 767 

Spain : 328 636 1,003 1,831 240 

Turkey : 5,731 8,327 1,507 2,397 25 



Total : 9,155 11,531 4,814 2/10,305 1,089 

Figs, prepared or : 
■preserved : 

Israel : — 1 — — — 

Greece : 1 — 5 2 — 

Italy : 206 200 135 169 124 



Total : 207 201 140 171 124 



Grand total : 11,786 14,319 7,560 13,036 3,600 

1/ Three months September - November. 2/ Includes 229 tons not shown in country 
detail. 



- 11 - 



WORLD CURE AM 1 PACK 
BELOW AVERAGE 



The 196^ dried currant pack--in Australia, Greece and South Africa-- is 
now estimated at 96,^00 tons, or 12,000 tons less than previously forecast. 
The present 196k estimate though some 3,000 tons larger than the I963 pack is 
18,500 tons below the 5 -year (1958-62) average of 114,900 tons. 



The reduction of the earlier estimate is attributable to a smaller than 
expected output in Greece. The present estimate of 83,000 tons of Greek cur- 
rants represents the smallest Greek crop since 1955* Serious downy mildew 
damage to the vines in I963 was reportedly the main cause of the small 1964 
crop. In contrast to Greece, Australia had a much larger pack in 196*4- than 
in 1963. Production in the Republic of South Africa continued to be minor. 

Greek exports in 1963-64 of 66,900 tons were much below the heavy volume 
of 81,700 tons shipped in 1962-63. They were also below average. Australian 
exports in calendar year 1963 were less than in I962 and only about half of 
average. These decreases were consequences of the short I963 crops and the 
unusually large Greek 1962-63 shipments. 

Indications to date are that I96U- 65 Greek exports will be even lower 
than in I963-6U and may not be much over 60,000 tons. Australian 1964 calendar 
year exports bounced back from the depressed levels of the previous two years 
and are tentatively estimated at 7,800 tons. 

Greek currant prices have held relatively firm after opening at excep- 
tionally high levels. Greek prices, c and f, London in January I965 were the 
highest in some years. 



DRIED CURRANTS: Estimated commercial production in specified 
countries average 1958-62, annual 1961-64 



Country 


Average 
1 1958-62 


1961 


1962 


1963 ■ 


1964 


South Africa, Republic of 


Short Short Short Short Short 
tons tons tons tons tons 

11,500 14,500 8,700 7,500 12,600 

102, 4oo 102,000 120,000 85,000 83,000 

1,000 900 800 800 800 


: 114,900 117,1+00 129,500 93,300 96,1+00 



-12- 



DRIED CURRANTS: Exports from specified countries 
average 1958-62, annual 1961-63 



Country 


1 Ave race 1 
: 1958-62 : 


I90I * 
• 
• 


1902 • 

• 


1963 




Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 




tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


Australia: : 










(Year beginning Jan. l).. 


! 7,100 


9,300 


4,800 


3,600 


Greece: : 










(Year beginning Sept. l).: 


. 72,500 


71,500 


81,700 


66,900 



GREEK DRIED CURRANTS: Prices, c & f London, 
average, January 1962-65 



Type 



January price 



1962 : 


1963 : 


1964 : 


1965 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


per 


per 


per 


per 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


13.6 


13.2 


16.0 


17.6 


11.8 


11-7 


15.1 


16.0 


11-7 


11.3 


14.8 


16.0 



Vostizza (Aegion) 

Pyrgos 

Kalamata 



- 13 - 



RECORD WORLD 
CtCOA BEAN CROP 



The 1964-65 world cocoa bean crop is estimated at l,48l,tOO metric 
tons, 18 percent above the record 1963-6^ outturn and 67 percent »ver the 
1955-59 average. Favorable weather and more care in pest control has 
resulted in record West African crops, and production in other world cocoa 
areas is also above that of last season. 



The Cocoa Producers Alliance (comprised of Ghana, Nigeria, Brazil, 
Ivory Coast, Cameroon, and Togo and producing over four-fifths of the 
world crop) re-entered the cocoa market after a ih week period of sus- 
pended sales. The Alliance withdrew from selling in mid-October after 
prices fell below the "indicator" level of 23.75 cents per pound. 
February prices were still well below the indicator level. 

At the January 25-27 meeting of the CPA in Lagos, Nigeria, members 
announced that 250,000 tons of cocoa beans would be diverted from tradi- 
tional uses and that negotiations have been undertaken to sell to the 
margarine and soap industries at prices competitive with other fats and 
oils products. 

Preliminary statistics indicate that I96U world exports of cocoa 
beans may not reach the record level of 1,038,000 tons attained in 1963. 
Increased shipments by Nigeria, Brazil, and New Guinea were offset by 
smaller exports from Ghana and by sharp reductions in Mexico's and 
Ecuador's trade. As more cocoa processing plants become operational in 
major producing countries, cocoa product exports will show significant 
gains in 1965. 

North America : Production in North America is estimated at 9^>300 
tons, up 7 percent over the 1963-64 outturn. More favorable weather has 
resulted in a moderate increase in the Dominican Republic and Mexico . 

South America : The South American crop is placed at 21^,600 tons, 
a gain of k percent over the previous year. Although production is up for 
the second consecutive season, output is still well below the 1955-59 
average of 237,700 tons. 

The Brazilian crop is estimated at 132,000 tons, up slightly over the 
previous season. The Bahia main crop outturned at 900*000 bags (5^,000 
tons), approximately the same as in the previous two seasons. The temporao 
crop is forecast at 1,200,000 bags (72,000 tons), compared with last year's 
crop of 1,150,000 bags (69,000 tons). Production from other States usually 
amounts to 100,000 bags (6,000 tons). 

As a result of the Government's decision to abolish the 7 percent 
state export tax exemption for cocoa products and with the CPA ban on 
sales, several cocoa processing factories temporarily reverted to crushing 
castorbeans and others shutdown all operations. 

(Continued on page 16) 
-ik- 



COCOA BEANS: World total production for the crop year 1964-65 with comparisons l/ 



Continent and country 



Average 

1955/56- 

1959/60 



1960-61 



1961-62 



1962-63 



1963-6'i 



Preliminary 
I96I4-65 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic .... 

Grenada 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Mexico 

Panama 

Trinidad and Tobago . . . 
Other North America 2/. 



Total South America . . . 

Africa: 

Angola 

Cameroon 3/ 

Congo, Brazzaville 

Congo, Leopoldville 

Fernando Po and Rio Muni 

Gabon 

Ghana 

Ivory Coast 

Liberia 

Malagasy Republic 

Nigeria 4/ 

Sao Tome and Principe . . . 

Sierra Leone 

Togo 5/ 



Total Africa 

Asia and Oceania: 

Ceylon 

Indonesia 

New Guinea and Papua 

New Hebrides 

Philippines 

Western Samoa 



Total Asia and Oceania 



World total 



1,000 

metric 

tons 



Total North America . . . : 

South America: 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Surinam 

Venezuela 



.4 
60.7 
• 3 
t.5 
22.7 
2.6 
258.4 
61.3 
.8 
.4 
127-0 
9-0 
2.7 
6.5 



557.3 



2.7 
1.4 
3-6 
• 9 
2.0 
3-8 



Ih.k 



1,000 

metric 

tons 



1,000 

metric 

tons 



1,000 

metric 

tons 



1,000 
metric 
tons 



.k 
71-5 
.6 
5-8 
25.4 
4.1 
i+39-2 
93-8 
.8 
• 5 

198.4 
10.5 
3-6 
12.8 



867.4 



2.6 
1.0 
7.6 
• 7 
3-6 
3-6 



19-1 



1,164.9 



.4 
73-0 

• 9 
5-8 

26.0 
2.4 
416.0 
84.8 

• 9 
.6 

193-9 
10.5 
3-9 
11-3 



830.4 



2.4 
.8 
10.7 

.8 

3-2 
4.4 



22.3 



1,129.2 



.4 
76.2 

• 7 
6.2 

31.5 
3.7 
428.4 
102.4 
1.0 

• 5 
178.8 

10.5 
3-5 
9-1 



852.9 



2.5 
1.1 
14.2 
.8 

3.* 
3-6 



25-6 



1,157.5 



.4 
90.0 
.8 
6.0 
33-5 
3-3 
450.O 
97-2 
1.0 
• 5 
219-5 
10.5 
3-5 
13-7 



929.9 



2.3 
1.0 

17.0 
.8 

3.* 
h.9 



29.4 



1,252.6 



1,000 
metric 
tons 



9.4 


: 11.1 


! 12.3 


: 11.0 


: 11.8 


! 12.0 


2.4 


: 2.8 


: 2.3 


: 2.3 


1.7 


: 2.0 


34.0 


: 35-2 


: 35-0 


: 37.0 


! 38.9 


! 40.0 


1-5 


: 2.4 


: 2.4 


: 2.1 


! 2.7 


: 2.9 


1 8 


! 2. 1 


: 2.2 


■ 2. 1 






2 7 


■ 2 S 


: 2.4 


■ 2 s 


. 1.6 




13 8 


16 5 


! 21. 0 


. 26. 0 


■ 21. 0 


! 24. 0 




. 1.4 


! 1.2 


: '.6 


• 7 


, .8 


8 4 


• 7 0 


' 6*5 


: 6.h 


s 4 


■ s s 


1.6 


! 1.7 


! 1.7 


! 1^6 


! 1.6 


! 1.6 


77-1 


82.7 


: 87.O 


91.6 


87.9 


94.3 


2.0 


: 2.0 


! 2.0 


! 2.0 


: 2.0 


: 2.0 


173-3 


122.0 


116.0 


111.0 


129.3 


132.0 


12.5 


: 14.3 


: 15.0 


13-5 


: 15.0 


16.0 


32.0 


41.6 


40.0 


42.0 


: 35-0 


39-0 


2.1 


: 3,5 


: 3.8 


: 4.0 


! 4.2 


: M 


.2 


: .2 


• 3 


• 3 


! -3 


: -3 


15.6 


12.1 


12.4 


14.6 


19.6 


21.0 


237.7 


195-7 


189-5 


187.4 


205.4 


214.6 



.4 
90.0- 
.8 
5-9 
3^.0 
3-9 
570.0 
135.0 
1.0 
• 5 
270.O 
10.5 
3-5 
15-0 



1,140.5 



2.4 
1.0 
19.0 
.8 
3-^ 
5-0 



31-6 



1,481.0 



l/ Estimates are based on a crop year of October 1 to September 30. 2/ Includes Dominica, Guatemala, 
Guadeloupe, Martinique, Nicaragua, and St. Lucia. 3/ Beginning with 1961-62 includes former British 
Southern Caraeroons. 4/ Prior to 1961-62 includes former British Southern Cameroons. jj/ Includes 
some Ghanaian cocoa marketed through Togo. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source material, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 15 - 



Production in Ecuador is estimated at 39,000 tons, up slightly 
over the small 1963-6^ crop which was reduced by heavy infection of 
"monilia" pod-rot. A $9 million cocoa processing facility is to he 
built near Guayaquil and an established chocolate confectionery firm 
in Guayaquil is planning to invest $5^0,000 for the processing of 
3,000 tons of cocoa products annually. 

More recent information shows Venezuelan production to be increas- 
ing at a faster rate than previously reported. The 1963-6^ outturn of 
19,600 tons was the largest in ih years. The continuation of favorable 
weather is expected to result in a even larger crop this season. 

Africa : Record crops in Ghana, Nigeria, and Ivory Coast will 
boost African production to over 1 million tons. The African crop 
this year is expected to be about as large as total world production 
during the I96I-62 season. 



Production in Cameroon is expected to approximate the record 
I963-6U harvest of 90>000 tons. A new cocoa processing plant is being 
considered at Yaounde. The proposed facility will be built by Japanese 
interests and will have approximately tie same capacity (15,000-20,000 
tons) as the Douala factory. 

Political instability is expected to result in a further decline 
in Congo's (Leopoldville ) production this season. Although the plan- 
tations are reported to be in good condition, labor and transportation 
difficulties are expected to retard output for sometime. 



Continued heavy crop purchases indicate that Ghanaian production 
will reach a record 570,000 tons this season. The main-crop harvest 
through February K totaled 510,000 metric tons, well above total pro- 
duction of any preceding year. Beginning with the I965 mid-crop, 
growers will receive 11.66 U.S. cents per pound, compared with the 
current level of 12.6 cents. The United Ghana Farmers' Cooperative 
Council announced that the "voluntary" contribution of .tyk cents per 
pound will go towards a trust fund to further the establishment of 
the proposed Agricultural Credit and Cooperative Bank. 



The new Takoradi cocoa processing plant began operations last 
November and reportedly has an annual capacity of about 18,000 tons. 
The larger-capacity Tema facility is scheduled to begin limited 
operations in April. 

Production in the Ivory Coast is estimated at a record 135,000 
tons, 39 percent over the 1963-6^ harvest. The country's first cocoa 
processing plant began operations in November and will utilize approxi- 
mately 10,000 to 12,000 tons of cocoa beans annually. 

-16- 



Nigeria* s crop is expected to reach 270,000 tons, 23 percent above 
last year's record. The drier weather this season has greatly reduced 
the incidence of pod-rot and effective spraying has reduced capsid damage. 
The $5*6 million cocoa storage, handling, and fumigation facilities at 
Ikeja is "being rushed to completion to facilitate the handling of the 
unusually large harvest. Two of the proposed six-shed complex (each with 
a capacity of 12,000 tons) have been completed and are in use, and con- 
struction has been accelerated on the remaining h sheds. 

Asia and Oceania : Production continues to increase in this region. 
The 196^-65 crop is estimated at 31>6C0 tons, 7 percent above the pre- 
vious season and more than double the 1955-59 average. 

LENTIL PRODUCTION SLIGHTLY 
DOWN IN 20 COUNTRIES 

Lentil production in 20 reporting countries is 196^ was estimated 
at 18.9 million bags, slightly less than last year but nearly 50 percent 
above the 1955-59 average. 

Excluded from the foregoing estimate is unreported but sizable pro- 
duction in several African countries, and any production in communist 
East Europe and the USSR. 

Of the 20 reporting countries, about half reported declines of pro- 
duction from last year and others increases. The major increases occurred 
in the United States and Morocco; the major decreases in India and Spain. 

The world's lentil production centers in Asia. Almost 66 percent of 
the 20-country output came from India, Pakistan, Turkey, and Syria. The 
smallest of this four, produced almost as much as all the American pro- 
ducers combined and more than all the European producers. 

The United States is now the largest lentil producer in the Western 
Hemisphere, the 196k output being about half that of Syria. The U.S., 
Chile, and Argentina are the 3 leading lentil producers in the Americas. 
U.S. and Moroccan production have risen much more rapidly than in other 
countries. U.S. production in I96U was nearly 7 times larger than the 
1955-59 average and Morrocco's was more than 5 times larger. 

International lentil trade centers in West Europe as major importer. 
Countries in the Mediterranean basin and the Americas are the major 
exporters. 

In calendar year 1963> the big exporters were Turkey, Spain, the U.S., 
Ethiopia, Morocco and Chile. Together they exported a total of approxi- 
mately 2 million bags of lentils. The big importers were West Germany, 
France, the U.K., Italy, and Greece. 



-17- 



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- 18 - 



WORLD CORN CROP 
SECOND OF RECORD 



The I96U world corn crop is now estimated at 7>735 million "bushels on 
the "basis of latest information available to the Foreign Agricultural Service. 
At this level the current estimate is second only to the record harvest of 
8,030 million bushels in 1963--a h percent decline. 

The predominant factor in the outturn is a 13 percent drop in the U.S. 
crop, which makes up k6 percent of world production in 196^ as compared with 
51 percent in 1963. The Western European crop declined moderately because of 
a sharp drop in France's production, but all other major producing areas 
showed gains. 

World production of the three principal feedgrains--corn, barley and 
oats--is estimated within 2 percent of the record outturn of 37^ million short 
tons in 1963. World trade in feedgrains is expected to proceed on its upward 
trend, with the ranking importers of 1963-6^- -Italy, the United Kingdom, Japan, 
West Germany and the Netherlands --continuing to import at high levels. 

North America's corn production is estimated at 3>935 million bushels, 
down 51° million bushels from a year earlier. U.S. production declined 5^3 
million bushels, largely due to reduced acreage and smaller yields in the Corn 
Belt. Canada's record crop of 53 million bushels, up h6 percent from the I963 
crop, resulted largely from exceptional yields. Mexico also produced at a new 
high level of 263 million bushels, 5 percent above last year's record. 

The corn crop in Western Europe is estimated at 320 million bushels, well 
below the 19^3 level. France's harvest of 77 million bushels is sharply down 
from their exceptional 152-million-bushel outturn the previous year. Italy's 
crop of 152 million bushels, their third largest, is 3 million bushels below 
the I96I record. Spain produced hh.5 million bushels, up 3 percent and a new 
record. 

Corn production in Eastern Europe continues to increase, with the crop 
estimated at 735 million bushels. Substantial gains are indicated in both 
Yugoslavia and Rumania. 

In the Soviet Union corn production increased to an estimated U60 million 
bushels, as compared with the 3^5 -million -bushel level of the two previous 
years and the 500 -million-bushel record of I96I. While there was some reduc- 
tion in acreage, yields were apparently considerably improved. 

Asia' s corn crop is estimated at 1,010 million bushels as compared with 
9^-0 million bushels in I963. Gains in acreage and yield are broadly shared 
by a number of countries. 

Total corn production in Africa is estimated at 625 million bushels, up 
from 57° million bushels in 19^3^ The outlook in the Republic of South 
Africa is for a crop considerably larger than in 1963 an( ^ near the record of 
I962. Prospects are variable in other countries. (Continued on page 22) 



-19- 



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- 21 - 



The outlook for the approaching harvest in South America is for a 
somewhat better outturn than a year ago. In Argentina prospects are for 
an outturn equal to the previous crop of 210 million bushels , although 
short of the 220 -million-bushel record of 1957* Brazil's crop is expected 
to be somewhat larger than the poor harvest of a year earlier. 

Corn is a minor crop in Oceania and a crop of 7 million bushels is 
estimated. 

GARBANZO PRODUCTION DOWN, 
MAINLY IN INDIA 

Garbanzo production in 18 reporting countries totaled 128 million 
bags (100 pounds each) in I96U. This was lk percent below I963 and 15 per- 
cent below the 1955-59 average. 

Garbanzo production is centered in India and countries west thereof 
through the Middle East and Mediterranean Basin. Production in many small 
producing countries in the Mediterranean Basin and the Middle East is not 
reported, however. 

The decline of 196^ garbanzo production reflects principally the 
situation in India where 77 percent of the total reported production occurs. 
The decline is also reflected in the k garbanzo producing countries of 
Southern Europe. 

Increased production was reported generally in South America and 
Africa, but these were more than offset by the decreases in Europe and much 
more than offset in India. 

India's production was down 16 percent in 196^ from 1963 and 21 per- 
cent below the 1955-59 average. Pakistan, the world's second largest pro- 
ducer reports a 10 percent decline from 1963, but a 13 percent increase 
from the 1955-59 average. 

Garbanzo s are also known as chickpeas. They are a high -protein pulse 
crop which has been raised and consumed in the sub-continent and Middle 
East for centuries. 

WORLD COTTON PRODUCTION 
AGAIN AT RECORD HIGH 

World c»tton production in 196^-65 is now estimated at a record 51 • 9 
million bales. This figure is 0.^ million bales above the first 196^-65 
estimate of last November, and reflects significant increases in the crop 
outturns in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Peru, Egypt, Sudan, Afghanistan, 
Pakistan, and the USSR, which more than offset reductions in Brazil, 
Guatemala, India, and a few other countries. 

This season's world production is larger than the 1963-6^- crop of 50*2 
million bales by 1,7 million, or 3 percent, and exceeds the 1955-59 average 
by 8.2 million bales. This is the fourth successive season in which world 
production has set a new record. Most of this year's increase took place 
outside of the United States. (Continued on page 2^-) 

-22- 



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- 23 - 



The total area devoted to cotton this season is now placed at 8l.3 
million acres — 0.8 million above 1963-64, and slightly higher than the 
1955-59 average. This season's record output is largely the result of 
a high average yield of 307 pounds of lint per acre, 8 pounds above the 
average in 1963-64. 

Foreign Free World production in 1964-65 is now estimated at 22.5 
million bales, up 3 percent from the previous alltime high in 1963-64. 
Major production increases occurred this season in Egypt, Mexico, Syria, 
El Salvador, Nicaragua, Argentina, Sudan, and Turkey. In Egypt, high 
yields under ideal growing conditions contributed to a bumper crop in 
196^-65, despite a slight reduction in acreage. The 1964-65 Sudanese 
crop is expected to be considerably larger than last season's reduced 
outturn. Mexico's 1964-65 crop is up sharply from last season, a result 
mainly of a shift in cotton acreage to higher-yielding districts. Cotton 
production in Central American countries will reach new records this 
season because of expanded acreage and ideal growing conditions. Yields 
in Central America are among the highest in the world for rain -grown 
cotton, and production in El Salvador and Nicaragua has nearly doubled 
since 1960-61. 

Recent estimates of Brazil's crop have been lowered because of a 
smaller Northern crop than previously indicated. Crop progress to date 
promises a larger Southern crop than a year ago. In India the 1964-65 
crop is estimated at 4.9 million bales, down 0.3 million from a year ago 
because of lower yields in the North and Central belts. In Spain, 
drought conditions in rain-grown areas, uncertainties over government 
price policies, and rising production costs had an adverse effect on the 
1964-65 crop. 

Cotton production in Communist countries is forecast at 14.0 million 
bales, up 1.1 million from the previous season. The increase is mostly in 
Mainland China, where planted area, reportedly, was higher and growing 
conditions were improved over 1963-64. In the USSR, production in 1964-65 
is reported at 8.2 million bales, another alltime record for that country. 

Production in the United States this season is placed at 15.4 mil- 
lion bales, (December crop report), compared with 15.3 million in 1963-64 
and the 1955-59 average of 13.0 million. Harvested area of 14.1 million 
acres is slightly below the l4.2 million acres harvested a year ago, but 
the estimated average yield of 524 pounds of lint per acre again set a new 
record. 

Free World production of extra long staple cotton in 1964-65 is now 
estimated at 2.1 million bales, 0.3 million above last season's crop. Most 
of the increase is in Sudan, where ELS production may reach 675; COO bales, < 
percent above the insect-reduced crop of 407,000 bales a year earlier. 
Egypt's production of ELS cotton in 1964-65 is estimated at slightly over 
1.0 million bales, compared with 9^6,000 a year ago. Peruvian production 
is now placed at 165,000 bales, against 180,000 in 1963-64. The U.S. crop 
is placed at about 129,000 bales of extra long staple cotton this season, 
compared with 165,000 in 1963-64. 

-24- 



COTTON: Acreage, yield, and production in specified countries, average 1955-59 and 1963 and 1964 1/ 



Acreage 



Continent and country 



Yield 



Production 2/ 









t Average 






: Average 






j 1955-59 


: 1963 


: 1964 3/ 


| 1955-59 


: 1963 


i 1964 3/ 


\ 1955-59 


: 1963 


: 1964 3/ 


: 

: 1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 


• Pounds 


• Pounds 


: Pounds 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: acres 


'• acres 


• acres 


: per acre 


■' per acre 


s per acre 


■ bales 


: bales 


: bales 


• 


: 14,212 


! 14,058 


: 428 


: 517 


: 524 


: 13,013 


: 15,334 


: 15,356 




' 260 


! 275 


: 673 


: 618 


: 698 


: 150 


s 335 


: 400 


. 1 48 


' 215 


: 225 


: 600 


'• 670 


: 661 


: 60 


: 300 


: 310 


. s 14 


! 21 


: 32 


: 343 


: 709 


: 750 


: 10 


: 31 


I 50 


. : 2,270 


1,964 


: 1, 924 


: 430 


: 515 


: 568 


I 2,032 


: 2,109 


: 2,275 


. : 209 


' 285 


■ 325 


: 423 


: 691 


: 738 


: 184 


s 410 


: 500 


. : 11 


' 5 


! 5 


: 175 


! 192 


: 192 


: 4 


: 2 


: 2 


. : 17,323 


: 17,069 


16.954 


: 429 


: 522 


' 536 


: 15,465 


: 18,549 


: 18,923 


■ 
* 

. : 1,323 


! 1,304 


1,400 


: 196 


: 166 


I 

: 182 


: 539 


: 450 


: 530 


. : 4,320 


! 5, 750 


6,000 


■ 166 


: 192 


: 184 


: 1,490 


: 2,300 


: 2,300 


. ! 224 


: 400 


405 


: 330 


: 402 


: 379 


: 154 


: 335 


t 320 


. : 44 


: 45 


45 


! 142 


149 


: 160 


: 13 


: 14 


: 15 


. s 133 


' 200 




1 159 


! 132 




: 44 


t 55 




. : 588 


: 680 


680 


423 


! 441 


! 459 


: 518 


: 625 


i 650 


. : 100 


: 100 


100 


: 134 


168 


: 192 


28 


: 35 


: 40 


. : 6,737 


• 8,489 


8,840 


199 


216 


! 213 


2,788 


: 3,821 


: 3, 923 


• 
• 

. : 383 


570 


350 


338 


362 


: 446 


270 


: 430 


: 325 


, : 104 


40 




208 


288 




45 


: 24 




. ! 454 


650 


490 


221 


329 


: 338 


209 


: 445 


345 


. : 219 


135 




153 


160 




70 


45 




. : 33 


28 ' 


28 


175 


223 


257 


12 


13 


15 


. ! 1,426 


1,484 


1, 104 


217 


319 


348 


644 


987 


800 


• 

: 5,270 
2 


6,100 • 


6, 150 


616 


637 


640 


6, 750 


8, 100 


8, 200 


: 

. '• 129 


100 ' 


100 


130 


120 


96 


35 


25 


20 


. : 128 


140 : 





120 


240 


. 


32 


70 





. ! 375 


400 ! 


— : 


81 1 


54 


— : 


63 


45 





. : 580 


715 ! 


— 


83 


111 


— . 


100 


165 


160 


. : 848 


300 '• 


— 


138 


96 


— : 


243 


60 





, : 1,858 


1,689 ! 


1,672 ! 


467 


577 


652 ; 


1,807 


2, 029 


2, 271 


. : 102 


135 ! 


135 '• 


56 '• 


64 


71 '• 


12 


18 


20 


. : 16 


37 •' 


— ; 


27Q ■ 


298 


• 


9 


23 




: 744 ! 


775 : 


775 1 


105 ' 


105 


124 i 


162 


170 


2 C 0 


. : 790 ' 


800 ! 


800 


100 ■ 


132 


126 ' 


164 


220 


210 


. : 45 


68 : 


100 


117 i 


226 


202 i 


11 


32 


42 


, : 100 


125 : 




139 • 


180 




29 


47 





, : 784 : 


1,100 ' 


1,100 ' 


306 i 


205 


327 i 


500 


469 


750 


, : 370 : 


475 '• 


500 : 


171 ' 


217 


221 ! 


132 


215 


230 


. : 1,670 : 


1, 986 : 


1,950 ■ 


89 : 


76 


80 


308 


315 


325 


. : 8,709 


9,159 : 


9,063 i 


201 ■ 


210 


241 ! 


3,654 


4, 007 


4, 550 


: 

, : 37 ■ 


50 ! 


! 


298 ' 


240 


— : 


23 


25 




. : 175 ' 


300 : 


350 ! 


192 : 


280 


240 '• 


70 


175 ' 


175 


, : 18 ! 


45 : 


45 : 


133 : 


171 • 


235 '• 


5 • 


16 ■ 


22 


336 ! 


500 = 


550 ! 


104 ! 


62 : 


79 1 


73 ! 


65 • 


90 


, : 14,428 : 


10,300 ! 


11,000 ! 


238 ! 


219 ' 


249 '• 


7, 160 


4, 700 ' 


5, 700 


, : 19,720 : 


19,600 : 


19,700 : 


97 : 


127 ! 


119 • 


3,991 ! 


5,200 : 


4, 900 


, : 656 : 


988 : 


980 • 


224 : 


257 ! 


257 '• 


306 ' 


530 : 


525 


, : 127 : 


100 : 


— : 


170 '• 


120 '• 


— : 


45 : 


25 ■ 




. : 13 : 


31 ! 


32 : 


738 : 


960 ! 


960 : 


20 '• 


62 • 


64 


: 208 : 


61 ! 




129 ! 


142 ! 




56 : 


18 ■ 




, : 3,490 : 


3,670 : 


3,670 ! 


189 ! 


254 : 


248 : 


1,376 : 


1,940 : 


1,900 


, : 623 : 


721 : 


710 


340 : 


466 ! 


507 '• 


441 '• 


700 


750 


, : 100 : 


140 : 


160 ! 


211 ! 


209 : 


195 : 


44 • 


61 : 


65 


. : 1,554 : 


1,553 : 


1,650 : 


228 : 


355 • 


349 = 


738 : 


1,150 : 


1.200 


.' 41,593 ' 


38,191 • 


39,164 : 


166 ■• 


185 : 


190 : 


14,383 : 


14,713 


15.510 


, : 81,058 : 


80,492 : 


81,275 ! 


258 ' 


299 ' 


307 = 


43,684 : 


50, 177 ! 


51,906 


, ! 46, 249 ' 


- 49,571 : 


49,758 : 


173 ! 


212 ' 


217 '• 


16,643 : 


21,932 : 


22,522 


, ! 20,196 : 


16,709 ! 


17,459 : 


333 : 


371 ' 


386 : 


14,028 : 


12,911 : 


14, 028 



NORTH AMERICA: 
United States. 
El Salvador... 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

West Indies... 
Total 4/.. 



SOUTH AMERICA 
Argentina 
Brazil... 
Colombia. 
Ecuador. . 
Paraguay . 

Peru 

Venezuela 
Total 4/ 



EUROPE: 

Greece 

Italy 

Spain 

Bulgaria 

Yugoslavia 

Total 4/ 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia): 

AFRICA: 

Angola 

Cameroon 

Central African Republican. 

Chad 

Congo, Leopoldville 

Egypt 

Kenya 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

Rhodesia & Malawi 

South Africa, Republic of.. 

Sudan 

Tanganyika 

Uganda 

Total 4/ 



ASIA AND OCEANIA: 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Australia 

Burma 

China, Mainland. 

India 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Korea, South.... 

Pakistan 

Syria 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Total 4/.... 



World total 4/ 

Foreign Free World 4/.. 
Communist countries 4/. 



1/ Years refer to crop years beginning August 1 in which major portion of crop was harvested. 2/ Production in bales o 
pounds net. 3/ Preliminary. 4/ Includes estimates for minor-producing countries not listed above and allowance for coun 
where data are not yet available. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other 
foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 
related information. 



- 25 - 



SUGAR STOCKS CHANGE 
LITTLE IN 1963-6)+ 



Sugar stocks in h-2 selected countries totaled 5.k million short tons at the 
beginning of the I96U-65 season. These countries had stocks of 5*2 million tons 
at the beginning of the 1963-6^ year. The stock figures do not include in- 
visible stocks which became rather large in several countries. 

The countries included in this report account for about two -thirds of the 
total world production of centrifugal sugar , excluding Communist Bloc nations. 
World consumption during 1963-6^ exceeded production by almost one million tons. 
There was a slight increase in "Free World" stocks and a decrease in Bloc stocks. 

Stocks will increase considerably during the 196^-65 season, from the 
relatively low level at the beginning of the season. While world production 
during the year will exceed consumption by some k million tons, a considerable 
part of the buildup will be in Bloc countries. Production in the USSR will be 
much higher than a year earlier, and will probably exceed consumption. Cuba is 
also expected to have a substantial production increase over 1963-6)4- and will 
be shipping substantial amounts to Bloc countries. 

Stock changes for most of the countries covered by this study were rather 
minor during 1963-6^. The largest increase occurred in West Germany, and there 
were no substantial declines in any of the k2 selected countries. Stocks in 
the United States showed an increase and were larger by far than for any other 
country. The most notable declines took place in Argentina, India, the Nether- 
lands, and the Republic of South Africa. While the overall level of stocks is 
not much different than the 1955-59 average individual countries in many cases 
show big differences. 

It should be noted that the estimates in this study relate to carryover 
stocks at the beginning of each country's season, rather than the quantities on 
hand on a particular date for all countries. The stock figures, therefore, in 
most instances reflect the low point in stocks for a year in the individual 
countries. For the convenience of users, the month for which the sugar-making 
season begins is also shown in the table. 

WORLD FLAXSEED PRODUCTION 
DOWN MODERATELY 

The second estimate of world production of flaxseed in I96U places the out- 
turn at 120 million bushels, 7 percent less than that of I963 and 9 percent less 
than the 1955-59 average. This was the smallest production since 1961. 

The decline of an estimated 9 million bushels from a year earlier is due 
chiefly to reduced production in three of the four major producing countries, 
the United States, Canada, and India. Contrary to early indications, production 
in Argentina exceeded that of the previous year's. 

Substantial declines from a year earlier in both the United States and 
Canada reduced the North American total by one-sixth, or 9 million bushels. 
In Canada increased acreage failed to offset unfavorable weather, and the 
(Continued on page 28) 

-26- 



CENTRIFUGAL SUGAR (raw value): Stocks beginning of grinding season, in 42 selected countries 
average 1955-56 through 1959-60, annual 1961-62 through 1964-65 





• 




Sugar-aaking season 






Date 1/ 


Average * 










Country 


' 


1955-56 ; 


1961-62 ; 


1962-63 ; 


1963-64 ; 


1964-65 2/ 








through \ 












: 

-.„?., 




1959-60 ] 












• 
• 






1,000 shoi 


•t tons, rs 


iw value 






• 


April 1 i 


14 : 


37 : 


51 : 


64 : 


90 






May 1 ! 


46 : 


80 s 


41 1 


33 s 


7 






May 1 ' 


30 : 


37 : 


28 : 


30 : 


(30; 






June 1 i 


3y 95 : 


38b : 


97 ! 










June 1 ! 


168 : 


222 : 


154 : 


I84 ! 


243 






June 1 ! 


: 386 ! 


426 ; 


666 j 


316 : 


438 






June 1 ! 


: 4 ! 


4 ! 


7 ! 


7 : 


10 


South Africa, Republic of .. 


• * 


June 1 ! 


64 s 


235 i 


108 


80 ■ 


31 






July 1 


t 2/ 32 ! 


43 1 


52 


17 ' 


(17) 






July 1 


: 130 : 


222 ■ 


227 


50 


66 






August 1 


! 9 


10 


3 


: 10 


! 10 






August 1 


! 41 


49 i 


53 


: 47 


! 52 






August 1 


: 278 


: 494 


203 


: 156 


: 90 






August 1 


t 86 


1 165 


j 204 


s- 99 


1 73 






September 1 


t 73 


1 87 


1 87 


1 116 


: 95 






September 1 


i 638 


l 756 


1 676 


i. 613 


i 609 






September 1 


1 71 


► 72 


i 80 


t 44 


t 71 




» * 


October 1 


t 87 


t 98 


: 36 


1 26 


1 57 






October 1 


1 25 


1 39 


r 60 


1 15 


► 15 






October 1 


1 11 


! II 


: 10 


: 15 


t 17 






uctober x 


1 44 


1 143 


1 92 


t 28 


: 36 






October 1 


: 128 


1 838 


t 751 


1 282 


1 276 






October 1 


1 283 


1 610 


t 371 


► 234 


f 431 






October 1 


1 29 


t 60 


i 61 


1 15 


t 22 






October 1 


'. 99 


i 153 


1 193 


t 120 


t 106 






October I 


t 77 


t 174 


1 330 


s 220 


: 156 




• • 


October 1 


1 155 


t 139 


t 193 


1 148 


t 187 






October 1 


t 135 


t 165 


: 170 


t 109 


1 127 






October 1 


: 1,230 


! 1,160 


t 1,075 


: 1,236 


: 1,301 






November 1 


: 6 


t 1 


1 2 


t 3 


5 3 






November I 


x 6 


1 3 


t 6 


t 8 


t 8 






November 1 


t 494 


: 1,326 


L 1,131 


t 208 


1 90 






November 1 


1 326 


t 341 


L I46 


: 264 


1 270 






November 1 


:. 120 


1 103 


L 123 


1 125 


i (100) 






November 1 


: 14 


t 88 


: 85 


J 38 


1 41 






December 1 


: 102 


1 103 


1 55 


: 26 


1 33 


Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika... 


■ 


January 1 


: 20 


i. 32 


: 12 


t 18 


s 23 






January 1 


: y 4 


: 6 


1 4 


! 2 


1 4 






January 1 


! Ill 


J 43 


: 45 


1 61 


t 93 


West Indies, Federation of.. 


• * 


January 1 


! 16 


: 17 


: 11 


; 46 


: 40 








; 5,687 


; 8,978 


! 7,699 


1 5,174 


; 5,381 



"}J All stock carryover dates, except for January and April 1, apply to the first year mentioned 
at the head of each column. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Less than 5-year average. 



Foreign Agricultural Service* Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of 
foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and 
Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 27 - 



outturn at 18.9 million bushels was down 11 percent from that of 1963. In the 
United States the combination of reduced acreage and inclement weather through- 
out most of the season resulted in an outturn of 2*4-.^ million "bushels, one- 
fifth less than in I963. 

The South American crops which were harvested late in 196*4- and early in 1965 
produced slightly more flaxseed than those of a year earlier. The second offi- 
cial estimate placed Argentina's production at 30-5 million bushels, slightly in 
excess of that realized in I963. This surprisingly good outturn, following a 
seeded acreage which had been reduced by almost one -fifth from the previous year 
and dry conditions early in the season, resulted from yields well above those of 
the previous crop year. 

In Uruguay acreage seeded to flaxseed declined by 12 percent from a year 
earlier, owing to the government's loan program which encouraged seeding wheat. 
If yields approximated the average of the previous 5 years, production probably 
was about 2.5 million bushels or slightly larger than in 1963. At an estimated 
1.7 million bushels Brazil's outturn was double the exceptionally small one of 
the previous year. 

European flaxseed production is believed to have increased slightly in 196*4- 
although data for Communist controlled Eastern European countries are still in- 
complete. The probable expansion from a year earlier is attributed to an increase 
of over one-half in the Netherlands and one of 10 percent in Belgium. Production 
in France appears to have declined slightly. In the USSR flaxseed production is 
believed to have declined substantially in recent years because competing crops 
in producing areas have been yielding higher net returns. 

Africa produces about 3 million bushels of flaxseed annually of which over 
2 million is in Ethiopia, and most of the remainder is in the UAR and Morocco. 
No estimates are available for 196*4- production in Ethiopia. Production in the 
UAR reportedly was up one -third from a year earlier, while that of Morocco in- 
creased by one -half . 

Production in Asia was an estimated 11 percent less than in I963, with the 
decline accounted for primarily by the reduction in India accentuated by declines 
in Pakistan, Turkey, and Japan. India's outturn at 15.2 million bushels was down 
11 percent from the previous year. Acreage increased slightly, but yields were 
down because of the failure of winter rains and damage by a cold wave early in 
196*4-. The new crop now being harvested is expected to be up substantially — to 
about 17 million bushels. 

An expansion of one -third is estimated to have occurred in Oceania, due 
mainly to the large output in Australia. At a record of almost 1.7 million 
bushels, production in that country increased by nearly *4-5 percent from the 
previous year, reflecting increased acreage, particularly in Queensland, and 
above average yields in all major producing areas. In Queensland, where the 
bulk of the crop is grown, an increasing number of growers have been attracted 
to the production of flaxseed following the introduction of higher yielding 
varieties and a favorable price guaranteed by crushers. 



-28- 



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- 29 - 



U.S. FEED GRAIN 
EXPORTS CONTINUE UP 

Exports of United States feed grain totaled 8.7 million metric 
tons during July-December I96U--9 percent above the same period of 
the preceding year. All feed grain shipments continue upward with 
the exception of oats. 

Corn exports of 6.6 million metric tons during July-December 
196^ were 11 percent over the similar period of last year. Greater 
shipments to all countries of the Common Market, the United Kingdom, 
India, and Japan accounted largely for the increase. Declines 
occurred chiefly in shipments to Mexico, Greece, Spain, and Israel. 
East Germany, Hungary, and Yugoslavia reported none during this 
period compared with a total of 257>000 tons for a comparable period 
last year; however, 36,000 tons were exported to Bulgaria and Poland 
during July -December I96U compared to none during July - December I963. 

Exports of oats totaled ^2,000 tons -- down 25 percent from the 
56,000 tons shipped during July -December 1963. Reduced shipments 
occurred in all countries with the exception of Belgium-Luxembourg, 
West Germany, and the Netherlands. 

Barley shipments showed an increase of 13 percent over the 
617,000 tons shipped during a similar period of last year. This 
increase resulted from larger shipments to Mexico, most countries of 
the Common Market, Japan, and the Republic of Korea. This was partly 
offset by reduced shipments to Spain, Yugoslavia, and Israel. 

Sorghum exports totaled l.h million tons and showed a slight 
increase over July -December I963. Shipments to Mexico, Belgium- 
Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom showed sub- 
stantial increases. However, exports to West Germany, Denmark, 
Ireland, Israel, and Japan were considerably below those of July- 
December 1963. 

Shipments of feed grains to Canada are mostly for transshipment 
to other destinations. A separate table showing quantities and 
destinations of feed grains inspected for export from Canadian ports 
is omitted this month. The only transshipment through Canadian 
ports during December was 7^3 metric tons of corn for the United 
Kingdom. 

Preliminary forecast for July 196^- January I965 indicates that 
total feed grain exports will be approximately 9*0 million tons-- 
6 percent less than the 9«6 million tons exported during the July 
1963-January 196^1- period. This decrease is attributed largely to 
the East Coast dock strike in the United States, 



-30- 



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- 31 - 



UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF WHEAT 
AND FLOUR CONTINUE SLIGHT GAIN 



United States exports of wheat and wheat flour (grain equivalent) 
totaled 389 million bushels during the first 6 months of the I96U-65 
fiscal year. This represented an increase of only 1 percent over 
exports in the same 6-month period of 1963. 

The acute slow-down for exports is reflected by the increased 
availability of wheat supplies in Western Europe, and the East Coast 
dock strike in the U.S. Shipments to this area were less than half 
of those during July-December I963. Only exports of wheat and flour 
to Finland, Gibraltar, Iceland, and Portugal were larger this year 
than in the same period last year. 

Exports of wheat and flour to Soviet satellite countries, however, 
were still increasing. The 15 million bushels shipped to these countries 
during July-December I96U represented an increase of 13 percent over 
those exported during July -December 1963. Of the total shipment to this 
area, 92 percent went to Yugoslavia and the remainder to Poland and 
Rumania. 

The Asiatic countries required approximately 16 percent more 
wheat and flour during July -December 196k than during July -December 
1963. Greater shipments to India accounted largely for this increase — 
63 percent more than last year. 

Exports to the African countries were approximately 2 percent 
lower during the last 6 months of I96U than in I963. Of the 50 mil- 
lion bushels exported to this area over 73 percent went to the United 
Arab Republic. 

Grain shipments increased less than 1 percent between July 1 - 
December 31> 196^ > i- n comparison with the period July 1 - December 31 > 
I963. Over 36 percent of the total 3^-0 million bushels went to India. 
Shipments to Brazil and Pakistan totaled another 22 percent. 

Exports of flour were 6 percent higher in the first half of 
fiscal year 196^-65 as compared with the first half of 1963-6^. Over 
35 percent or 17 million bushels was destined for the United Arab 
Republic. 

Shipments of wheat to Canada are predominantly for transshipment 
to other destinations. A separate table showing quantities and 
destinations of wheat inspected for export from Canadian ports is 
omitted this month. The only transshipment during December 196^ was 
approximately 1 million bushels to Yugoslavia. This compares with 
transshipment during December 1963 of 701,000 bushels destined for 
West Germany. 



-32- 



It is anticipated that United States exports of -wheat and flour 
will only reach klj million bushels by January 31, 19^5 as compared 
with lj-59 million bushels in the first 7 months of the 1963-6^ fiscal 
year. This sudden decline is attributed to the continued dock strike 
on the East Coast of U.S. (Tables on pages 3^ and- 35) 

U.S. RICE EXPORTS 
BELOW A YEAR AGO 

U.S. rice exports in the first 5 months of the current marketing 
year (August -December) showed a decline of 8 percent below exports 
in the same months of 1963-6^. December was the first month in which 
this season's exports declined below the comparable volume of the year 
before, mainly because of the dock strike on the East Coast. 

December exports, at 123,900 metric tons, were 23 percent below the 
l6l,70O tons exported in December 1963. Increased exports to all other 
continents failed to offset a 51-percent decline--122,CC0 to 6l,800 
tons — in exports to Asia. This occurred chiefly in shipments to India 
and to some extent to Saudi Arabia. 

U.S. rice exports, milled basis, from August through December 
totaled 391,700 metric tons compared with ^26,600 in the same months 
in 1963* The reduction occurred mainly in a sharp drop in exports to 
India and Indonesia and partly in smaller exports to the Dominican 
Republic and Canada. 

Exports to African countries, however, continued to rise. 
December exports of l6,4C0 tons brought the August-December total to 
Africa to 77,000 tons compared with ^4,900 in the same months of 19 63. 
The principal destinations were the Republic of South Africa, Ghana, 
Liberia, The Republic of Congo, Guinea, and Ivory Coast. 

Exports to all regions of Europe also increased during the first 
5 months. Those to Western Europe were 21,900 tons compared with 
1^,200 in the same months of 1963. December exports of 10,262 tons to 
Poland and 9^+5 tons to Hungary brought the August -December exports to 
East Europe to 11,210 tons compared with h,200 tons in the same months 
of 1963. 

December exports to the EEC countries were nearly up to the 13,000 
tons exported in December 1963. This brought the August -December total 
to 27,^-00 tons or slightly above those in the corresponding period of 
I963. Increases in exports to West Germany and France more than offset 
declines in quantities going to the Netherlands and Belgium-Luxembourg. 

Rice exports to other Western European countries rose substantially- 
from 1^,200 to 21,900 tons—during the 5-™°nth period. The principal 
countries taking more rice were the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Sweden, 
Denmark, and Greece. 



Table A. — WHEAT AND FLOUR 1/: U.S. exports by country of destination, 
July-December 1963 and July-December 1964. 





: July-December 1963 


July-December 1964 


Destination 


: Wheat 


Flour 2/ 


Total 


Wheat 


Flour 2/ 


Total 




• 1,000 


1 ,000 


1,000 


1 ,000 


1,000 


1,000 




• bushels 


bushel s 


bushel s 


bushel s 


bushel 9 


bushels 


Western Hemisphere: 
















: 23 231 


139 


23,370 


8,399 


118 


8,517 




: 2 


595 


597 


23 


580 


603 






113 


113 




107 


107 




. _ 


4 


4 




5 


5 




: 2 


393 


395 


2 


390 


392 




: 700 


55 


755 


412 


45 


457 




: 1,092 


45 


1,137 


' 1,005 


56 


1,061 




: 326 


61 


387 


476 


55 


531 




: 118 


116 


234 


255 


71 


326 




: 414 


159 


573 


510 


109 


619 




u 


14 


14 




12 


12 




20 


49 


69 


9 


54 


63 




: 801 


71 


872 


520 


94 


614 




808 


78 


886 


883 


50 


933 




: 6 


379 


385 




667 


667 






33 


33 




44. 


AL 






147 


147 




169 


169 












2 


2 




; 2 


628 


630 


4/ 


560 


560 






13 


13 




5 


5 


Bolivia 




2,380 


2,380 


1 


3,106 


3,107 




: 20,626 


143 


20,769 


38,216 


429 


38,645 






497 


497 


11 


652 


663 


Chile 


994 


356 


1,350 


5,058 


915 


6 973 








<c,ouo 


4,5 'J. 




0 TOT 




: 332 


74 


i 406 


633 




706 






126 


281 


778 


13 


791 






140 


2,698 


1,249 


186 


1,435 






164 


: 164 




209 


209 




: 


21 


a 





20 


20 






147 


4.909 


5.042 


126 


5.168 






7.501 


66.897 


66.053 


9.082 


75.135 


Western Europe: 














EEC 


















17 


3,093 


316 


4 


320 






— 


6,550 


892 


3 


895 






1,416 


4,709 


2,693 


967 


3,660 






759 


9,311 


4,608 


510 


5,118 






8 


6.216 


998 


. 6 


1.004 






2.200 


29.879 


9.607 


1.490 


10.997 


Other Western Europe: 
















: 44. 




44. 


232 




232 




: 377 


11 


388 




4/ 


4/ 




: 19 




19 




2 


2 






4/ 


4/ 


209 


4/ 


209 




, 


3 


3 




5 


5 




: 909 


970 


1,879 


1 


463 


464 




; 6 


185 


191 


6 


198 


204 




: 102 




102 


75 




75 


Malta 










18 


18 




• 1 T3£ 


10 


1,348 












401 


1,635 


2 229 


67Q 


2 808 


Spain 






3,352 




241 


'241 






6 


AAA 


20 


4 


24 








4,385 


455 


U 


455 






161 : 5,500 


4,397 


79 


4,476 




7.903 


103 


8.006 


938 


151 


1.089 






1,850 


27.696 


8.562 


1.740 


10.302 


Eastern Europe: 




















4,564 












429 


5,981 


913 


325 


1,238 










a 




41 






748 


2.650 


13.615 


359 


13,974 






1,177 


13,1.95 


14,569 


684 


16.253 




s 66.543 


5.227 


70.770 


32,638 


2.9H 


36.552 



- 34 - 



Table A. — WHEAT AND FLOUR 1/: U.S. exports by country of destination, 
July-December 1963 and July-December 1964 (Continued) 





: July-December 1963 


July-December 1964 


Destination 


: Wheat 


Flour 2/ 


Total 


Wheat 


Flour 2/ 


Total 




: 1,000 


1,000 


1.000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




: bushels 


bushels 


bushel s 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


Asia: 




























14 


14 






1 


1,287 


40 


1 


41 






33 


143 




76 


76 




: 


264 


264 





275 


275 






8 


8 














932 


932 





628 


628 






105 


74,905 


121,812 


166 


121,978 






447 


447 




10 


10 






320 


1,163 


7,183 


100 


7,283 






19 


1,866 


31 


567 


598 






34 


4,120 


3,902 


90 


3,992 






2,365 


3,277 




1,721 


1,721 






509 


520 


24 


485 


509 






57 


61 




34 


34 






704 


749 





680 


680 






77 


77 





57 


57 






80 


127 


36 


55 


91 






26 


37,815 


36,696 


51 


36,747 






253 


5,992 


2,676 


280 


2,956 






1,649 


1,695 


121 


2,166 


2,287 













35 


35 






26 


26 




41 


41 






1,172 


1,178 


111 


1,642 


1,753 






371 


469 


101 


215 


316 






1,419 


37,198 


25,048 


368 


25,416 






553 


13,804 


8,344 


3,052 


11,396 






310 


735 


429 


293 


722 






646 


6.844 


6.680 


319 


6.999 






12.330 


195.702 


213,234 


13. 421 


226.655 


Africa: 


















661 


6,009 


3,176 


235 


3,411 






182 


182 




2 


2 






1,340 


2,778 


75 


1,682 


1,757 






1,352 


2,530 


1,318 


1,424 


2,742 






88 


1,385 


382 


176 


558 






13,806 


29,577 


19,585 


17,258 


36,843 






47 


503 


471 


46 


517 












5 


5 




. 


33 


33 





37 


37 




. 


5 


5 


449 




449 




72 


3,203 


3,275 


63 


1,388 


1,451 












4 


4 






86 


90 





78 


78 













1 


1 






53 


56 


1 


74 


75 






32 


319 


275 


17 


292 












3 


3 






62 


178 













36 


875 


1,503 


11 


1,514 






77 


77 




60 


60 




. 






U 


15 


15 









239 




4 


4 






34 


53 





11 


11 







32 


32 





: 27 


27 







20 


20 





14 


14 




: 8 


33 


41 





: 30 


30 










3 


(> 


9 






9 


11 


17 


10 


: 27 






u 


123 


— 


1 


1 






— 


1 


— 


: 18 


18 






32 


3,077 


— 


1 


1 


North Rhodesia, South Rhodesia Kyasaland .... 


: 52 


— 


52 


438 


— 


438 






21.223 


51.521 


27.756 


22.638 


50.394 
















Oceania: 


















j 


O 

J 




£ 

J 


C 

J 






2 


2 




5 


5 






1 


1 




2 


2 






21 


21 




37 


37 


Total 


27 


27 




49 


4? 


World total 




46,358 


384,917 


339,681 


49,104 


388,785 



1/ Data includes shipments for relief or charity. 2/ Grain equivalent. 3_/ The bulk of exports to Canada are for tranship- 
ment to other destination - see Table B. Lj Less than 500 bushels. 



- 35 - 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 20250 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



RICE MILLED 1/: U.S. exports to specified countries, Deoember 1964 with comparisons 



Destination 



August-July 



1955/56- 
195? 



December 



1963-64 



1963 



1964 



1963 



1964 



1,000 

: m. t. 

Western Hemisphere: : 

Canada : 14.7 

Nicaragua : 0.6 

Bahamas : 1.1 

Jamaica : .2 

Dominican Republic : 2/ 

Netherlands Antilles : 2.4 

Venezuela : 2.8 

Peru : 15.3 

Chile 1.9 

Other countries 3/ 185.0 

Total : 224.0 

Western Europe: : 
EEC : 

Belgium-Luxembourg : 15.5 

France : .8 

Germany, West : 17.4 

Italy : .2 

Netherlands : 9.3 

Total : 43.2 

Other Western Europe: : 

Sweden : 1.2 

United Kingdom : 8.9 

Switzerland : 1.6 

Other countries : 2.9 

Total 14.6 

Eastern Europe: : 

Poland : .1 

U.S.S.R ; p_ 

Total JL_ 

Total Europe : 57.9 



3.5 
1.9 
3.1 
4.8 
.9 
82.1 
92.1 
22.8 
7.4 
16.0 



Asia: 

Iraq 

Israel 

Kuwait 

Saudi Arabia 

Aden 

India 

Indonesia 

Japan 

Nansei and Nanpo Islands n.e.c 

Philippines, Republic of 

Other countries : 5/ 165.1 

Total : 399.7 

Africa: : 

West Africa, n.e.c 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Liberia 

Congo, Republic of 

South Africa, Republic of 

Sierra Leone 

West Portuguese Afrioa 



: 0 

: 1.9 

u 

: V 

14.4 

: .1 

, 3.6 

, 0 

2/ 

Other countries : 8/21.5 

Total : 41.5 



Oceania: 

World total 



-2x1 



,1 2/ 783.0 



1,000 
m. t. 

45.8 
9.2 
5.0 
9.5 
45.5 
4.8 
2.7 
37.5 
6.9 
.2*3- 



174.8 



15.7 
.5 

45.4 
2/ 

36.3 



97.9 



4.0 
42.4 

8.9 
JL1 



64.8 



15.0 
68,3 



83.3 



246.0 



27 
8 
4 
43 
6 
353 
61 
105 
63 
24 

a 



720.9 



kj 33 
26 
42 
18 
31 
12 
56 
13 
4 
Jl 



234.5 



_8.9 



1,385.1 



1,000 
m. t. 

17.4 
2.5 
2.5 
3.3 

10.6 
2.0 
0.7 
.4 
1.6 
2.0 



43.0 



5.7 
.5 
12.5 
2/ 
7.4 



26.1 



1.8 
7.9 
2.3 
2.2 



U-2 



4.2 

0 



44.? 



.4 
2.3 
2.5 
23.1 
2.3 
192.3 
42.4 
2/ 
24.3 
2/ 

±2 



290.5 



,3 
,4 
0 
0 
,5 
,5 
.1 
,4 
.1 



1,000 

Sx-lx 

13.1 
1.8 
1.6 
4.2 
0.2 
2.6 

2/ 
6.6 
1.8 
2^9_ 



1,000 
Bi fcj 

7.1 

0 

0.4 



.4 : 
0 1 
2/ . 
.4 i 
.2 : 



34.8 : 



^1. 



1.9 
2.6 
17.9 

2/ 
5.0 



27 ,4 



2.6 
10.3 
4.3 

4 / 4,7 



a. 9 



10.3 

o 



11.2 



60.5 



1.7 

3.7 
3.8 
12.9 
3.3 
114.6 
0 
2/ 
22.0 
50.0 
2/7 



214.7 



44, 9 



.3 
16.0 

0 

10.1 
14.5 
10.8 
18.6 
.3 
2.0 



2.7 

0 

7.2 
2/ 
3.1 



13.0 



.5 
2.8 
1.2 



^8. 



17.8 



0 
0 
.2 
5.7 
.7 
103.6 
2/ 
0 

11.7 

0 

A 



122.0 



77.0 



.1 
1.3 

0 

0 : 

4.4 1 
.2 : 

3.5 1 
.1 : 
.1 : 

^0 



11.7 : 



3.7 : 



, 4.7 ' 



426.6 



391.7 



161.7 : 



1,000 
Hj— tu. 



5.2 
2/ 

0.4 

1.2 
.1 
.3 
7J 

6.1 
.3 
.6 



U.2 



.6 
.6 
9.6 

2/ 
2.0 



12.8 



.5 
3.9 
1.4 
_i2_ 



10.3 

0_ 



10.3 



29.6 



.1 

.3 
1.5 
1.7 
.7 
46.3 
0 
0 

9.8 

0 

1.4 . . 



61.8 



.1 

4.2 
0 
0 
3.2 
2.0 
5.7 
2/ 
0 

4*2- 



16-4 



123.9 



1/ Includes small quantity of rough rice in milled equivalent. 2/ Less than 50 tons. 37 Includes 167,300 ton* 
to Cuba, lj Includes 1,635 tons to Denmark and 1,070 to Greece. 5/ Includes 107,200 tons to Pakistan. 
6/ Includes rice to Senegal and Togo. Jj Not separately reported. 8/ Includes 10,800 tons to French West 
Africa. 2/ Includes 57,600 tons of ground rice for animal feed and Section 416 donations. 



Source: Bureau of the Census. 



- 36 - 




nwm a:*? ■ ^s. i^gr 
MAY 11 1965^| 

CONTENTS • ■ 

MARCH 1965 

WORLD SUMMARIES Rage 
Production: 

Coffee Production Estimate Changes Little Since December 3 

Soybean Production Rises to New Record 6 

Walnut Production Rising 10 

Almond Crop Above Average 10 

Substantial Grain Supply in Exporting Countries 14 

1964 World Bread Grain Harvest Shows 10 Percent Gain 16 

Trade: 

International Trade in Garbanzos 8 

COUNTRY SUMMARIES 

U.S. Specified Vegetable Fiber Imports Down in 1964 17 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 

Single copies free to persons in the United States 
from the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D. C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du-8-2¥f5 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars 

FC 3-65 World Cotton Crop at Near Record in 196^-65 

FC h-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles I and 
IV, Public Law kQO 

FDAP I-65 Situation for Apples and Pears as Southern Hemisphere 
Harvesting Begins 

FDP 3-65 International Dry Bean Trade Up Sharply in I963 

FDP International Dry Pea Trade in I963 Similar to Previous Year 

FFVS 3-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. exports, December 196^ with 
comparisons 

FFO 2-65 World Castorbean Production Sets New Record 

FFO 3-65 The Republic of the Congo's Fats and Oils Situation 

FH I-65 EEC Hop Industry 

FS I-65 Sugar Stocks Change Little in 1963-6*+ 



COFFEE PRODUCTION ESTIMATE 
CHANGES LITTLE SINCE DECEMBER 

The Foreign Agricultural Service's fourth estimate (March) of the 
I96U-65 world coffee crop places total production at 52.3 million bags, 
with exportable production at 37 «8 million bags. These estimates show a 
slight increase over those of last December and remain substantially 
below 1963-6^ estimates of 68.2 and ^k.2 million bags total and export- 
able production, respectively. 

Total and exportable production in North America is practically 
unchanged at 10. 3 and 'J m k million bags, respectively. Exportable pro- 
duction will probably be lower than had been expected in Mexico and 
Guatemala, and a little higher in Costa Rica. 

Exportable production in South America is still estimated at 11.6 
million bags, even though total production is now estimated at 20.7 
million, slightly higher than the December estimate. This is due to a 
larger crop than previously foreseen in Colombia; however, the increase 
is expected to be domestically consumed. The total 196^-65 crop in 
Brazil is still estimated at 10.0 million bags, of which 3»0 million is 
shown as exportable production (total production minus domestic 
consumption) . 

Total 196^-65 African production is now estimated at 17.0 million 
bags, with exportable at 16.2 million. Both of these estimates are 
above those of December, due to larger-than-expected crops in Cameroon, 
the Ivory Coast, and Kenya. Estimates of domestic consumption on the 
African Continent generally remain very low. 



In Asia and Oceania, total and exportable production remain at 
about U.3 and 2.6 million bags, respectively, almost the same as esti- 
mated in December. Both figures are approximately 200,000 bags above 
the 1963-6^ level. 

Exportable production in the smaller producing countries in 196^-65 
(with comparable 1963-6^ data in parentheses), in bags of 132. 276 pounds, 
is estimated as follows: Jamaica 15,000 (17,000); Puerto Rico 25,000 
(25,000); Bolivia 20,000 (20,000); Paraguay 40,000 (1+5,000); Surinam 
8,000 (8,000); Dahomey 28,000 (28,000); Gabon 18,000 ( 17,000); Ghana 
1+8,000 (48,000); Liberia 58,000 (58,000); Nigeria 33,000 (33,000); Congo 
(Brazzaville) lJ+,000 (lil-,000); Sao Tome and Principe 5,000 (5,000); Sierra 
Leone 80,000 (80,000); Spanish Guinea 110,000 (110,000); New Caledonia 
30,000 (30,000); Papua and New Guinea 80,000 (75,000); Portuguese Timor 
33,000 (30,000). 



-3- 



GREEN COFFEE: World exportable production for the marketing year 1964-65 with comparisons l/ 



Continent and country- 



Average 
1955/56- 
1959/60 



1961-62 



1962-63 



1963-64 



5th 
estimate 
1964-65 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . . . 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Trinidad & Tobago 
Other 4/ 

Total North America 



1,000 
2/ 



3/ 



658 
207 
421 
1,327 
1,158 
^35 
262 
1,369 
334 
10 
37 
171 



1,000 
bagB 2/ 

1,025 
200 
450 

1,800 

1,500 
525 
290 

1,500 
395 
40 
35 



1,000 

bags 2/ 

930 
50 
420 
1, 540 
1,700 
425 
335 
1,250 
460 
19 
53 
122 



1,000 
2/ 



6,389 



970 

525 
1,885 
1,565 
365 
320 
1,950 
405 
26 
68 
51 



7,848 



7,304 



8,134 



Africa: . 

Angola : 

Burundi 6/ : 

Cameroon jj ; 

Central African Republic ; 3/ 

Congo (Leopoldville) : 

Ethiopia : 

Guinea 3/ 

Ivory Coast „ 

Kenya 

Malagasy Republic : 

Ruanda-Urundi 9/ : 10/ 

Rwanda 6/ : 

Tanzania 11/ \ 

Togo I 

Uganda 

Other 12/ '. 



Total Africa 



1,427 


2,750 


: 3,050 


! 2,750 






! 295 


145 


396 


820 


: 805 


875 


37 


140 


: 100 


180 


1,164 


850 


1,050 


1,050 


850 


1,100 


1,150 


1,225 


105 


220 


200 


160 


2,063 


1,600 


3,300 


4,300 


399 


505 


615 


720 


812 


700 


900 


800 


118 


390 










195 


120 


369 • 


390 


455 • 


560 


121 : 


170 


175 : 


225 


1,454 : 


1,933 : 


2,930 : 


2,785 


308 : 


284 : 


367 : 


396 


9,623 ; 


11,852 ; 


15,587 ; 


16,291 



Asia and Oceania: 

India 

Indonesia 

Philippines 

Yemen 

Other 13/ 

Total Asia and Oceania 



World exportable production 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

600 

525 
1,780 
1,390 
380 
340 
1,700 
480 
27 
72 

fil. 



7,357 



South America: 
















28,000 
: 6,800 
: 650 
: 570 
: 310 
: 50 


: 20,000 
: 6,500 
: 570 
: 605 
: 370 
: 73 


: 19,000 
: 6,800 
: 460 
: 630 
: 395 
: 77 


5 3,000 

: 6,900 
'• 600 
' 630 

! 425 

: 72 






I 36,380 


; 28,118 


; 27,362 


11,627 



3,045 
195 
920 
145 
950 

1,200 
185 

3,650 
830 
900 

120 
560 
220 
2,885 
397 

16,202 



: 223 : 
: 1,120 : 


315 : 
1,650 : 


370 ': 
2,080 : 


600 : 
1,600 : 


555 
1,850 


: Ik : 
63 : 


80 i 
150 : 


72 ! 

135 : 


70 : 
13? : 


70 

147 


i,48o ; 


2,195 ;' 


2,657 ; 


2,409 ; 


2,622 


': 48,591 ! 


58,275 i 


53,666 ': 


54,196 ! 


37,808 



— u= 6J ^o uuiuis uue eecona naxr or tne calendar year starting in some 

countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. Exportable produc- 
tion represents total production minus consumption, except for Brazil prior to 1959-60 which was 
based on "registrations" of current crop minus port consumption and coastwise shipments. 2/ 132.276 
pounds each. 3/ 2-year average. 4/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico. 5/ In- 
cludes Bolivia, British Guiana, Paraguay and Surinam. 6/ Prior to 1962-63 shown as Ruanda-Urundi. 
7/ Beginning with I96I-62 includes West Cameroon. Prior to 1961-62 this area was identified as 
Southern Cameroon and its production was included with Nigeria. 8/ 3-year average. 9/ Prior to 
1959-60, Ruanda-Urundi shown in Congo (Leopoldville). Beginning 1962-63 shown as Burundi and 
Rwanda - I 0 /. 1 y ear °oly° iV P rl °r to 1964-65 year was shown as Tanganyika. Now includes Zanzibar 
as well. 12/ includes Cape Verde, Comores Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Republic 
of Congo Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 13/ Includes Malaysia, New Caledonia, 
New Hebrides, Papua and New Guinea, Portuguese Tiinor and Vietnam. — 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 4 - 



GREEN COFFEE: World total production for the marketing year 1964-65 with comparisons 1/ 



Continent and country 



Average 

1955/56- 

1959-60 



1961-62 



1962-63 



1963-64 



: 1,000 

: bags 2/ 

North America: : 

Costa Rica , . : 734 

Cuba : 713 

Dominican Republic : 54-9 

El Salvador : 1,436 

Guatemala : 1,357 

Haiti : 600 

Honduras : 321 

Mexico . : 1,716 

Nicaragua : 376 

Panama : 3/ 27 

Trinidad & Tobago . . . . : 44 

Other 4/ . : 42J_ 

Total North America „....; 8,300 

South America: : 

Brazil : 28,300 

Colombia <> : 7,360 

Ecuador , : 521 

Peru 4 o : 324 

Venezuela : 835 

Other 5/ . . : 6j_ 

Total South America j 37,403 

Africa: : 

Angola . o .... : 1, 443 

Burundi 6/ . : — 

Cameroon 7/ : 405 

Central African Republic : 3/ 41 

Congo (Leopoldville) ...: 1,195 

Ethiopia : 1,100 

Guinea : 8/ 114 

Ivory Coast : 2,130 

Kenya . 415 

Malagazy Republic : 902 

Ruanda-Urundi 9/ „ . . : 10/ 120 

Rwanda 6/ : — 

Tanzania 11/ : 375 

Togo „: 122 

Uganda : 1,508 

Other 12/ ......: 332 

Total Africa j 10,202 

Asia and Oceania: : 

India : 712 

Indonesia : 1, 343 

Philippines : 199 

Yemen , : 88 

Other 13/ : 179 

Total Asia and Oceania j 2,521 

World total production : 58,426 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

1,140 
800 
600 

1,900 

1,700 
725 
365 

2,350 
440 
85 
42 
392 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

1,050 
650 
570 

1,650 

1,900 
675 
410 

2,200 
505 

73 

60 

416 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

1,100 
V75 
675 

2,000 

1,775 
610 
395 
2,900 
450 
85 
75 
314 



10,539 



10,159 



10,854 



35,000 
7,800 
85c 
710 
750 

101 



27,000 
7,500 
800 
770 
850 

124 



26,000 
7,800 
700 
815 
890 
128 



45,211 



37,044 



36,333 



2,800 

835 
1*5 
900 

1,^30 
235 

1,650 
525 
800 
460 

4oo 
172 
1,945 
316 



3,ioo 
300 
825 
105 

1,100 

1,490 
215 

3,350 
635 

1,000 

200 
470 
177 
2,945 

400 



2,800 
150 
900 
185 

1,100 

1,575 
175 

4,350 
740 
900 

125 
575 
230 
2,800 
429 



12,613 



16,312 



17,034 



765 
1,850 
680 
90 
295 



930 
2,330 
550 
82 
280 



1,145 
1,900 

550 
80 

319 



3,680 



4,172 



3,994 



72,043 



67,687 



68,215 



l/ The coffee marketing season begins during the second half of the calendar year, starting in some 
countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. 2/ 132.276 pounds 
each. 3/ 2-year average. 4/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, Martinique, and Puerto Rico. 
5/ Includes Bolivia, British Guiana, Paraguay, and Surinam. 6/ Prior to 1962-63 shown as Ruanda- 
Urundi. 7/ Beginning with I96I-62 includes West Cameroon. Prior to 1961-62 this area was identi- 
fied as Southern Cameroon and its production was included with Nigeria. 8/ 3-year average. 9/ Prior 
to 1959-60, Ruanda-Urundi shown in Congo (Leopoldville). Beginning 1962-33 shown as Burundi and 
Rwanda. 10/ 1 year only. 11 / Prior to 1964-65 year was shown as Tanganyika. Now includes Zanzibar 
as well. 12/ Includes Cape Verde, Comores Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Republic 
of Congo, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 13 / Includes Malaysia, New 
Caledonia, New Hebrides, Papua and New Guinea, Portuguese Timor and Vietnam. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 5 - 



WORLD SOYBEAN PRODUCTION 
RISES TO NEW RECORD 



The second estimate of world soybean production in 196^ confirms the 
early indication of a record cr«p of 1.1 billion bushels. This was 3 per- 
cent larger than the previous record in 1963 and one -fifth above the 
1955-59 average. 

The estimated increase of 28 million bushels from the previous year 
is attributed to the presumed increase in Mainland China. Relatively small 
absolute increases in the United States, Canada, Indonesia, Colombia, 
Mexico and several other countries were virtually offset by declines in 
Japan, the USSR, and Brazil. 

The United States accounted for about 65 percent of the l$6k crop, 
Mainland China for nearly 30 percent and other countries the small balance. 

Soybean production in the United States at a record 700 million 
bushels exceeded that of the previous year by only 519; 000 bushels or less 
than one percent but was above the 1955-59 average by i+5 percent. 

Growers harvested a record 30.7 million acres of beans, 8 percent 
more than the previous record in 1963. However, yields averaged only 22.8 
bushels per acre or 1.7 bushels less than the average of a year earlier. 
High temperatures and lack of sufficient rain, particularly in the heart 
of the soybelt, were primary factors in the low yields. 

Canadian production approximated a record 7*0 million bushels, almost 
kO percent above the reduced outturn of the previous year. Acreage increased 
only slightly, but the average yield per acre at 30.2 bushels was 8.3 
bushels above that of 1963. 

Soybean acreage in Mainland China in I96U is believed to have recovered 
to that of i960, following a sharp decline from the 1955-59 average between 
i960 and I963. In general, weather conditions were better than normal. 
Consequently, the outturn has been estimated at 315 million bushels, 10 per- 
cent more than in the previous year. 

Soybean production in Indonesia is estimated at 1^.7 million bushels, 
one -sixth larger than the revised estimate of the I963 crop. Both acreage 
and average yields were above those of the previous year. 

Continuing the downward trend of the last decade, Japan 1 s soybean 
area in 196^ at 535>000 acres was 7 percent less than that of a year 
earlier. Increased damage from diseases and insects in recent years 
resulting in low average yields have discouraged soybean production and 
encouraged diversion to feed crops. Unfavorable growing conditions in 
196if in some areas and extremely adverse conditions in Hokkaido --the major 
producing area — reduced yields to abnormally low levels. The final official 
estimate placed the outturn at 8.8 million bushels, one-fourth less than 
in 1963. 

(Continued on page 8) 



-6- 



54 



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- 7 - 



After a number of years of relatively static production, Thailand 1 s soy- 
bean crop rose in 19^3 to 1.2 million bushels, then in 196^ to an estimated 
record 1.5 million bushels. Farmers reportedly will plant more soybeans in 
1965 if prices continue at or near present improved levels, as soybeans are 
a good "second" crop as well as a good cash crop. 

At an estimated 7*5 million bushels, soybean production in the USSR was 
over one-fourth less than that of 1963. In the Soviet Far East, where the 
bulk of the commercial crop is grown, heavy rains prevailed from mid-August 
until at least mid-September, according to official sources. Moreover, 
temperatures were unusually low. 

Brazil's 196^ production estimate has been revised to 11.2 million 
bushels, 6 percent less than the previous year's outturn. Acreage reportedly 
declined about 8 percent, but yields averaged slightly more than those of 1963. 
The new crop now being harvested is expected to "be the largest on record, bar- 
ring unfavorable weather. 

Soybean production has expanded sharply in the last decade in Mexico, 
Colombia and Argentina. At 2.k million bushels in 196^ Mexico's crop was up 
one-fourth from a year earlier while Colombia's at 1.8 million bushels was up 
one-half. Argentina's production, however, declined one-fourth from the high 
of 1963 to 515,000 bushels in 1964. 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE 
IN GARBANZOS 

Exports of garbanzos (chickpeas) from 17 reporting countries in I963 
(latest year of available data) totaled 1.6 million bags of 100 poiinds each. 
Reported imports for that year totaled approximately 600,000 bags. 

The difference between the quantities exported and imported is accounted 
for by exports to non-reporting importers. For example, Morocco, the largest 
of the exporters, reported 180,000 bags of garbanzos exported to Cuba in 1963; 
65,000 to Algeria; 28,000 to Libya; 22,000 to Jordan; 28,000 to Communist East 
Europe, and 15,000 to Ceylon. Turkey, a declining exporter, sent 30,000 bags 
to Jordan and 15,000 to Israel in 1963. Similar explanation applies to dif- 
ferences between total exports and imports in I96I and I962. 

Total exports of the 17 countries in I963 were 25 percent larger than 
exports in 1962, but 8 percent smaller than in I96I. 

The larger exporters of garbanzos are Morocco, Ethiopia, Turkey, Portugal, 
and Mexico. The larger importers among the reporting countries are France, 
Italy, and Greece. Among the larger nonreporting importing countries are 
Cuba, and several countries in North Africa and Communist East Europe. 

While the bulk of international trade in garbanzos centers in the 
Mediterranean Basin, Southern and Eastern Europe, and Cuba, the world's pro- 
duction centers in India and Pakistan. These two countries produce 90 per- 
cent of the world's garbanzos. 



-8- 



GAEBANZOS (CHICKPEAS) : International trade, annual 1961 - 1963 



Continent and country 



1961 



1962 



"Imports 
• 


[Exports 


'Imports 


[Exports 


[Imports 


[Exports 


. l nnn 
: i , uuu 


: 1 , uuu 


1 , uuu 


. 1 nnn 
: 1 , uuu 


. i nnn 
: 1 , uuu 


• 1 nnn 
. 1 , uuu 


. Dags \j 


: oags 1 1 


. uags 1/ 


oags _!/ 


. oags JL/ 


Dags xy 


: 


', 0 




: 11 






: 21 




: 57 




: 16 






11 










22 




: 9 




9 




1 


147 

J- A 1 


1 


: 60 


2 


: 141 


54 


2/ 26 

fa / fa VJ 


71 


2/ 67 


71 


;2j 50 






28 




: 29 




1 33 


1 8Q 


1 66 

► J. Vj vJ 


> XL) O 


1 27 

Xfa 1 


198 










PI 

fa X 0 


1 0 


30 


3 


2 


6 


: 8 


: 2 


83 


: 2 


: 95 


4 


127 


2 




: 279 




157 




121 


126 


3/— 


143 


: 6 


42 


18 


376 


: 289 


: 373 : 


177 


392 : 


153 


* 3/ 24 




138 




51 






4/ 99 : 




4/ 136 : 




4/ 121 




404 




230 




58 


: 24 : 


503 


138 


366 


51 : 


179 




181 




110 




188 




583 




469 




893 




764 




579 




1,081 


: 533 


T, 745 


677 


1,285 : 


570 : 


1,611 



1963 



Americas: 

Argentina „ . . . 
Brazil ...„.., 

Chile , 

Colombia , . . . , 
Mexico ......< 

United States 
Venezuela „ . . , 
Total 



Europe:: 
France „ . 
Greece . . 
Italy ... 
Portugal 
Spain ... 
Total 

Asia: 

Lebanon . , 
Syria 
Turkey . . , 
Total , 

Africa : 
Ethiopia , 
Morocco ., 
Total , 

Grand total 



l/ 100 pound bags. 2/ Includes cowpeas but assumed principally garbanzos. 



3/ Marketing year June 1961-May 1962. 
1964. 



4/ Fiscal years 1962, 1963, and 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source material, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research, and related information. 



- 9 - 



WORLD WALNUT 
PRODUCTION RISING 

Preliminary 196k data place commercial walnut production in the 
major producing countries (exclusive of the Soviet Bloc and Communist 
China) at 179*700 short tons. This represents an increase of 12 per- 
cent over the 1958-62 average, and 6 percent over 1963. Italy's pro- 
duction continued to decline for the third consecutive year, while the 
United States, France and Turkey all reported larger packs. 

The estimated ^3>000 tons of 196^-65 exports, though not much 
different from I963-6U, are well below the 1958-62 average, partly 
because of increased consumption within the exporting countries. 
France in I962 and 1963 exported the biggest portion of the foreign 
total (exclusive of exports from the Soviet Bloc and Communist China) 
followed by Italy and India. About the same pattern should prevail in 
196^-65. 

U.S. domestic walnut prices opened strong, weakened, and subse- 
quently remained firm below last year's level. On the London market, 
French and Turkish prices, which are down from March I96U, have leveled 
off but not yet stabilized. Indian Light halves opened higher, rose, 
and have remained fairly firm while light pieces have shown little 
change from last year. 

U.S. walnut imports which amounted to l'jh short tons (shelled 
basis) during October 196^ through January 1965 have not kept pace 
with those in the same period of I963-6U when they amounted to 35^- tons. 

U.S. exports of 1^5 tons shelled and 958 tons unshelled basis 
during the first three months of the 196^ crop year are also down from 
the previous year. 



WORLD ALMOND CROP 
ABOVE AVERAGE 

The I96U world commercial almond crop is estimated at 127,100 
short tons, shelled basis. The crop was 22 percent above the 1958-62 
average and the largest since a record 155*500 tons were harvested in 
I96I. In addition to the crop, estimated stocks of 11,100 tons were 
on hand in major producing countries at the beginning of the season. 

Both foreign and U.S. production were above the 1963 and the 
1958-62 average levels. All foreign producers except Italy had larger 
crops than in 1963 and all except Iran and Morocco had above average 
crops. U.S. production in 196k, at U2,000 tons, (kernel basis) was 
22 percent above I963 and. ^9 percent larger than the 1958-62 average 
crop of 28,200 tons. 

(Continued on page 12) 



-10- 



WALNUTS, UNSHELLED BASIS: Estimated commercial production in 
selected countries, average 1958-62, and annual 1961-64 

Couptry |*ggg ; 1961 j 1962 j 1963 j 

* 

: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons tons 

France .: 26,000 20,400 31,000 30,000 34,000 

India : 12,600 10,500 12,000 13,000 13,000 

Iran : 6,500 4,200 6,700 3,000 l/ 

Italy : 25,900 20,000 36,000 22,000 20,000 

Syria : 3,300 6,000 4,000 7,500 3,900 

Turkey : 8,200 10,800 7,600 7,000 9,500 

Yugoslaiva : 3,800 4,300 4,500 4,000 4,000 

Foreign total : 86,300 76,200 101,800 86,500 90,900 

United States : 74,300 67,500 79,900 83,100 j/ 88,800 

Grand total : 160,600 143,700 181,700 169,600 179,700 

l/ No estimate available; totals assume 1958-62 average production. 
2/ Walnut Control Board estimate. 

WALNUTS, UNSHELLED BASIS: Exports from selected countries, 
average 1958-62 and 1961-64 crop years l/ 

: Average ': ~ : ~ZZ : 7Z~1 : Estimated 
Countr y : 1958-62 : 1961 : 1962 ; 1963 : 1964 

: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons tons 

• 
• 

France : 15,200 12,100 17,500 15,900 

India : 10,900 13,200 8,600 9,200 

Iran : 2,700 3,000 3,700 2,300 

Italy : 16,200 16,400 14,800 10,100 

Turkey : 4,700 5,700 6,300 3,200 

Yugoslavia : 1,100 600 1,700 1,800 

Foreign total : 50,800 . 51,000 52,600 42,500 43,000 

United States : 1,800 1,300 1,400 1,700 

Grand total : 52,600 52,300 54,000 44,200 

1/ Crop year beginning October 1 in France, Italy, Turkey, Yugoslavia and the 
United States, and March 21 in Iran. 



- 11 - 



Stocks in major producing countries, estimated at 11,100 tons at the 
beginning of the 1^6k season were above last season's but less than half 
of 1958-62 average stocks of 2k,k00 tons. These stocks are about equally 
divided between foreign producers and the United States. 

Exports from major producing countries for the 1963-6^ season are 
estimated at 71*700 tons, shelled basis--6 percent above the 1958-62 
revised average of 67,700 tons. World exports in 196^-65 may reach 
75,000 tons. 

U.S. exports of almonds amounted to a record 9,^00 tons (shelled 
equivalent) during the 1963-6^ season. This total consisted of 9,lQk tons 
shelled and 626 tons inshell almonds. The 1962-63 totals were ^,663 tons 
shelled and 130 tons inshell for a shelled equivalent of only ^,700 tons. 

U.S. imports of almonds were negligible during the 1963-6^ season; 
only 119 tons of shelled and 66 tons of blanched almonds entered. 

In spite of above average supplies for the current season, prices 
of foreign almonds have been nearly as high as during the two previous 
seasons when supplies were below average. Bari shelled unselected 
almonds averaged 63.2 cents a pound (f.o.b. Bari) during February 1965. 
Prices rose slightly in early March in response to reports of some frost 
in Spain. 

ALMONDS, SHELLED BASIS: Estimated commercial production in 
selected countries, average 1958-62 and 1962-61+ crop years 



Country 



Average 
1958-62 



1962 



1963 



Preliminary 
196^ 



Short 
tons 



Short 
tons 



Short 
tons 



Short 
tons 



Iran : 8,000 8,000 5,500 7,200 

Italy : 32,300 1^,500 1+2,000 38,000 

Morocco : 3,800 2,200 3,100 3,300 

Portugal : 3^00 ^,300 1,300 3,600 

Spain : 28 ,600 20,000 29,000 33,000 

Total foreign : 76,100 1+9,000 80,900 8^100 

United States 1/ : 28,200 26,600 3^,500 1+2,000 

Grand total : 10l+,300 75,600 115,1+00 127,100 

Beginning stocks ; 2*+, 1+00 2^,500 8,600 11,100 

Total supplies : 128,700 100,100 12^,000 138,200 

l/ Source: Almond Control Board. 



-12- 



ALMONDS, SHELLED BASIS: Exports from selected countries, 
average 1958-62 and 1961-64 crop years 



Country 


: Average : 
: 1958-62 : 


1961 


1902 


Preliminary : 
1963 : 


Forecast 
1964 




: Short 
: tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


T"HO»-l 1 / 


• 
• 


1 , VAAJ 

48,000 
1,200 

5,000 

33,800 


D , OVA/ 
20,600 

1,100 

3,900 
15,000 


33,500 
1,500 

2,400 
23,000 


::: 

— 




• 
t 

• 


95,000 


47,200 


62,200 


65,000 




• 


4,900 


4,700 


9,500 


10,000 



Grand total : 67,700 99,900 51,900 71,700 75,000 



l/ Iranian series revised to a September 23 - September 22 crop year basis. 



ALMONDS SHELLED UNS ELECTED: Monthly average prices f .o.b. Bari, 

marketing seasons 1960-64 



Month 


! 1960-61 ; 


1961-62 : 


1962-63 


; 196 3-6V 


; 1964-65 

• 




U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




: per 


per 


per 


per 


per 




pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


September ; 


47.8 


38.7 


65.2 


64.4 


64.7 


October : 


i 46.9 


38.2 


66.0 


69.3 


63.7 


November 


i 46.5 


39-h 


69.6 


66.6 


61.9 


December 


46.0 


41.9 


68.5 


62.6 


62.0 


January i 


46.2 


45.0 


69.O 


64.9 


63.I 


February : 


45.6 


45.8 


67.O 


63.2 


63.2 


March 


42.4 


49.4 


6O.9 


62.5 




April i 


41.1 


vr-3 


58.9 


61.2 




May : 


42.0 


61.3 


62.3 


63.5 




June 


44.2 


63.7 


65.O 


65.2 




July : 


: 43.0 


60.7 


61.9 


65.I 




August : 


42.1 


62.8 


61.1 


66.2 





- 13 - 



SUBSTANTIAL GRAIN SUPPLY 
IN EXPORTING COUNTRIES 



The total grain supply in the four principal exporting countries on January 1, 
1965 was the lowest in the last 7 years, according to estimates of the Foreign 
Agricultural Service. 

Stocks of wheat, rye, barley, oats, and corn in the four countries are esti- 
mated at 2k2 million short tons. This is 17 million tons below the aggregate 
supply on January 1, 196^ and 36 million tons lower than the record level of I96I. 
All grains except rye showed declines. Lower corn stocks are the predominant 
factor in the reduced supply level. 

Compared with January 196^ supplies, total grain holdings were down 6 percent, 
The United States showed the biggest change, a decline of 19 million tons, 13 mil- 
lion tons of which were in corn holdings. Canada's stocks were down moderately, 
while those of Argentina and Australia were up about 2 million tons each. 

In addition to the five grains covered in this report, the U.S. holds grain 
sorghum stocks of 27 million tons. This is 2 million tons less than U.S. grain 
sorghum supplies in January 196^, although a half million tons above the 1959-63 
average. Wheat supplies in the four countries are estimated at 3*2 billion 
bushels, slightly lower than the l$6k total. Corn stocks of ^.0 billion bushels 
are down nearly a half million bushels. Barley and oats supplies are moderately 
lower while rye stocks gained slightly. 

Viewing stocks by country, the United States total for the five grains is 173 
million tons, 19 million tons, or 10 percent, lower than a year earlier and ^3 mil- 
lion tons below the peak in 1961. Wheat stocks of l.k billion bushels are 171 mil- 
lion bushels less than last year and the lowest level since 1958* Corn stocks at 
3.9 million bushels, are down h62 million bushels, and the lowest since 1959« 
Barley and oats supplies are down moderately while rye stocks are somewhat higher. 

Total grain stocks in Canada are estimated at 39 million tons, l.k million 
tons lower than a year ago. Wheat stocks total 91^- million bushels, up 10 million 
bushels. Stocks of barley and oats are moderately lower while those of rye are up 
slightly. 

Southern Hemisphere figures represent total supplies in the country, i.e., 
carryover of old grain plus the estimated harvest of small grains nearing comple- 
tion in early January. Argentine corn, however, as is the case for all Northern 
Hemisphere grains, represents stocks of old grain on January 1 from previous 
harvests . 

The Argentine grain supply, at 16.3 million tons, compares with stocks of 
1^.2 million tons a year earlier. Corn and rye supplies are up moderately and 
those of wheat substantially. Stocks of barley and oats declined. 

Australia's grain stocks totaling 1^.3 million tons, vs. 12.3 million a year 
earlier, are at a new record level. While oats and barley supplies showed small 
gains, wheat stocks at 380 million bushels are 18 percent above the previous high 
of a year ago. 

-ik- 



GRAINS: Estimated stocks in principal exporting countries, January 1, 1945-1965 1/ 



Country and year 



Rye 



Barley 



Oats 2/ i Corn : Total 



United States: 
Average 1945-49. 
Average 1950-54.. 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 3/ 

Canada : 

Average 1945-49. 
Average 1950-54. 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 3/ 

Argentina: 

Average 1945-49. 
Average 1950-54. 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 3/ 

Australia 

Average 1945-49. 
Average i950-54. 

1955 , 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 3/ 

Total: 

Average 1945-49. 
Average 1950-54. 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 3/. 



Million 
bushels 



764 

1,040 
1,481 
1,567 
1,489 
1,385 
1,820 
1,875 
2,068 
1,983 
1,817 
1,614 
1,443 

382 
563 
740 
840 
970 
945 
870 
850 
935 
670 
765 
904 
914 

262 
217 
325 
260 
300 
265 
290 
260 
195 
210 
180 
343 
421 

162 
209 
245 
280 
207 
132 
220 
245 
315 
255 
309 
323 
380 

1,570 
2,029 
2,791 
2,947 
2,966 
2,727 
3,200 
3,230 
3,513 
3,118 
3,071 
3,184 
3,158 



Million 
bushels 



Million 
bushels 



Million : 
bushels : 



Million 
bushels 



1,000 
short tons 



45 

68 
84 
86 
79 
73 
73 
70 
62 
48 
41 
48 
64 



376 
456 
595 
652 
680 
713 
780 
715 
711 
575 
585 
682 
615 



1,290 
1,321 
1,357 
1,511 
1,418 
1,432 
1,574 
1,266 
1,379 
1,208 
1,322 
1,367 
1,243 



2,141 
2,617 
2,879 
3,099 
3,448 
3,639 
3,928 
4,399 
4,712 
4,540 
4,252 
4,419 
3,960 



16 


: 200 


: 898 


: 2,062 


: 100,272 


16 


: 196 


: 856 


i 2,582 


i 122,344 


26 


: 285 


967 


: 2,849 


: 147,242 


29 


i 307 


: -1,039 


: 3,074 


: 157,886 


19 


: 292 


: 788 


: 3,408 


: 160,242 


20 


: 361 


: 925 


: 3,594 


: 166 , 206 


25 


: 396 


i 1,039 


: 3,868 


: 189,732 


20 


: 361 


: 766 


: 4,344 


: 199,362 


26 


: 358 


: 852 


: 4,687 


: 216,228 


L9 


: 336 


: 775 


: 4,495 


: 206,346 


24 


: 346 


: 770 


: 4,217 


: 193,882 


15 


: 333 


: 773 


: 4,384 


: 191,952 


21 


: 310 


i 712 


: 3,922 


: 172,527 


8 


: 116 


292 


: 

4/ 


i 

. ig 432 


20 


194 


351 


4/ 
4/ 


: 28 073 


28 




290 


4/ 


I 33,314 


27 


250 


342 


V 


: 37,770 


20 


274 


485 


% 


: 44 ,481 


20 


268 


390 


% 


: 41,972 




267 


365 




: 39,077 


1 2 


262 


330 


y 


: .37,734 


14 


248 


350 


V 


: 40,344 


8 


160 


280 


V 


: ~ 28,924 


9 


173 


412 


% 


34,358 


1 2 


245 


435 


V 


40,731 


15 


.213 : 


374 


V 


39,310 


21 


47 : 


71 


79 


12,924 


32 : 


36 


68 


35 


10,338 


30 


55 


50 


30 


13,550 


30 : 


55 


55 


25 


11,540 


40 


67 


85 


40 


14,208 


33 : 


50 


80 


45 


12,614 


35 : 


50 


60 


60 


13,520 


38 : 


52 : 


70 


55 


12,772 


22 


40 : 


65 


25 


9,166 


21 
8 : 


38 : 


60 


45 


10,020 


20 : 


35 


35 


7,644 


21 : 


55 : 


71 


35 


14,223 


28 : 


40 : 


55 


38 


16,313 


4/ 
4/ 

4/ : 

4/ 

4/ 

4/ 

V 

4/ 
4/ 
4/ 

4/. : 
4/ : 


13 : 


29 




5,636 


30 : 


46 




7,726 


30 ' 


50 




8,870 


40 : 


75 




10,560 


47 : 


60 




8,298 


34 i 


37 




5,368 


67 : 


110 : 




9,968 


40 : 


100 : 


4/ 


9,910 


65 : 


112 : 


i/ 


12,802 


41 : 


93 : 




10,122 


46 : 


105 : 




12,054 


49 : 
52 : 


88 
102 


If, 
1/ 


12,274 
14,280 



138,264 
168,481 
202,976 
217,756 
227,229 
226,160 
252,297 
259,778 
278,540 
255,412 
247,938 
259,180 
242,435 



1/ Data for Northern Hemisphere countries "presets remaining on January 1, estimates J^^^ ontnu"" • 
yfez^&XW ^-^l^lZtZ't^ or 32 pounds. ,J Preliminary. 
4/ Production small and stocks are of minor importance. 

and related information. 



- 15 - 



196k WORLD BREAD GRAIN 
HARVEST SHOWS 10 PERCENT GAIN 



Revised estimates place the world's 1964 production of wheat and rye 
at a record high of 309 million short tons, according to latest informa- 
tion available to the Foreign Agricultural Service. This exceeds the 
combined I963 crop of these bread grains by 27 million tons--or 10 percent. 

The increase is principally in wheat, although rye production showed 
a small gain of k percent. Totals for both grains reflect improved pro- 
duction in North and South America, Western Europe, and Oceania and a 
recovery to normal crop levels in the Soviet Union. 

World wheat production of 9A70 million bushels is a new record and 
compares with that of 8,315 million bushels a year earlier and the previous 
record of 8,760 million bushels in 1962. The world rye crop, at 1,230 
million bushels, while being 50 million bushels above that of 1963 , is 
slightly below the 1962 total and 15 percent lower than the 1955-59 average. 

Wheat production in North America totaled 1,970 million bushels, 
second only to the 2,026 million-bushel crop of 1952. U.S. production 
was 1,290 million bushels, largest since i960. Larger harvested acreage 
plus higher yields accounted for the good crop. Canada's production of 
600 million bushels, although 17 percent below the 1963 record, was well 
above the 1955-59 average of 466 million bushels. An increase of 2 mil- 
lion acres in harvested area was outweighted by a sharp drop in yield. 
Mexico's record crop of 77 million bushels was 19 percent above the 1963 
outturn and 73 percent over the 1955-59 average. 

North America's rye production of 45.7 million bushels was up 3.6 
million bushels from 1963 and 26 percent over the 5 -year average. The 
principal change was a 4.3 million-bushel increase in the U.S. crop. 

Western Europe's wheat production at 1,570 million bushels was 204 
million bushels higher than the I963 crop and second only to the 1,620 
million-bushel total of I962. The largest gains occurred in France, 
Greece, the United Kingdom and Italy. Spain's crop was off 34 million 
bushels. Acreage and yield were both close to those of the 1962 record 
year. 

Rye production in Western Europe totaled 240 million bushels, up 15 
million bushels. Western Germany accounted for most of the gain. 

In Eastern Europe wheat production is estimated at 650 million 
bushels, slightly above the I963 crop and 18 percent over the 1955-59 
average. Hungary registered an increase of 20 million bushels and 
Yugoslavia a 9 million-bushel decline. 

Rye production at 385 million bushels was down 10 million bushels. 
Poland's large crop was 6 million bushels below that of 1963. 



-16- 



The wheat crop in the Soviet Union was similar to that of 1962 and 
is estimated at 2 billion bushels. This represents a generally good crop 
in the principal producing regions in contrast to the disastrous spring 
wheat harvest of 1963. Soviet rye production is estimated at 5C0 million 
bushels, up moderately from the previous year's crop, but well below the 
5 -year average of 635 million bushels. 

Asia' s wheat production is estimated at 1,9^0 million bushels. This 
is moderately below the I963 outturn, due principally to smaller crops in 
Turkey and India. Rye production in Turkey, the only important producer 
in Asia, is placed at 26.6 million bushels, 6.9 million bushels lower 
than a year earlier but above the 5-year average. 

Wheat production in Africa is an estimated 220 million bushels. This 
is lower than in I963 largely because of smaller crops in Algeria and 
Tunisia. 

In South America wheat production is placed at H30 million bushels, 
up from 375 million a year ago. The Argentine crop, estimated at 3^-0 
million bushels, is their largest since 1938* The outturns in Uruguay 
and Brazil recovered sharply from low levels in 1963. 

Australia 1 s record wheat harvest is now estimated at 380 million 
bushels, well over last year's high. Both increased acreage and yield 
contributed to the large current crop. (Tables following pages) 



U.S. SPECIFIED VEGETABIE FIBER 
IMPORTS DOWN IN 196^ 

U.S. imports of hard and miscellaneous fibers in 196i+ totaled 127,250 
long tons valued at $35 »1 million, a decline from 1963 of 13 percent in 
quantity and 6 percent in value. Kapok was the only fiber of these groups 
to increase in both quantity and value. Abaca increased in value but 
decreased in quantity. 

Large declines were reported in sisal, henequen, and coir, with the 
largest drop in istle. United States industry depends upon imports for 
its entire supply of these vegetable fibers. 

Hard fibers , used mainly in cordage, floor coverings, and various 
industrial uses, accounted for 86 percent of the quantity and 85 percent 
of the value of these two groups of fibers, including sisal as the major 
fiber with 52 percent of the grand total, abaca, 21 percent; and henequen, 
13 percent. Of the Miscellaneous fibers, kapok was first with Ik percent 
of the grand total. 

The average unit value in I96U compared with I963 remained constant 
for henequen at $188 per long ton. Sisal increased to $266 from $256 
and abaca to $371 from $308. The average unit value through 1960-6^ 
was larger than in 1955-59 f° r sisal and henequen, but smaller for abaca. 
(Continued on page 21) 



-17- 



13 

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o - 

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Co ITS 

> O 

«* rH 



bD UA 
0) I 

CO ua 
> 0 s 



U IT. 

0) ua 
> 0 s 
•=t rH 



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a) m 

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- 20 - 



The areas of supply changed somewhat in I96U compared with the 
1955-59 average. Asia and Africa gained in percentage of the total, but 
North and South America declined. In 196k, North America, South America, 
and Africa contributed approximately the same quantity each to total 68 
percent of the imported hard and miscellaneous fibers. 

In value, Africa and South America increased in relative importance 
to the total, but Asia and North America decreased. The 2 Americas and 
Asia (with Oceania) contributed about equally to 60 percent of the 196k 
value . 

Countrywise, the Philippines supplied the largest value of these 
fibers with $8.3 million. Next in importance, with value in millions of 
dollars were: Brazil (7.2), East Africa (Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda) 
(^.9), Mexico (3.9), Thailand (3. 5), and Haiti (2.9). These 8 countries 
together furnished 87 percent of both quantity and value of the hard and 
miscellaneous fibers. 

Sisal comes mostly (87 percent) from Brazil, East Africa, and Haiti. 
Henequen and istle are almost entirely from Mexico, abaca from the 
Philippines, crin vegetal from Morocco, and raffia from the Malagasy 
Republic. Coir is furnished principally (9^ percent) by Ceylon, Mexico 
and other American countries, and India. Thailand supplies 80 percent 
of the kapok and Indonesia, 17 percent. Palmyra , piassava , and palm-leaf 
fibers are mostly from Nigeria, other West African countries, and Brazil. 
Other fibers of lesser importance come from Nigeria, India, Brazil, 
Mexico, Malagasy Republic, and many other countries. 

(Table next page) 



* , 



-21- 



SPECIFIED VEGETABLE FIBERS: U.S. imports for consumption 
of hard and miscellaneous fibers, quantity and value, 
1964 with comparisons 



Calendar Year 



: 

Fibers : 


Average 
1955-59 


: 1963 1/ 


| 1964 1/ 
Preliminary 


1964 
: change 
: from 1963 


Hard fibers: : 


Long 
tons 

106,922 
22,346 

39,502 

2.1+71 


' Long 
! tons ! 
: 70,700 
: 20,292 
i 28,026 : 
6.963 


Long 
: tons 
: 6*67221 
: 16,330 

26,299 
875 


' Long 
l tons 

: -47479 
-3,962 

: -1,727 
-6.088 




171,2*0. 


125,981 


109,725 


-16,256 


VI a f* 1 a "1 T a n d 11c . . 

rlibLcllcLIlcUUD * . 

Broomroot fiber . . . : 
Other, n.e.s., l/ .: 


4,377 

386 
2,910 

285 
6 

867 


: 11,966 

: 85 
: 4/ 1,130) 
: 4/ 199) 

: V 5) 
: 1.981) 


! 13,004 

OM-O 

: 60 

! 3,813 


: +1,038 
: -031 
: -25 

i +498 




9,^63 


16,645 


17,525 


! +880 




180,704 


! 142,626 


! 127,250 


! -15,376 


• 
• 

• 

Hard fibers: : 


1,000 
dollars 
16,427 ! 

3,407 
14, 600 
529 


! 1,000 
dollars 
18,080 
: 3,819 
8,636 
1.348 


! 1,000 
, dollars 
: 16,978 
! 3,581 
! 9,100 
170 


1,000 
: dollars 
! -1,102 
: -238 
: +464 
: -1.178 




3^,963 


31,883 


29,829 


-2,054 


Miscellaneous: : 

Broomroot fiber . . . : 
Other, n.e.s., l/ .: 


2,279 : 

94 ! 

33 s 
753 i 
147 
6 
165 


4,046 
103 : 
7 

4/ 281) 
4/ 71) 

y 3) 

463) 


: 4,319 
80 
6 

833 


: +273 
i -23 
: -1 

+15 




3,477 


4,974 : 


5,238 ! 


+264 




38,44o i 


36,857 i 


35,067 : 


-1,790 



l/ Data for 1963 and 1964 not comparable with those of preceding years because of 
changes in classifications beginning September 1, I963. 

2/ Imports from Mexico, Cuba, and El Salvador include little sisal and their total 
represents total henequen; imports from all other countries represent total sisal. 

3/ Includes palmyra, piassava, and other palm fibers not separately classified. 

4/ January- August. Included in "other" beginning September 1, 1963- 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Compiled from reports of the U.S. Department of 
Commerce. 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WASHINGTON 25, D. C. 



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check here j . "7 return this sheet, 
and your name will be dropped fron the 
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or type the new address on this sheet 
and return the whole sheet to: 

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ft*" 



WORLD A 
PRODUCTION AND TRADE 




Statistical Report 



■JT» ; Ji W 




CONTENTS 



APRIL 1965 

WORLD SUMMARIES Page 
Production: 

1964 Prune Pack Large 3 

Record Large World Filbert Harvest ' 5 

Smaller World Olive Pack 7 

Hard Fibers Production Continues Upward 9 

Output of Dairy Products Increased in 1964 11 

Peanut Production Sets New Record 13 

Apple Production Down, Pears Up 18 

Reduction in Mediterranean Basin Olive Oil Estimate 18 

World Barley and Oats Production Declines Slightly 22 

Cattle Numbers Reach New High 23 

Hog Numbers Increased 31 

COUNTRY SUMMARIES 

U.S. Imports of Soft Vegetable Fibers Down in 1964 13 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE 



I 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 

Single copies free to persons in the United States 
from the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du 8-2^5 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars 

FC 5-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles 
I and IV, P.L. 1+80 

FCB I-65 Record World Cocoa Bean Crop 

FFO k-65 U.S. Trade in Specified Oilseeds and Oils 

FFO 5-65 U.S. Exports of Soybeans, Edible Oils, Cakes and Meals 
at Record Rates, First Quarter 196^-65 

FFO 6-65 World Flaxseed Production Smallest Since I96I; Availa- 
bilities Down Moderately 

FG 5-65 196k World Bread Grain Harvest Shows 10 Percent Gain 

FDP 5-65 Lentil Production Slightly Down in 20 Countries 

FDP 6-65 Garbanzo Production Down, Mainly in India 

FR I-65 Net Rice Imports of European Economic Community Double 
in a Year 

FLM I-65 U.S. Exports of Beef Breeding Cattle Calendar Year 196^ 

FLM 2-65 U.S. Exports of Livestock, Meat and Products to All 
Countries, The EEC, and the United Kingdom, 196^ 

FT 2-65 U.S. Tobacco Imports A Little Larger in 1^6k 

FCOF 2-65 World Coffee Production Estimate Changes Little Since 
December 



-2- 



PRUNE 
PACK LARGE 



The 196^ world dried prune pack is now estimated at 21*1,300 short 
tons, the largest since the 191*6 pack of 21*5,800 tons. It is 5^,300 tons 
larger than the I963 pack and 1*9, 600 tons or 26 percent above the 1958-62 
average. 

The U.S. pack of 179,300 tons is 35 percent above the 1963 volume 
and the largest since 1956. It is also 33 percent above average. The 
increase in the U.S. crop alone accounts for 1*6,300 tons of the ^h, 300- 
ton increase in world production over the 1963 level. 



PRUNES, DRIED: Commercial production in selected countries, 
average 1958-62, annual I96I-6I* 



Country 


: 1958-62 


\ 1961 


\ 1962 


: 1963 


; 1961* 




: Short 
: tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


South Africa, 


. 3,900 
5,700 
. 7,1*00 


7,300 
5,000 

5,600 

7,200 

1,1*00 

1,200 
1*3,300 


7,700 
3,700 
5,700 
13,200 
1,300 

1,800 
31,000 


6,900 
5,900 
5,500 
8,300 
1,500 

2,000 
23,900 


10,500 
5,100 
5,600 

10,000 
1,300 

2,000 
27,500 




• 

: 56,800 


71,000 


6U,l+00 


5^,000 


62,000 




• 


11*1,900 


152,500 


133,000 1/179,300 






212,900 


216,900 


187,000 


21*1,300 



l/ Unofficial estimate; California estimate 178,300 tons by Prune 

Administrative Committee and Oregon official crop estimate 1,000 tons. 



Production abroad, estimated at 62,000 tons, is 15 percent above the 
1963 pack and 9 percent above average. Some countries showed a distinct 
increase for I96I* over 1963> i.e. Argentina, France, and Yugoslavia, while 
Australia and Italy showed declines. Chile and South Africa experienced 
little change. 

The above figures on world production do not include the production 
of Rumania, Bulgaria, Turkey, and Iran. Production in the latter two 
countries is of minor magnitude; for the former two, reliable data are 
not available. 



-3- 



Revised figures for world exports (only for the countries shown in 
the table below) in I963-6I+ indicate that 7^,657 tons °^ Prunes moved in 
international commerce. U.S. exports in I963-6I+, though down slightly 
from 1962-63, represented a larger share of world trade in I963-6I+ 
because foreign countries' exports declined more than U.S. exports. 
Yugoslav, Australian, and Chilean exports were smaller. 

PRUNES, DRIED: Exports from principal producing countries, 
average 1958-62, annual I96I-6I+ 1/ 



Country 



Average 
1958-62 



1961 



1962 



1963 



Preliminary 
I96I+ 





: Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 




: tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 




k, 200 


3,3^3 




M21 


8, to 




l,6co 


2,297 


2,220 


1,839 


2,100 




: 3,200 


3,357 


3,311 


2,850 


2,500 




800 


1,102 


893 


1,000 


2/ 500 


South Africa 














600 


97 


15k 


200 


2/ 200 




: 21,700 


16,559 


29,529 


24,366 


2/23,000 


Foreign total . . . 


: 32,100 


26,755 


1*0,2+91 


3^,576 


2/36,700 


• 

' 38,300 




1+2,1+73 


1+0,081 


2/48,000 




: 70, to 


70,905 


82,961+ 


7^,657 


2/8i+,700 



l/ Year beginning January 1 in Argentina, Australia, Chile, and the 
Republic of South Africa; August 1 in France; September 1 in the 
United States; and October 1 in Yugoslavia. 2/ Unofficial forecast. 



World exports this season, I96I+-65, are expected to total about 
85,000 tons, or approximately 10,000 tons more than the 7^,657 tons 
exported in I963-6I+. Should this expectation materialize, I96I+-65 world 
trade in dried prunes will have been the largest since 1957-58 when over 
89,000 tons were shipped. 

Larger U.S. shipments will account for nearly all of the increase 
in world exports. Based on current indications U.S. exports should 
approximate 48,000 tons as against 1+0, 08l tons in I963-6I+ and 38,300 
tons for the 5 -year average. California export prices are appreciably 
lower than a year ago. U.S. exports in the first five months of the 
season, September I96I+ through January I965, have amounted to 26,55^- tons 
as against 22,318 tons in the same period of I963-6I+. Information on 
sales for subsequent shipment indicate a still greater increase over 
I963-6I+ exports than through January I965. Exports by the other prune- 
producing countries are expected to be only slightly larger, in aggregate, 
than in I963-6I+. 



-1+- 



RECORD LARGE 

WORLD FILBERT HARVEST 

The commercial harvest of filberts in 196*4- "by the world's four main 
producing countries is estimated at a record 258, U00 short tons, unshelled 
basis. This would be a 38 percent increase from the 187,^00 ton 1963 
crop and 59 percent above the 1958-62 average. 

Filbert production in the United States, estimated at 8,i+00 tons, was 
below average while Italy's crop was far below both 1963 and the 1958-62 
average levels. The Spanish crop was down from 1963 but above average. 
Turkish production, now estimated at 200,000 tons, made up over three 
quarters of the world total. This is double Turkey's 1963 crop and over 
110 percent above average. However, the government -sponsored filbert 
cooperative Fiskobirlik bought the bulk of the crop and will probably 
withhold a substantial amount from the market this season. 

Exports during the 1963-6^- season from the three Mediterranean 
countries totaled 150,600 short tons, unshelled basis. This is substan- 
tially above the volume of any other recent year and 11 percent above 
average. Turkish exports, at 105,800 tons, were the largest on record, 
exceeding the 1959-60 peak by a slight margin. Spanish exports were 
also above average but Italian shipments were the lowest in recent years. 
During the I96U-65 season Italian and Spanish exports are expected to be 
down somewhat but Turkish exports should more than make up the difference . 

(Continued on page 7) 



FILBERTS, UNSHELLED: Estimated commercial production in 
specified countries, average 1958-62 and 1962-6*4- crop years 



n ' Average ' , , ' Forecast 

Country : ^ Q _%2 \ 1962 1963 \ 1 9 6>4 

: Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons 

Italy : kh,UO0 kk,QQ0 6l,000 33,000 

Spain : 15,200 13,500 19,500 17,000 

Turkey : 93,800 110,000 100,000 200,000 

Total foreign : 153,1+00 167,500 l80,500 250,000 

United States i 9,200 7,800 6,900 8,^400 

Grand total : l62,600 175,300 l87,UOO 258,^00 



-5- 



FILBERTS, SHELLED, KERASSUNDES: Prices, f.o.b. Turkish port 
first week each month 1960-64 marketing seasons 



First week of j 


1960-61 : 


: 1961-62 \ 


: 1962-63 ; 


; 1963-64 


; 1964-65 

• 




U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




: per 


per 


per 


per 


per 




: pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


October 


47. 0 


53-7 


62.5 


6O.3 


45.1 


November 


: 50.2 


59.4 


64.1 


58.1 


45.7 


December 


I+9.5 


59- 7 


62.9 


53-3 


44.8 


January 


: 50.8 


63.0 


62.5 


55-2 


45.1 


February 


5^-9 


64.0 


61.6 


52.7 


46.7 


March 


: 5^-3 


63-5 


61.0 


50.8 


1. 1. 0 

44.0 


April 


5^-3 


C ). Q 

64. 0 


60.6 


40.9 


■* 


May 


\ 48.6 


50.4 


e-Q 1. 
50.4 


46.4 


mm mm 


June 


: 40.9 


57-5 


57-2 


|.Q 0 
40«3 




July 


: 50.8 


5*-3 


57.8 


47.6 




August 


: 52. T 


57.8 


57.5 


46.7 




September 


: 5^-0 


57-2 


60.3 


45.7 





FILBERTS: Exports from selected countries, average 1958-62, 
and 1961-64 marketing years 



Type and Country \ ggg j 1961 | l 9 6a j 1963 | 



: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons tons 
Unshelled : 

Italy : 13,200 13,200 13,300 14,300 

Spain : 900 1,000 600 1,400 

Turkey : 900 200 300 700 — 

Total : 15,000 14,400 14,200 16,400 



Shelled : 

Italy : 8,100 10,900 8,100 7,100 

Spain : 5,000 4,500 4,300 5,700 

Turkey : 45,800 43,900 46,800 52,600 

Total ; 58,900 59,300 59,200 55,400 



Unshelled Equivalent : 

Italy : 31,000 37,200 31,100 29,900 22,000 

Spain : 11,900 10,900 10,200 13,900 12,000 

Turkey : 92,500 88,000 103,300 105,800 120,000 

Total : 135,400 136,100 144,600 150,600 154,000 



- 6 - 



U.S. imports of shelled filberts totaled 2,671 tons during the 
1963-6^ season. During the first four months (October - January) of 
the 196^-65 season, imports amounted to l,08l tons compared to 1,399 
tons in the same period of 1963-64. As usual, imports of unshelled 
filberts were negligible. 

Prices of foreign filberts during the first half of the 1964-65 
season are lower than they have been for several years. However, a 
new Turkish export regulation has been adopted which is designed to 
keep export prices above 46 cents per pound f.o.b. Turkey. If this 
is successful, world prices should not drop below present levels 
despite the huge crop. 



SMALLER WORLD 
OLIVE PACK 

The I96U table olive production of the three major producing 
countries is estimated to have dropped roughly 50 percent from the 
previous year and may total 93>800 short tons. The sharply reduced 
pack is 9>000 tons above the short 1962 production, but 58,500 tons 
below the 1959-&3 average. All three countries, Spain, Italy, and 
Greece have alternate "on" and "off" years in production; 1964 was 
the "off" year for all three. 

Exports have fluctuated somewhat during the last 4 years and 
have reflected a slight downward trend. The 1964-65 export forecast 
of the three leading production areas is 62,100 tons — down 8,200 
tons from the 1959-^3 average and nearly as much from the I963-6U 
volume . 

Spain, generally the world's leading olive producer, has the 
largest 1964 pack amounting to approximately 39; 700 tons — down 
29,000 tons from the I963 pack mainly because of low yields and 
heavy fly infestation. Spanish olives "exportable to the U.S." 
may amount to 28,400 tons and when added to the 17,100 tons of 
other varieties should bring total exports to roughly 45,500 tons. 

A reduced 1964 Greek edible olive pack of 31^600 tons is 
anticipated because of adverse weather conditions and fruit damage 
resulting from the dacus fly. The large carryover from 1963 is 
expected to offset decreased production, consequently exports 
during the 1964-65 season may approximate 16, 500 tons as compared 
to 18,900 in 1963-64. 

Italian olive production in 1964 is expected to be much 
smaller than the previous year and may total 22,500 tons—down 
37,700 tons from 1963 and 22,000 from the 1959-63 average. Italy 
has been a net importer of olives, and its exports are of minor 
importance in the world export supply. 



-7- 



TABLE OLIVES: Production in selected countries, 
average 1959-63, annual 1961-64 



Country ' 


Average : 
1050-63 ; 


1961 ; 


1962 ; 


1963 : 


1964 




Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 




48,100 


91,000 
50,800 
57,900 


13,000 
36,800 
35,000 


59,000 
60,200 
69,400 


31,600 
22,500 
39,700 




44,500 
: 59,700 






• 152,300 


199,700 


84,800 


188,600 


93,800 





l/ Of this production, an average of 
in 1962# 58,400 tons in 1963? and 
"exportable to the U.S." quality. 



59,700 tons in 1959-63? 35,000 tons 
12,100 tons in 1964 were considered 



TABLE OLIVES: Exports from selected countries, 
average 1959-63 and annual l/ 1961 through 1964 



Country 



Greece .... 

Italy 

Spain 2/ • • 

Total 



Average : 
1959-63 : 


1961 


: 1962 

» 


Preliminary: 
: 1963 : 


Forecast 
1964 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


17,900 
500 
51,900 


19,000 
300 
48,700 


18,900 
2/ 200 
41,300 


18,900 
2/ 300 
50,100 


16,500 
2/ 100 
45,500 


70, 300 


68,000 


60, 400 


69,300 


62,100 



l/ Greece- -November - October; Spain- -December - November; Italy- 
calendar year, 

2/ Estimate. 

2/ Includes exports of both "exportable to the U.S." and "other exportable" 
quality olives . 



- 8 - 



WORLD HARD FIBERS 
PRODUCTION CONTINUES UPWARD 



World production of the three principal hard fibers for cordage- 
sisal, abaca, and henequen--is estimated at 2,133 • 7 million pounds 
in 136k, compared with 2,059*3 million in 196^ and an average of 
1,729. million in 1955-59' The I96U estimate is k percent over 
that for the preceding year and 23 percent over the 1955-59 average. 



Sisal showed the largest increase, rising to 1,539 million 
pounds in I96U from 1,^66 million produced in I963, an increase of 
5 percent. Henequen increased 5 percent to 3^8.5 million pounds 
from 332.^ million. Abaca production fell 6 percent to 2k6. 2 mil- 
lion pounds from 260.9 million in the preceding year. 



Larger sisal harvests in six of the seven principal producing 
countries accounted for the large total in I96U. Tanzania and 
Brazil now furnish 6k percent of the world crop, compared with 58 
percent in 1955-59- 

African countries produce 62 percent of the world's sisal and 
ship most of their crop as raw fiber. African production has in- 
creased 216.7 million pounds or 30 percent since 1955-59* Brazil, 
with an increase of Qh percent in the same period retains about a 
third of its crop for domestic manufacture. 

The Philippines (producing most of the abaca) and Western 
Hemisphere countries (with practically all of the henequen and more 
than a third of the sisal) consume large quantities of their hard 
fibers in domestic mills. They manufacture ropes, twines, and other 
fiber products both for domestic use and for export. 

Exports of sisal from Tanzania, the largest producer, go mainly 
to European countries which accounted for hO"] million of the total 
of 63^ million pounds in 1963. The United States and Canada furnished 
the most important markets outside of Europe, taking U3 million and 
hi million pounds, respectively. Brazil sends more than half of its 
287 million pounds of sisal exports to Europe, and about a fourth to 
the United States. 

The Philippines exported about a third of its 228 million pounds 
of abaca to Europe during 196^. It exported 57 million to the United 
States and 67 million to Japan. Japan, the United States and the 
United Kingdom together accounted for 71 percent of the total. 
Practically all of the henequen exports from Mexico is to the United 
States. (Table next page) 



-9- 



HARD FIBERS: World production by countries, calendar years, average 1955 _ 59, 

annual, 1962 through 1964 



: Average 


Calendar year 


Fiber and area : 

. 1955-59 


! 1962 


! 1963 1/ 


! 1964 1/ 


: Million 
SISAL : pounds 
Western Hemisphere: : 


: Million 
: pounds 

i 396.8 
: 58.O 
: 18.6 
: 2.7 


Million 
pounds 

: 451.6 
: 44.1 
: 24.7 
2.4 


■ Million 
: pounds 

: 475.9 
: 55.1 
: 2/ 20.0 
: 2.1 




: 476.1 


522.8 


: 553-1 


Africa: : 


: 151.8 

: 131.3 
: 48.1 
: 59-8 
: 479.4 

: -9 
11.0 


I 136.6 

: 157-1 
: 53.0 
: 69.2 
: 480.0 
: .8 
11.1 


: 147.7 
: 148.5 
: 57.3 
: 70.5 
: 514.9 
: .8 
10.4 




: 882.3 


907.8 


: 950.1 


Asia and Oceania: : 


: 17.0 
: 18.0 
1.5 
3.8 


22.1 

8.6 

: 1.0 
3.7 


: 25.3 
: 6.1 
: 1.0 
2-4 




40.3 


35.4 


35-8 




1,398.7 


1,466.0 


1,539-0 


ABACA : 

• 

Asia and Africa: : ! 


1.6 

7.6 
1.0 

210.9 
.5 : 


2.9 

9.0 
.8 
247.1 
1.1 


3-0 

9.0 
2/ .7 
232.5 

1.0 




221.6 : 


260.9 


246.2 


HENEQUEN : 
Other 2/ : 1.4 


344.9 : 
22.4 : 
7.8 ' 

I • ^ « 

2.7 : 


300.7 
22.4 
6.6 
2.7 : 


317.5 

2/ 22.4 

6.0 
2.6 


Total sisal, abaca, and henequen : 1,729 .4 : 


377.8 : 
1,998.1 : 


332.4 ! 
2,059-3 : 


348.5 
2,133.7 



l/ Preliminary. 

2/ Foreign Agricultural Service estimates. 
3/ Includes Comoro Islands. 

4/ Data include only fiber inspected by the Philippine Fiber Inspection Service 
and represent generally only 90 to 95 percent of total Philippine production. 
Converted at 278.88 pounds to the bale. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U. S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research, and related information. 



- 10 - 



WORLD OUTPUT OF DAIRY 
PRODUCTS INCREASED IN I96U 



Overall world output of manufactured dairy products (milk equivalent - 
fat oasis) in the principal dairy countries in 196^ increased over 1963. 

In Western Europe, milk production was up in Belgium, Denmark, 
Ireland, and Norway, but down in France, West Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, 
and the United Kingdom. In the Netherlands, it was practically the same 
as in the earlier year. 

Milk production in Australia and New Zealand set new records. 

In Canada, milk production was about the same as in the preceding 
year. In the United States, it was up slightly, and exceeded the record 
set in 1962. 

Creamery butter production in 196^ increased 2 percent over 1963. 
Output in Western Europe fell just short of last year, in spite of 
heavier production in West Germany, France, Denmark, Norway, and Ireland. 

The record output produced in New Zealand reflected both the higher 
milk production and the good export demand. Production expanded 
significantly in Australia, surpassing the record set in 1956. 

In Canada, creamery butter production was maintained at the I963 
level; U.S. output gained slightly. 

Factory cheese production rose 5 percent. In Western Europe, output 
increased 5 percent; all countries in that area reported heavier production 
except Norway. 

Output in Australia, 10 percent above the preceding year, was a 
record. In New Zealand, also, production was the highest yet reported. 

In both Canada and the United States, more cheese was manufactured 
in 196^ than in 1963. 

Production of canned milk ( condensed and evaporated) was 3 percent 
higher. In Western Europe, (represented by four countries), output was up 
in all but West Germany, where it approximated that of the earlier year. 
Australia established another record with an increase in production of 
all types of canned milk of 25 percent. Output in Canada and the United 
States gained very little over I963. 

Dried milk production (most of which is nonfat dry milk) increased 
6 percent. The heavier output in France, West Germany, the Netherlands, 
and Belgium accounted for the 7 percent gain in production in Western 
Europe. Australia manufactured both dried whole milk and nonfat dry milk 
in larger quantities than in 1963. New Zealand reports only nonfat dry 
milk, production of which was up 29 percent to a new high. Heavier 
production of nonfat dry milk accounted for nearly all the increase in 
total dried milk production in both Canada and the United States. 



-11- 



FACTORY DAIRY PRODUCTS : Output in 
principal producing and exporting countries, 1963 and 1961+ (Preliminary) 





BUTTER 


Country 


1963 


I96I4 


ANNUAL 


1961+ 


January 


July 


January 


July 






compared 




through 


: through 


: through 


through 


1963 


1961+ 


with 




June 


December 


June 


December 






1963 




Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 






pounds 
r 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


Percent 


Canada 


160,791 


195,505 


162,901 


193,1+28 


356,296 


356,329 


100 


United States 


829,960 


590,189 


830,800 


603,385 


1,1+20,11+9 


1,1+3U,185 


101 


Belgium 










112,152 


110,671 


99 


Denmark 


17U,381t 


15U,763 


179,011+ 


163,11+0 


329,11*7 


31+2,151+ 


101+ 


Finland 


108,936 


110,979 


121,120 




219,715 




- 


France 


273,370 


332,895 


329,367 


303,791+ 


606, 265 


633,161 


101+ 


Germany, West 


51+6,001+ 


1+79,810 


558,1+32 


1482,069 


1,025,811+ 


1,01+0,501 


101 


Ireland 


hh,h& 


65,811 


U9 , 663 


72,110 


110,266 


121,773 


110 


Netherlands 


110,171 


98,012 


96,098 


101,073 


208,183 


197,171 


95 


Norway 


25,726 


lit, 1+1+0 


26,3l4li 


114,188 


1+0,166 


1+0,532 


101 


Sweden 


97,209 


89,190 


93,097 


81,618 


186,399 


1714,715 


91+ 


Switzerland 


1+3,950 


32,550 


31+, 801 


31,778 


76,500 


66,579 


87 


United Kingdom 


61,152 


35,616 


31,581+ 


20,832 


96,768 


52,1+16 


51+ 


Argentina 


65,161+ 


1*9,1.75 


58,771 


1/ 51,159 


lll+,639 


1/ 110,230 


96 


So. Africa, Rep. of 


1+9,975 


1+6,91+7 






96,922 






Australia 


182,905 


27l+,129 


179,572 


295,339 


1457 , 031+ 


l+7l+,911 


101+ 


New Zealand 


178,683 


312, la2 


219,879 


327,3514 


1+91,095 


5U7,233 


111 




CHEESE 


Canada 2/ 


56,002 


83,365 


61,669 


81,930 


139,367 


1U3,599 


103 


United States 


8514,238 


777,200 


899,310 


803,665 


1,631,1+38 


1,702,975 


101+ 


Denmark 


ll+l,09li 


125,663 


11+9,251 


12l+,560 


266,757 


273,811 


103 


France 


ia8,278 


l+81+,506 


1+85,338 


505,630 


902,7814 


990,968 


110 


Netherlands 


226,189 


219,597 


215,583 


2314,319 


1+1(5,786 


1+1+9,902 


101 


Norway 


52,751 


1+1,132 


51+,23i+ 


38,1(05 


93,883 


92,639 


99 


Sweden 


61,316 


58,891 


66,875 


57,905 


123,237 


12l+,780 


101 


Switzerland 


73, Jail 


80,908 


75,012 


86,365 


1514,322 


161,377 


105 


UI1J.VCU 1\ Xlitl Will _.■ / 










23l4,30U 


21+6,1+00 


105 


Argentina 


113,550 


17li,57U 


l61+,61+6 


1/ 155,021 


318,121+ 


1/ 319,667 


100 


So. Africa, Rep. of 


15,558 


17,61+5 






33,203 






Australia 


V7,li57 


79,995 


1+9,195 


91,226 


127,1+52 


11+0,1+21 


: 110 


New Zealand 


78,265 


131,01+0 


83,372 


139,530 . 


209,305 


222,902 


106 




CANNED MILK 


Canada bj 


l68,30li 


170,676 


180,61+6 


160,117 


338,980 


31+0,763 


100 


Unit pri ^tfltp^ ^/ 


1,01+9,893 


926, 31a 


1,01+9,300 


933,600 


1,976,231* 


1,982,900 


100 


France 


108,232 


127,111 


lll+,809 


166,281+ 


1/ 235,31+3 


1/ 281,093 


119 


Lit; I UHill^f , U 


51+6,085 


153,119 


551,951 


1+1+8,133 


" 999,201+ 


~l,000,081i 


100 


Netherlands 


1+85,826 


506,123 


515,71+8 


509,869 


991,91+9 


1,025,617 


103 


United Kingdom 


221,536 


186,592 


2l+l+,l60 


180,51+1+ 


1(08,128 


l+2l+,70l+ 


101+ 


Argentina 


8,162 


1U,325 


11,673 


1/ 10,373 


22,1+87 


1/ 22,01+6 


• 98 


Australia 6/ 


72,861+ 


115,385 


99,520 


135,1+1+0 


188,21+9 


" 23i+,960 


125 




DRIED MILK 7/ 


Canada 0/ 


97,358 


100,635 


106,523 


118, 851+ 


197,993 


225,377 


111+ 


United States 8/ 


1,302,907 


907,790 


1,319,1+00 


937,250 


2,210,697 


2,256,650 


102 


Belgium 










127,825 


139,190 


109 


France 


183, 13U 


258,227 


21+5,1451 


280,31+6 


Ida, 361 


525,797 


119 


Germany, West 


182, 63U 


137,511 


203,1+52 


171,910 


320,11+5 


375,362 


117 


Netherlands 


11+2,783 


914,139 


131,588 


108,898 


236,922 


21+0,1+86 


101 


Sweden 


1+3,898 


33,587 


Uk,W 


29,809 


77,1+85 


71+, 295 


96 


Switzerland 










53,572 


52,029 


97 


United Kingdom 


101,021+ 


66,976 


71,680 


53,760 


168,000 


125,1+1+0 


75 


Argentina 


16,91+8 


16,121 


19,531+ 


1/ 13,535 


33,069 


1/ 33,069 


100 


Australia 


1(9,907 


71,570 


52,309 


" 86,1468 


121,1+77 


138,777 


111+ 


New Zealand 9/ 


36,071 


87,81+2 


53,110 


107,296 


123,913 


160, 1+06 


129 



1/ Partially estimated. 2/ Cheddar cheese only. 3/ Total cheese production, h/ Both bulk and case goods. 
5/ Evaporated whole and condensed whole case goods only. 6/ Includes mixtures oT full cream and skimmed milk, 
mixtures of full cream, skim and buttermilk, and "coffee and milk." 7/ Dried whole milk and nonfat solids 
production. 8/ Includes dried milk for animal feeding. 9/ Nonfat dry milk production only. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, 
other foreign source materials, reports of U. S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of 
office research, and related information. 



- 12 - 



U.S. IMPORTS OF SOFT 
VEGETABLE FIBERS DOWN IN 1964 

United States imports of soft vegetable fibers (other than cotton) 
in I96U totaled 77>593 long tons valued at $11.8 million, representing 
decreases of k percent in quantity and 19 percent in value from comparable 
data for I963. The United States depends almost entirely on imports to 
meet its needs for soft fibers. Imports of jute, the principal soft 
fiber in this grouping, were down 6 percent in 1964 from I963. Sunn 
fiber imports were also down in 1964 while imports of flax and hemp 
exceeded 1963 receipts. 

Imports of raw jute in 1964 totaled 72,972 tons, or 94 percent of 
total purchases of soft vegetable fibers, and were valued at $10.3 million. 
After the partition of India and Pakistan in 1947, Pakistan became the 
principal supplier of raw jute fiber to the United States. Most of U.S. 
jute requirements, however, are imported as woven fabrics (mainly burlaps) 
for making bags, backing for tufted carpets, and other uses. In 1964, 
the total value of imports of manufactured jute goods, which come mainly 
from India, Pakistan, and Europe, amounted to $173 million, as compared 
with $179 million in 1963. 

Imports of all classes of flax in 1964 totaled 3>596 tons, sub- 
stantially above I963 due mainly to a sharp increase in imports of flax 
straw from Canada. A breakdown of total 1964 flax purchases (with I963 
quantities in parentheses) include tow, noils, waste and advanced waste -- 
1,675 tons (1,615); flax straw 1,403 (20); unhackled flax -- 462 (575); 
and hackled flax 56 tons (l). (Table on page 14) 

WORLD PEANUT PRODUCTION 
SETS NEW RECORD 

The second estimate of world production of peanuts in 1964 places 
the outturn at a record 17.5 million short tons, unshelled basis. This 
is 4 percent above the previous record of I963 and one -fifth above the 
1955-59 average. 

The estimated 645,000-tons expansion from a year earlier is attri- 
buted largely to increases in 4 of the 5 major producing countries — 
India, Mainland China, the United States and Senegal—of f set only par- 
tially by declines in Nigeria, Brazil, South Africa and Malawi. 

North America produced about 6 percent more peanuts than in 1963. 
Output in the United States, at 1.1 million tons, was 9 percent above 
that of 1963, more than one-third above the 1955-59 average, and one 
of the largest crops of the post World War II period. The 1.4 million 
acres picked and threshed was slightly less than acreage of the previous 
year but the average yield of 1,569 pounds per acre exceeded the previous 
record of I963 by 134 pounds. 

(Continued on page 15) 



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- 14 - 



African peanut production was down moderately from a year earlier. 
The smaller outturn is accounted for largely by the decline now estimated 
to have occurred in Nigeria. Early prospects favored an alltime record 
high outturn in that country, but claims now are that heavy rains caused 
rotting in the ground, and this, followed by the earlier-than -usual 
harmattans (dry winds) in late September and early October resulted in 
considerable kernel shrivelling. Purchases by the Nigerian Marketing 
Boards for crushing and export are now expected to approximate 772,800 
short tons (690,000 long tons), shelled basis, compared with purchases 
of 881,13^ tons (786,727) from the I963 crop and 976,098 tons (871,516) 
from the record outturn of 1962. Purchases of this volume would in- 
dicate a total crop of slightly less than l.k million tons, unshelled 
basis, a decline of 10 percent from a year earlier. 

Senegal produced a large crop of peanuts in 1964 as a result of 
favorable weather. Commercial purchases for crushing and exports from 
the I96U crop are forecast at 926,000 short tons (840,000 metric tons), 
unshelled basis, compared with 873,545 tons (792,1+75) from the I963 
crop and the record 994,000 tons (901,764) from the 1961 crop. Total 
production is estimated at 1,050,000 short tons, unshelled basis, about 
6 percent above last year's estimated total. 

Mexico's crop was almost one-fifth less than that of a year earlier, 
reflecting the encouragement given to corn production in Jalisco, and 
the resulting decline in acreage in that important producing state. 
Although 1964 was an unprofitable year for the Mexican peanut processors, 
they are optimistic about I965. Domestic consumption continues to rise 
and the export market for unshelled nuts reportedly looks good. 

Peanut crops in South America , harvested early in 1964, were in 
aggregate one -fourth less than a year earlier because of the sharp 
decline in Brazil. After reaching a peak in I962, Brazil's production 
declined moderately in 1963 then, because of extremely poor weather, 
declined again in 1964 by over 40 percent, to only 385>0OO tons. This 
year's weather has been favorable, and the 1965 harvest now underway 
is expected to yield about 645,000 tons. While the bulk of the crop 
has normally been grown in Sao Paulo, production in Parana is expected 
to rise rapidly within the next few years. In fact, because production 
is expected to increase substantially in I965, peanuts probably will be 
crushed this year for the first time in Parana. 

In Argentina acreage was at a record high, but wet weather delayed 
the harvest and reduced yields, and the 1964 outturn at 367,000 tons 
was only moderately above the previous year's reduced crop. The third 
official estimate of acreage planted for the I965 crop is an alltime 
high of 936,500 acres. Growing conditions were generally favorable 
despite some areas of below-normal rain and others of excessive rain. 
The recent drought is believed to have caused only limited damage in 
Cordoba, where most of the crop is grown. Consequently, production may 
approximate 450,000 to 460,000 tons. 

Uruguay's 1964 peanut outturn was virtually the same as that of a 
year earlier. However, a serious drought reportedly has reduced this 
year's crop by over one -half. (Continued on page 17 ) 



-15- 



PEANUTS l/ : Acreage and production in specified countries and the world, 
averages 1950-54 and 1955-59, annual 1962-64 



: Acreage 2/ 


Production 


wumicuo . Average 


1962 


1963 


1964 3/ 


Average 


1962 


1963 


1964 3/ 


™ ^uii^ry . ]_cj50-54 


1955-59 


1950-54 


1955-59 


: 1,000 
: acres 


1,000 
acres 


: 1 000 
acres 


1,000 
acres 


1 000 
acres 


1 000 
short 
tons 


1 000 

short 
tons 


1,000 
"tons 


1,000 
tons* 


1,000 
short 

1,102 
83 

58 


North America: : 

Cuba : V 24 


1,501 
163 
30 
117 


1,412 
181 

124 


1,409 
188 

124 


1,405 
151 

124 


763 
78 
6 
24 


799 
92 
9 

59 


905 
99 

57 


1,011 
103 

53 


Estimated total 5/. : 1,955 


1,825 


1,805 


1,805 


1,765 


870 


960 


1,090 


1,195 


1,270 


South America: : 


526 
6/ 486 
J 28 
20 


691 
6/ 1,177 
26 
25 


657 
6/ 1,045 

23 


851 
6/ 899 
30 
19 


154 
161 

12 

6 


261 

270 
11 

6 


477 

714 
10 

9 


344 
666 

8 


367 
385 
11 

8 




1,105 


1,970 


1,865 


1,855 


3^5 


565 


1,230 


1,055 


795 


Europe : : 


5 

13 
18 


7 
14 
16 


7 
12 


7 
11 


5 
9 
14 


: 5 
12 
10 


7 
14 
11 


7 
13 

9 


6 

12 


Estimated total ex-: 
eluding U.S.S.R.5/: 50 


45 


45 


40 


40 


30 


30 


35 


30 


30 


U.S.S.R. (Europe : 


V 1 


7/ 


7/ 


V 






7/ 


7/ 


7/ 


Africa: : 

United Arab Republic. . : 29 

Chad, Congo (Brazza- : 
ville), Central : 
African Rep. and : 

Congo, (Leopoldville). : 705 

Niger : 313 

Zambia (Northern :) 


339 
38 

4/ 94 
328 

556 
692 

4/ 137 . 
47 — 
102 

690 
4/ 3,500 

) 
) 
) 

4/ 2,175 

425 
4/ 550 


735 
55 

297 

100 
798 

) 
) 

) 

) 
) 

2,505 

615 

6/ 722 


920 
55 

301 

: 787 
) 

2,595 
6/ 973 


52 
310 

) 

2,645 
6/ 1,077 


25 
23 

4/8/ 5 
90 

101 

196 
72 
49 
30 
21 

103 
: 20 
72 

851 

600 
32 
184 
144 


: 129 
: 34 

■4/ 22 
110 

193 
193 

: 80 

! 45 

4/ 28 
: 31 
: 124 
: 40 
• . 162 
: 1,103 

4/ 925 
22 
186 

! 204 


263 
55 

: 36 
: 109 

"94 
84 
110 

! 22 

35 

i 121 
35 
226 
1,670 
217 

171 
J- (J- 

: 107 
955 
28 

! 180 

: 204 


322 
50 
38 

112 

99 
85 
115 

35 
127 
41 
243 
1,535 
166 

180 

107 
995 
3h 
180 
294 


50 
33 
115 

95 
90 

37 
130 
52 
253 
1,380 

120 
176 

J. ( u 

108 
1,050 

: 30 
233 


Estimated total 5/. : 9,335 


12J.06 


14,065 


14,555 


14,760 


2,905 


4,075 




5,345 


: 5,135 


Asia: : 
Turkey (Europe and Asi: 

Hil no Mta -f nl onrl • li 9Cm 

China, Taiwan 6/ : 210 


12 

20 
5 8l4 
'905 
248 
14,717 

Pi c 
olb 

91 
71 
221 


9 

25 
3,755 

238 
16,962 
916 
159 
49 
211 


10 

23 
4,005 

241 

16,814 
855 

: 152 

48 
202 


7 

22 
4,645 

250 
17,000 
1,013 
155 
6/ 62 
5/ 237 


7 

12 

189 
67 
3,812 

all/? 

34 
17 

85 


! 17 

: 23 

266 

: 96 
5,000 
379 
76 

: 20 
123 


14 

27 
1,800 
476 
105 
5,31^ 
426 
105 
12 
- 124 


14 

25 
2,095 
361 
101 

5,832 
349 

107 
12 
125 


10 

25 
2,525 
480 
127 
6,175 
445 
151 
16 
132 


Estimated total ex-: 
eluding U.S.S.R.5/: 18,190 


23,030 


24,030 


24,045 


25,195 


7,025 


: 9,135 


8,555 


9,175 


10,185 




39 


34 


35 


45 


10 


19 


17 


22 


30 


Estimated, world : 


40,145 


41,950 


42,285 


43,660 


11,195 


14,785 


16,200 


16,820 


17,465 



l/ Peanuts in the shell. Southern Hemisphere peanut crops, which are harvested from April to June, are combined with those 
of the Northern Hemisphere harvested from September through December of the same year. 2] Harvested areas as far aa possible. 
3/ Preliminary. 4/ Less than 5 years. 5/ Includes estimates for the above countries for which data are not available and 
for minor producing countries. 6/ Planted area. 7/ Less than 500 acres and 500 tons. 8/ Exports. 9/ Commercial crop. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other 
foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research 
and related information. 



- 16 - 



Estimates of total peanut production in Malawi, Rhodesia and Zambia, 
formerly the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, again have been 
revised upward on the basis of more complete data. Aggregate production 
in 196^ is believed to have reached i+0^,COO tons, 10 percent less than in 
the previous year. Peanut crops in these countries are grown principally 
by Africans for their own subsistence, with relatively small quantities 
grown by Europeans. It is generally believed that only about 25 percent 
of total production is marketed commercially. Despite estimated declines 
in the last 2 years, output in all 3 countries has trended sharply upward 
in recent years and the outlook is for continued expansion. 

In South Africa drought during the growing season dimmed the early 
outlook for increased production in 196^ and outturn at 233*000 tons was 
down one -fifth from a year earlier. Again this year, reportedly unprece- 
dented drought and heat have prevailed since the first of February, and 
the 1965 crop is expected to approximate only about 2^+5,000 tons, con- 
siderably less than early indications. 

Estimates of peanut production in the Sudan have been revised 
upward. Official data for 196^ are not yet available, but production 
is believed to have declined from the I963 outturn, which was officially 
placed at 322,000 tons. Early expectations were for increased production 
in view of larger plantings and substantial rains. 

In line with early indications peanut production in Asia expanded 
significantly in I96U from the previous year, with production up in all 
major growing areas. At the unofficial estimate of almost 6.2 million 
tons, India's outturn reached a new high, exceeding the previous year's 
record by 6 percent. Expanded acreage reportedly was due in part to the 
acute shortages of supplies experienced a year earlier, boosting prices 
of peanuts and peanut oil, and partly to favorable weather in most areas. 

The early estimate of 196^ peanut production in Mainland China 
remains unchanged at 2.5 million tons ( World Agricultural Production 
and Trade , November 196^) . A downward trend in peanut production is 
believed to have occurred from the peak year of 195& until 1963, during 
which time increasing emphasis was centered on grain production. With 
the improvement of the food situation and a pressing need for more vege- 
table oil, peanut acreage and production appear to have increased in 
I963 and again in 196^. 

Following a year of reduced peanut production in 19^3* resulting 
in a shortage of edible oil, the government of Burma planned to increase 
production sharply in 196^. An unofficial estimate places the outturn 
at U80,000 tons, up one -third from the previous year. 

As for other major producing countries of Asia, 196^ crops in both 
Indonesia and Taiwan increased one -fourth from a year earlier and in 
Thailand by 6 percent. Japan's production declined 10 percent. 



-17- 



WORLD APPLE PRODUCTION 
DOWN, PEARS UP 



World apple production in important exporting countries in 196^-65 
is about 2 percent below the previous year, while pears show a ih percent 
increase . 

The reduction in apples is a result of poorer crops in Western Europe, 
particularly France, West Germany, and Yugoslavia. This reduction is not 
completely offset by a 7 - Pe rcen "t increase in North America. Most other 
areas are about the same level as last year. Adverse weather hit during 
the growing season and caused the European loss. West Germany, the largest 
single apple importer in the world, was affected the most, therefore pro- 
viding a stimulus to exports. 

All world areas for pear production in 196^ were above the previous 
year, except Australia and Asia whose output was down 20 percent and 
5 percent respectively. 

On the other hand, North America reflected a substantial increase, 
primarily owing to a gain in the United States of almost 55 percent 
after the very short I963 crop. However, this 196^ level was about 
average for the United States. Western Europe reports a 10 percent 
increase which is an aggregate of small gains in a number of countries. 
No single country reported a really large increase except Italy which was 
up 5» 5 million bushels or about 12 percent. 



REDUCTION IN MEDITERRANEAN 
BASIN OLIVE OIL ESTIMATE 

In 196^-65 production of pressed olive oil in the major producing 
countries of the Mediterranean Basin is now estimated at about 1.1 million 
short tons. This is 6l,000 tons below the volume forecast in December 
( World Agricultural Production and Trade Statistical Report, December 31, 
196^) . Moreover it is one -fourth below the average of the last four 
marketing years but somewhat above the small outturn of 1962-63. Supplies 
of olive oil in 196^-65, however, declined significantly less than pro- 
duction, reflecting heavy carry-in stocks from 1963-crop olives. 

Factors most strongly influencing the sharp reduction estimated for 
1964-65 from the exceptionally large outturn of 1963-6^ include: (l) 
general cyclical off-year production declines in the major producing 
countries of Southern Europe; (2) drastically lower production in Spain, 
reflecting serious drought; (3) reduced production in Italy, reflecting 
damage caused by heavy rains; (h) a markedly smaller outturn in Greece 
due to olive kernel borer and dacus fly infestations; and a severe 
decline in Portuguese production because of adverse weather. 

(Continued on page 20) 



-18- 



APPLES and PEAfS51 Production In specified countries, dessert and cooking, average 1955-59, annual 1962-64 1/ 



cntinent and 
Country 



Average 
1955-59 



ajPLES 

North America: 

Canada 

Mexico 

United States 4/ 

Total. 

Europe: 

Austria 5j 

Belgium and Luxembourg. . . 

Denmark 4/ 

France 5/ 

Germany, /est 

Greece 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Spain 5/ 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 5/ 

Yugoslavia 

Total 

Asia: 

Japan 

Lebanon 

Turkey 

South America: 

Argentina 

Chile y 

Africa: 

South Africa 6/ 

Oceania: 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Total Specified countries jj . 

PEARS 

Nortn America: 

Canada 

Mexico 

United States 4/ 

Total 

Europe: 

Austria 5/ . 

Belgium and Luxembourg. . . 

Denmark 4/ 

France 5/. 

Germany, Vest 

Greece 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 5/ 

Yugoslavia 

Total 

Asia: 

Japan 

Lebanon 

Turkey 

South America: 

Argentina 

Chile 4/ 

Africa: 

South Africa 6/ 

Oceania: 

Australia 

Nev Zealand 

Total specified countries 7/. 



1,000 
Bushels 2/ 

15,999 
2,887 
116,233 



135,119 



11,743 
8,236 
4,44l 
20,210 
5^,677 

6k, 522 
12,502 
2,653 
0,544 
8,955 
16,610 
22.764 

9:52 



1,000 
Bushels lj 

20,095 
3,^55 
125,575 



149,12? 



1963 



11,023 
5,017 
3,362 
39, 36l 
77,304 
6,442 
100,231 
10.360 
2,937 
11,767 
12,565 
22,046 
22,269 



1,000 
Bushels 3/ 

23,016 
3,520 

ig: i5g5 



152,0^1 



10,793 

6,643 

3,312 
45,332 
90,090 

6,109 
107,309 
12,060 

2,268 

16,213 
9,967 

13, 372 
24,425 
12.360 



250, 516 


334,353 


307,253 


341.4Q1 


' 32,993 


: 45,929 


: 53,048 


: 50, 3o4 


: 1,562 


: 3,353 


: 3,261 


: 3,904 


8,096 


: 14,785 


: 15,005 


: 15,157 


: 17,054 


21,770 


: 17,04o 


: 20,622 


2,100 


2,503 


: 2,526 


: 2, 572 


: 1,576 


: 2,910 


: 3,910 


: 4,168 


: 11,569 


16,054 


: 16,874 


: 17.940 


• 3,122 

j 1 


3,330 


4,133 


4,238 


; 463, 716 


594,162 


635,091 


623,631 


1,360 


1,720 


1,638 


1,946 


- 776 


934 


944 


970 


: 29,942 


29,294 


19,378 


-^29.977 


32,060 


31,948 


22,010 


32,695 


l,oo6 


3,086 


2,425 


2,734 


: 5,145 


2,328 


2,231 


3,066 


: 255 


273 


265 


366 


: 7,837 


13.624 


14,727 


13,404 


: 15,017 


20,326 


10,651 


21.341 


: 1,799 


1,510 


1,934 


2.258 


: 20,559 


38,599 


42, 394 


47.655 


4,409 


4,056 


4,762 


6,6l4 


366 


394 


309 


275 


4,236 


5,472 


6,967 


7.055 


T 1.429 


2,690 


1,696 


2.513 


: 9,172 


9.700 


7.055 


8.813 


; 2,653 


2,320 


2.865 


3,060 


: 2,904 


4,453 


3,519 


4.4C9 


• 77,637 


103,621 


110,070 


123.566 








: 7,713 


14,299 


15,009 


14.^05 


• 169 


132 


8£ 


265 


4.502 


5.647 


6,684 ; 


6.393 


4,515 


4,^21 


4,638 ': 


4.731 


269 


333 


397 : 


397 


1,626 


2,355 


-2,331 : 


2,84o 


! 4,335 


5.100 


6,226 : 


5,085 


: 


611 


679 : 


724 


; 133.-5^1 


173,822 


, 66,632 ; 


191,424 



1/ Years shovn refer to years of harvest in Northern Hemisphere. Harvests of Northern Hemisphere countries are i~ombined with those of the 
Southern Hemisphere vhich immediately folio v.: thus, the crop harvested :n the Northern Hemisphere in l^ok is combined with preliminary 
for*"*"ts for the Southern Hemisphere harvests which began lat«* in 1°jo^ and ended early in 19^5* 

2/ Preliffiina-ry- 

Basic production datn reported in units other than DU6hels converted to lb. equivalents for apples and 50 lb. equivalents for pears. 
hj ■ r^ercial crop. 

vS-cludes cider apples and pears reported separately. 
of T>ciduous yruit Board handlings. 

if May include some cider epples or rears in countries not reported separately. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated cn the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source 
materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreir^i Service Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 19 - 



Production in Spain , the traditional major olive oil producing and 
exporting country, is now estimated by the Foreign Agricultural Service 
at 225,000 tons compared with an estimated 650,000 tons in 1963-6*4. The 
drastic decline resulted from tree exhaustion compounded by inadequate 
moisture. This decline is being reflected in a significant decline in 
exports, from November 1, 196*4 through February, which approximated those 
in the like period of 1962-63 despite heavy carry-in stocks from the 
1963-6*4- outturn. 

In Italy olive oil production this year will exceed that in Spain- - 
a phenomenon which in the last 10 years has occurred only twice --in 
1957-58 and- in I96I-62. Italian production is estimated at nearly two- 
fifths below the revised estimate of last year's record outturn, largely 
reflecting an off-year decline. Although olives are grown widely through- 
out most of the Italian Peninsula, including Sicily and Sardinia, production 
since before World War II has been below domestic needs. Olive production, 
however, does provide the advantage of utilizing more arid regions not 
suited to other crops. 

Greece's 196*4—65 outturn is down sharply from the high volume of 
1963-6*4 to approximately that of the 195^-55/1957-58 average. The decline 
occurred notwithstanding favorable growing conditions because of a cyclic 
decline, accented by severe attacks of both dacus fly and olive kernel 
borer. Despite the sharp decline in production, ample supplies are 
available for domestic needs reflecting large carry-in stocks on November 1, 
196*4-. Olive oil is, however, blended with soybean oil and being sold to 
lower income consumers in oil deficit areas such as Macedonia, Thrace 
and Ipirus. According to a recent official revision the I96I-62 outturn 
is now placed at 273 ,> 211 tons — 9 percent above that formerly estimated. 

Portugal' s 196*4-65 output is down by more than one -half from a year 
earlier to the smallest since 1950-51 • The decline resulted mainly from 
the biennial production cycle but also adverse weather. Consequently, 
it is expected that a substantial volume of olive oil will be imported 
to cover the deficit for domestic consumption. Despite the deficit, 
however, domestic consumption and exports are expected to approximate those 
those of a year ago. 

Turkish production rose substantially due to favorable growing con- 
ditions, accented by additional output from newly cultivated groves and 
the use of improved cultural practices. Further expansion of production 
is expected to result as the government under its 1963-67 Development 
Plan promotes cultivation of non-productive groves along the Anotolian 
Peninsula. Most of the olives are currently produced in the Aegean and 
Eastern Mediterranean Districts. 

In Syria and Jordan production is significantly above that in 
1963-6*4-. The rise in both countries was influenced by increases in the 
number of productive trees as well as by favorable weather. Although 
some increase in domestic consumption is anticipated, most of the increase 
in supplies in both countries is expected to be channeled into export 
markets . 



-20- 



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- 21 - 



In Tunisia , the world's second largest olive oil exporting 
country, production is estimated to have declined from the relatively 
high volume of 1963-6^- reflecting extensive damage from early rains 
in the northern and central regions. Reportedly a government -owned 
grove in northern Tunisia, planted principally to the Chatawi variety, 
has become infected with "bacterial knot" caused by Pseudomonas 
sevastanoi . Attempts at eradication of the disease have as yet not 
been successful. The susceptivity of the Chamlali variety, the other 
major variety of olives grown in Tunisia, is not known. Although it 
is regarded as a serious disease, it spreads rather slowly and in 
California reportedly has been kept in check. Under the agricultural 
development plan (1962-71) the Tunisian government is attempting to 
stimulate olive oil production by planting new groves, improving 
cultural practices and replacing low yielding trees. Roughly one- 
fifth of Tunisia's national income is derived from olive oil produc- 
tion, in "on-years". 

WORLD BARLEY AND OATS 
PRODUCTION DECLINES SLIGHTLY 

World production of barley and oats in 196^ was 3 percent below 
the record I963 level, according to revised estimates of the Foreign 
Agricultural Service. Combined production of the two grains is esti- 
mated at about ikh million short tons, k million tons lower than a 
year earlier. 

World barley production is now estimated at i+,080 million bushels, 
a new record, even though acreage declined by 5 million acres. An 
estimated 25 percent increase in the crop in the Soviet Union was the 
strongest factor in the over-all production. 

The Canadian barley crop at 578 million bushels was off 9 percent, 
with a 16 percent decline in yield. U.S. production at ^03 million 
bushels was down 2.5 million bushels, with yield at a record 37*8 bushels 
per acre on 8 percent lower acreage. 

Western Europe had a record barley crop with the United Kingdom 
and Denmark showing big gains. Yield at bushels per acre is 28 

percent above the 1955-59 average for that region. The crop was off 
sharply in India, Turkey, and North Africa. South American production 
was down moderately principally because of a 21 percent drop in 
Argentina. The Australian crop was down 13 percent. 

World oat production of 2,910 million bushels was 8 percent below 
that of 1963, and 29 percent below the 1955-59 average. The Canadian 
and U.S. crops were each off by nearly 100 million bushels to account 
for most of the decline in the world total. Western European production 
was moderately lower, with a 12 percent decline in France's area as the 
main factor. The crop in Poland was down 21 percent accounting for 
most of the decline in Eastern European production. Turkey's oat crop 
was off 10 percent. South American production was down 6 percent 
principally because of a smaller Argentine crop. Australia's crop 
showed a 4 5 percent gain, with a substantial increase in acreage. 
(Tables on pages 2k, 25, 26, and 27) 



-22- 



WORLD CATTLE NUMBERS 
REACH NEW HIGH 



In early I965 there were an estimated l,0Qk million cattle and 
"buffalo in the world, 2 percent more than 196^ and 11 percent above the 
1956-60 average. Numbers increased in all geographical regions in 196^ 
with the largest gains in South America, Oceania, and the USSR. More 
moderate increases occurred in Asia and North America but smaller 
increases were registered in Europe, "both Eastern and Western, and in 
Africa. 

High cattle prices and the good outlook for export demand are 
encouraging expansion of cattle numbers in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, 
Mexico, and in many Central and South American countries. Conditions seem 
favorable for further marked expansion in cattle numbers and beef produc- 
tion in most of these countries. Feed shortages and low returns from 
dairying caused numbers to decline slightly in most countries of Europe 
from 1963 to I96U but numbers are now increasing as feed supplies have 
improved and dairying is more profitable. 

Numbers in North America are 17 percent above the I956-60 average. 
New record highs have been reached in the United States, Mexico, Canada, 
and in several Central American countries. The rate of increase is likely 
to slow down and numbers may even decline in the United States and Canada, 
but further increases in most of the other countries are expected in the 
next few years. 

South America has 175 million cattle, about 12 percent more than the 
I956-6O average. Numbers in Argentina and Chile are near 1956-60. The 
cattle population in Argentina dropped sharply in 1962 and 1963 owing to 
high slaughter during two drought years. Although numbers have been 
increasing since, the population now is still not quite up to 1956-60. 
In Uruguay large slaughter in the past 2 years has brought numbers below 
the record highs reached in 1963 and I96I+. However, numbers in 1965 are 
still considerably above the 1956-60 average. Apparently the cattle 
population has reached new records in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and 
Vene zuela. 

Numbers in Western Europe increased U00,000 head in 1^6h after having 
dropped 1.6 million during 1963. The decline was due to shortages of feed 
in the area as a whole during the winter of 1962-63 and a sharp increase 
in cattle prices to record levels which encouraged slaughter. At the 
same time there were surpluses of dairy products and the outlook for 
dairying did not appear good. 

Feed supplies during the winter of 1963-6^ were larger than a year 
earlier so that farmers were not forced to sell cattle, but the high 
prices still encouraged larger slaughter. By late I96U the dairy supply 
situation had changed appreciably; the surpluses vanished and milk and 
butter prices rose. Slaughter cattle prices continued at or near record 

(Continued on page 28) 



-23- 



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- 27 - 



(Continued from page 23) 



levels. Cattle numbers increased in all EEC countries during 196^ , 
except Italy. The total for the six countries in I965 was kQ mil- 
lion compared with V7.8 million a year earlier and the peak of U9.O 
million in I963. 

Conditions were somewhat the same in other West European 
countries. Ireland has "been the exception where numbers have con- 
tinued to rise steadily. In the past 2 years numbers have continued 
to decline in Denmark which has increased exports and thereby 
capitalized on the strong demand for cattle and beef in other West 
European countries. 

Apparently there was a slight increase in cattle numbers in 
Eastern Europe during I96U and the total in 19&5 of 33 million head 
was 9 percent above 1956-60. Numbers in Yugoslavia are below 19^3 
due to the large slaughter and large exports of cattle and meat in 
recent years. Cattle production in most other countries in the 
area have increased only moderately in recent years due to emphasis 
on other production enterprises. 

Cattle numbers in the USSR are reported at 87 million head, an 
increase of 2 percent over 196^ and 31 percent above 1956-60. 
Numbers have recovered from the sharp drop during 1963 which was 
caused by a shortage of winter feed. Official estimates of the USSR 
show a greater increase in numbers in that country since 1956-60 
than in any other major area of the world. 

In most African countries numbers continue to show a steady 
upward trend but the rate of increase for the continent as a whole 
apparently is relatively slow. Numbers in 1965 are estimated at 
120 million, 0.5 percent more than a year earlier, and only 7 per- 
cent above 1956-60. 

Bovine numbers in Asia show mixed trends. The 398 million head 
in 1965 is 2 percent above 196i+ and 6 percent above the average. In 
India, they are probably increasing slowly and steadily each year. 
In China numbers declined sharply in 1958-59 when individual farms 
were being merged into collectives. In the past 2 years, Chinese 
numbers apparently have increased as the food and feed situation has 
become more favorable. Numbers in Japan have been fairly stable in 
recent years at a level considerably above 1956-60. Not much increase 
is expected in the future under ordinary conditions. In recent years 
in the Philippines some beef cattle ranches have been formed and 
there has been a moderate increase in cattle numbers. This develop- 
ment has been slow in view of large amounts of good land which could 
be developed for pastures. 

Numbers in Oceania increased 2 percent during 1^6k to a new 
record high and are 17 percent above average. Numbers in both 
Australia and New Zealand are at new all-time high. Both countries 
have a very large potential for increasing both cattle numbers and 
beef production. 

-28- 



CATTLE AND BUFFALO: Number in specified countries, average 1956-60, annual 1963-65 



Continent and country 



Average 
1956-60 



1963 



1964 1/ 



1965 1/ 



Month of 
estimate 



; Thousands 
North America: : 
Canada (excluding New- : 

foundland) ; 10,220 

Mexico ; 19,320 

United States 3/ ; 93,899 

Puerto Rico : 431 

Costa Rica : 988 

El Salvador : 888 

Guatemala ; 1,080 

Honduras ; 1 , 1 66 

Nicaragua : 1,377 

Panama ; 4/ 636 

Cuba : 5,460 

Dominican Republic : 947 

Total North America 5/. . . . : 137,800 

South America: : 

Argentina : ^3, 385 

Bolivia ; 6/ 2,317 

Brazil jj ; 68,879 

Chile : 8/ 2,917 

Colombia ; 14,046 

Ecuador : 1,383 

Paraguay ; 3,770 

Peru : 3,401 

Uruguay : 7,4l4 

Venezuela : 8,288 

Total South America 5/....: 156,000 

Europe: ; 
Western ; 
EEC : 

Belgium & Luxembourg ; 2,392 

France ; l8,086 

Germany, West 10/ ; 12,276 

Italy -jj : 8,811 

Netherlands : 2 , 910 

Total : 44,475 

Austria : 2,311 

Denmark 11/ : 3,177 

Finland :12/ 1,898 

Greece jf ; 1,084 

Ireland : 4,077 

Norway ; 1,066 

Portugal : 1,144 

Spain : 13/ 3,048 

Sweden : 12/ 2, 1+97 

Switzerland ; 1 , 677 

United Kingdom : 10,954 

Total Western Europe 5/...: 77,500 

Albania jj : 6/ 42l+ 

Bulgaria 7/ : 1,666 

Czechoslovakia ; 6/ 4,l64 

Germany, East : 3,967 

Hungary : 2,011 

Poland ; 8,375 

Rumania jj : 4, 563 

Yugoslavia 7/ : 5 , 129 

Total Eastern Europe 5/...: 30,300 

Total Europe 5/ : 107,800 

U.S.S.R. (Europe & Asia) : 66,1*00 



Thousands 



11,206 
25,367 
103,736 
495 
1,122 
918 
1,263 
1,595 
1,734 
839 



Thousands 



11,552 
26,838 
106,1488 
515 
1,117 
919 

1,641 
1,821 
858 



850 



154,500 159,000 



1+0,112 

79,139 

2,935 
15,600 
1,630 

3,927 
8,617 
10,000 



1*0,500 
79,918 

2,900 
15,800 
1,650 

3,801 
8,719 



168,300 



2,687 

20,286 
13,355 
9,189 
3,521 



2, 480 
20,11+7 
13,011+ 
8,972 
3,226 



49,038 



1+7,839 



2,1+37 
3,393 
2,022 
1,201 
4,301 
1,096 
1,116 
3,683 
2,1+87 
1,716 

ll,6oi+ 



2,311 
3,197 
2,013 
1,188 
4,369 
1,071 
1,116 
3,670 
2,602 
1,698 
11,1+38 



81+, 200 



82,600 



1,759 
l+,507 
l+,508 
1,906 
9,81+1 
4,566 
5,1+11+ 



l+,l+80 
!+,5l+0 
1,883 
9,9ltO 
4,637 
5,167 



32,900 



32,700 



117,100 



115,300 



Thousands 



11,900 
28,1+00 
107,152 

1,106 
920 

1,691+ 
1,910 



161,800 



1+3,000 

81,515 
2,890 
16,000 



3,800 
8,500 



170,200 i7i+,8oo 



9/ 2,528 
20,155 
13,01+1+ 
8,970 
3,315 



1+8,012 



2,350 
3,183 
1,938 
1,183 
4,524 
1,050 

1,11+0 

3,723 

2,1+1+1+ 
1,720 
11,679 



83,000 



4,^36 
4,550 



5,211 



32,900 



87,000 



85,300 



115,900 
87,100 



Dec. 1 

Spring 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Jan. 
Dec. 
July 



2/ 

2/ 
2/ 

2/ 



June 30 
Jan. 

Dec. 31 2/ 
Dec. 
Oct. 
Aug. 



2/ 



Dec. 31 2/ 
May & June 
Mid year 



Jan. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 



Dec. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

April 

Dec. 



Jan. 
Jan. 1 
Dec. 3 
March 
June 30 
Jan. 
Jan. 15 



2/ 
2/ 

2/ 

H 
2/ 

H 

H 
2/ 

2/ 



2/ 



Jan. 1 
(Continued) 



- 29 - 



CATTLE AND BUFFALO: Number in specified countries, average 1956-60, annual 1963-65 (continued) 



Continent and country 


; Average 
: 1956-60 


; 1963 


■ 1964 1/ 


1 1965 1/ 


; Month of 
estimate 




;Thousands 


: Thousands 


: Thousands 


: Thousands 








Africa: 


























_ _ _ 


Nov . 


20 


2/ 






22,000 














2,930 


2,800 


2,920 


Jan • 


1 










7,100 




Dec . 




2/ 













• Dec . 


•51 


% 






3,221 


3,252 


3,252 


Jan. 


1 












Dec . 


31 


2/ 












Dec, 


h.1 


% 















Dec. 




% 














Dec. 


31 


2/ 






1,^55 
















7,286 
























Dec. 




2/ 






365 


383 





Dec. 


31 























... 


















1,142 


1,127 















3,500 

































..: 


3,717 


3,850 





Dec. 


31 


2/ 





















8,ll+6 


8,175 


8,250 


Dec. 




2/ 






3,^65 












1,840 


_ 















1,271 


1,270 




Dec. 


31 


2/ 






1,352 







Aug. 


& Sept. 








— 


12,500 


Aug. 


31 
































Sept 










118 , 600 


119,800 


120,1+00 








Asia: 




















4,805 


4,805 


4,805 


March 1 














Mar. 


21 








13,822 


13,817 


13,760 


Dec. 


31 


H 




488 


3^5 


359 


362 


Dec. 


31 














Dec. 




§/ 






_ _ _ 








March 




1,793 







Dec. 




2/ 






















1+09 


39^ 





Dec. 




g/ 



















9,56l 








Dec. 




2/ 






3,1*82 


3,Wt 
1,367 


3, ^50 


Feb. 


1 






1,256 




Dec. 


31 


a/ 

















..: 675 


685 


681+ 



















— 












4,790 


i+,790 


4,870 


Mar. 


1 








12,665 


13,120 




Mar. 


31 






1,922 







Dec. 


31 








386,U00 


391,500 


397,600 








Oceania: 






















19 00^ 




Mar. 








..: 5,852 


6,691 


6^697 


6,810 


Jan. 










25,500 


26,000 


26,600 









Total World 5/ : 979,300 1,057,^0 1,067,100 1,084,200 : 

1/ Preliminary. 2/ October-December numbers are included under the following year for com- 
parison and totals. 3/ Does not include Alaska and Hawaii prior to 1961. 4/ August. 5/ In- 
cludes an allowance for any missing data for countries shown and for other producing countries 
not shown. 6/ Less than a 5-year average, jj Includes buffaloes. 8/ January. 9/ December. 
10/ Includes Saarland, ll/ Includes Faroe Islands. 12/ June. 13/ May. 14/ Taxed only. 
15/ Formerly Nyasaland. 16/ Formerly Tanganyika and Zanzibar. JjJ On native farms. 
18/ Formerly Northern Rhodesia. 19/ 1957 only. 20/ Formerly North Borneo (Sabah) , Malaya, 
Sarawak, and Singapore. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of 
foreign governments, other foreign source material, reports of United States Agricultural 
Attaches and other representatives abroad, results of office research and related information. 
April 19, 1965. 



- 30 - 



WORLD HOG 
NUMBERS INCREASED 



I965 world hog numbers are estimated at h6o million head 
reversing the decline registered a year ago. The 19^5 figure is 
6 percent above the I96U total and 7 percent above the 1956-60 
level . 

In the U.S. there was a marked decrease from 196^ but in all 
other areas there were increases ranging from a reported 29 percent 
in the USSR to 2 or 3 percent in the lesser developed countries. 
This has been a continuation of a substantial upv/ard trend from 
the 1956-60 level in all areas except Asia and North America. 

The sharp decline in U.S . hog numbers last year was the result 
of relatively low prices in the second half of 1963. Farmers bred 
fewer sows in anticipation of continued low prices. This pattern 
carried on throughout 1^6k. June -November I96U farrowings were, in 
fact, 8 percent less than a year earlier. January 1965 numbers 
in the U.S. — at 53 million -- were therefore much lower than a 
year ago. 

Hog numbers in Canada and Mexico have increased in recent years 
due primarily to a general strengthening of prices. 

In South America hog numbers have continued to advance at a 
rapid pace since the late 1950' s. Brazil accounts for the great 
bulk of hogs in that area. The steady expansion has been the 
result of continued efforts to maintain output at levels sufficient 
to satisfy domestic requirements. 

Together, the countries of the EEC account for 37*6 million 
hogs -- up 22 percent from the 1956-60 level. Apart from a moderate 
decline during 1963 due to feed scarcities, the expansion has been 
rather steady. Larger domestic production has been spurred by 
increased demand resulting from rising income levels. Despite in- 
creased output high prices have generally been maintained thus 
encouraging further expansion. Similarly, domestic policies have 
tended to favor increased production. 

EEC-CAP regulations affecting hogs and pork were implemented 
in July I962. These regulations have tended to restrict imports 
of hogs thus encouraging local production. 

West Germany , with 18.2 million head, is the largest single 
producer in the EEC and in Western Europe as a whole. Except for 
a slight reduction during 1963 hog numbers have trended upv/ard in 
each of the EEC countries for the reasons described above. 

Denmark and the United Kingdom -- each counting around 
8 million hogs — are Western Europe's largest producers outside 
the EEC. In each case numbers have moved steadily upward since 



-31- 



195^-60. No dip was noted in 1963. Feed scarcities in most parts 
of Europe were not sufficient to offset the greater incentive to 
expand provided by relatively high prices. 

Poland's 13 million hogs top the list of big producers in 
Eastern Europe followed by East Germany and Hungary . Expansion has 
been steady in recent years but may have been slowed last year due 
to reported outbreaks of disease. The pattern has been similar in 
Yugoslavia which, together with Poland, exports hogs and pork to 
various West European countries. 

Soviet Union hog numbers turned upward last year following a 
sharp cut-back caused by feed shortages in 1963. January I965 hog 
numbers are estimated at 52.8 million. 

The bulk of Asia's 133 million hogs are in Mainland China where 
numbers fell off sharply for several years following communalization 
in 1958» Since the end of 1961 numbers have been edging upward 
again. The Philippines and Japan are important and developing pro- 
ducers in the region. 

In Africa hog numbers are estimated at 5*1 million head -- 
only 1 percent of the world total. Over 25 percent of these are 
located in the Republic of South Africa . Expansion has been gradual 
in recent years. 

Hog numbers in Australia and New Zealand are increasing at a 
slow but steady rate. 



-32- 



HOGS: Number in specified countries, average 1956-60, annual 1963-65 





; Average 


i 1963 


; 1961+ 1/ 


; 1965 1/ 


: Month of 


Continent and country 


: 1956-60 


: estimate 




; Thousands 


:Thousands 


: Thousands 


: Thousands 








North America: 
















Canada (excluding New- 




















l+,993 


5,31+8 


5,575 


: Dec. 


1 






8,22U 


8,972 


9,325 


9,600 


: Spring 


United States 3/ 


• 55,168 


58,883 


58,119 


53.052 


: Jan. 


1 






82 


163 


151+ 




: Jan. 


1 








86 


87 


88 


: Jan. 


1 








323 


323 


322 


: Oct. 


1 


2/ 






381 






: Spring 






767 


798 





: Aug. 
























• k/ 217 


208 


217 


22l+ 


Jan. 
















; Dec. 




2/ 




. .• 1,1+1+6 


900 


1,171 




: July 




Total North America 5/. • 




(O, ouo 


79,100 


71+, 600 








South America: 


















• 3,608 


3,1+12 


3,1+00 


3,500 


June 


30 








52, 91+1 


55,990 


57,669 


Dec. 


31 


2/ 




• 6/ 987 


975 


980 


970 


Dec. 




i 






2,300 


2,1+00 


2,1+00 


Oct. 


1 








1,530 


1,650 


— 


Aug. 








1,620 


1,565 


1,590 


Dec. 


31 


2/ 






*+u 1 


*+<JO 




May 








3,1+00 


m 




Mid year 




Total South America 5/ • • 




67,800 


71,100 


72,900. 








Europe : 
















Western 
















EEC 




















1,859 


1,563 


1,7*6 


Jan. 










9,080 


8,967 


9,087 


Oct. 




H 






16,869 


16,61+3 


18,169 


Dec. 




y 






1+,681+ 


5,020 


5,120 


Jan. 






..: 2,650 


3,156 


3,022 


3,525 


Dec. 




2/ 






35,61+8 


35,215 


37,61+7 










2,852 


2,81+9 


2,925 


3,131 


Dec. 




2/ 

£/ 




•9/ 5,233 


7,26o 


7,1+1+1+ 


8,205 


Jan. 






•10/ 1+81 


520 


1+92 


528 


Dec. 




H 




63!+ 


626 


621 


621 , 


Dec. 




2/ 






1,011+ 


1,013 


1,158 


Jan. 








1+21+ 


^53 


620 


Dec. 




2/ 






1,895 


1,7^0 


1,1+1+0 


Jan. 








6,118 


6,055 


5,011 , 


Oct. 




2/ 






2,159 


2,Ol+5 


2,081+ , 


Oct. 




ii 






1,31k 


1,1+26 


1,5*0 ; 


April 




.: 6,261+ 


7,250 


7,1+66 


7,958 : 


Dec. 




u 


Total Western Europe 5/ • • 


•: 57,900 


67,100 


66,900 


70,000 : 








Eastern 


































1,838 


2,066 


2,097 




Jan. 










5,897 


5,81+5 


6,139 : 


Jan. 


1 


2/ 






8,01+5 


9,200 




Dec. 


3 






5A28 


6,358 


— : 


March 






11,653 


12,918 




June 


30 








^,518 


M58 


— : 


Jan. 








• — h flcfl 








Jan. 


15 








1+2,71+0 


1+7,300 


1+8,1+60 : 












109,81+0 


lll+,200 


118,1+60 : 












70,000 


1+0,900 


52,800 : 


Jan. 


l 





(Continued) 



- 33 - 



HOGS: Number in specified countries, average 1956-60, annual 1963-65 (continued) 



; Average ; 

Continent and country . 1956.60 • 


1963 


: 1964 1/ : 


1965 1/ 


Month of 
• estimate 




: Thousands : Thousands 


: Thousands : ' 


rhousands 








Ainca: 


• 


















— — 




™ ™ ~ 


■ Nov. 


20 


r> 1 






— — — 






; Dec. 


31 














1 Dec. 


31 








— — — 






■ Dec. 






Congo (Leopoldville) . . 




™ ™ ™ 






; Dec . 


31 




Ivory Coast 


: T 1 *- 














c n 


35 
















— — — 






; Dec . 




0 1 
% 


n Atfj t )i / 


Q n 


105 


i oA 




Dec. 


31 


2/ 




85 


82 


oA 






















2/ 






133 






Dec. 


31 




• i o / onn 












T T"Tt"n ot ^TrtT fo 


. ok 






— 








7 fiTTlM ft 1 S / 


• 




oO 










tjvU 011 nil x^dj j. \ u. u j_ x 


01 • . : 1 ft-j^ 






i,4oo 




J- 1 - 




i 4, 380 


4,900 


5,000 


5,ioo 








Asia: 




















31 


31 


31 








Turkey (Europe & Asia) 




125 


T OCT 

125 




Dec. 


31 


0 / 






69,000 






Dec. 




% 




















689 






March 








2,921 


2,070 


0 Ann 


Dec. 






Ty, - 


n /— n / r— n i — /-\ 
















1,723 






Dec. 








.... 1 . 70S 


3.296 


J,^OX 




Fee. 


1 






1,672 


1,51(J 




Dec. 


31 


2/ 






— — — 






Dec. 








• onn 




1,600 








PV> T 1 ^ "PiT"\ -f tiOQ 


ry CSXr\ 


9,3^ 


10,000 


10,900 


March 1 




rpVio -t 1 oriH 


3,826 


4,150 


3,900 




Mar. 


31 








2,953 






Dec. 


31 






111,100 


122,400 


133,100 








Oceania: 




















1,440 


l,46o 


1,500 , 


Mar. 








....: 65U 


766 


771 


780 


Jan. 










2,400 


2,500 


2,500 : 












444,840 


435,200 


459,460 : 









1/ Preliminary. 2/ October-December numbers are included under the following 
year for comparison and totals. 3/ Does not include Alaska and Hawaii prior to 1961. 
4/ August. 5/ Includes an allowance for any missing data for countries shown and 
for other producing countries not shown. 6/ January. 7/ Includes Saarland. 
8/ Includes Faroe Islands. 9/ December. 10/ June. 11/ May. 12/ Less than a 
5 -year average. 13/ Taxed only. 14/ Formerly Nyasaland. 15/ Formerly Northern 
Rhodesia. 16/ 1956 and 1957 represent middle of the preceding year. YjJ Formerly 
North Borneo (Sabah), Malaya, Sarawak and Singapore. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office re- 
search and related information. 
April 16, 1965. 



- 3k - 



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WASHINGTON) D. C. 20250 



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? 



gL'tiRENI SERIAL BECOflK 





MAY 1965 
CONTENTS 

WORLD SUMMARIES Page 
Production: 

Another Record Tea Crop Expected 3 

Milk Production and Utilization in Principal Producing Countries in 1964 6 

Cotton Production at New Record in 1964-65 9 

Exports of Flaxseed and Linseed Oil Up Slightly in 1964 12 

1964 Meat Production Down Slightly 15 

Sheep Numbers Unchanged in 1965 16 

Tobacco Harvest in First Half of 1965 Up Slightly 22 

Cottonseed Production at Alltime High 26 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 



Single copies free to persons in the United States 
from the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Em. 5918 South, Du 8-2^5 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars — 

FC 6-65 Cotton Highlights in Selected Foreign Importing Countries 

FC 7-^5 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles 

I and IV, Public Law hQO 

FCAN I-65 Record South African Canned Fruit Pack Indicated 

FCF 2-65 European Citrus Marketing and U.S. Citrus Trade Reported, 

1963-6)+ Season 

FVF I-65 U.S. Specified Vegetable Fiber Imports Down in 1^6k 

FG ^-65 Substantial Grain Supply in Exporting Countries 



Reports 



FAS-M-53 (Rev.) The World Grain Trade 1959-60 -- 1962-63. 31 tables 
on world exports of the 6 grains and wheat flour. 



ANOTHER RECORD TEA 
CROP EXPECTED 



The 1965 world tea crop is forecast at 2,hl6 million pounds, 
21 million pounds over the record 196^ harvest. The continuation of 
the upward trend in world tea production is attributed to expanding 
acreage, increased use- of fertilizers, and to the replanting of 
existing estates with higher yielding bushes. 

Although there has been a series of successive record crops 
over the last several years, rising consumption — in producing coun- 
tries as well as in importing countries — thus far has been able to 
absorb the ever-increasing world production. 

Asia : Asian production- -which accounts for 92 percent of the 
world crop — is forecast at 2,236 million pounds, 1 percent above the 
preceding year and 23 percent over the 1955-59 average. 

Production in Ceylon is estimated at a record U90 million pounds. 
The 196^ crop of U81.8 million pounds was adversely affected by poor 
weather and in part to a reduction in fertilizer usage. Also adding 
to the smaller harvest was the sharply curtailed buying by Iraq. — the 
principal market for the low-grown teas — resulting in reduced output 
on many of the estates producing the Iraq-type teas. 



Production in India — the world's largest tea producer — is 
expected to exceed the record 196^ outturn of 823.8 million pounds. 
The large 196^ harvest was attributed to a bumper North Indian crop, 
especially in the Assam Valley and Dooars Districts. South Indian 
production was down nearly h million pounds from the preceding year 
because of insufficient rainfall. 



The government plans to encourage increased production by set- 
ting up a Tea Finance and Guarantee Corporation which would directly 
provide or otherwise facilitate medium and long-term credits for the 
development of tea estates. Other measures are being considered by 
the government to promote tea production and exports which include 
rebates on tax rates as developmental allowance and speedier refund 
of excise duties paid on tea that is exported. 



India and Ceylon have agreed to set up a joint Tea Commission 
to promote tea sales in foreign markets. The Commission will con- 
sist of three senior officials of each Government and will meet 
periodically to formulate plans for the development, pricing, and 
sales promotion of tea for the export markets. (Cont. on page 5) 



-3- 



TEA: world production for calendar year 19&5* with comparisons 



Continent and country 


• 

[ Average 
: 1955-^9 

• 


: 1961 : 


: 1962 ! 


1963 : 


\ 1964 1/ 1 


Forecast 
1965 




• 

: Million 


: Million 


: Million : 


Million 


Million : 


Million 




: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


pounds 


pounds : 


pounds 


Asia: 


* 
• 














: 395-9 


1 — mm mm 

: 455.2 


! 467.0 


\ 484.6 


: 481.8 : 


490.0 


China, Mainland 2/ . . 


: 279.8 


: 345.0 


: 350.0 


: 350.0 


: 350.0 


: 350.0 




: 695.9 


: 781.3 


: 764.4 , 


: 762.6 


: 823.8 


: 825.0 






: 9b. 4 


: 104.1 : 


/■t 1 (~~\ 

84.8 


; 100.0 


! 100.0 






: 22.5 


: 27.6 


: 28.5 


: 28.5 : 


: 30.0 






: 179-4 


: 170.8 


: 178.8 


: I83.6 


: 185.O 




: 5.2 


: 5.8 


: 6.3 


: 6.0 


: 6.5 


: 6.5 




: 53-5 ' 


: 58.5 


: 51.6 


•— t mm 

: 54.2 


: 63.2 


: 70.0 






: 39.8 ! 


: 43.5 


: 46.5 


: 40.3 


: 42.0 




: 5.6 


12.0 


: 18.2 


: 22.0 


: 25.O 


: 27.0 


USSR 


6^.7 


; 81.9 


: 90.7 


: 94.3 


: 100.0 


: 100.0 




: 8.1 - 


10.7 


10.0 


10.4 


: 10.5 


10.5 




: 1,817.5 


2,088.5 


: 2,104.2 


: 2,122.7 


: 2,213.2 


2,236.0 



Africa: : 
Congo, Leopoldville . : 

Kenya : 

Malawi : 

Mauritius : 

Mozambigue .: 

Rhodesia : 

Tanzania : 

Uganda : 

Total : 



South America: 
Argentina . . 

Brazil 

Peru 

Total 



Grand total : 1,908.9 : 2,231.8 : 2,2o2.3 : 2,290.4 : 2,395.3 : 2,4l6.2 



1/ Preliminary. 
2/ Estimated. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U. S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research, and 
related information. 



4.9 


: 7.5 


i 6.5 


: 11.5 


: 10.0 


: 8.0 


23.1 


: 27.9 


: 36.2 


: 39.9 


: 44.6 


: 45.0 


20.7 


: 31.5 


: 29.4 


: 26.3 


: 27.3 


: 26.0 


1.7 


: 2.8 


: 2.8 


: 3.3 


: 3.0 


: 3»2 


15.2 


: 23.4 


: 20.7 


: 19.0 


; 22.2 ■ 


22.0 


1.5 


: 2.4 


: 2.8 


: 2.7 


: 5.2 


: 3.0 


6.1 


: 9.8 : 


9.5 


: 11.1 


: 10.6 


: 11.0 


8.0 


: 11.3 


13.9 


13.6 


: 16.8 


: 17.0 


81.2 


: 116.6 ; 


• 123.8 : 


127.4 


: 137.7 


135.2 


5.2 


18.0 . 


21.0 : 


24.0 


27.5 


: 27.0 


3.1 : 


6.2 


11.1 : 


13.5 : 


14.0 


: 15.0 


1.9 : 




2.7 : 


2.8 : 


2.9 : 


3.0 


10.2 


: 26.7 : 


34.8 ; 


^0.3 : 


44.4 : 


: 45.0 



- 4 - 



The Indonesian crop is expected to equal the 196^ harvest of 
100 million pounds. Although production levels have been maintained 
on the former Dutch and British estates , the quality of exports has 
teen declining. 

Pakistan 1 s production is forecast at 70 million pounds, an 
increase of nearly 7 million pounds over the record I96U crop. The 
acreage has been expanded to 88,000 acres from 8U,000 the year before, 
and 180,000 acres are planned to be under cultivation by 1970. 
Because of the larger crops, exports are once again being permitted 
on a limited scale. 

Turkey — formerly a tea importer—has become self-sufficient in 
tea and has exported "$,k million pounds during I96U. Production is 
forecast at 27 million pounds, 2 million ove^ the I96U outturn. 

Africa : African tea production is forecast at 135*2 million 
pounds, down slightly from the bumper I96U harvest of 137*7 million. 
Unusually dry weather during the early part of the year has curtailed 
output in most producing areas. 

Kenya' s crop is expected to approximate the record 196^ outturn 
of kk.6 million pounds. The I965 crop has been adve.sely affected 
by dry weather and hail damage. Several tea factories in the Kericho 
District were operating on a 2-3 day week basis because of smaller 
harvests. However, new areas coming into bearing and with improving 
weather, production is expected to be maintained at the 196^- level. 

Production in Malawi is estimated at 26 million pounds, down 
about 5 percent from the 196^ harvest. Output during January totaled 
3*5 million pounds, compared with 5*^- million for January I96U. 
Mozambique ' s crop is estimated at 22 million pounds, about the same 
as the 196^ harvest. 

Production for Tanzania is forecast at 11 million pounds. Out- 
put in 196^ was reduced to 10.6 million pounds because of a prolonged 
drought late in the year. The I965 crop has also been affected by 
dry weather. Production through February totaled 3*^- million pounds, 
compared with k.6 million during the corresponding period a year 
earlier. 

Uganda' s production is expected to reach 17 million pounds. 
At the onset of the 196^ season, nearly 23,000 acres were in tea, but 
only about two-thirds were mature plants. An additional 20,000 acres 
are scheduled to be planted in tea by 1973* Lack of adequate rain- 
fall has curtailed early harvesting this season, but production is 
expected to pick up because weather conditions have improved. 

South America ; South American tea production has gained 
rapidly during the last decade and is estimated at a record million 
pounds . 



Production in Argentina is expected to approximate the record 
196^ harvest of 27.5 million pounds. Argentina* s tea production has 
shown marked expansion during the last decade, however, the 
industry — which is dependent upon hand labor- -is being threatened by 
the newly enacted minimum wage law which has nearly doubled workers 
wages and has made production unprofitable for many tea growers. 

Brazilian production is continuing the upward trend and is 
estimated at 15 million pounds, nearly five times the 1955-59 average. 
Peru* s crop will also be larger this year. Approximately 8,000 acres 
are now in tea and the 19&5 harvest is anticipated to yield 3 million 
pounds. 



About 1,200 acres are presently being cleared for tea cultiva 
tion in Ecuador . Currently only Argentina, Brazil, and Peru are 
producing tea on a commercial scale in the Western Hemisphere. 



MILK PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION IN 
PRINCIPAL PRODUCING COUNTRIES IN 196k 

Production : Milk production in 18 primary producing countries in 
196^ increased less than 1 percent over 1963* Production in these 
countries, which represent approximately 60 percent of estimated 
total world output, was kOl billion pounds; in I963, it was 399 
billion pounds. 

In Western Europe, the largest producing area, production was 
slightly below 1963* The principal factors contributing to this 
decrease were a widespread decline in cow numbers, and in several 
countries, unfavorable weather and pasture conditions during the 
summer. Among the countries in which milk production declined as 
compared to a year ago were France, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, 
Switzerland, Norway and the United Kingdom. 

In Denmark, conditions were more favorable than in I963 and 
milk production was up, despite lower cow numbers. Higher yields 
from fewer cows also accounted for the higher milk production in 
Belgium and Finland. Production in West Germany was maintained at 
the I963 level in spite of a decrease in cow numbers. Ireland's 
record production was attributed to an increase in cow numbers, 
better breeding practices and care of the dairy herds. 



(Continued on page 9) 



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- 8 - 



In Australia and New Zealand, weather and pasture conditions were 
above normal, and new production records were established. 

Cow numbers in Canada continued the downward trend evident for 
several years, but yields were somewhat higher and production was about 
the same as a year ago. 

In the United States, cow numbers were down, but production per cow 
was up h percent, the largest year-to-year gain since 1958. Total milk 
production for the year was at a record high. 

Use : Slightly larger quantities of milk were utilized for fluid consump- 
tion in 196^ than in I963. ^ n Western Europe, fluid milk consumption was 
somewhat higher, despite lower consumption in about half of the reporting 
countries. Fluid use increased in Australia, Canada and the United 
States, but declined in New Zealand. 

Milk for butter production was virtually unchanged. Less milk was 
used for this purpose in Western Europe, but more in the Southern and 
Western Hemispheres. 

There was a slight increase in the amounts going into cheese making. 
Practically the same quantity was used for cheese in Western Europe in 
both years. In Australia, Canada and the United States, more milk went 
into cheese production; in New Zealand, less. 

Milk for canning was up about 1 percent, all countries reporting 
increased use for this purpose except the Netherlands. 

The quantity of milk going into dry whole milk and other products 
increased more than 7 percent. Only West Germany, the Netherlands and 
Canada took less milk for this use in I96U than in 1963. 

Milk for feed was down about 5 percent. In Western Europe, the 
quantity of milk fed to livestock in 196^ was smaller by about 5 percent. 
In Oceania, slightly more milk was used for feed than in the earlier 
year; in the Western Hemisphere, slightly less, 

WORLD COTTON PRODUCTION 
AT NEW RECORD IN 196^-65 

World cotton production in I96U-65 is now estimated at 51*6 million 
bales. The present estimate is about 3 percent above the 50.2 million 
produced in 1963-6^ and 7»9 million above the 1955-59 average. The record 
crop is expected to exceed world consumption by about 1.6 million bales. 
World cotton stocks at the end of the current season are expected to climb 
to 26.6 million bales, despite record consumption. 

The 196^-65 crop was grown on an estimated 8l.6 million acres-- 
1.1 million above 1963-6^ and 0.5 million above the 1955-59 average. The 
upward trend in average yields continued, and is largely attributed to 
the increased use of improved cultural practices, insecticides, and 
fertilizers in many foreign producing countries as well as in the United 
States. 



-9- 



Final ginnings in the United States showed a 196^-65 crop of 
15.2 million "bales. The season's average yield of 517 pounds per acre 
was equal to last year's record. Harvested acreage was 1 percent be- 
low a year earlier. The 196^ crop is over 1.0 million "bales greater 
than the sum of estimated consumption and exports. Stocks are 
expected to exceed 13.0 million hales on July 31 • 

Foreign free world production is now estimated at a record 22. h 
million bales. This is about 0.^ million bales above last season's 
alltime high and 35 percent above the 1955-59 average. This figure , 
although a record, is somewhat lower than the February estimate 
because of downward revisions in production in El Salvador, Brazil, 
India, and Pakistan which more than offset upward revisions in 
Argentina, Mexico, Nicaragua, and a few other countries. 

Central American countries produced about 1.2 million bales of 
cotton in 196^-65, an increase of 13 percent from last season. Most 
of the increase was in Nicaragua, where total production exceeded 
0.5 million bales. The crop in El Salvador was reduced from earlier 
estimates because of late season windstorms and delays in harvesting. 
Mexico's production of about 2,k million bales is up sharply from the 

2.1 million a year ago, largely because of the shift of production 
from lower to higher-yielding districts. 

The Argentine crop of 0.6 million bales is up substantially, 
largely because of very favorable weather conditions throughout the 
season. In Brazil this season's estimated production of 2.2 million 
bales is 0.1 million below a year earlier. The 196^-65 North Brazil- 
ian production of 0.8 million bales was 0.2 million bales smaller 
than a year earlier; however, the Southern crop is 0.1 million larger 
than a year ago. 

African production was nearly 0.6 million bales above a year 
earlier, principally because of a sharp comeback from last year's 
low production level in the Sudan and an unusually good crop in 
Egypt of 2.3 million bales, 1^ percent above a year ago. 

In India, the 196^-65 crop is now estimated at ^-.8 million bales, 
down 0.^ million from a year earlier because of heavy rain and insect 
damage last fall in the Northern and Central belts. The 196^-65 
Pakistani crop of 1.8 million bales is down 7 percent from a year 
ago because of unusually heavy rains in the lower Sind areas. Favor- 
able growing conditions, together with adequate insect control, con- 
tributed to Syria's record production of 780,000 bales this season. 

Communist countries as a group produced an estimated l^-.O million 
bales this season, 1.1 million more than last season. Most of the 
increase occurred in Mainland China, where acreage was higher and 
growing conditions more favorable than a year ago. Production of 

8.2 million bales in the Soviet Union this season is another record 
for that country. 



-10- 



COTTON: Acreage, yield, and production in specified countries, average 1955-59 and 1963 and 1964 1/ 



Acreage 



Continent and country 



Average 






: Average 






: Average 






1955-59 


: 1963 


: 1964 3/ 


1 1955-59 


: 1963 


: 1964 3/ 


; 1955-59 


1963 


1964 3/ 


1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1, 000 


: Pounds 


: Pounds 


Pounds 


: 1,000 


1,000 


■ 1,000 


acres 


: acres 


: acres 


: per acre 


per acre 


: per acre 


bales 


bales 


bales 


14,613 


: 14,212 


: 14,060 


: 428 


517 


: 517 


13,013 


15,334 


15, 180 


107 


: 260 


: 275 


: 673 


: 618 


585 


150 


335 


335 


48 


: 215 


: 225 


: 600 


670 


661 


: 60 


300 


: 310 


14 


: 21 


: 32 


: 343 


: 709 


750 


: 10 


31 


: 50 


2, 270 


: 1, 964 


: 1, 935 


430 


: 515 


594 


2,032 


2,109 


2,395 


209 


: 285 


325 


423 


691 


775 


184 


410 


525 


11 


: 5 


5 


175 


192 


192 


4 


2 


2 


17, 327 


17,069 


16,967 


428 


522 


533 


15,465 


18,549 


18,827 


1,323 


1,304 


1,400 


196 


166 


: 206 


539 


450 


600 


4,320 


5,750 


6,000 


166 


t 192 


: 176 


1,490 


2,300 


2,200 


224 


400 


405 


: 330 


: 402 


356 


154 


335 


300 


44 


45 


45 


142 


149 


160 


13 


14 


15 


133 


200 


200 


159 


132 


156 


44 


55 


65 


588 


680 


680 


423 


441 


459 


518 


625 


650 


100 


100 


134 


134 


168 


192 


28 


35 


40 


6,737 


8,489 


8,875 


199 


216 


210 


2,788 


3,821 


3,878 


383 


570 


350 


338 


362 


: 411 


270 


430 


: 300 


104 


40 





208 


288 





45 


24 


22 


454 


650 


490 


221 


329 


: 343 


209 


445 


: 350 


219 


135 




153 


160 




70 


45 




33 


28 


25 


175 


223 


230 


12 


13 


12 


1,430 


1,484 


1, 100 


217 


319 


338 


647 


987 


774 


5,270 


6, 100 


6, 150 


616 


637 


640 


6,750 


8, 100 


8,200 


129 


100 


100 


130 


120 


96 


35 


25 


20 


128 


140 


175 


120 


240 


192 


32 


70 


70 


375 


400 


370 


81 


54 


58 


63 


45 


: 45 


580 


715 


740 


83 


111 


104 


100 


165 


: 160 


848 


300 





138 


96 





243 


60 


30 


1,858 


1,689 


1,672 


467 


577 


665 


1,807 


2,029 


2,315 


102 


135 


135 


56 


64 


71 


12 


18 


: 20 


16 


37 





270 


298 





9 


23 





744 


775 


775 


105 


105 


124 


162 


170 


: 200 


790 


800 


800 


100 


132 


114 


164 


220 


: 190 


45 


68 


100 


117 


226 


202 


11 


32 


42 


100 


125 





139 


180 





29 


47 


50 


784 


1,100 


1,100 


306 


205 


327 


500 


469 


750 


370 


475 


500 


171 


217 


221 


132 


215 


: 230 


1,670 


1,986 


2,150 


89 


76 


73 


308 


315 


325 


8, 727 


9,154 


9, 288 


201 


210 


237 


3,653 


4,012 


4,579 


37 


55 





298 


201 





23 


23 


27 


175 


300 


350 


192 


280 


240 


70 


175 


: 175 


18 


45 


50 


133 


171 


384 


5 


16 


40 


336 


500 


600 


104 


62 


72 


73 


65 


90 


14,428 


10,300 


11,000 


238 


219 


249 


7,160 


4,700 


5,700 


19, 720 


19,600 


19,700 


97 


127 


117 


3,991 


5,200 


4,800 


656 ■ 


988 


980 


224 


257 


247 


306 


530 


505 


127 


100 





170 


120 





45 


25 





13 


31 


32 


738 


960 


1,080 


20 


62 


72 


208 : 


61 





129 


142 





56 


18 





3,490 • 


3,670 


3,670 


189 


254 


235 


1,376 


1,940 


1,800 


623 ■ 


721 . 


710 


340 


466 


527 


441 


700 


780 


100 


140 


160 


211 


209 


195 


44 


61 


65 


1,554 


1,553 


1,650 


228 


355 


349 


738 


1, 150 


1, 200 


41,603 = 


38, 203 


39, 230 


166 


185 


188 


14,382 


14,710 


15,347 


81,094 : 


80,499 


81,610 


259 


299 


304 


43,685 


50,179 


51,605 


46,280 


49,606 : 


50,130 


173 


212 


215 


16, 644 


21, 947 


22,412 


20,201 


16,681 ■ 


17,420 : 


333 


371 


386 


14,028 


12,898 


14,013 



Production 2/ 



NORTH AMERICA: 
United State 
El Salvador. 
Guatemala. . . 
Honduras. . . . 
Mex ico 
Nicaragua. . . 
West Indies. 



SOUTH AMERICA: 

Argentina • 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Peru. 

Venezuela 

Total 4/ 

EUROPE : 

Greece 

Italy 

Spain 

Bulgaria 

Yugoslavia 

Total 4/ 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia): 

AFRICA: 

Angola 

Cameroon 

Central African Republic... 

Chad 

Congo, Leopoldville 

Egypt 

Kenya 

Morocco. 

Mozamb ique 

Nigeria 

Rhodesia, Malawi, & Zambia. 
South Africa, Republic ot.. 

Sudan 

Tanzania. 

Uganda 

Total 4/ 



ASIA AND OCEANIA: 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Australia. 

Burma 

China, Mainland, 

India : 19,720 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Korea, South 

Pakis tan 

Syria 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Total 4/ 



World total 4/ 

Foreign Free World 4/.. 
Communist countries 4/. 



1/ Years refer to crop years beginning August 1 in which major portion of crop was harvested. 21 Production in bales of 480 
pounds net. 3/ Preliminary. 4/ Includes estimates for minor-producing countries not listed above and allowance for countries 
where data are" not yet available. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other 
foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 
related information. 



- 11 - 



WORLD EXPORTS OF FLAXSEED AND 
LINSEED OIL UP SLIGHTLY IN 196k 

World exports of flaxseed and linseed oil in calendar I96I+ at ^4-9 million 
bushels, seed equivalent "basis, were only slightly more than in I963 but 3. 3 
million bushels less than the 1955-59 average and 2.5 million less than the 
average of the 5 previous years, 1959-63 • Tbe expansion in exports from the 
United States and Canada more than offset the decline in exports from Argentina 
and Uruguay. Roughly 55 percent of the world trade in I96J+ moved out as oil 
and K5 percent as seed. 



FLAXSEED AND LINSEED OIL: Exports from major producing countries 
and world totals, average 1955-59; annual 1959-6^- l/ 

(In te rms of flaxseed equivalent) 



* Average •••••• 

Country : 1955-5 9: 1959 : 1960 : 1961 : 1962 : 1963 §i 



: Million bushels 

United States 11.5 9-^ 7-0 5-6 lj-,3 k.2 7.9 

Canada : 1^.7 12.7 1^.9 1^.9 H-7 12.0 15.8 

Argentina : 17-1 25.2 21.8 27.2 30.7 25.5 22.3 

Uruguay : 2.3 1.8 2.3 3-1 3-0 3-8 1.0 

India : k.O 2.k .9 .1 .1 (3/) .2 

Others, excl. Europe ; 2. 5 3.1 2.k l.k 2.2 2.7 1.6 



World total : 52.1 5^.6 ^9.3 52.3 52.0 kd.2 1+8.8 



1/ Excludes re-exports of flaxseed and exports of linseed oil produced from 
imported flaxseed, 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Less than 50>000 bushels. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the ba is of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research and related information. 



Argentine exports, at the equivalent of 22.3 million bushels of flaxseed, 
were one-eighth less than those of I963 but almost one-third more than the 
1955-59 average. Over 85 percent of the total exports, which consisted mainly 
of oil, went to Europe and almost 10 percent went to the Soviet Union. 

Canada, the world's leading exporter of flaxseed as such, shipped the 
equivalent of 15.8 million bushels of seed in I96U (1^.8 million as seed and 
1.0 million as oil). Normally about one-third of the seed and virtually all of 
the oil go to the United Kingdom. 

(Continued on page 15 ) 



-12- 



FLAXSEED: Exports from specified countries, 
average 1955-59, annual 1960-64 



Continent 
and country 


: Average 
: 1955-59 


; i960 


: 1961 


• 1962 


: 1963 y 


; 1964 1/ 


North America: 

United States 


: 1,000 
: bushels 


; 1,000 
: bushels 


: 1,000 : 
bushels 


1,000 • 

■ bushels 


1,000 

bushels 


. 1,000 
: bushels 


7,299 
14, 062 

: 16 


\ 4,149 
14,508 
2 


4,527 
13,854 : 


3,9^2 
11,515 ' 


\ 3,to8 
11,537 


: 6,947 
• 14,844 




• 21,377 


: 18,659 


: 18^81 


15,^57 : 


^.945 


: 21/ TO 


South America: 


125 : 
8 


2,195 • 
55 i 


3,511 
177 
216 . 


: 155 
274 
1,078 


: 815 
965 


: 22 




133 


2,250 


: 3,904 


: 1,507 


: 1,780 


22 


Europe: 

Belgium-Luxembourg . 

Sweden* 

Total : 

Africa: 

Tunisia 


286 
17 
U 

573 : 
8 : 


594 
: jjl 

: 2 : 

473 
1 


797 
7 

: 2 
470 ' 


: 729 
1 < 

: 3 
351 : 


: 1,002 

d 

: 38 
551 


: 2/ 912 

! " 3 

1 94 

: 399 


8?5 


1^081 : 


1,276 


: 1,084 : 




: 1.408 


9 

4/ 654 • 
169 ■ 

: 11 : 


74l : 
400 


646 i 
: 86 


1,020 

: 92 


\ 1,463 
: 72 


: 1,181 
: 37 


843 


1,141 




1,112 • 


1,535 : 


1,218 


Asia: 

China, Mainland 5/. : 

T-_ _ J J ^ 

Iran 7/ : 


649 ' 
6/ : 
"118 : 

203 ' 

158 


787 

a 1 
2/ 

1 : 
191 : 
?1 ' 


146 

PJ 

52 
195 
23 


500 

6/ 

: 271 


: 6/ 

: 72 
39 


£ / 

: 6/ 
: ~62 




1,12S 


1,010 : 


4l6 


771 


11 


62 


Grand total.. 


24,376 


24,141 


: 24,709 


: 19,931 


: 19,964 


: 24 } 501 



l/ Preliminary; partly estimated. 2/ January-October. 3/ Year ending September 
107 4/ Year ending December 10. 5/ Unofficial estimates. 6/ Less than 500 bushels. 
7/ Year beginning March 21. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 
related information. 



- 13 - 



LINSEED OIL: Exports from specified countries, 
average 1955-59, annual 1960-64 



Continent 
and country 


: Average 


; i960 


; 1961 


! 1962 


5 1963 1/ ' 


. 1964 1/ 


North America: 


Short 
; tons 

: 40,343 
5,803 


: Short 
tons 

: 28,491 
: 3,301 


Short 
: tons ; 

: 10,257 
: 9,900 


: Short 
tons 

: 3,165 s 


Short 
! tons 

8,181 
: 4,020 


: Short 
tons 

9,552 

: 9,498 






: 31,792 


: 20,157 




: 12,201 


: 19,050 


South America: 

Uruguay 


: 162,450 
: 21,666 


! 186,244 
21,886 


: 225,261 : 
: 27,844 


291,113 

: 17,984 


: 234,641 
= 36,f>7 J * 


i 211,777 
: 9,814 


. I84;il6 


: 206,130 


: 253,105 


: 309,097 


: 271,215 


: 221,^1 


Europe: 

Belgium- Luxembourg . 

Germany, West ; 

Switzerland, ........ 


9,505 
i 56 
: 2,060 • 

. 3,731 
6s 

23,711 

88 : 

1,653 : 
11,583 


1,720 
125 
2,241 
: 6,116 
123 
10,861 
342 
4/ 741 
• 9,695 


6,162 ! 

: 56 
: 2,037 : 
: 5,248 : 

10,742 
46 

: 4/ 700 : 
: 9,826 


1,891 ! 

: 58 : 

773 
5,842 

1Q 

: 7,534 
: 25 ' 

4/ 639 
. 8,555 


1,676 
34 

: 611 
: 5,805 
: 18 
: 7,888 
23 

: 4/ 474 
4,214 


: 2,o4l 

: 37 

: 995 

: 5,872 

• i s 
• 

: 10,246 
: 3/42 
: 4/~U70 
: 6,362 




52.452 


31,964 


. 34,848 ; 


2^,336 


. 20,743 


: 26.080 


Africa: 


1,340 ! 


1,653 










Asia: 


37,899 
158 : 


: 8,863 

37 : 


840 
451 ' 


: 1,225 
127 


432 
870 


1 1,632 

; 2,820 






0,900 


1,291 s 


1*352 


1,302 




Oceania: : 
Australia 5/ : 

Grand total, . * • : 


210 : 


30 


39 ! 




16 


28 


322,321 


282,469 : 


309,440 : 


341,232 : 


305,477 


2J1,201 



l/ Preliminary; partly estimated. 2/ January-October. 3/ January November. 
kf~ Includes soybean oil. 5/ Year ending June 30. 

Foreign Agricultural Servica. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, othar foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research and related information. 



- 14 - 



The United States exported the equivalent of 7«9 million bushels of 
flaxseed (6.9 million as seed and 1.0 million as oil) — almost double I963 
exports. The Netherlands continued to be the major market, accounting 
for two-thirds of the total. 

Indian oil exports of 1,637 short tons, equivalent to 0.2 million 
bushels of seed, went largely to the United Kingdom and Pakistan. Exports 
from India have declined to minor quantities in recent years, largely be- 
cause prices of Indian oil have been high in relation to world prices. 
Because of expanding domestic demand as opposed to the almost static level 
of production, prices probably will continue high and export prospects 
remain dim. Exports of seed as such are prohibited. 

In Uruguay, government taxes on exports favored exporting oil rather 
than seed, and no flaxseed as such was exported in V)Gh. Linseed oil 
exports at ^,Ql.h tons, equivalent to 1.6 million bushels of seed, went 
mainly to Europe. 

(For a summary of world flaxseed production and trade, see Foreign 
Agriculture Circular , FFO 6-65, April 1965. 



196^ tffiAT PRODUCTION 
DOWN SLIGHTLY 

Total meat production in the hh leading countries during 196^ — 
estimated at 112.2 billion pounds--was slightly less than the record high 
set in 1963. Still, last year*s level was 15 percent above the 98 billion 
pound average registered during 1956-60. 

Compared with the previous year, I96U output of beef and veal in- 
creased by almost one percent, but this was offset by declines in pork — 
down roughly k percent — and mutton, lamb, and goatmeat. Of the total meat 
output, beef and veal comprised about 53 percent, pork about 39 percent 
and mutton, lamb; and goatmeat about 7 percent. Horsemeat accounts for 
less than 1 percent of the total. 

Since the mid-1950' s, total meat production has risen at a rate 
roughly parallel to population growth but lagging somewhat behind rapidly 
expanding demand for red meat. Higher living levels associated with large 
incomes in the industrialized areas of the world has spurred demand to new 
highs each year. 

Beef and veal production amounted to an estimated 59*^ billion 
pounds last year- -about k-00 million pounds above the 1963 level. A two 
billion pound increase in the United States — world's largest producer- 
was partly offset by significant declines in South America and Western 
Europe. Slight increases, however, were registered in Canada, Australia, 
New Zealand and a few other individual countries. 



-15- 



Pork production in I96U totaled around i+3.3 billion pounds — off 1.6 
"billion pounds from I963. Slight to moderate increases in most areas 
were offset by a substantial 2.6 billion pound reduction in the USSR. 
The sharp cutback in I96U Soviet pork output was caused by the previous 
year*s unusually heavy slaughter, forced by feed shortages. Soviet hog 
numbers were reduced drastically by the end of I963. In order to rebuild 
herds the following year, slaughter and pork production were thereby 
restricted. In Western Europe, pork output has increased steadily in 
proportion to a continued expansion in hog numbers over the past several 
years. The United States --leading pork producer — recorded a slight 
increase last year compared with I963. 

World production of mutton, lamb, and goatmeat amounted to 8.5 billion 
pounds in 196^- — off only slightly from I963. Little change was noted by 
the three leading producers --USSR, Australia, and New Zealand. In the 
United States, 196^ production was somewhat under 1963 and slightly below 
the 1956-60 level. 

During I96U, total red meat production increased over I963 in North 
America (by an estimated 2.3 billion pounds), Eastern Europe (by 60 mil- 
lion pounds), Asia (by 127 million pounds), and in Oceania (by 1^7 million 
pounds); it decreased from I963 in South America (by 1 billion pounds), 
Western Europe (by 8 _ million pounds), USSR (by 2.8 billion pounds), and in 
Africa (by 19 million pounds) . Total meat production in South America 
last year was, in fact, slightly below the 1956-60 average level. 
(Tables on page 17 and 18) 

WORLD SHEEP NUMBERS 
UNCHANGED IN 1965 

World sheep numbers in I965 are estimated at 986 million head, down 
slightly from each of the two previous years, but 5 percent above the 
average for 1956-60. 

For the second straight year, numbers were reduced sharply in the 
USSR and this was the major reason for the drop in world numbers. There 
was a continuation of the decrease in numbers in both the United States, 
Canada, and Western Europe. 

Numbers continued to increase in Australia and New Zealand and there 
was another reported increase in Argentina. Drought in the other two 
Southern Hemisphere countries, Uruguay and the Republic of South Africa, 
was responsible for the slight drop in numbers in those countries. 

Australian numbers were estimated to have reached a record 169 mil- 
lion in March, 1965- Higher wool prices in the two previous seasons led 
to retention of more wethers and breeding ewes. However, drought has 
affected much of the sheep area in recent months, and wool prices in the 
196^-65 season have averaged about one-fifth less than the previous 
season. These two factors could bring a leveling off or even a decline 
in the current year. (Continued on page 19) 



-16- 





MEAT l/: Production in 44 


countries, 


average 1956 


-60, annual 1962-64 










Beef and 


veal 




Pork 2/ 


Continent 


' Average 
: 1956-60 
















and country 


1962 : 


1963 


; 1964 3/ 


Average 
1556-62 


I962 




l9o i <- 3/ 




: Million 


Million : 


Million 


; Million 


Million 


Million 


Million 


Million 




: pounds 


pounds : 


pounds 


: pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


North America: 


















1,1+19 


1,539 


1,693 


980 


978 


978 


1,061 






999 


1,064 


1,CA2 


406 


444 


458 


465 






16,311 


17,350 


19,435 


11,135 


11,836 


12,439 


12,523 






V 


Zl 


k/ 
2J 


83 




V 


V 




... 17 067 


19,044 


20,240 


22,450 


12 6o4 








South America: 


; 


















: 4,984 


5,244 


5,408 


4,211 


409 


351 


337 


386 






2,989 


3,000 


3,020 


1,041 


1,296 


1,267 


1,296 






317 


298 


289 


58 


56 


54 


55 






797 


862 


896 


110 


122 


122 


119 






265 


271 


y 














172 


161 


154 


"4 


97 


68 


68 




: 576 


600 


(O f 


□LLC 


45 


54 


56 


55 






10,38U 


10,707 


9,652 


1,737 


1,976 


1,904 


1,979 



Europe: 



Western 



EEC 



Belgium & Luxemoourg • • 


447 


482 


591 


531 


446 


526 




512 




2,919 


3,642 


3,556 


3, 393 


2,446 


2,802 


2,681 


2,722 




2,071 


2,513 


2,4i6 


2,324 


3,371 


3,893 


3,845 


4,052 






1,552 


1,424 


1,252 


930 


1,015 


956 


1,158 




..: 481 


616 


713 


630 


816 


922 


926 


977 






8,805 


8,700 


8,130 


8,009 


9,158 


8,943 


9,421 






315 


318 


300 


451 


48l 


485 


493 






396 


428 


369 


1,158 


1,381 


1,504 


1,572 






178 


195 


213 


135 


149 


147 


150 






77 


111 


121 


51 


62 


74 


80 




168 


244 


244 


204 


1 07 


p4q 


240 


244 






130 


123 


126 


116 


128 


117 


122 






115 


108 


99 


198 


197 


199 


171 






36O 


380 


489 


504 


568 


686 


750 






343 


363 


335 


ko3 


1. Qn 
1*09 


462 


484 




217 


264 


246 


237 


262 


287 


336 


347 






2,024 


2,083 


1,903 


1,481 


1,735 


1,778 


1,861 






13,251 


13,299 


12,526 


13,025 


14,884 


14,971 


15,695 


Eastern 






















178 


191 




221 


265 


223 








471 


452 




669 


698 


714 


I 






458 


V 


i 


1,046 


829 








248 


302 


313 




618 


665 


670 


1 




641 


857 


964 


1,021 


1,792 


2,026 


1,740 


1,740 






498 


485 


476 


487 


527 


524 


573 






2,764 


2,890 


2,912 


4,833 


5,010 


4,750 


4,793 






6,180 


6,930 


6,750 


5,360 


6,610 


7,110 


4,460 


Africa: 






















426 


357 


327 


4 


5 


4 


3 






925 


1,070 


1,096 


118 


117 


118 


116 






1,351 


1,427 


1,423 


122 


122 


122 


119 


Asia: 






















2 


2 


2 


7/ 112 


114 


116 


119 




6 


14 


18 




384 


479 


471 








322 


410 


467 


325 


715 


616 








111 


117 


121 


406 


515 


538 


569 






256 


247 


262 


1 


1 


§/ 


§/ 




.: 651 


705 


794 


871 


1,228 


1,824 


1,741 


1,791 


Oceania: 






















1,949 


2,086 


2,198 


220 


269 


247 


260 




.: 559 


643 


643 


645 


90 


91 


95 


102 




.: 2,303 


2,592 


2,729 


2,843 


310 


360 


342 


362 




.: 50,293 


56,271 


59,016 


59,427 


39,219 


44,104 


44,870 


43,298 



(Continued) 



- 17 - 



MEAT l/: Production in 4k countries, average 1956-60, annual 1962-6k 



(Continued) 



Mutton, lamb and goatmeat 



Continent 
and country 



Total meat production 



* Average 








! Average 








J 1956-60 


i 1962 


i 1963 


: 196k 3/ 


; 1956-60 


; 1962 


! 1963 


; 196k 3/ 


: Million 


: Million 


: Million 


: Million 


: Million 


: Million 


: Million 


; Million 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


; pounds 


j pounds 


• pounds 


• pounds 




oi 


31 


29 


2,355 


2,k30 


2,51*8 


2,783 


: 116 


126 


128 


129 


l,k22 


1,597 


1,680 


1,667 




809 

k/ 


1 |U 


715 


27,215 




30,559 


32,673 


* 2 


k/ 

it/ 


k/ 
21 


**95 


)■ / 
V 


V 


it/ 


878 


970 


931 


875 


31.U87 


33,360 


35,131 


37,"*55 


n 1 A 


job 


325 


265 


5,771 


5,961 


6,070 


k,862 


86 


100 


10k 


106 


k 16k 


k iRz, 




k kOO 


: 63 


58 


58 


57 


'k29 


U31 


klO 


1*01 


k 


i+ 


k 


k 


797 


923 


988 


1,019 










275 


265 


271 


V 


: 79 


"85 


~83 


88 


30k 


35U 


312 


310 


: 113 


99 


102 


107 


73 u 


753 


865 


971* 


: 723 


712 


676 


627 


12,k7k 


13,072 


13,287 


12,258 



North America: 

Canada 

Mexico 

United States. 
Cuba 



Total 5/. 



South America: 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Total 5/ 

Europe: 
Western 
EEC 

Belgium & Luxembourg. 

France 

Germany, West 

Italy 

Kether lands 



5 

26k 
35 

102 
19 



k 

289 
29 

106 
19 



5 

260 
29 

10k 
17 



3 

269 
29 

101 
13 



936 
5,838 
5,52k 
2,162 
1,31+1* 



l,0k2 
6,951 
6,k68 
2,777 
1,580 



1,163 
6,72k 
6,319 
2,588 
1,672 



Total EEC. . . 

Austria 6/ 

Denmark 

Finland 

Greece 

Ireland 

Norway. ........ 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland. . . . 
United Kingdom. 



k25 



kk7 



3 
2 
6 

155 
71 
31 
kk 
219 
3 
5 

k72 



3 
2 
k 

162 
81 
32 
k T 
278 
3 
7 
560 



4 =L 

3 

2 

3 

195 
85 
32 
1*7 
252 
k 
7 

51*0 



1*15 

3 
2 
k 

198 
83 
33 
kk 
280 
k 
7 
563 



15,8ok 

7"*5 
1,529 
301 
255 
k56 
260 
333 
1,072 
772 
k9l* 
3,736 



18,818 

812 
1,798 
338 
301 
571* 
295 
36k 
1,250 
852 
569 
!*,319 



l8,k66 

817 
1,91*9 
351* 
380 
569 
278 
359 
1,361 
8k7 
601 
k.koi 



Total Western Europe : 1,1*36 



1,626 



1,585 



1,636 



25,757 



30,290 



30,382 



Eastern 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia. 
Germany, East.. 

Hungary 

Poland 

Yugoslavia 



105 
2k 

12 
62 
117 



131* 

2k 

15 
51* 

128 



132 

2k 

15 

k8 
110 



k8k 
1,091 
1,385 

910 
2,520 

9ll* 



577 
1,200 
1,288 
1,005 
2,98k 
1,162 



51+6 

1,197 

V 
1,010 

2,790 
1,125 



Total Eastern Europe 5/. 



320 



355 



329 



329 



7,301* 



3,216 



8,033 



USSR (Europe & Asia) : 1,610 

Africa: 

Egypt 

South Africa, Rep. 

Total 5/ 

Asia: 



1,91*0 



1,91*0 



1,91*0 



12,630 



15,11*0 



16,390 



of. 



69 
2kl 



51 
286 



ko 
318 



39 
307 



1*59 
1,201 



k82 
1,328 



kOl 
1,506 



310 



337 



358 



3k6 



1,660 



1,810 



1,907 



Total 5/.. 
Oceania: 

Australia. . . 
New Zealand. 



313 



3k8 



351 



365 



2,2k3 



2,935 



2,938 



1,013 
792 



1,329 
1,036 



1,30k 
1,028 



1,315 
1,030 



2,977 
1,1*41 



3,51*7 
1,770 



3,637 
1,766 



Total 5/ : 1,805 



2,365 



2,332 



2,31*5 



k,kl8 



5,317 



5,1*03 



Total kk countries 5/ : 7,395 



8,653 



),463 



97,973 



110, lko 



1,077 
6,623 
6,1*31* 
2,606 
1,635 



18,375 
803 
1,951* 
377 
399 
531 
287 
320 
1,563 
8ki 
597 
l*,327 



30,371* 



I 



977 
2,8kl 
1,163 



8,093 



13,560 



369 
1,519 



Burma : 7/ 56 56 58 58 7/ 180 172 176 179 

China, Taiwan ..: 11 hj hj 391 k9k k90 hj 

Japan : 17 lk 12 9 688 1,106 1,087 1,139 

Philippines : 7 9 9 9 5 k 6 638 667 702 

Turkey : 232 268 271 288 k38 525 518 550 



3,065 



3,773 
1,777 



5,550 



113, k71 112, 2k3 



8,502 

1/ For calendar years - carcass weight basis: Beef and veal, pork, mutton, lamb and goatmeat; horsemeat is included in the 
total meat figures for Japan, Philippines, Western and Eastern Europe. Excludes variety, rabbit, and poultry meat. 2/ Pro- 
duction for Canada, United States, and Eastern Europe, which excludes lard and rendered pork fat are not comparable with those 
for some other countries which exclude only commercial lard. 3/ Preliminary, k/ Not available. 5/ Includes an allowance for 
any missing data from countries shown. 6/ Includes variety meats. Tj Less than a 5-year average. 8/ Less than 500,000 pounds. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, 
source materials, reports of United States agricultural attaches and other representatives abroad. 



other foreign 



- 18 - 



New Zealand numbers in I965 are continuing to expand slowly as they have in 
recent years. The national flock of breeding ewes is expected to reach 37*5 mil- 
lion by June, and with normal lambing in the coming season, numbers should con- 
tinue to expand at least for another year. 



The return of favorable growing conditions and high world wool prices spurred 
an increase in sheep numbers in Argentina . However, economic instability at home, 
high cattle prices, and lower wool prices may discourage continued expansion. 



Uruguayan sheep numbers are expected to show a slight drop in I965 as the 
result of drought in January and February in the main sheep producing areas. 



Although no official figures are available, it has been estimated that sheep 
numbers dropped slightly during the latest drought in the Republic of South 
Africa. 



SHEEP: Number in specified countries, average 195°-60, 

annual 1963-65 



Continent 



Average 
1956-60 



1963 



1964 1/ 



1965 1/ 



Change 



I965 



1956-60 



1965 



1964 



1,000 
head 



1,000 
head 



1,000 
head 



1,000 
head 



Percent Percent 





39,700 38,800 36,600 35,400 
120,900 122,100 125,100 126,200 

77,800 81,800 79,700 77,300- 
4o,6oo 42,400 42,800 43,200. 


-10.8 - 3.3 
+ 4.4 + .9 

- .6 - 3.0 
+ 6.4 + .9 




Europe : : 




USSR : 


118,400 124,200 122,500 120,500: 


+ 1.8 - 1.6 


119,500 139,700 133,900 125,200 : 

134,800 147,300 l48,8oo 149,600: 
209, 4co 206, 4oo 205,800 206,900: 
193,800 208.900 216,300 222,500: 


+ 4.8 - 6.5 
+11.0 + .5 
- 1.2 + .5 
+14.8 + 2.9 


Africa : 




Oceania : 




936,500 987,400 989,000 986,300: 


+ 5.3 - .3 



l/ Preliminary. 



-19- 



SHEEP: Number in specified countries, average 1956-60, annual 1963-65 



Continent and country 



Average 
1956-60 



1963 



19611- 1/ 



1965 1/ 



Month of 
estimate 



: Thousands 
North America: ; 
Canada (excluding : 

Newfoundland) : 1,076 

United States 3/ : 31,761 

Guatemala : 811 

Mexico : 5,398 

Cuba : 209 

Total North America k/ : 39,700 

South America: : 

Argentina : 1+7,291 

Bolivia : 5/ 5,566 

Brazil : 19,286 

Chile : 6/ 7,3^0 

Colombia ; 1,189 

Ecuador ; 1,511 

Falkland Islands : 6l0 

Paraguay ; 1+00 

Peru : 15, l*+7 

Uruguay : 22,373 

Total South America k/ : 120,900 

Europe: ; 
Western : 

EEC : 

Belgium & Luxembourg . . . ; 99 

France : 8,565 

Germany, West jj : 1,192 

Italy : 8,1*95 

Netherlands : 365 

Total EEC UJ : 18,716 

Austria ; 21 1+ 

Denmark 8/ : 37 

Finland : 9/ 1+31 

Greece : 9,213 

Iceland : 7 1+1 

Ireland : 2,814-7 

Norway : 958 

Portugal 10/ : b,55k 

Spain ;ll/ 20,913 

Sweden : ihd 

Switzerland : 210 

United Kingdom : 18,621 

Total West Europe k/..: 77,800 

Eastern : 

Albania : 5/ 1,629 

Bulgaria : 8,111 

Czechoslovakia : 5/ 878 

Germany, East ; " 1,989 

Hungary : 2,078 

Poland : 3,917 

Rumania : 10,929 

Yugoslavia : 11,062 

Total East Europe k/..: 1*0,600 

Total Europe kj : 118,1400 

USSR (Europe & Asia) : 119,500 



Thousands 



886 
30,170 
702 
6,1460 



Thousands 



860 
28,021 
690 
6,513 



38,800 



36,600 



146,071+ 

19,718 
7,530 
1,500 
1,910 
637 

16,3140 
22,000 



1*7,500 

21,033 
7,580 
1,600 
2,050 



15,879 
22,300 



122,100 



125,100 



60 
8,91+5 
981 

7,857 
267 



58 
8,926 

898 
7,8140 

260 



18,110 



17,982 



153 
61 
166 
9,666 

3,333 
960 

5,029 
22,099 
l8k 

235 
20,8Ul 



P+T 

70 

1^3 
9,525 

3,387 
1,009 
5,030 
19,869 
221 
21+0 
21,081 



81,800 



79,700 



10,107 
521+ 

12/ 1,792 
3,Ol43 
3,056 
12,168 
10,055 



10,308 
527 
1,902 
3,305 
3,022 

12,l4O0 
9,726 



1*2,1400 



1+2,800 



12l+,200 



122,500 



139,700 



133,900 



Thousands 



833 
26,668 

6,600 



35,1+00 



1+8,000 

21,1+53 
7,500 
1,800 



16,000 
22,100 



126,200 



8,539 
839 

7,800 
287 



17,523 



WT 

131 
9,1+60 

3,i+56 
1,01+3 
5,031 
17,618 

250 
21,297 



77,300 



568 
2,003 



10,100 



1+3,200 



120,500 



125,200 



Dec. 1 2/ 
Jan. 1 
April 
Spring 
Dec. 2/ 



June 30 
Jan. 

Dec. 31 2/ 
Dec. 2/ 
Jan. 1 
August 



Dec. 31 2/ 
May 



Jan. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 



Dec. 

July 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

June 

April 

Dec. 



2/ 
2/ 

2/ 

2/ 
2/ 
2/ 

2/ 



Jan. 
Jan. 1 
Dec. 3 2/ 
March 
June 30 
Jan. 
Jan. 15 



; Jan. 1 
(Continued) 



20 - 



SHEEP: Number in specified countries, average 1956-60, annual 1963-65 (continued) 



Continent and country 


: Average 
: 1956-60 


i 1963 


i 1961* 1/ 


1965 1/ 


; Month of 
: estimate 




: Thousands 


f xiiuubano.5 


: Thousands 


Thousands 








Africa * 






















£ ppn 








I Nov« 


pn 








on 7ftn 


pli oqn 


Pk Mk. 








T i hvfl 




1 O^O 

1,^03 


















1 0 k<ik 


ion lift 


13,500 


13, (i f 












O, f>4 








De c 










3 O'SQ 

3,o3 


]i ATl^ 

1 *,mjo 






■ Dec • 


31 


2/ 






1,3x0 


i fii p 


1 foPfl 


i 6pr 


*, Jan* 




DurtUiU.x anu nwanui ■ ■ • • • 




^pn 








Dec ; 


Ol 

jl 


p / 






coo 








De c • 




i 


fori rr/~\ 1 T onnnl <*1 Tr"f 1 "1 0 1 
UUIlgU ^ J_jtr UjJ Ul 'J. - 'J. J Lc y 0 0 e 


c / 

V, 


££7 








Dec • 


jl 


p / 


















Tvotv Pnn«;t 


% 


















1 , *P j 














MoT ocrfiQv Rimini 1 c* 




P7n 


3.pn 


■?R7 

JO f 




iJCL 0 


Jl 


S/ 


Mali 
















MfinTM "I" fi n "i s * 


i 
















Mi ct^t* * 




p i nn 


















7 ^nn 


















3.RA 

J 00 


30 ( 




Dec • 




2/ 




2J 


^n 












Tfln7fln"T n lU/ « 


2,852 


P Skk 


p 7nn 


p 7 c ;n 






£7 




5/ 


368 












ITrroT^no T K / « 


1,081* 


7£n 


001 












5/ 


1,150 






_ _ _ 










1,280 


— 


— 


--- 








South Africa, Rep. of..; 




38,100 








Aug. 


31 




South West Africa* •••••* 




3,l k 9 
















13k,800 


11*7,300 


11*8,800 


lk9,600 








Asia: : 


















f^/TITH 1C ■ 




395 


ki n 


k^n 




Dec • 




2/ 






23,6ko 


pp knn 


pn ~\ 


pn i 


Mar ■ 


21 


Tran IS/ "1 6/ • 


5/ 


9,01*0 










21 




-T (~i"r*f^ sa Ti ■ 


1*70 








Dec • 






5/ 


3,800 








Nov# 




2/ 


fT^m^T^Q^r ■ 


29,613 


.31,014- 


3P 07O 


■3 3 nnn < 


Dec 




27 






5,032 




k nnn 


k l nn 


Dec. 


31 


I 




3,970 














1 


55,13>+ 








Dec • 


± 


o / 
£/ 






39,500 


1*0,700 


k0,900 











881 


3o9 


27k 


200 


r s: u • 


X 








6,805 
















209,14.00 


206, k00 


205,800 


206,900 








Oceania: ; 




















114.9,220 


150,626 


I6k,9o0 


169,000 


Mar. 










W*,535 


50,190 


51,290 


53,500 


June 








193,800 


208,900 


216,300 


222,500 










936,500 


987, k00 


989,000 


986,300 









1/ Preliminary. 2/ October-December numbers are included under the following year for cotn- 
parison and totals. 3/ Does not include Alaska and Hawaii prior to 196l. h/ Includes an 
allowance for any missing data for countries shown and for other producing countries not 
shown. 5/ Less than a 5-year average. 6/ January. 7/ Includes Saarland. 8/ Excludes Faroe 
Islands. 9/ June. 10/ Includes Azores and Maderia Islands. 11/ May. 12/ November. 
13/ Taxed only. lk/Formerly Tanganyika and Zanzibar. 15/ On Native farms. 16/ Includes 
goats. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics 

of foreign governments, other foreign source material, reports of United States Agricultural 

Attaches and other representatives abroad, results of office research aid related information. 



- 21 - 



TOBACCO HARVEST IN FIRST HALF 
OF I965 UP SLIGHTLY 



World tobacco harvest in the first half of calendar year I965, mainly 
in the Southern Hemisphere, is forecast at 3»1 "billion pounds — up slightly 
from the 3*0 billion last season, but almost 3° percent larger than the 
1955-59 annual average of 2.4 billion. 

Record harvests are forecast for Brazil, Colombia, Pakistan, and 
Thailand. Adverse weather, mainly drought, reduced the harvests in 
Argentina, and the Republic of South Africa. Blue mold, hail, and frost 
further reduced the Australian crop from earlier expectations and frost 
damage adversely affected the New Zealand crop. Reduced flue -cured 
plantings in Rhodesia, Zambia, India, the Philippines, and Mauritius 
caused smaller harvests in those countries this season. In some countries 
tobacco is harvested in both six-month periods of the year, but all pro- 
duction is summarized in this report. 1/ 

Production by Areas 

North America, including Caribbean area : Harvest in the first half 
of 1965 is forecast at 289 million pounds --up 7 percent from the 1964 
harvest of 270 million. All countries in this area expect to harvest 
larger crops this season, except El Salvador, and Haiti. The Dominican 
Republic, Jamaica, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and Puerto Rico accounted 
for most of the increase over last season. 

South America : Harvest is forecast at 692 million pounds, or one- 
fifth larger than the 571 million harvested in 1964. Record harvests in 
both Brazil and Colombia accounted for most of the increase over 196k, 
Planted acreages in all countries in this area, except Paraguay, were 
up from 1964 but drought reduced the I965 harvest in Argentina. Also, 
favorable weather conditions in Brazil, Colombia, Paraguay, and Venezuela, 
enhanced yields over last season. 

Africa : Harvest is forecast at 508 million pounds — down slightly 
from the 1964 harvest of 524 million. Reduced plantings of flue-cured 
tobaccos in Rhodesia, Zambia, and Mauritius accounted for the drop in 
the I965 harvest from a year ago. All other countries in this area 
expect larger harvests this season, except the Republic of South Africa 
where drought has reduced final outturn of all kinds of leaf tobaccos, 
except flue -cured. 

Asia : Harvest during the first half of I965 is placed at 1,582 
million pounds, or down slightly from the 1964 harvest of 1,596 million. 
A smaller harvest of flue-cured tobaccos in India, along with all kinds 
of tobaccos in the Philippines, more than offset expected increases in 
all other countries in this area. 

1/ Included in this category are Colombia, the Malagasy Republic, 
Ceylon, Pakistan, and Thailand. 



-22- 



Oceania ; Harvest in this area is forecast at 32.6 million pounds, or 
almost one-fourth smaller than the 1964 harvest of 43.5 million. Reduced flue- 
cured plantings, in conjunction with "blue mold, hail, and frost damage, reduced 
the Australia crop and frost damage adversely affected the I965 harvest in 
New Zealand. 

Production by Kinds 

Increases are forecast for all kinds of tobacco harvested during the first 
half of 1965, except other light air-cured, including Maryland. Flue-cured is 
estimated at 1,066 million pounds — up slightly from the 1964 harvest of 1,049 
million. The record harvest in Brazil, along with moderate increases forecast 
for Argentina, Venezuela, the Republic of South Africa, Indonesia, Pakistan, 
Taiwan, and Thailand, more than offset smaller harvests in Rhodesia, Zambia, 
India, the Philippines, Mexico, and Australia caused by reduced plantings. Also, 
unfavorable weather conditions reduced yields in both New Zealand and Australia, 
with blue mold reportedly severely damaging the I965 harvest in Australia. 

Burley production continues its upward trend. The I965 harvest of 6l mil- 
lion pounds is slightly over 3 times the 1955-59 annual average of 19 million. 
Other light air-cured, including Maryland, almost equals last year's harvest of 
39»7 million pounds. Oriental and semi -oriental is estimated at 23.9 million 
pounds, compared with 21.2 million in 1964. Light sun-cured is forecast at 177 
million pounds, or up nearly 8 percent from the 1964 harvest of 164 million. 
Dark air-cured types are expected to rise to 929 million pounds from 900 million 
last season. Harvest of dark sun-cured types is currently placed at 7^9 million 
pounds, compared with the 1964 harvest of 7^5 million. Fire-cured production is 
forecast at 39*4 million pounds, or almost 27 percent above the 1964 harvest of 
31.1 million, but still 22 percent below the I963 record harvest of 50.4 million. 



LEAF TOBACCO: Estimated world production by kinds in first half of 
calendar year I965, with comparisons --farm sales weight l/ 



• Production 


Kinds : 


Average : 


1963 2/ ; 


196k 2/ ; 


1965 2/ 




1955-59 : 




1,000 
pounds 


1,000 

pounds 


1,000 

pounds 


1,000 

pounds 


Oriental and semi -oriental . . : 


615,^32 
18,906 
27,233 
15,587 
146,682 
816,062 

7^9,035 
34,4o8 


905,652 
52,965 
31,868 
20,191 
189,108 
984,622 
827,338 
50,439 


1,0^9,274 
54,138 
39,702 
21,172 
163,625 
900,210 
745,1+84 
31,115 


1,066,061 
60,962 
39,654 
23,862 
176,562 
928,870 
768,575 
39,370 




2,423,345 


3,062,183 


3,004,720 


3,103,916 



1/ Farm sales weight is about 10 percent above dry weight normally reported in 
trade statistics. 2/ Preliminary; subject to revision. 



-23- 



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25 - 



WORLD COTTONSEED PRODUCTION 
AT ALLTIME HIGH 



The second estimate of world production of cottonseed in the 
marketing year beginning August 1, 196^ confirms the early forecast of a 
record outturn of 2k. Q million short tons ( World Agricultural Production 
and Trade , October l$6k) . This estimate exceeds that of 19&3 by 3 per- 
cent and the 1955-59 average by one-sixth. 

While U.S. production increased slightly from a year earlier, most 
of the increase in world production was outside the United States. Major 
expansions, both relative and absolute, occurred in Mexico, Argentina, 
the Sudan, the United Arab Republic and Mainland China. The most signifi 
cant declines in production were in India, Pakistan, Greece, Brazil, and 
Spain. 

Cottonseed output increased slightly in North America with larger 
cotton crops in virtually all major producing countries. U.S. production 
at 6.2 million tons was 1 percent above that of I963 but one -sixth above 
the 1955-59 average. Cotton acreage declined slightly, but average 
yields of seed were about 2 percent above those of the previous year. 
The high yields resulted from continued use of improved cultural practice 
and generally favorable growing conditions in most producing areas. 

Mexico's seed production increased sharply from last year's mainly 
as a result of a shift in cotton acreage from lower to higher-yielding 
districts. Production in other Central American countries, except 
El Salvador, is estimated at new records because of further acreage 
expansion and ideal growing conditions. Outturn in these countries has 
more than tripled since the 1955-59 average period. 

Cottonseed production in South America is up only slightly from a 
year earlier. Estimated at around 1.1 million tons, Brazil's output, 
however, is down moderately, mainly because heavy late-season rains 
sharply reduced the crop in the northeast. In Argentina, seed production 
is about one -third larger than the reduced output of a year earlier 
because of increased acreage and improved yields. And, in Peru, seed 
production is moderately above the reduced outturn of last year. 

Europe ' s relatively small production of cottonseed declined an 
estimated one -fifth because of the sharply reduced cotton crops in Spain 
and Greece. In Spain many farmers, discontent with government support 
prices, shifted from cotton to other crops in 196^-65. In Greece, cotton 
acreage was reduced as large areas of nonirrigated land were planted to 
wheat. Diversion from cotton was largely the result of the fact that 
the cotton subsidy was not announced until the 196^-65 planting season 
had passed. However, labor shortage and rising production costs also 
were factors. 

Seed production in the Soviet Union is placed at 3«9 million tons, 
slightly larger than last year's, on the basis of the Government esti- 
mate of the 196^-65 cotton crop. 



-26- 



COTTONSEED: Production in specified countries and the world, 
averages 1950-54 and 1955-59, annual 1961-64 



Year beginning August 1 1/ 



Continent and country : 


Ave 
I95O-54 


rage 

: 1955-59 


' I961 


• 1962 


106-5 0/ 






1,000 


• 1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




short 


short 


: short 


: short 


short 


short 




tons 


tons 


: tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


North America: : 
















5,808 


5,370 


5,978 


: 6,139 


6,192 


6,225 




25 


: 72 


: 124 


: 158 


: 161 


161 




11 


: 32 


: 77 


: 134 


: 160 


: loo 




JL 


5 


! 9 


: 11 


17 


27 




WO 


: 975 


: 958 


: 1,164 


1,012 


1,145 






94 


: 130 


: 173 


: 209 


2oo 




1, 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






o,pou 


7,290 


! 7,795 


7,765 


8, 010 


South America: : 
















283 


: 275 


253 


: 312 


230 


306 




794 


715 


1,212 


1,104 


1,104 


1,056 




37 


82 


192 


200 


179 


160 




30 


22 


23 


: 26 


28 


33 




240 


: 277 


350 


: 360 


33^ 


3^7 




7 


15 


15 


15 


19 


21 




I_j400 


1,395 


2,055 


2,030 


1.905 


1,935 


Europe: : 
















70 


138 


: 228 


: 209 


: 219 


153 




17 


24 


13 


: 10 


13 


12 




30 


100 


: 235 


240 


214 


loo 




llC 


37 


19 


30 


24 






dlSJ 


325 


515 


520 


490 


305 




2,845 


3,24o 


3,385 


3,215 


3,890 


3,935 


Africa: : 
















175 


221 


454 


335 


205 


34o 




772 


830 ■ 


726 


945 


! 918 


990 




13 


18 


: 10 


15 = 


13 


10 




) 69 


32 


23 


26 


23 


23 




) 69 


51 


64 


77 


84 


82 




113 


124 


38 


38 


31 


15 




75 


83 


97 


69 


87 


102 




58 


84 


84 


122 


112 


97 


Rhodesia, Malawi, and Zambia 4/: 


7 


6 


13 


12 


16 


21 


28 


67 • 


71 


89 


110 


117 




148 


157 : 


78 


151 


161 


166 




1,505 


1,740 


1,750 


2,005 


1,900 


2,105 


Asia and Oceania: : 
















99 


I63 : 


283 


227 


283 


270 




14 


24 : 


21 


20 : 


13 






126 


235 


305 


368 


37^ 


400 




318 


376 


484 


: 551 


586 


612 




2,755 


4,010 : 


2,296 


2,352 


2,632 


3,192 




31 


39 


48 : 


67 


98 


98 




51 


41 


53 


50 


36 


50 




1,906 


2,235 


2,282 


2,744 


2,912 


2,688 




39 


29 


21 


14 


9 






673 


702 


768 : 


862 


989 


918 




17 


23 


31 


33 


33 


35 




1 


2 


4 




8 


19 




6,045 


7,920 


6,690 




0,045 


8,305 


Estimated world total 3/. . : 


18,540 


21,180 


21,685 


22,945 


23,995 


24,755 



1/ Years shown refer to years of harvest. 2/ Preliminary. 3_/ Includes estimates for the 
above countries for which data are not available and for minor producing countries, k/ Formerly 
Southern Rhodesia, Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia, respectively. 5_/ Formerly Tanganyika 
and Zanzibar. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Data for countries other than the United States, the United Arab 
Republic and the Sudan were calculated from lint-production estimates. 



- 27 - 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20250 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

U. i. DVARTMINT OP AORICULTUtl 



Official Business 



NOTICE 

If you do lo nger need this publication, 
check here / /'return this sheet, 

and roar name will be dropped from the 
mailing lieu 

If roar address should be changed, print 
or type the new address on this aheet 
and return the whole aheet tot 

foreign Agricultural Service, Rm. 5918 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D.C 20250. 



The substantial gain estimated for seed production in Africa from 
the I96U-65 cotton crop is due mainly to the sharp expansion in the Sudan 
and the sizable increase in the United Arab Republic. Estimated seed 
production from Sudan's cotton crop reflects an increase of two-thirds 
from the severely reduced level of last year. The expansion is attributed 
to favorable weather and improved insect control measures. Seed production 
from the record 196^-65 cotton crop in the United Arab Republic is esti- 
mated at almost a million tons — an increase of 8 percent from the previous 
year's. Higher yields achieved this year are attributed to generally 
favorable growing conditions , more general use of improved cultural prac- 
tices and changes to higher yielding varieties. 

The moderate gain estimated for Asia this year stems largely from 
the expansion that is believed to have occurred in Mainland China. On 
the basis of the reportedly larger cotton acreage and relatively favorable 
growing conditions, seed production in Mainland China is estimated at 
abo\it 3*2 million tons or one-fifth above the estimated outturn from the 
1963-6^ cotton crop. 

India's production is placed at about 2.7 million tons against 2.9 
million last year. A major factor in the smaller production despite a 
slight increase in acreage was unusually heavy rains and insect damage 
in some important cotton-growing areas. 

A slight reduction in yields this year from the extremely high 
levels of 1963-6^ reduced Pakistan's cottonseed production moderately. 
However, production in recent years has increased significantly from 
the 1955-59 average. Expansion is expected to continue with improved 
irrigation systems, increased use of fertilizers and the adoption of 
higher yielding varieties. 

Syria's production is estimated at an alltime high. The large out- 
turn is attributed to exceptionally favorable weather. Turkey's seed 
production also increased moderately from a year earlier, but Iran's 
declined by about the same proportion. 



-28- 



JUN oO 19od 

CONTENTS 
JUNE 1965 

WORLD SUMMARIES: Page 
Production: 

Coffee Crop Largest Since 1959-60 3 

Sugar Crop at High Record 6 

Tobacco Exports Set New Record 10 

Butter and Cheese Production Up in 1964 14 

Corn Crop Confirmed as Second Largest on Record . 17 

Hops Production Down Slightly 20 

Output of Lard Down Sharply in 1964 24 

Trade: 

Exports of Palm Oil and Palm Kernels 17 

Fish Oil Exports 24 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 



Single copies free to persons in the United States 
from the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du-8 -2hk^ 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars -- 

FC IO-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles 
I and IV, PL kQO 

FFO 7-65 U.S. Exports of Soybean and Cottonseed Oils Under PL 1+80, 
Marketing Years 195^-55/1963-6^ 

FFO 8-65 World Soybean Production Rises to New Record 

FG 7-65 World Barley and Oats Production Declines Slightly 

FFVS ^-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. exports, January 1965, with 
comparisons 

FFVS 5-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. exports, February 1965* with 
comparisons 

FLM 3-65 World Hog Numbers Increase 

FLM ^-65 World Cattle Numbers Reach New High 

FLM 5-65 U.S. Exports of Dairy Breeding Cattle, 196^ 

FVF 2-65 U.S. Imports of Soft Vegetable Fibers Down in 196k 

FT 3-65 Tobacco Harvest in First Half of 1965 Up Slightly 

FT World Tobacco Exports Set New Record 



Reports 
FAR -126 



BARRIERS TO INTERNATIONAL. GRAIN TRADE IN SELECTED FOREIGN 
COUNTRIES, By Lyle P. Schertz and Koy L. Neeley. 30 pp. 
On a country -by-country basis, discusses type of trade 
restrictions and producer prices; describes grain trading 
practices; and gives a series of grain tariff schedules for 
importers. 



WORLD COFFEE CROP 
LARGEST SINCE 1959-60 

Early indications are that 1965 -66 world coffee crop will "be the 
largest since 1959-60, and up almost 50 percent from the relatively small 
crop in 196^-65. The Foreign Agricultural Service's first estimate of 
the new crop is for a total of 75 • 5 million hags, of which 60.8 million 
will he exportable. 

In 1959-60, when the crop totaled more than 78-9 million bags, 
Brazil produced about kk.O million hags or about 56 percent of the world 
total. In 1965-66 Brazilian production, of about 32 million hags, is 
expected to he only about ^3 percent of the total thus indicating the 
increasing production in other parts of the world. Africa, for example, 
produced 12.5 million bags (l6 percent of the world crop) in 1956-60 
but is expected to produce 17. 5 million bags (23 percent) in 1965-66. 

Production in North America is expected to total 10. 9 million bags 
in 1965-66, of which 8.0 million will be exportable. This is about 700,000 
bags higher than 196^-65 due to a larger crop over most of the area with 
the biggest increase coming in Guatemala which had suffered a disease 
reduced crop in 196^-65. The most notable exception to this uptrend in 
production will be in Nicaragua where producers will be experiencing a 
"down" year in their production cycle. 

A large crop in Brazil will be the principal factor in more than 
doubling South American production in 1965-66 as compared with I96U-65. 
Total production for the area is forecast at ^2.8 million bags, of which 
33 • 6 million bags will be exportable production. This compares with 

19.7 and- 10.6 million bags, respectively, in 196^-65. Production in 
Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela is also expected to be up slightly. 

African production should reach 17*5 million bags in 1965-66, with 

16.8 million exportable, up slightly from 196^-65. Production is expected 
to increase in the Ivory Coast, Cameroon, the Congo (Leopoldville) , Kenya, 
and Uganda. Slight decreases are anticipated in Angola and the Malagasy 
Republic. 



Exportable production in the smaller producing countries is expected 
to change little in 1965-66; hence, is estimated to be as follows (with 
comparable 196^-65 estimates in parentheses), in bags of I32.276 pounds 
each: Jamaica 20,000 (15,000); Puerto Rico 25,000 (25,000); Bolivia 
20,000 (20,000); Paraguay ^0,000 (U0,000); Surinam 8,000 (8,000); Dahomey 
28,000 (28,000); Gabon 18,000 (l8,000); Ghana ^8,000 (U8,000); Liberia 
58,000 (58,000); Nigeria 33,000 (33,000); Congo (Brazzaville) 1^,000 
(lC,000); Sao Tome and Principe 5,000 (5,000); Sierra Leone 90,000 
(90,000); Spanish Guinea 110,000 (110,C00); New Caledonia 30,000 (30,000); 
Papua and New Guinea 80,000 (80,000); Portuguese Timor 33,000 (33,000). 



-3- 



GREEN COFFEE: World total production for the marketing year 1965-66, with comparisons l/ 



Continent and country 



Average 

1955/56- 

I959/6O 


1962-63 


1963-64 


1964-65 


1st 
estimate 
1965-66 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


734 
713 
549 
1,436 
1,357 
600 
321 
1,716 
376 
3/ 27 
44 
427 


1,050 
650 
570 

1,650 

1,900 
590 
410 

2,200 
505 
73 
60 
416 


1,100 
475 
690 

2,000 

1,775 
530 
395 

2,855 
450 
85 
75 
314 


800 
6OO 
675 
1,900 
1,500 
565 
420 
2,700 
550 
90 
80 
351 


885 
600 
700 
2,080 
1,740 
600 
420 
2,900 
475 
90 
75 
349 


8, 300 


10,074 


10,744 


10,231 


10,914 


28,300 
7,360 
521 
324 
835 
63 


27,000 
7,500 
800 
770 
850 
124 


26,000 
7,800 
700 
815 
890 
128 


9,000 
8,000 
835 
870 
850 
123 


32,000 
8,000 
865 
900 
875 
123 


37,403 


37,044 


36,333 


19,678 


42,763 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic ... 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama ....«..••».«..» 
Trinidad & Tobago .... 
Other 4/ 

Total North America 

South America: 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other 5/ 

Total South America 



Africa: : 

Angola : 1,443 

Burundi 6/ : — 

Cameroon 7/ ■ 405 

Central African Republic : 3/ 41 

Congo (Leopoldville) : 1,195 

Ethiopia : 1,100 

Guinea : 8/ 114 

Ivory Coast : 2,130 

Kenya 415 

Malagasy Republic : 902 

Ruanda-Urundl 9/ : 10/ 120 

Rwanda 6/ : — 

Tanzania ll/ .....: 375 

Togo : 122 

Uganda 1, 508 

Other 12/ : 332 



Total Africa 



Asia and Oceania: 

India 

Indonesia 

Philippines 

Yemen 

Other 13/ 

Total Asia and Oceania 



World total production 



3,100 
110 
825 
105 

1,100 

1,490 
215 

3,350 
635 

1,000 

*85 
470 
177 
2,945 
400 



2,800 
250 
900 
210 

1,100 

1,575 
175 

4,350 
740 
835 

145 
560 
230 
2,900 
429 



10,202 


16,007 


17,199 


16,896 


17,511 


-712 
1,343 
199 
88 
179 


1,020 
2,330 

550 
82 

280 


I 

1,240 
1,900 

550 
80 

319 


1,065 
2,200 

655 
90 

337 


1,180 
2,000 

675 
90 

337 


2,521 


4,262 


4,089 


4,347 


4,282 


58,426 


67,387 


68,365 


51,152 


75,470 



3,200 
200 
950 
135 
950 

1,550 
170 

3,500 
800 

1,050 

175 
550 
225 

3,000 

441 



countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. 2/ 132. 276 pounds 
each. 3/ 2-year average. 4/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, Martinique, and Puerto Rico. 
5/ Includes Bolivia, British Guiana, Paraguay, and Surinam. 6/ Prior to 1962-63 was shown as Ruanda- 
Urundl. 7/ Beginning with 1961-62 includes Weflt Cameroon. Prior to 1961-62 this area was identi- 
fied as Southern Cameroon and its production was included with Nigeria. 8/ 3-year average. 9/ Prior 
to 1959-60, Ruanda-Urundl shown in Congo (Leopoldville). Beginning 1962-53 shown as Burundi and 
Rwanda. 10 / 1 year only. 11/ Prior to 1964-65 year was shown as Tanganyika. Now includes Zanzibar 
as well. 12/ Includes Cape Verde, Comoro Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Congo 
(Brazzaville), Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 13 / Includes Malaysia, New 
Caledonia, New Hebrides, Papua and New Guinea, Portuguese Timor and Vietnam. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 4 - 



GREEN COFFEE: World, exportable production for the marketing year 1965-66, with comparisons l/ 



: Average 

Continent and country : 1955/56- 
: 1959/60 

: 1,000 

: bags 2/ 

North America: : 

Costa Rica : 658 

Cuba : 207 

Dominican Republic : 421 

El Salvador : 1, 327 

Guatemala •: 1, 158 

Haiti : 435 

Honduras : 262 

Mexico : 1,369 

Nicaragua : 334 

Panama : 3/ 1° 

Trinidad & Tobago : 37 

Other 4/ : 171 

Total North America ] 6, 389 

South America; : 

Brazil : 23,360 

Colombia : 6,550 

Ecuador : 422 

Peru : 251 

Venezuela : 472 

Other 5/ : 44 

Total South America j 31,099 

Africa: : 

Angola : 1,^1 

Burundi 6/ : — 

Cameroon 7/ •••• • • s 396 

Central African Republic : 3/ 37 

Congo (Leopoldville) : 1,164 

Ethiopia : 850 

Guinea : 8/ 105 

Ivory Coast : 2,063 

Kenya : 399 

Malagasy Republic : 812 

Ruanda-Urundi 9/ : 10/ 118 

Rwanda 6/ .....: — 

Tanzania ll/ : 369 

Togo : 121 

Uganda : 1,454 

Other 12/ : 308 

Total Africa j 9,623 

Asia and Oceania: : 

India : 223 

Indonesia : 1,120 

Philippines : — 

Yemen : 74 

Other 13/ : §3_ 

Total Asia and Oceania | 1,480 

World exportable production : 48,591 



1962-63 



1963-64 



1964-65 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

930 
50 
420 
1,540 
1,700 
425 
335 
1,250 
460 
19 
53 
122 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

970 

540 
1,885 
1, 565 
365 
320 
1,855 
405 
26 
68 

55 



7,304 



8,054 



20,000 
6,500 
630 
605 
370 

73 



19,000 
7,200 

525 
630 
395 
77 



28,178 



27,827 



3,050 
105 
805 
100 

1,050 

1,150 
200 

3,300 
615 
900 

80 
^55 
175 
2,930 
367 



2,750 
245 
875 
205 

1,050 

1,225 
160 

4,300 
720 
735 



2,£ 



l4o 
545 
225 
,885 
396 



15,282 



16,456 



365 
2,080 

72 
135 



620 
1,600 

70 
139 



2,652 



2,429 



53,416 



54,766 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

660 

525 
1,780 
1,290 
400 
340 
1,700 
500 
27 
70 

63 



7,355 



2,000 
6,900 
650 
670 
350 
72 



10,642 



3,145 
195 
920 
130 
900 

1,200 
155 

3,450 

760 

950 

170 
535 

220 
2,985 
407 



16, 142 



425 
1,850 

80 
147 



2,502 



36,641 



l/ The coffee marketing season begins during the second half of the calendar year starting in sons 
countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. Exportable -produc- 
tion represents total production minus consumption, except for Brazil prior to 1959-60 which was 
based on "registrations" of current crop minus port consumption and coastwise shipments. 2/ 132. 276 
pounds each. 3/ 2-year average. 4/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, jj/ In- 
cludes Bolivia, British Guiana, Paraguay and Surinam. 6/ Prior to 1962-63, was shown as Ruanda-Urundi. 
7/ Beginning with 1961-62 includes West Cameroon. Prior to 1961-62 this area was identified as 
Southern Cameroon and itB production was included with Nigeria. 8/ 3-year average. 9/ Prior to 
1959-60, Ruanda-Urundi shown in Congo (Leopoldville). Beginning 1962-63 shown as Burundi and 
Rwanda. 10/ 1 year only. 11^ Prior to 1964-65 year was shovn as Tanganyika. Now includes Zan z ibar 
as well. 12 / Includes Cape Verde, Comoro Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Congo 
(Brazzaville), Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 13 / Includes Malaysia, New 
Caledonia, New Hebrides, Papua and New Guinea, Portuguese Timor and Vietnam. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



WORLD SUGAR CROP 
AT HIGH RECORD 



The Foreign Agricultural Service's second estimate (June) of the 
196^-65 world sugar crop places total production at 70.1 million short 
tons , raw value. This is by far an alltime record production and 
exceeds the 1963-6^ crop by 18 percent. It reflects both increased 
acreage and exceptionally favorable weather conditions in almost all 
producing areas. 

Production of sugar from sugarcane accounts for 5^- percent of the 
total sugar production for 196^-65. This compares with 57*2 percent 
in 1963-6^ and 59*1 percent for the 1955-59 average. 

Production gains were particularly significant for Worth America, 
Europe and Asia. There was little change in total African production 
in 196^-65 as typhoons in Mauritius reduced that crop, thereby off- 
setting gains made in other countries. 

The United States production totalled 6.5 million tons in 196^-65, 
just slightly above the I963-6U crop. Cuban production made a signifi- 
cant comeback from the very low production the previous year, which was 
reduced by hurricane damage. Outturn for the Dominican Republic crop, 
however, is estimated somewhat lower than the previous season. Brazil, 
the largest producer in South America, showed a significant gain over 
the previous season. This country has announced plans for expanding 
both acreage and mill capacity. 

Sizeable increases in sugar production were made in several 
Western European countries. These include Belgium, France, West 
Germany, Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. 

In Eastern Europe, Poland recorded a significant increase in 
196^-65. The crop in Czechoslovakia, however, showed a reduction. The 
USSR recorded the largest increase of any country for the 196^-65 
season. Acreage was increased for this crop by about 10 percent, and 
yields were much higher than for the previous season. 

India showed the largest gain in Asia, with a sizeable increase 
in Turkey. The Republic of the Philippines crop increased over the 
previous season. 

While it is still too early in the 1965-66 growing season to 
make estimates for that crop, weather conditions in some countries 
have not been nearly as favorable as they were a year earlier. 
Australia, Dominican Republic, and South Africa have experienced 
droughts which will likely reduce their crops. Several countries 
which had planned expansion of sugar production are now slowing down 
on these plans in view of the very large 196^-65 crop. 



-6- 



NONCENTRIFUGAL SUGAR l/: Production in specified countries, average 1955-56 
through 1959-60, annual 1962-63 through 1964- 65 2/ 



Continent and country 



Average 








1955-56 
through 
1959-60 


j 1962-63 


1963-64 


1964-65 3j 


1,000 
short tons 


1,000 
: short tons 


: 1,000 
short tons 


: 1,000 
. short tons 


30 
70 
147 
25 
4 


27 
40 
132 

: 23 
5 


27 
40 
132 

23 ' 
5 


20 
40 
132 
22 
5 


276 


227 


227 


219 


160 

545 
24 
3,950 
303 
26 
1,258 
70 
50 
21 


174 
242 
24 
4,299 
330 

19 
728 

50 
143 

4o 


157 
242 

24 
4,960 
330 

25 
672 

52 : 
154 : 

36 . 


160 
242 
24 
4,960 
330 

25 
610 

61 
165 

40 


6,407 


6,049 


6,652 


6,617 


486 
26 : 
30 
71 : 


675 ! 

40 : 
27 : 
42 : 


715 I 
40 : 

25 : 
42 . 


728 
40 
28 

42 


613 


784 . 


822 ; 


838 


7,296 ; 


7,060 ; 


7,701 : 


7,674 



North America: 

El Salvador 

Guatemala ....<> 

Mexico . . . » 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Total 

Asia: 

Burma 

China: Mainland 

Taiwan 

India 

Indonesia. 

Japan 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Thailand 

Vietnam : 

Total 

South America: 

Colombia „ ; 

Ecuador » : 

Peru. 

Venezuela 

Total j 

Total of above countries ..." 



l/ Noncentrifugal sugar includes all types of sugar produced by other than 
centrifugal process which is largely for consumption in the relatively few areas 
where produced. The estimates include such kinds known as piloncillo, panela, 
papelon, chancaca, rapadura, jaggery, gur, muscovado, panocha, etc. 
2/ Years shown are crop- harvesting years. For chronological arrangements here, 
all campaigns which begin not earlier than May of one year, nor later than April 
of the following year, are placed in the same crop- harvesting year. The entire 
season's production of each country is credited to the May/April year in which 
harvesting and sugar production began. 
3_/ Pre liminary . 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research and related information. 

- 7 - 



CENTRIFUGAL SUGAR (raw value) l/: Production in specified countries, average 1955-56 
through 1959-60, annual 1962-63 through I96V65 2/ 



: Average 








Continent and country 


through 


1962-63 


1963-64 


1964-65 2/ 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


North America (cane unless : 


3hort tons 








otherwise indicated): : 












151 


"15^ 


159 


160 




1,380 


1 870 


2 097 


2 368 


United States : 












2,0oo 


? 598 


3,086 


3 300 

X ,XH- 1 




572 


853 


1 183 




1,013 
1,036 


1,101 


1 17Q 

989 
y\jy 


1 150 

X , X^W 




QQ0 

yy^j 


900 




11 


16 


16 


k 




12 


31 
JX 


38 


44 




44 


96 


100 


110 


T Q n 1 . m <3 *-> « • 


51 


68 


86 


118 




70 


152 


159 


158 




17 


30 


30 


34 




Ol 


111 


105 


113 




25 


40 


54 


63 




5,883 


4,211 

8U7 


4,000 


6,000 






Q70 


900 




lU6 


185 


184 


201 


Haiti : 


61 


67 


68 


70 




Ul9 


542 


531 


580 




83 


102 


68 


80 




205 


255 


255 


275 




183 


214 


180 


210 


leeward & Windward Islands kj 


9h 


(0 


72 


60 




14,488 


14,608 




18,045 


South America (cane unless : 










otherwise indicated): : 












906 


858 


1 1 57 
x,x? 1 


1 074 




11 




101 


83 




3,110 


3 576 


3 6?o 


k 087 


lj * X- -.' — U l" 1 . ■ J J-i r~. • 


330 


355 


290 


375 


Chi To ( "h^o-t- ^ ■ 


ho 


119 


119 


133 




297 


449 


399 


470 


Ecuador* ■•••••••••••••••••••«••••••••••••• 


CH 
~j 


149 


130 


130 




30 


38 


41 


56 




800 


904 


861 


914 




10 


13 


16 


: 16 




27 


57 


44 


84 




205 


292 


339 


387 




5,859 


6,065 


7,117 


7,809 


Europe (beet unless otherwise indicated): : 












2CJ2 


286 


355 


360 




393 


383 


k05 


632 




353 




U03 


k7Q 






10 


65 


76 




30 


49 


57 






1,571 


1 795 


2,218 


2,645 




1,590 


1 635 


2 228 




f~l . _ . _ _ t / T / • 


0 


P9 


42 


73 
1 J 




126 


151 


160 


157 




1,271 

1+90 


1 DQQ 


1 093 


1,116 




50 j 


4DX 


( uu 


PoT+uffal * 












13 


13 


18 


18 




470 


529 


448 


558 




311+ 


239 


272 


294 




40 


33 


50 


61 




818 


836 


900 


1,126 




7,769 


7,815 


9,105 


10,646 



- Continued 



- 8 - 



CENTRIFUGAL SUGAR (raw value) l/: Production in specified countries, average 1955-56 
through 1959-60, annual 1962-63 through 1964-65 2/ - continued 





Average 








Continent and country 


1955-56 
through 


1962-63 


I963-64 


1964-65 _3y 




1959-60 










1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


Europe - continued ■ 


short tons 


, short tons 


sfciort "tons 


short tons 




IP 


. 2.4 


> -Lt 






137 


: I09 


170 


270 




860 


1,112 


: 1,191 


: 935 




790 


I OcfcL 


. Oku 




332 


468 


: 512 


540 




1,152 


1,464 


: 1,570 


1,975 




244 


337 


: 3^3 


420 




219 


272 


375 


395 




3,760 


4,626 


4,995 


5,387 




11,529 


12,441 


14,100 


16,033 




5,632 


6,600 


6,475 


10,600 












■p-t-v,-! d-n-to 


J? 




• 7^ 


76 






J ox 




489 






4q 


4=; 


■33 
jj 




OQ 
<2j 


yy 






Tfln7fln^n V / ft/ ■ 


28 


44 
124 


66 
14s 


79 
147 


MaIa jflsv R*3T\iVh T ~i • 




102 


1P7 


"19Q 
±cy 




ol2 


5°7 


75° 


572 




165 


203 


200 


167 




219 


225 


280 


280 




9 


91 


140 


172 




989 


1,193 


1,265 


1,395 






84 


94 


96 




93 


171 


177 


147 




2,694 


3,362 


3,848 


3,8l6 


Asia: (cane unless otherwise indicated): : 












no 
±±y 


180 


±yv 


200 




408 


467 




876 




836 


900 


j., 


1 300 


Taiwan * 


yvj 


876 


Q16 
y±v 


yyj 






7? 


60 


60 


Tr^A-la TO/ • 


O Til 


9 Q7Q 




3, you 






£nft 


70c; 


71 ^ 


Japan (beet; incl. cane beginning 1959-60) 


86 


225 


256 


302 




174 


240 


333 


280 




1,356 


1,71^ 


1,856 


1,920 




23 


166 


141 


270 




102 


147 


194 


304 




33 


127 


127 


143 




7,778 


8,701 


9,991 


11,303 


Oceania ( cane ) : : 












1,428 


2,000 


1,883 


2,132 




210 


279 


330 


330 




1,638 


2,279 


2,213 


2,462 




29,324 


31,716 


33,983 


37,983 




20,294 


23,140 


25,370 


32,085 




1*9,618 


54,356 


59,353 


70,068 



l/ Centrifugal sugar, as distinguished from noncentrifugal, includes cane and beet sugar pro- 
duced by the centrifugal process, which is the principal k^ad moving in international trade. 
2/ Years shown are crop- harvesting years. For chronological arrangement here, all campaigns 
which begin not earlier than May of one year, nor later than April of the following year, are 
placed in the same crop-harvesting year. The entire season's production of each country is 
credited to the May/April year in which harvesting and sugar production began. Prelimi- 
nary. 4/ Includes Antigua, St. Kitts and St. Vincent. St. Lucia discontinued January 1, 1964. 
j>/ Danish beets exported to Finland, Sweden and West Germany, in terms of sugar, not included 
in the production for those countries. 6/ No sugar produced prior to 1961-62. jj Production 
refers to calendar year for the first of the two years indicated. 8/ Formerly Tanganyika, 
beginning 1964-65 includes Zanzibar. 2/ Prior to 1964-65 included Malawi and Zambia. 16/ 
Beginning 1962-63 Swaziland reported separately. 11/ Other Africa includes Algeria, French 
Somaliland, Somali Republic, Sudan, Angola, Congo TBrazzaville) and Liberia. 12/ Includes 
Khandsari. 13_/ Prior to this issue, included in "Other Asia." 14/ Other Asia includes 
Afghanistan, Israel, Syria, South Vietnam, Irao, Lebanon and Ceylon. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of 
foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and 
Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 9 - 



WORLD TOBACCO EXPORTS 
SET NEW RECORD 

World exports of unmanufactured tobacco set a new record of 
1,87^ million pounds in 196^-, 10. 9 percent above the previous high 
of 1,690 million in I962, and 12.3 percent above the 1,669 million 
shipped out in The big increase in total exports reflects 

record shipments from many of the most -important exporting coun- 
tries, including Rhodesia-Zambia-Malawi, India, Brazil, the 
Philippines, Canada, and Greece. 



Principal Exporting Countries 

United States ; U.S. exports of unmanufactured tobacco in 196^, at 
510.^- million pounds, were 1 percent above those of I963. Export 
value was $^-13 million, up 2.k percent from I963. Exports of flue- 
cured at 391*5 million pounds last year were down 3 percent from the 
previous year, with smaller exports to the United Kingdom, Ireland, 
Denmark, West Germany, and Australia more than offsetting increases 
to Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Belgium-Luxembourg, and Thailand. 

Exports of burley totaled a record 53 million pounds in 196^ 
or 19 percent more than in I963. Major purchasers of burley last 
year included West Germany, Sweden, Mexico, Egypt, and Italy. 
Kentucky -Tennessee fire -cured exports, at 20.8 million pounds, were 
up sharply from those of 1963. Virginia fire -cured exports dropped 
from 5*2 million in I963 to ^-.6 million. Maryland rose 15 percent 
from 10.7 million to 12.3 million in l^ok. Foreign purchases of 
Green River, One Sucker, and cigar tobaccos were larger. On the 
other hand, exports of Black Fat dropped from h.2 million in 1963 
to 3*7 million last year. 



Rho de s ia - Zamb ia -Mai awi : Tobacco exports from the three countries 
formerly comprising the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland totaled 
252 million pounds — a new record level, one-sixth above the previous 
high of 216 million in I962. Flue-cured exports, at about 223 mil- 
lion in 196^, represented 88 percent of the total. This compares 
with l8l million pounds in 1963. Larger exports to most major 
markets, including the United Kingdom, West Germany, the Netherlands, 
Japan, and Australia pushed the total to its record high. 

Exports of fire-cured tobaccos from Rhodesia-Zambia-Malawi in 
196^-, at 19.^ million pounds, were a little below those of 19&3- 
The United Kingdom, canary Islands, and France were the leading 
purchasers. Burley exports totaled 6.7 million pounds — a little 
less than in 1963--with principal foreign outlets including the 
Netherlands, Hong Kong, Switzerland, and West Germany. 



-10- 



India : India's exports of unmanufactured tobacco in I96I+ set a new 
record of 158 million pounds, compared with the previous high of 150 
million in 1963* Shipments of flue -cured reached 136 million pounds, 
or 86 percent of the total, compared with 11^.5 million in the previous 
year. Major destinations for India's flue-cured tobacco in I96U in- 
cluded the USSR, the United Kingdom, Japan, Yugoslavia, and East 
Germany. The USSR--the most -important purchaser- -took 71 million 
pounds — more than half the total. The United Kingdom took 33«^ 
million pounds, and Japan, 7*8 million. 

Greece : Greece exported a record quantity of 158 million pounds of 
tobacco last year, 15 percent above the 1963 level. West Germany, 
with purchases of U6.9 million pounds last year, was the largest 
market. The United States took ho million, or about 6 million less 
than in 19^3 • Other leading markets for Greek leaf in 196k were: 
France 11.2 million pounds; the USSR 9*1 million; Italy 8.8 million; 
Poland 7 million; and Switzerland 3*7 million. Total exports to the 
six Common Market countries in I96U rose to 7O.8 million pounds, 
from 53 • 3 million in I963. Consignments to the Soviet Bloc countries 
in 196^ were 25.3 million pounds, compared with 17.8 million in 1963 , 
with significant increases in exports to Poland and Hungary account- 
ing for most of the gain. 

Brazil : Brazil exported a record 133 million pounds of unmanufactured 
tobacco in 196^-, 36 percent more than the 98 million shipped out during 
1963. Larger exports to practically all major destinations, with 
the exception of West Germany and Belgium-Luxembourg, accounted for 
the increase. Exports to the United States, Spain, France, and Algeria 
were more than double the I963 shipments. Other principal markets for 
Brazilian leaf last year included the Netherlands, the USSR, Denmark, 
and Switzerland. 

Turkey : Turkey's exports of unmanufactured tobacco in I96U, at 125.6 
million pounds, recovered somewhat from the abnormally low level of 
98.3 million in 1963. Larger exports to the United States, West 
Germany, Hungary, the United Kingdom, Israel, and the Netherlands last 
year more than offset smaller shipments to Poland, East Germany, 
Switzerland, Belgium-Luxembourg, Japan, Finland, the USSR, and France. 
The United States purchased about 79 million pounds in 196^-, or 63 per- 
cent of the total. Turkey's record exports had been recorded in I962, 
when some 200 million pounds moved into export channels. 

Canada : Exports from Canada reached the record total of 52.5 million 
pounds in I96U, with flue -cured accounting for about 93 percent. The 
United Kingdom, as usual, was the biggest purchaser, taking about 3^- 
million pounds of flue -cured last year. West Germany, with 3 million, 
ranked second. Combined purchases by Soviet Bloc countries, that 
bought Canadian tobacco for the first time, totaled 3*7 million pounds. 

Other Exporters : Several other important producing countries had 
record or near-record tobacco exports in 196^. These include Colombia, 
the Dominican Republic, Paraguay, and Yugoslavia. 



-11- 



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- 13 - 



WORLD BUTTER AND CHEESE 
PRODUCTION UP IN 196^ 



Total world butter production in 196^ is estimated at 10. 9 "billion 
pounds — slightly over that of I963 (10. 8 billion) and 6 percent above 
the 10.1 billion estimated for 1956-60. 

Production in Western Europe dropped slightly below the 19^3 level. 
Countries in that area in which output declined included the Netherlands, 
Sweden, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Output 
was up in France, Denmark, Finland, Austria, and Ireland. In West 
Germany, it showed little change from a year ago. 

Oceania's outjut was up 8 percent and; in South America, it was up 
5 percent. North America' s production was maintained at the 19&3 level. 

Creamery butter production in 196^ in 33 countries was 9*1 billion 
pounds, compared with 8.8 billion pounds in 1963 and 7*8 billion pounds 
in the 1956-60 period. 

In Western Europe, output was only fractionally below 19&3 • ^ n 
West Germany, the largest producing country in that area, production was 
up 1 percent to a record 1,0^0 million pounds. France reported a 3-per- 
cent increase to 7&3 million pounds. Denmark's production rose k percent 
to 3^-2 million pounds. Gains in output also occurred in Finland, Austria, 
Norway and Ireland. 

Production in the USSR, the world's largest producer of creamery 
butter, was reported at 1,863 million pounds, 9 percent higher than in 
1963. 

In Oceania, output was up 8 percent. In South America, it increased 
7 percent. In North America, production was about 1 percent higher than 
that of a year earlier. 

Total cheese production in 32 countries reporting output in 196^ 
was 7*5 billion pounds, 2 percent above 1963. Compared with the 1956-60 
average, the gain was 18 percent. 

Output in Western Europe, which accounted for more than half of the 
total cheese produced in 196k, increased slightly over the preceding year, 
with all countries reporting increased production except Italy and Norway. 

In Oceania, output was 8 percent above 19^3 output. In South 
America, production rose 2 percent, and in North America, h percent. 

Factory cheese production in 29 countries in I96U is estimated at 
6.3 billion pounds - k percent above 19^3 ant ^ 22 percent above the 1956-60 
average. 

In Western Europe, output increased 3 percent. Norway was the only 
country in that area in which production declined below the 1963 level. 

In Oceania, factory cheese output was up 8 percent. Production in 
South America increased 2 percent, in North America, k percent. 

-Ik- 



Butter: World Production, Average 19?6-60, Annual 1963 and 1961* 



Continent and Country- 



Average 19?6-60 



1963 



: Factory 


' Total 


Factory 


• Total ! 


Factory ! 


Total 


: Million 


Million 


: Million 


: Million 


Million - 


Million 


: pounds 


i pounds 


pounds 


• pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


: 320 


! 332 • 


3?6 


: 362 : 


3?6 


361 


: 1,38? 


: 1,1*81* : 


1,1*20 


l,k$3 


l,k3k 


J.,l*60 


: 130 ! 


130 ! 


115 


11? 


110 


: 110 


: 67 


! Ill 


: 5k 


: 98 


71 ' 


11? 


: 7 


! Hi • 


9 i 


1? ! 


9 : 


1? 


: u* 


21* 


20 


s 33 : 


22 


36 




! ? 




i 6 ! 


— 


! 7 


: ? 


12 


! 7 


16 


7 


16 


: 9 


! 9 ! 


8 • 


8 ! 


y 8 


3/ 8 


: 6? 


82 : 


71* 


s 88 ; 


76 


! 90 


: 107 


19? : 


112 


! 181* 


m 


! 172 


: 367 


367 


i 329 : 


329 1 


3h2 i 




: 169 


! 181 


220 


: 226 


22? 


! 231 


: $09 


: 760 


71*3 


: 9?3 ! 


763 


961 


s 773 ' 


836 


: 1,026 


: 1,087 


l,Ct*0 


1,083 


* 


! 23 


— 


i 26 


! — 


! 26 


: 100 


! 11*3 


110 


13? ! 


122 


! 11*1* 


! -— 


11*3 : 


™~ 


! 12? 




: 123 


: 10 


: 10 


• 3/ 10 


• y 10 


3/ 10 


3/ 10 


: 187 


— n n 
! 187 


208 


208 


197 


1 " 197 


: 33 ! 


ill i 


1*0 


1*? 


Ul 


: 1*5 


: 6 


6 


: 5 


: ? 


: ? 


: ? 


: 181* 


: 186 s 


186 


I87 : 


17? 


! 176 


: 68 


68 


: 76 


: 76 


: 67 


: 67 


: 63 


! 8? 


: 97 


! 106 - 


?2 


?8 


: 16 


i 16 : 


21 


! 21 


■ 3/ 26 


: 3/ 26 


: 120 


: 120 j 


163 


: 163 : 


3/ 163 


• 3/ 163 


: 3U9 


3U9 


i 371 


: 371 


3/ 38? 


' 3/ 38? 


: 33 


33 


! 39 


: 39 J 


U2 


1*2 


: 181* 


: 181* 


: 179 


: 179 


! 192 


! 192 


: 20 


; 20 


' 36 


36 - 


3/ 1*2 


: 3/ 1*2 


1,1*60 


: ?A,777 


: 1,713 


: 1,91*9 : 


1,863 


2,099 


: 12 ! 


12 


12 


12 • 


12 


: 12 


8 1 ? 


> 9^ 


96 


00 

> 77 


89 


92 

» 7C 


i 1*21* 


i 1*31 


\ k$7 


i U61* 


i U7? 


\ 1*82 


: U71 


\ h7B 


: 1*91 


1 1*98 


: ?U7 


! ??U 


5 7/7,7*2 


:8/L0,100 


:7/ 8,803 


:8A0,800 


'V 9,079 


8/LO,900 



1961* 1/ 



North America: 

Canada 

United States 

South America: 

Argentina 2/ — - — 

Brazil 3/ 

Chile 

Colombia — — — — — 

Uruguay — — — 

Venezuela 2/ — — 

Europe : 

Austria — — — — - — 

Belgium — . — 

Denmark — — 

Finland 

France-— —————— 

Germany, West 

Greece hj — — 

Luxembourg 2/ — 

Netherlands - 

Norway 

Portugal — 

Sweden 

Switzerland — ■ 

United Kingdom 

Bulgaria 2/ 

Czechoslovakia 2/ 

Germany, East 2? 

Hungary 2/ — 

Poland 2/ 

Rumania 2/ — 

Africa: 

Kenya 2/ 

South Africa, Rep. of 6/ 

Oceania: 

Australia-- — 

New Zealand 

Total 



1/ Preliminary. 2/ Creamery butter only. 3/ Estimated, k/ Made from the milk of cows, 
buffalos, sheep and goats. ?/ Less than a 5-year average." 6/ Years ending September 30. 
7/ Total factory production in above countries. 8/ World total butter production 
estimated on basis of change in production in countries shown, which represents about 
92 percent of total production. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics 
of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U. S. Agricultural 
Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 15 - 



Cheese:^ Production in Specified Countries, Average 1956-60, Annual 1963 and 1961* 



Continent and Country 


Average 1956-60 : 


1963 ; 


1961* 2/ 


Factory 5 


Total j 


Factory : 


Total j 


Factory : 


Total 




Million ■ 
pounds : 


Million • 
pounds : 


Mi lllon < 

l Ul JL X-LvJ 1 1 « 

pounds : 


Mil Hon • 
pounds : 


Ml 1H on • 
pounds : 


Ml 1 H on 

1 U.XXXU 1 1 

pounds 


North America: i 














Canada : 


109 : 


110 : 


155 i 


156 : 


160 : 


161 




1,101 : 


1,101 : 


1,631 : 


1,631 


- 1,703 ' 


1,703 


South America: : 


















ty j ■ 


H8 • 






**20 


Brazil I*/ " 


86 s 


132 ! 


85 : 


11*2 


88 


U*5 


Chile—-— - — 


20 : 


28 : 


21 : 


32 • 


22 


33 


Colombia ■ 


: 75 : 


107 : 


92 : 


132 


i 98 


: 11*0 




: — : 


19 


• 


22 


: 


: 22 




: 8 : 


19 : 


9 : 


20 


! 8 ! 


! 17 


Europe : 














Austria 


: 111* : 


1*8 


: 62 : 


66 


i 65 


i 69 




: 39 : 


1*2 ! 


62 


i 65 


: 68 


! 70 




: 229 ! 


229 


: 267 


: 267 


: 271* 


: 271* 


Finland 


: 58 


: 58 : 


75 


75 


i 77 


: 77 




: S16 


! 900 


• 1,039 


: 1,096 


: 1,051* 


: 1,107 




: 3U2 


: 3U2 i 


: 301* 


: 3CU 


! 320 


: 320 


Greece 6/ — 


! — : 


170 


: 


: 236 


: 


: 239 


Ireland~3/ 


: 7 


: 7 : 


21 


! 21 


: 31 


1 31 


It ly 5^™ 


: 


: 821 


: 


: 826 


! 


1 772 




: 386 


: lOl 


: Uk6 


5 1*66 


: 1*50 


: 1*68 




: 79 


: 80 


: 9k 


: 95 


: 93 


: 91* 


Portugal 3/ 


: 5 


i 5 


: 8 


: 8 


: 8 


: 8 




: 115 


s 115 : 


! 123 


: 123 


: 125 


: 125 


Switzerland if 


: 136 


: 11*0 


: 15U 


: 15U 


: 161 


: 161 




: 21h 


226 


: 216 


: 23U 


! 227 


21*6 


Bulgaria 3/, 8/ 


8I1 

> uq. 


8J1 


• 1^0 1 


150 ! 


'>k/ 11*1 




Czechoslovalcia 3/ 


: 82 


: 82 • 


: 99 


i 99 W 99 


•y 99 


Germany, East 3_7 


: 71 


: 71 


: 97 


i 97 


W id* 


y 101* 




: 21 


! 21 


: 1*0 


U0 » 39 


i 39 


Poland 3/ 


: 33 


: 33 


: 1*0 


: 1*0 tfj/ 1*0 


>y ho 


Rumania 3/ 


: 70 


: 70 


: 96 


: 96 


W 121 


.5/ 121 


Africa: 






> 








South Africa,Rep.of3/,9/- 


: 28 


i 28 


: 33 


I 33 


t 31 


! 31 


Oceania: 














Australia — 


! 95 1 


95 


: 127 


! 127 


: 11*0 


! 11*0 


New Zealand 


: 211 


: 211 


! 209 


: 209 


: 223 


: 223 


Total of above countries 


I 5,137 


! 6,378 


6, 07 3 


I 7,380 


: 6,290 


! 7,51*0 



1/ Whole milk cheese made from cows 1 milk, unless otherwise noted. 2/ Preliminary. 
3/ Factory production only. k/ Estimated. 5/ Made from the milk of" cows, sheep and 
goats. 6/ Made from the milk of cows, buffalos, sheep and goats. 7/ Made from the milk 
of cows and goats. 8/Made from the milk of cows and sheep. 9/ Year spending September 30. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics 
of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U. S. Agricultural 
Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 16 - 



WORLD CORN CROP CONFIRMED AS 
SECOND LARGEST ON RECORD 



Latest information available to the Foreign Agricultural Service 
indicates world 196^ corn production at 7 ,670 million "bushels, con- 
firming the crop as second to the record of 8,010 million "bushels in 
I963. The 196^ total is k- percent "below that of a year earlier and 
somewhat above the 1962 crop of 7,^-80 million bushels. 

The United States production of 3,5^-9 million bushels, although 
off 13 percent from the 1963 crop, made up k-6 percent of the world 
total. Canada and Mexico had record crops in 196^. 

The total European crop of 1,080 million bushels in 196^ was 
slightly larger than that of the previous year. Western European 
production, at 320 million bushels, was down 16 percent, principally 
because of a sharp drop in the French harvest. In contrast, the 
Eastern European crop, at 760 million bushels, was up 11 percent. 
Yugoslavia's production at 27^ million bushels and Rumania's at 263 
million bushels were both at record levels. 

Corn production in the Soviet Union, currently estimated at 360 
million bushels, was well above the 1963 crop but not equal to that 
of 1962. 

Asian production of 990 million bushels was 50 million bushels 
larger than in the previous year because of larger crops in Indonesia, 
India, Thailand and the Philippines. 

The African com crop is estimated at the same level as last year. 
Production in the Republic of South Africa, which suffered from severe 
drought and \eat, as it did a year ago, is currently placed at l6h 
million bushels, down from liQ million bushels in I963. 

Corn was a good crop in South America in I96U, totaling 7^0 mil- 
lion bushels, up 13 percent. Brazil's record production of million 
bushels, up nearly 100 million bushels from 19&3, was the principal 
factor in the South American increase. The crops in Argentina, Uruguay 
and Chile were all reduced by drought. (Tables 18 and 19) 

WORLD EXPORTS OF PALM 
OIL AND PALM KERNELS 

World exports of palm oil, provisionally estimated at 535,700 metric 
tons in I96I+, were up 1 percent from I963. Palm kernel and palm kernel 
oil exports, on an oil -equivalent basis, also rose 1 percent to total 
357,600 tons from 353,900 in 1963. 

Although Africa supplied about 57 percent of the palm oil entering 
world trade in 196^, total African shipments were down 2 percent from 
I963 largely because of the decline in exports from the Congo 
(Leopoldville) . While Congolese shipments fell 11 percent, shipments 
from Nigeria rose 7 percent to total 136,^00 tons. This increase enabled 
(Cont. on page 20 ) 



-17- 



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- 18 - 



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- 19 - 



Nigeria to surpass the Congo and become the leading world supplier in 
ItyGk. Exports from the Malay States and Singapore increased 18,000 tons 
or 17 percent, while those from Indonesia were estimated at slightly 
lower levels. 

African palm kernel exports accounted for 91 percent of the 196^- 
world trade compared with 93 percent in 1963. A greater proportion of 
the African palm kernel supply was processed and shipped in the form of 
oil in 196^ than in the year before. Palm kernel oil exports rose 31 
percent or 11,700 tons, reflecting increased supplies from the Congo 
and Angola. 

Palm kernel shipments from the major West African producing coun- 
tries, Nigeria, Dahomey, Sierra Leone, Republic of Guinea, and Angola, 
were in smaller volume than in 19^3 • Palm kernel shipments from 
Indonesia, however, were up an estimated li+,700 tons. (Tables 21 and 22) 

WORLD HOPS PRODUCTION 
DOWN SLIGHTLY 

World hops production during 196^ is now estimated at 195*3 million 
pounds --a slight increase over earlier estimates. The 196^ crop was 
second only to the 1963 crop of 202.1 million pounds. In spite of a 
widespread drought, all European countries had an above average crop 
except Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union. However, of the major 
European producers, only West Germany and Yugoslavia had a larger crop 
than in 1963. The North American crop was above both the average and 
the I963 levels. 

The Southern Hemisphere's I965 crop is already harvested and the 
estimates (in pounds) with I96U crop in parentheses are: Argentina - 
209,000 (269,000); Australia - 3,050,000 (2,22^,000); New Zealand - 
930,000 (662,000); and the Republic of South Africa - 153,000 (133,000) 
pounds. Though all Southern Hemisphere crops were above their I96U 
level, all except New Zealand's were substantially below average, due 
to adverse weather conditions. 

World beer production in 196^ is estimated at about k2^> million 
barrels up 6 percent from the h-00 million level of 1963. At an assumed 
world hopping rate of ,k-5 pounds per barrel, world requirements for 
I963 crop hops should have approximated 190 million pounds. Carryover 
stocks were moderately increased after having fallen considerably below 
normal. The estimated requirements for l^Gh crop hops should slightly 
exceed the production—causing a slight decline of stocks. 

The European hops market has been strong throughout the season with 
very few stocks remaining in growers hands in West Germany. Much of the 
1965 crop of West German hops has been sold on advance contract; 
Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia also have entered futures contracts heavily. 
While it is still too early to forecast the 1965 world crop, production 
in the Southern Hemisphere did increase and there are indications of 
moderate acreage increases in West Germany and Yugoslavia. In addition, 
the United Kingdom marketing allotment was increased to 102 percent of 
basic quota for 1965« (Table on page 23) 



-20- 



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- 21 - 



PALM KERNELS: World exports, by principal producing 
countries, average 1955-59* annual 1960-6^ 



Continent 
and country 



: Average 
: 1955-59 



I960 : 1961 



1962 



1963 : 19& 1/ 



1,000 Metric tons 



Africa: : 
















10.7 


5.2 


10.2: 


11.6: 


18.0: 


16.7 


Cameroon, Rep. of 2/: 


21.5 


20.9 


: 19.4 


16.8 


19. 4 


3/ 12.5 


Congo ( Brazziville ) : 


7.0: 


6.5 


: 6.1- 


7.7' 


9.7 


" 6.U 


Congo : 














(Leopoldville )k/t 


41.1 


20.2 


: 12.8' 


18.9 


3.0 


1.1 




49.8 


61.3 


: ^ 8. 5 


43-9 


50.6 


3/ 50.0 


Guniea, Portuguese. : 


16.1 


6.8 


: 16.7 


17.6 


11.7 


9.1 




21.3 


23.0 


: I8.7 


22.7 


23.7 


13.9 


Guinea, Spain! sh. . . : 


3.8 


k.o 


: 4.0 


2.9 


3/ 3.5 


: 3/ 3.0 




13.4 


16.4 


12.5 


10.7 


10. If 


: 3/ 12.0 




12.1 


15.2 


: 12.9 


8.5 


: 6.6 


6.9 




If3lf.3 


419.3 


: 417.2 


372.5 


404.7 


: 4 00. 5 


oao lCHne « rxxncipjLe . 


4. ( 


li k 
f .*f 


k 0 




• 3.5 


3/ *f.O 


Senegal : 


2.3 


if. 2 


\ 4.9 


: 5.6 


4.0 


• "\l 2.0 


Sierra Leone : 


57.0 


55.4 


58.7 


62.0 


53.6 


: 53.4 




9.6 


: l4.2 


: 11.1 


10. 4 


: 12.7 


: 14.5 




10.6 


: 6.8 


5.2 


4.4 




6. ^ 




715.3 


683.8 


663.I 


620.5 


: 640.0 


: 612.4 


Asia: : 
















37.5 


33.5 


32.6 


: 31.I 


: 31.3 


\ 3/ 46.0 




15.6 


22.4 


19.4 


14.3 


16.0 


11.6 




33^1 


55.9 


52.1 


hs.h 


47.3 


57.6 




" 768.4 


739» 7 


: 715.1 


665.9 


687. 3 


670.0 



1/ Preliminary. 2/ Including West Cameroon data formerly included in 
Nigerian statistics prior to October i960. 3/ Estimated. V From July 
i960 excludes production from Katanga, Rwanda, and Burundi; in 1961 
excluding production from South Kasai, Kivu, and Oriental Province as 
well. 5/ Net exports. 6/ 1955-60 data adjusted on basis of West Cameroon 
purchases. 



PALM KERNEL OIL: World exports, by principal producing 
countries, average 195 5 -59 > annual 1960-64 



Continent : Average : : 

and country : 1955-59 : i960 : 1961 



1962 : 1963 : 1964 1/ 



1,000 Metric tons 





.2 


1.1: 


3.4 


2.6 


: 1.6 


2/ 


2.2 


Cameroon, Rep. of....: 


.6 


.5: 


.4 


.8 


.6 


.6 


Congo ( Leopoldville . . : 


50.1 


52.4: 


50.0 


41.9 


32.0 




45.7 








.3 


: .1 


.4 


2/ 


.1 






3/": 




.1 


3.2 


.9 




.1 


.1: 














H 

• 

O 


53.9: 


54.0 


45.5' 


37.8 


49.4 



1/ Preliminary. 2/ Estimated. 3/ Less than 50 tons. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research and related information. 

- 22 - 



HOPS: Production in specified countries, 
average 1958-62, annual 1 962-65 1/ 



Country 



: 1,000 

: Pounds 

Canada : 1,318 

United States : ^4-5 ,635 



Average : Revised : Revised : Revised : Preliminary 
1958-62 : 1962 : 1963 : 196*+ : 1965 



Argentina. 



309 



Austria : 243 

Belgium : 3,206 

France : 4,632 

Germany, West. % 35,282 

Spain : 1,111 

United Kingdom : 27, 829 

Czechoslovakia ; 14,438 

Germany, East....... : 2,644 

Hungary. ........ \ 2j 607 

Poland : 3,871 

Rumania : 2/ 706 

Yugoslavia. .: 10,1+37 

U.S.S.R : 13,355 



South Africa, Republic of. 



Japan 

Australia . . . 
New Zealand. 
Others . . . 



197 

3,083 
3,748 
918 
29k 



1,000 
Pounds 



1,456 
44,231 

305 

265 
2,jkl 
3,485 

33,977 
1,823 

29,883 

15,642 
3,250 
909 
k,6kl 
728 
11,574 
13,228 

159 

3,615 
3,689 
888 
928 



1,000 
Pounds 

1,455 
51,422 

27k 

342 
3,317 
5,104 

39,808 
2,576 

30,955 

19,859 
5,852 
856 
5,710 
79^ 
10,406 
13,228 

201 

4,390 
3,767 
664 

1,159 



1,000 
Pounds 

1,523 
53,378 

269 

300 
3,400 

5,351 
40,600 

2,927 
28,203 

14,000 
4,400 
1,000 

6,000 
900 
13,470 
9,000 

133 

6,046 
2,224 
662 

1,500 



Total 1 173,863 177,417 202,139 195,286 



1,000 
Pounds 



209 



153 



3,050 
930 



l/ Revised series: Production shown "by calendar year of harvest for both 

Northern and Southern Hemispheres. 
2/ Three year average 1960-62. 

3_/ Includes Mexico, Switzerland and Sweden all years; Bulgaria 1962 to date. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research, and related information. 



- 23 - 



WORLD OUTPUT OF LARD 
DOWN SHARPLY IN 1964 



Production of Lard in 1964 in the major producing countries is 
estimated at 6, 690 million pounds, down 6 percent from the 7A30 million 
pounds produced in 1963. 

The major reason for the decline was the drop in the USSR associated 
with the sharp decline in hog numbers in the previous year. 

Pork production dropped sharply in Western Europe in late 1963, hut 
had largely recovered by the end of 1964 as the production cycle reversed 
itself. Production of lard in the EEC and Western Europe in 1964 
recovered to about the level of I962. 

In 1965 competition from European produced lard is likely to have 
some effect on U.S. exports to the United Kingdom, currently the world's 
major lard importer. 

Production in the United States in 1964 was practically unchanged 
from the previous year, but is forecast to be down in I965 paralleling 
the drop in hog slaughter. 

WORLD FISH 
OIL EXPORTS 

World gross exports of fish oil, including fish liver oil, remained 
at a record level in 1964. World exports increased less than 1 percent 
but were more than twice the 1955-59 average. 

Peru, the United States, Iceland, and the Republic of South Africa 
are the most important world suppliers of fish oil, accounting for 
nearly 75 percent of the world's gross exports and about 95 percent of 
the world's net exports of fish oil in 1963-64. AL though several 
European countries export sizable quantities of fish oil, the area as a 
whole is a net importer and takes most of the world's exports of fish 
oil. Much of the domestic production of fish oil in Europe is retained 
for domestic consumption, normally in the country of origin, or exported 
to other European countries as in the case of Iceland, Portugal, 
Western Germany, and Denmark. In addition, Norway, Western Germany, and 
the Netherlands import large quantities of fish oil for further process- 
ing and export largely to other European countries. 

Exports from Peru reached a record 147,300 tons in 1964, an increase 
of 21 percent from 1963« This increase enabled Peru to surpass the 
United States and become the leading world supplier. Exports from the 
Republic of South Africa, Chile, Denmark, and Canada rose, while exports 
from the other major suppliers, the United States and Iceland, declined. 
Norway's reported exports of fish oil were up slightly in 1964, but are 
probably much larger than indicated owing to the exclusion of hardened 
fish oils which are not classified separately in trade returns. 

(Tables on page 26) 



-24- 



LARD l/: Estimated production in specified countries, 
average 1956-60, annual 1962-64 



Continent and country 


; Average 
: 1956-60 


1962 


1963 : 


196k 2/ 




: Million 
: pounds 

..: 80 


Million ; 
pounds : 

124 
2, WO 
91 


Million : 
pounds : 

137 
2,476 
95 


Million 
pounds 

143 
2,1+77 
99 






2,750 


2,760 


2,770 


South America: 


• 6l 
..: 28 


203 
31 
32 


181 
31 
31 


33 
28 






370 


350 


350 


Europe: 
Western 
EEC 


34 
164 

81 
28 


1+0 

185 
581 

84 
31 


39 
173 
584 

77 
32 


37 
168 

593 
90 
3U 




. . : 858 


921 


905 


922 




79 

li c 

. • 18 


80 
78 

21 
l4 
22 


80 
79 

41 

26 
Ik 
22 


80 
80 
39 
29 
12 
23 




1,130 


1,220 


1,210 


1,230 


Bulgaria 5/ 7/ 


59 

: 196 

116 


71 
I87 

156 
125 

543 
265 


60 
191 
165 
126 
464 
255 


--- 






..: 1,270 


1,350 


1,260 


1,280 






2,570 


2,1+70 


2,510 






1,240 


1,330 


81+0 


Other countries: 
Africa: 

South Africa, Republic of 5_/ jj ... 


• 


22 


22 


22 






30 


30 


30 


Asia: 


58 


129 


111 


113 






200 


180 


180 






7A70 


7,130 


6,690 



1/ Estimates of rendered lard except where otherwise noted. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Commercial, 
^/includes an allowance for any missing data from countries shown and minor producing countries 
not shown. 5/ Calculated from pork production. 6/ Includes Saarland, jj Includes unrendered 
pork fat in terms of lard. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of 
foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and 
Foreign Service Officers, results of office research, and related information. 
June 8, 1965 



- 25 - 



FISH OIL ( INCLUDING FISH LIVER OILS) l/: World gross exports, 
average 1955 -59^ annual 1959-64 



Continent and 
country 



: Average 



1959 



I960 : 1961 : 1962 : 1963 



1964 2/ 



North America: 

Canada 

Mexico 

United States 

Total 

South America: 

Argentina 

Chile 

Peru 

Total 

Europe : 

Denmark 

France 

Germany, West, 

Iceland 



Portugal 

Sweden 

United Kingdom. ....... 

Others (incl. USSR) jj 

Total 

Africa: 

Angola : 

Morocco : 

South Africa, Rep of 8 / 15.2 

Total : 26.0 

Asia and Oceania: 

Japan : 5 .8 

Others jj : 1.2 

Total : 7.0 



8.1 
2.7 



World total : 209*7 



1,000 Short tons 



8.5 


14.8 


15.2 


4.4 


3.2 


6.4 


15.8 


.7 


.7 


3/ 


.8 


.3 


.2 


.3 


64.1 


72.2 


71.8 


6l.2 


6I.5 


131.2 


75.7 


73.3 


87.7 


87.0 


66.4 


65.O 


. 137.8 


91.8 


0 


h 


x. u 


c 

• O 


h 


.5 


•5 


4/ 1 


• j- 


6 6 


? .X 


tp r» 


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Xtl . ( 


xp.x 


J* J 


ifi Q 


38 6 


np ft 




1P1 "5 


x^ ( . J 


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1Q h. 


46 p 


lift R 

XXO . p 


TTft li 


j i- „ 


i 0 


1 p e; 


lOil 




in c 
xu.p 


XO.O 


^.9 


33*5 


1.1 


1.6 


2.4 


: 2.7 


: 2.8 


4.0 


3.2 


17.9 


31.6 


26.2 


25.3 


22.9 


19.7 


16.2 


21.1 


18.9 


5^.5 


35.2 


72.5 


71.2 


: 68.6 


10.4 ■ 


16.0 . 


7.8 


: 5-2 


2.6 


: 2.8 


2.7 


21.3 


21.8 


18.4 


24.0 


18.6 


21.2 


22.3 


5.1 


5.7 


• 4.9 


7.4 


6.7 


10.5 


7.5 


2.5 


3.0 


2.5 


3.4 


: 2.0 


■ 3.^ 


: 3.0 


3.8 


3.7 


: 3-7 


: 3.2 


: 2.6 


: 2.7 


: 2.2 


1.7 


2.3 


2.0 


2.8 


: 2.9 


2.6 


: 2.8 


97.4 


120.7 


: 129.8 


119.7 


, 150.4 


: 161.0 


: 162.0 



5.6 

k.3 
26.6 



7.3 
5.7 

50.4 



3.3 



2.9 
4.9 
5Q.4 

5BT2" 



3^ 
5-7 
35.3 



3.6 
1.7 



2691.6 



3.8 
1.0 



2.7 

.8 



3.2 
.7 



3^ 



3.9 



2.0 
.8 



8.1 

5.8 
49.2 
"637T 



2.3 
.8 



3.1 



318.2 : 366,2 : 455.9 : 480.5 | 482.9" 



1/ Hardened fish oils have been included wherever separately classified in export 
statistics. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Under 50 tons. 4/ 1959 only. 5_/ May include some 
whale oil prior to i960. 6/ Excludes sizeable quantities of hardened fish oils 
exported annually which are not separately classified in trade returns, jj Includes 
estimates for minor exporting countries. 8/ Including the territory of South West 
Africa. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 
related information. 



- 26 - 



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CONTENTS 



JULY 1965 



WORLD SUMMARIES: Page 
Production 

Citrus Production Sets New Record 5 

1964 Sunflowerseed Production At New Record 9 

Large World Almond Crop Forecast 11 

Smaller World Filbert Crop Forecast For 1965 13 

Production of Whale Oil 20 



Trade 

Vanilla Bean Exports Larger .... 
Fishmeal Trade Expanding Rapidly 



3 
16 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 

Single copies free to persons in the United States 
from the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U. S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D. C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du-8-2^5 



FD-6-65 U.S. Dairy Trade At Record High in 196*4- 

FFO 9-65 Seychelles Copra Situation 

FFO IO-65 Tung Oil Availabilities from Mainland China Increase 

FFO II-65 U.S. Exports of Soybeans, Edible Oils, Cakes and Meals Continue 
Record Pace 

FFO 12-65 Nigeria's Vegetable Oil and Oil-Bearing Material Exports 

FFO-I3-65 Portuguese Guinea's Vegetable Oil and Oil-Bearing Material 
Exports 

FCF 3-65 Summer Citrus Prospects For Competition in Europe 

FS 2-65 World Sugar Crop at High Record 

FTEA 2-65 Another Record Tea Crop Expected 

FVF 3-65 World Hard Fibers Production Continues Upward 

FFVS 6-65 Grass and Legume Seeds 

FDP 7-65 U.S. Pulse Imports Decline 



WORLD VANILLA BEAM 
EXPORTS LARGER 



Exports of vanilla beans from major producing countries during 196^4- 
amounted to approximately 2.3 million pounds, up 25 percent over the 
previous year and equaling the high levels achieved in 1961 and 1962. 
The increase is attributed to the recovery of exports from the Malagasy 
Republic, which usually accounts for one -half of the vanilla beans enter- 
ing into world trade. Exports from Mexico, formerly a large supplier, 
continued to decline, and French Polynesian shipments approximated the 
I96I-63 average level. 

World consumption of vanilla beans has been static over the years 
as vanilla prices have been characterized by erratic price swings, which 
has discouraged larger usage. Because of the uncertainty of supplies and 
cost of vanilla, vanillin has captured a large portion of the market and 
has become the most widely used substitute. 

Production of vanilla beans in the Malagasy Republic -- the world's 
largest producer -- is expected to be down sharply from the 1964 harvest 
of 1.9 million pounds because of unfavorable weather conditions. However, 
stocks held from previous crops are estimated to approximate 2 million 
pounds, or enough to supply world requirements for nearly 1 year. A series 
of successive large crops over the past several years has resulted in a 
rather large build up of stocks and a weakening of prices. Malagasy 
vanilla is currently selling for $5 per pound (New York Spot), compared 
with July I963 Prices of about $8 per pound. 

As a result of the resumption of large scale buying by the United 
States, total 1964 exports from the Malagasy Republic amounted to 
1,384,000 pounds, more than double those of the previous year, but 
slightly below the 1,411,000 pounds shipped in I962. Malagasy exports 
to the United States amounted to 1,237,000 pounds, up 670,000 from I963 
and comprised 89 percent of the total. France, West Germany, and the 
United Kingdom took most of the remainder. Malagasy's 1964 vanilla 
exports earned $6.4 million and accounted for 7 percent of the foreign 
exchange earnings. 

At the conclusion of a joint meeting held in early June, the Malagasy 
Republic, Reunion, and Comores adopted a common policy to enter into a 
marketing agreement for vanilla exports. Although no quotas were dis- 
closed, the f.o.b. export price would remain at $10.20 per kilogram ($4.63 
per pound) as stipulated in the July 1964 marketing agreement between the 
Malagasy Republic and U. S. Vanilla Bean and Flavoring Extract Manu- 
facturers Associations. 

Under the July 1964 agreement, the U.S. bought .8 million pounds 
at $10.20 per kilogram, less an 80-cent advertising discount to be 
returned to the purchaser -- and an additional 20 cents to be subtracted 
for brokerage commissions. Through an extension of the agreement, the 
Malagasy Republic set export quotas of 926,000 pounds at similar price 
arrangements for shipment to the U. S. during the first half of 1965. 



-3- 



VANILLA BEANS: Exports by major producing countries, 
1964 with comparisons 



• 

Couirfcrv 

• 


Average 
1955-59 


! i960 


: 1961 ! 


1962 ! 


1963 


: Preliminary 
1964 


• 
• 


1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 : 


1,000 


- 1,000 


: 1,000 


• 


pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


Malagasy Republic . : 


855 


! 595 


: 1,290 


: 1,1*11 


: 644 


: 1,384 


French Polynesia . . : 


3^9 


: 392 


! U92 


: 1*61 : 


: 492 


: 1/ 480 




257 


: 256 


: 227 


! 86 


: 49 


: 1/ 35 




129 


: 176 


: 198 


: 106 


: 456 


: 1/ 235 




117 


i 68 


: 93 


: 73 


: 132 


: 1/ 75 




23 


: 22 : 


: 51 


: 99 


: 1/ 56 


: 1/ 85 




10 


! 17 


: 9 


: 15 


s 5 


: 3 




15 : 


! 2 ! 


: 2 


: 1 


: 2 


: 1/2 




6 ! 






: 4 


: 9 


! 1/ 4 




4 


; 5 ; 


; 6 


: 2 


: 2 


: 5 


• 
• 


1,765 


: 1,533 


\ 2,368 


i 2,258 

1 


\ 1,847 


: 2,308 



l/ Estimated. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U. S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office re- 
search, and related information. 



VANILLA BEANS: United States imports by country of origin 



Country of origin 


! Average 
s 1955-5? 1 


1962 


: 1963 i 


', 1964 


January 
1964 i 


r-May 

1965 




» 

! 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




: pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


pounds : 


pounds 


pounds 


Malagasy Republic . . . 


: 830 


! 1,273 


! 861 


: 1,366 : 


: 39^ 


: 674 




: 22 


: 129 


: 56 


: 85 : 


: 24 


: 51 




: 73 


: 65 


: 62 


: 41 s 


: 18 


: 2 




: 219 


: 74 


: 31 


! 24 : 


: 5 


: 20 




: 10 


: 8 


: 39 


: 19 


13 ! 


: 47 




: 5 


: 12 


: 2 






• 1/ 




: 1? 


! 18 


: 14 


I "94 - 


"76 


58 




! 1,178 


: 1,579 


: 1,065 : 


i 1,629 : 


1 530 


! 852 



l/ Less than 5 00 pounds. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Compiled from reports of U. S. Department of 
Commerce . 



Uganda is increasing vanilla acreage and plans to open its first vanilla 
processing factory this year. The plant will convert cured "beans into a semi- 
finished product and the entire output will be exported to the United States. 

The French Polynesian islands of Tahiti, Moorea, Raiatea, Tahaa, Huahine, 
and Bora Bora, remain the world's second largest vanilla producers. Exports 
during the first 9 months of 196^ totaled 3^-0,000 pounds, compared with 
3^8,000 pounds for the corresponding I963 period. Total 196^ exports are 
expected to reach the high levels of the past few years. 

Imports of vanilla beans into the United States -- by far the world's 
largest consumer -- during 196^ amounted to 1.6 million pounds, up 53 percent 
from the previous year and 3 percent above the 1962 level. Larger purchases 
from the Malagasy Republic, which supplied nearly 1.^ million pounds, repre- 
senting 8^ percent of total in 196h, were responsible for the increase. 
Imports from Mexico fell 23 percent from the previous year to only 2U,000 
pounds . 

United States imports during January -May I965 totaled 852,000 pounds, corn- 
ered with 530,000 pounds during the similar I96U period. Continued large 
rchases from the Malagasy Republic were responsible for the increase. 

WORLD CITRUS PRODUCTION 
SETS NEW RECORD 

Florida's continuing recovery from frost damage experienced in 1962 to- 
gether with a large crop in the Mediterranean area resulted in record world 
citrus production in 196^. Although most of the major producing areas 
reamined relatively free from adverse weather conditions, droughts were 
reported in several Southern Hemisphere areas and frost and storms caused 
some damage in Spain and Italy, respectively. 

Oranges . World orange and tangerine production from the I96U bloom 
is estimated at a record k6l million boxes, 10 percent above 1963 and 29 per- 
cent above the 1955-59 average. An increase of 29 million boxes in the United 
States and record large production in the Mediterranean area and Japan more 
than offset the reduced output in the Southern Hemisphere. 

Grapefruit . World production of grapefruit is estimated at 52.2 million 
boxes in 196^-, anl8 percent increase over 1963 but only slightly above the 
1955-59 average. The U.S. crop is approximately U0.7 million boxes, 6.5 mil- 
lion boxes more than in I963. Production in Israel and Mexico, the second 
and third leading producers in 196k, also increased. 

Limes. Lime production for the specified countries increased to 5*1 
million boxes in 196^ as compared to h.Q million boxes in 1963 and the 1955-59 
average of 3«8 million boxes. 

Lemons. World lemon production in 196^ is estimated at a record ^7*9 
million boxes, up slightly from k'J .3 million boxes in 1963 but 28 percent 
above the 1955-59 average. A decline of h.h million boxes in the U.S. was 
more than offset by increases in Spain and in Italy. 



CITRUS FRUIT: Production in specified countries, average 1955-59 

annual 1962-64 l/ 

Oranges, including tangerines 



Area 



Average 
1955-59 



1962 



1963 



1964 2/ 



North America: 

British Honduras 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Mexico 

Trinidad and Tobago 

United States 

Total 

Mediterranean Area: 

Algeria 

Cyprus 

Egypt 

Greece 

Iran 

Israel 

Italy 

Lebanon 

Morocco 3/ 

Spain 

Syria 

Tunisia 

Turkey 

Total 

Far East: 

Japan 

Taiwan 

Total 

Northern Hemisphere total... 
South Arrerica: 



1,000 
Boxes 

2,395 
753 
525 
20,3^0 
281 
129,673 



1,000 
Boxes 

758 
2,500 
800 
1,929 
24,769 
271 
106,915 



1,000 
Boxes 

847 
2,500 
800 
1,995 
25,207 
360 
96,355 



301,224 



1,000 
Boxes 

1,000 
2,500 
800 
2,301 
24,880 

571 
125,360 



154,214 


137,942 


128,064 


157,412 


11,122 

9,317 

5,64? 

1,330 
12,914 
23,950 

2,375 
10,215 
35,384 

39 
1,750 
5,106 


13,228 

11,137 
7,231 
i,to7 
17,300 
26,068 

3,179 
13,900 

48,038 
202 
1,1+58 
7,796 


10,708 
1,921 

12, 569 
7,024 
1,417 

19,099 

33,790 
3,370 

19,200 

58,286 
183 
: 2,268 

10,683 


11,653 

1,953 
12,000 

10,407 
1,400 
22,990 
37,642 
3,811 
18,815 
58,920 
220 
2,200 
10,074 


120,231 


152,234 


180, 518 


192,085 


25,608 
1,121 


3^,113 
1,99 ] + 


38,788 
2,3^3 


to, 897 
2,500 


26,729 


36,107 


^1,131 


^,397 



326,283 : 3^9,713 : 393,89^ 





18,879 
19,600 

1,133 
186 
1,076 


21,778 
26,000 

1,244 
121 

1,412 


22,525 
24,000 

1,339 
149 
1,669 


20,131 
25,000 

1,260 
37 

1,323 




40,874 


50,555 


49,682 


1+7,751 


Other Southern Hemispheres 


4,716 
12 

: 10,061 


6,348 
22 

: 11,300 


6,651 
21 

: 13,356 


5,3^9 
27 

: 14,494 


Southern Hemisphere total... 


: 55,663 


: 68,225 


: 69,710 


: 67,621 




S 356,887 


: 39^,508 


: 419,423 


: 461,515 



-6- 



CITRUS FRUIT: Production in specified countries, average 1955-59, 

annual 1962-61* 1/ 



Grapefruit 



Area 


• jft,v t?I 


! 1962 


1963 


• 196U 2/ 




! 1,000 


! 1,000 


', 1,000 


\ 1,000 




Boxes 


Boxes 


Boxes 


Boxes 


North America: 


• 
• 












: 232 


: 317 


: 325 




: 198 


! 200 


: 50 


: 50 




: 1*12 


: 621 


: 690 


: 700 




: 166 : 


: 193 


: 198 


: 207 






: 572 


: 599 


: 800 






: 3U,7UO : 


3U,210 i 


. 1*0,700 




• 


36,558 


36,061* : 


1*2,782 



Mediterranean Area: 



Algeria : 150 : 100 : 100 : 100 

Cyprus : 218 : 350 : 370 : 350 

Israel : 1,718 : 2,51*9 : 3,689 : k,h09 

Morocco 3/ : 2l*l* : 200 : 329 : 368 

Spain : 1*3 : 167 : 69 : 165 



Total : 2,373 : 3,366 ': 1*,557 : 5,392 

• 111 1 i 1 _ 

: ... 

• • • • 

Northern Hemisphere total....: 1*7,120 : 39,92k : hO,621 : 1*8,171* 



South America: : : : : 

Argentina k/ : 708 : 1,361* : 1,667 : 1,998 

Surinam : 109 : 132 : 127 : 1*0 

• • • • 

• • • • 

Other Southern Hemisphere: : : : : 

Australia : l8l : 210 : 197 : 210 

New Zealand : 68 : 101* : 89 : 93 

South Africa, Republic of..: 1*82 : 1,11*6 : 1,507 ; 1,656 



Southern Hemisphere total.... : 1,51*8 : 2,956 : 3,587 : 3,997 



• • • * 

World total : 1*8,668 : 1*2,880 : 1*1*,208 : 52,171 



Limes (Acid) 







1,553 : 
2,977 : 
1*00 : 


1,361* : 
2,997 : 
1*50 : 


1,1*00 
3,11*2 
560 


Total specified countries , , , 


..: 3,833 : 


U,930 


l*,8ll ! 


5,102 



CITRUS FRUIT: Production in specified countries, average 1955-59, 

annual 1962-64 1/ 



Lemons 



Area 


Average : 
1955-59 : 


1962 


196^ : 


1964 2/ 


North America: : 


1,000 
Boxes 

16,334 


1,000 
Boxes 

12,990 


1,000 
Boxes 

19,040 


1,000 
Boxes 

14,610 


Mediterranean Area: : 

Ttnl v 


420 
278 
82 
1,563 
398 
1 O 1 fto 

JL\J j ±SJ j 

504 

ecu 
1,526 

405 
1,107 


200 
430 
57 
2,635 
853 

: 957 

: 2,321 
: 261 
: 1,619 


: 200 
: 450 

! 38 

: 2,426 
: 881 
i b 1 1 c; 

J-M,J_JO 

: 1,102 
ttyo 
• 1,717 
: 392 
: 1,716 


200 
: 400 
: 50 
: 2,459 
: 900 

J-O , yj\J 

\ 1,213 

: 4,699 
: 403 
: 1,571 




16,698 


: 19,929 


: 23,293 


: 28,462 


Northern Hemisphere total... 


33,032 


: 32,919 


: 42,333 


: 43,072 


South America: 


: 2,590 
: 780 
: 288 


: 2,300 
: 1,276 
: 377 


: 2,292 
: 1,305 
: 392 


: 2,431 
: 1,276 
: 319 




1 3,658 


: 3,953 


: 3,989 


: 4,026 


Other Southern Hemisphere... 


I 444 
: 44 
: 219 


: 505 
: 59 
: 407 


: 474 
: 46 
: 4l4 


: 442 
: 47 
: 355 


Southern Hemisphere total . . . 


; ^,365 


: 4,924 


: 4,923 


: 4,870 




: 37,397 


: 37,843 


: 47,256 


: 47,942 



1/ Northern Hemisphere harvests begin in the fall of year shown and Southern 
Hemisphere in the spring following the year shown. Production in foreign 
countries converted to boxes of the following weights: oranges, 70 pounds; 
grapefruit and limes, 80 pounds; lemons, 76 pounds. 2/ Preliminary, jj Excludes 
production in areas formerly known as Spanish Morocco and Tangier. 4/ Includes 
unharvested production and fruit not of export variety or grade. 5/ Production 
from the bloom of indicated years is harvested the two following years, i.e., 
crop from the bloom of 1962 is harvested 1963-64. 

Source: Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis 
of official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, 
reports of U. 3. Agricultural Attache's and Foreign Service Officers, results 
of office research and related information. 



-8- 



1964 WORLD SUNFLOWERSEED 
PRODUCTION AT NEW RECORD 



Sunflowerseed production in calendar year I96U, estimated at Q.h mil- 
lion short tons, set a new record. This reflected a 25 percent increase 
from the relatively small output of 1963 and a 12 percent increase from the 
revised estimate of the previous record of 1962. 

The record 196^ crop primarily reflected: (l) an all-time high in 
Soviet production chiefly resulting from significantly higher yields 
although there was some increase in planted area; (2) sharply increased 
production in Turkey reflecting acreage expansion as well as higher yields; 
and (3) continued expansion in Yugoslavia's output largely due to higher 
yields . 

General prospects for 19^5 indicate a probable decline in aggregate 
production, due to a somewhat smaller output in the USSR, offset by 
increases in Argentina, Yugoslavia, and Canada. 

North America : Canadian production of sunflowerseed, the major source 
of U.S. imports, rose somewhat in I96U. The rise reflected a substantial 
increase in planted area largely offset by yields markedly lower than in 
the preceding year. Based on farmers' planting intentions, output in I965 
may increase substantially. 

South America : Argentina's output of sunflowerseed approximated that 
in I963 despite reduced acreage, which resulted from yields substantially 
above those of 1963. Uruguayan production declined sharply reflecting 
reduced plantings as well as yields. However, in Chile, production increased 
due largely to higher yields. 

According to preliminary estimates, production from crops harvested in 
the first half of I965 increased by more than 250,000 tons. The gain largely 
reflected favorable yields and expanded plantings in Argentina offset in part 
by a further decline in Uruguayan production because of reduced acreage. 

Europe : The 1^6h sunflowerseed production in Europe was estimated 
slightly above the large volume of 1963. The rise chiefly reflected higher 
yields in Rumania and Yugoslavia. Because of reduced acreage, production in 
Bulgaria, Hungary, and France declined. Spain, a major importer of vegetable 
oils, is reportedly attempting to stimulate production but output continues 
to be insignificant. 

USSR : Estimated at a new high, Soviet sunflowerseed production, con- 
centrated largely in the Ukraine and North Caucasus, increased by more than 
one -third from the reduced tonnage of 1963. The gain chiefly reflected 
higher yields although acreage was 6 percent above that in the previous 
year. Despite the fact that the 196^ crop was reported to have been rela- 
tively high in moisture content, production (oil basis) will increase sub- 
stantially with substantial quantities available for export. 

Af ric /ar"' Production of sunflowerseed in the Republic of South Africa, 
vM'cii accounts for the bulk of Africa's output, declined significantly in 
196^. The decline reflected sharply-reduced yields resulting from drought 
despite expanded acreage. Prospects for 19&5 indicate little change in output. 

-9- 




o3 "ltnI 



■6 *> 

4) p 

s I 

^ o 



5 JloSl 



si » 

4> fn 7( 

^ ft !) 

•d 4> 
«9u 

<>-< <n M 

O OO 

<a 



v v a 

P 4> in 

•S3 e 



O ,Q . 

4) *H 

4g P 

a a- 3 ! 

,3 - ° 

a a) 3 



1 S 



d 53 ■ 

o ra o p, 
ei ^ 

p o S 

•H rolnc) 



3 p to 

1 (0 

< Pis 



4) P, 



A 3 8 >d 

§ 5 H 

|»gl 

^ 4) * H 

U ilfl o 
P Hh 

V<N O ■> 
3 O iH 41 

q p p 

H W O 4) 

ill 1 

ca 0 u to 

0 P( 4) 

Sh h o » 
4) 4) 0) 4) 

Xt P T) 

•H H O O 

9 .a a 

a x) 

a "^sSIon) 
^ a 

41 *H 

XI • • 

P 13 TJ >> 
3 4> 4) r-f 

5 p p a 
ra u> «i o 
4> a 

i-flfj p o 
• n h 



-10- 



Asia: Following a marked downtrend, Turkish sunflowerseed produc- 
tion in 196^4- expanded to a high in recent years. The rise reflects a 
shift to Kussian varieties of seed which are resistant to the parasite 
Orobanche . The new varieties of seed are reported to "be higher in oil 
content and have resulted in significantly higher seed yields. Further 
expansion in production is expected in the future. 

LARGE WORLD 

ALMOND CROP FORECAST 

The 1965 world commercial almond crop is forecast at 133^200 short 
tons--up slightly from last year's 128, 400 ton crop and well above the 
114,100 ton average. The crop, however, will still be well below the 
record 155^500 ton harvest in I96I. Total supplies (including stocks) 
in producing countries for the 1965-66 marketing season are indicated 
at 154,800 tons, or 15,300 tons above 1964-65 supplies. 

Both foreign and U.S. production are above the 1964 and 1959-63 
average levels. All foreign producers except Spain are expected to 
have larger crops than in 1964 and all are above average. The U.S. 
crop at 44,000 tons would exceed the previous record harvest of 42, 200 
tons in 1959* 

Stocks in producing countries are estimated at 21,600 tons of which 
11,600 tons were foreign stocks and about 10,000 tons U.S. stocks. All 
of these are tentative estimates. 

Exports from the six major producing countries during the 1964-65 
season now drawing to a close are expected to total 74,200 tons --the 
highest level since 99; 9°° tons were shipped in I96I-62. 1958-62 average 
exports by these six countries totaled 67,700 tons. 

U.S. exports of almonds during the year ending July 31? ^-9^5, were 
a record 10,000 tons shelled equivalent, according to unofficial pre- 
liminary data. The previous record was in 1963-64 when 9? 500 tons 
(9,184 tons shelled and 626 tons inshell) were shipped. During the 10- 
month (August 1964-May I965) period, U.S. shipments of shelled almonds 
totaled 7? 952 tons and inshell exports were 503 tons. During the same 
period a year earlier, the totals were 8,866 tons shelled and 623 tons 
inshell. 

U.S. imports of almonds were negligible during the 1964-65 season 
with only 135 tons of shelled, 1 ton of inshell, and 69 tons of blanched 
almonds entering during the 10 months, August 1964-May 1965. Total 
I963-64 imports were 119 tons shelled and 66 tons blanched. 

Prices of foreign almonds have remained relatively strong with 
shelled unselected Baris averaging over 65 cents a pound in June 1965 
after having fallen to 6l.2 cents in April. The monthly average has 
remained above 60 cents since April 1963. 



-11- 



ALMONDS, SHELLED BASIS: Estimated commercial production in 
selected countries, average 1959-63 and 1963-65 crop years 



1/ Source: iilmond Control Board. 

2/ 

Forecast based on data. 



Country 


: Average 
• 3,959-63 


! 1963 


: Preliminary : 
; 196^ : 


Forecast 
1965 




* 

: Short 
: tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 






5,500 
42,000 
3,100 
1,300 
31,000 


7,200 
39,000 
3,300 
2,600 
35.000 


7,700 
40,000 
7,000 
3,500 
-32.000 






82.900 


87,100 


90,200 






34.500 


41.300 


44.000^/ 


Beginning stocks 


21.800 


117,400 
7.600 


128,400 
11.100 


134,200 
21.600 


Total supplies 


• 

...» 135,900 


125,000 


139,500 


155,800 



ALMONDS, SHELLED BaSIS: Exports from selected countries, 
average 1958-62 and 1961-64 crop yearsi/ 



P . : Average: , : , Preliminary :Forecast 

Countr y : 1958-62: 1961 : 1962 ; 1963 : 1964 

: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons ton3 tons tons 

Iran : 5,300 7,000 6,600 1,800 3,300 

Italy : 27,300 48,000 20,600 33,400 30,000 

Morocco : 2,000 1,200 1,100 1,500 2,300 

Portugal : 3,100 5,000 3,900 2,400 2,100 

Spain. : 24.900 33.800 15.000 23.000 26.500 

« 

Total foreign : 62,600 95,000 47,200 62,100 64,200 

■ 

United States : 5,100 4,900 4,700 9,500 10,000 

Grand total ; 67,700 99,900 51,900 71,600 74,200 

1/ Iranian series revised to a September 23 - September 22 crop year basi^t Morocco- 
calendar year following year shown; all others — year beginning August 1. 



-12- 



ALMONDS SHELLED DESELECTED: Monthly average prices f.o.b. Bari, 
Italy marketing seasons I96O-6I+ 



Month 


■ 1960-61 ; 


I96I-62 


1962-6^ ' 


1Q6V61+ ' 


1961+-65 




U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




: per 


per 


per 


per 


per 




pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


September 


1*7.8 


38.7 


65.2 


61+. 1+ 


61+. 7 


October 


4-6.9 


38.2 


66.0 


69.3 


63.7 


November : 


1+6.5 


_ _ 1 

39.^ 


69.6 


66.6 


61.9 


December : 


1+6.0 


Ul.9 


68.5 


62.6 


62.0 


January : 


1+6.2 


1+5.0 


69.0 


6l+. 9 


63.I 


February ' 


1+5.6 


1+5.8 


67.0 


63.2 


63.2 


March : 


1+2.1+ 


1+9.4 


60.9 


62.5 


62.5 


April : 


1*1.1 


^7.3 


58.9 


61.2 


61.2 


May 


1+2.0 


61.3 


62.3 


63.5 


63.O 


June : 


44-. 2 


63.7 


65.0 


65.2 


65.2 


July : 


1+3.0 


60.7 


61.9 


65.1 




August : 


4-2.1 


62.8 


61.1 


66.2 





SMALLER WORLD 

FILBERT CROP FORECAST FOR I965 

The I965 commercial harvest by the four main producing countries is fore- 
cast at 182,200 short tons. This would be just a little over two -thirds as 
large as the record 260,9°° ton I96I+ crop but still well above the 163,9°° ton 
average. There is also a heavy carryin of 1961+-crop Turkish filberts. 

Turkey, which had a record shattering 200,000 ton harvest in 1964, has a 
much smaller but still above average I965 crop --forecast at 110,000 tons. The 
Spanish harvest is forecast at 19,000 tons --virtually the same as last year's 
19,500 ton crop but well above the 16,809-ton average. Italy's crop is fore- 
cast at 1+6,000 tons as compared to 33>°°° tons in I96I+ and an average of 1+9,000 
tons . 

Exports from the Mediterranean countries during the I96I+-65 season are 
expected to reach a record 156,700 tons. The previous record was 151,900 tons 
in 1963 -61+. Spanish exports, forecast at ll+,700 tons for the year ending 
September 3°; 1965> will be almost identical to the ll+,3°° tons shipped the 
year before and only moderately above average. Italy, on the other hand, will 
have shipped only 21,000 tons during the I96I+-65 season--well down from the 
29,9°° "ton I963-6I+ season and the 31^000 ton average. Most of the increase in 
world filbert trade in recent years has been due to a fairly rapid increase in 
Turkish exports which are indicated at a record 121,000 tons for the I96I+-65 
season. Turkey's I963-6I+ exports totaled 107,700 tons while the 1958-62 average 
was 92,500 tons. 



-13- 



U.S. imports of shelled filberts totaled 1,874 tons during the eight 
months October 1964- May I965. During the same period a year earlier imports 
totaled 2,132 tons and for the entire 1963-64 season they were 2,671 tons. 
As usual, imports of inshell filberts were negligible. 

Prices of shelled Kerassundes (f.o.b. Turkish port) have ranged narrowly 
between 44 and 49 cents per pound. This is the lowest the market has been in 
five years but it is still remarkably stable and a fairly high level in light 
of the record 1964 Turkish crop. Extremely tight control of export prices by 
the Turkish Filbert Coop, Fiskobirlik, and the Turkish Government has evidently 
been responsible for the market stability. 

The heavy carryover of Turkish filberts will undoubtedly have some 
depressing effect on the market for new crop nuts. However, much depends on 
how the carryover will be disposed of by the Turkish Government. 



FILBERTS, SHELLED, KERASSUNDES: Prices, f.o.b. Turkish port 
first week each month 1960-64 marketing seasons 



First week of 


; 1960-61 


; 1961-62 ; 


1962-63 


; 1963-64 ; 


1964-65 




: U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 




: Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




: per 


per 


per 


per 


per 




: pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


October 


: 47.0 


53-7 


62.5 


60.3 


45.1 


November 


: 50.2 


59-4 


64.1 


58.1 


45.7 


December 


: ^9.5 


59-7 


62.9 


53.3 


44.8 


January 


: 50.8 


63.8 


62.5 


55.2 


45.1 


February 


: 54.9 


64.8 


61.6 


52.7 


46.7 


March 


: 54.3 


63.5 


61.0 


50.8 


44.8 


April 


: 54.3 


64.8 


60.6 


48.9 


44.1 


May 


: 48.6 


58.4 


58.4 


46.4 


43.5 


June 


48.9 


57.5 


57.2 


48.3 


47.0 


July 


50.8 


54.3 


57.8 


47.6 


48.3 


August 


52.7 


57.8 


57.5 


46.7 




September 


54.0 


57.2 


60.3 


45.7 





-14- 



FILBERTS: Exports from selected countries, average 1958-62, 
and 1961-64 marketing years 



Type and Country 1958-62 

Short 

: tons 

Unshelled 

Italy : 13,200 

Spain : 900 

Turkey : 900 

Total t 15.000 

Shelled 

Italy : 8,100 

Spain : 5,000 

Turkey : 45.800 

Total : 58.900 

• 

Unshelled Equivalent : 

Italy : 31,000 

Spain : 11,900 

Turkey : 92.500 

Total : 135,400 



1961 ; 


1962 : 

- 


1963 


bnor T> 


onon* 


onorxi 


tons 


tons 


tons 


13,200 


13,300 


U,300 


1,000 


700 


1,300 


200 


300 


700 



10,900 
4,500 

^3.900 



8,100 
4,300 
46.800 



Preliminary 
3964 



14.400 1A.300 16.300 



7,100 
5,900 
53.500 



59.300 59.200 66.500 



37,200 31,100 29,900 
10,900 10,300 14,300 
88.000 103.300 107.700 



Short 
tons 



21,000 
14,700 
121.000 



136,100 144,700 151,900 156,700 



FILBERTS, UNSHELLED: Estimated commercial production in 
specified countries, average 1959-63 and 1963-65 crop years 



Country 


[ Average 
i 1959-63 


: 1963 


• 

' Preliminary ' Forecast 
; 1964 1965 




t Short Short Short Short 
: tons tons tons tons 

49,000 61,000 33,000 46,000 
16,800 22,000 19,500 19,000 
90.400 100.000 200.000 110.000 




154.800 183.000 252.500 175.000 




9,100 6,900 8,000 7,200 




163,900 189,900 260,500 182,200 



-15- 



WORLD FISHMEAL TRADE 
EXPANDING RAPIDLY 



World exports of fishmeal, including fish solubles and similar prod- 
ucts, reached a record 2,610,^00 short tons during 196^, reflecting increased 
shipments from all major suppliers. World exports increased 556,300 tons 
or 27 percent from the previous high of 1963, and were more than four times 
the 1955-59 average. 

Fishmeal is a valuable high-protein material that contains the amino 
acids necessary for good animal nutrition. It is usually incorporated in 
balanced feed mixtures of vegetable substances to which minerals and vita- 
mins are added. The bulk of the fishmeal is used in poultry and hog rations 
and, when prices are competitive with other protein concentrates, in other 
livestock rations. Both the hog and poultry industries have been among 
the major growth sections of agriculture in the United States and Western 
Europe . 

In general exports of fishmeal follow the pattern of production as the 
greater part of the output in the major producing countries, Peru, Republic 
of South Africa (including the Mandated Territory of South West Africa), Chile, 
Norway, Iceland, Denmark, Angola, and Morocco is exported. The major 
exceptions are the United States, Japan, and the USSR, where virtually all 
the production is retained for domestic use. 

There has been a marked change in the regional pattern of world exports. 
Prior ,to 1959 Europe was the leading exporting region but with the rapid 
development in the productive capacity for fishmeal in other parts of the 
world, South America has become the leading exporting region and Africa has 
emerged as an important source of supply. Exports from North America con- 
tinue, as in the past, almost entirely from Canada. Asian exports are 
insignificant compared with those from other regions. 

As a result of the rapid large scale development of the fishmeal 
industry in Peru during the period 1957-59 an( i the resultant excess availa- 
bilities of supplies, a serious fall in international price levels for fish- 
meal was experienced in 1959 and i960. In consequence of the disruptive 
market conditions during this period, an international agreement among the 
leading exporting countries was signed in late i960 with the view of regu- 
lating the output of fishmeal by imposing an export quota system upon each 
member. 

The signatories to the agreement, Peru, Republic of South Africa, 
Norway, Iceland, and Angola, formed the Fishmeal Exporter's Organization 
(FEO). Chile became a member at the end of 1963. Members of the FEO 
agreed to pursue a common policy with the objectives of promoting the con- 
sumption of fishmeal and of ensuring a continuity of supply to world markets 
at stable and profitable prices. The activities of this Organization have 
since brought about a considerable improvement in international price levels 
and in the stability of the fishmeal market. 

The six member countries of the FEO account for over 90 percent of 
world exports of fishmeal. Peru, the world's leading producer, accounted 



-16- 



for 66 percent of total exports "by FEO countries in I96U; the Republic of South 
.Africa, 11 percent; Norway, 8 percent; Chile, 6 percent; Iceland, 6 percent; and 
Angola, 3 percent. 



FISHMEAL: Production and exports by member countries of the Fishmeal 
Exporter's Organization, annual I962-6U 



Countries 




Production 






















I962 


1Q63 
- L y 1 ~'0 


1 Qf)h 






1 a£>k 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 • 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




short 


short 


short 


short 


short 


short 




tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


Angola • 


36.2 


3^.7 


65.8 


35-9 


33.1 


62.6 


Chile 


102.3 


119.3 


159.3 


80.3 


95.7 


153.0 


Iceland 


105.9 


96.7 


iko.Q 


78.2 


109.2 


137.0 


Norway 


133.3 


1^5.7 


20k. 9 


: 68.0 


11^.7 


197.8 


Peru • 


1,235-5 


1,277.8 


1,711.0 


1,175.1 


1,278.3 


l,56l.^ 


South Africa : 


221.8 


262.3 


283.7 


212.6 


219. ^ 


214-9.7 


Total • 


1,835.0 


1,936.5 


2,565.5 


: 1,650.1 


1,850. k 


2,361.5 



Fishmeal Exporter's Organization, Paris, France. 



By areas of destination the percentage distribution of Peruvian fishmeal 
shipments in 196k, with I963 figures in parentheses, were as follows: Western 
Europe 57.1 (6l.2); North and South America 26.2 (25. 0); Eastern Europe q.h 
(7.0); and Asia and Oceania 7«3 (6.8) percent. 

Most of the increase in world supplies of fishmeal since 1959 has been 
absorbed by Western European countries and by the United States, the world's 
leading importer of this commodity. Four countries, the United States, the 
United Kingdom, Western Germany, and the Netherlands accounted for almost two- 
thirds of world exports in 1963-6^. Increased imports have also been recorded 
by countries in South and Central America, Asia, and Eastern Europe. 

Imports into specified countries in 196^- increased 2k percent or 4^9,^-00 tons 
from 1963. Imports in I963 increased 15 percent and those in 1962 increased 
20 percent. Purchases by the European Economic Community rose 192,300 tons in 
I96U, those by the United Kingdom 9^,900 tons, and those by the United States 
9k, 300 tons. There was a reduction of 39,500 tons in Spanish purchases in I96U. 

In addition, combined imports of fishmeal by Eastern Germany, Czechoslovakia, 
Hungary, Rumania, and Bulgaria in 196U- declined to an estimated 112,000 tons from 
an estimated 130,000 in 1963. Estimated purchases in 196^ by Eastern Germany 
fell to 55>000 tons from 82,500 in 1963. Imports into Czechoslovakia and Hungary, 
however, increased in I96U to an estimated 19,500 and 31,500 tons, respectively, 
from an estimated 17,000 and 26,500 tons in 1963. 



-17- 



FISHMEAL l/ : Exports from specified countries, average 1955-59, 

annual 1959-64 



: Average : : : : : : 

Country : 1955-59 ■ 1959 ■ i960 : 1961 : 1962 : 1963 : 1964 2/ 

: 1,000 short tons 

Canada 3/ : 44. 3 46. 9 35.5 40.6 48.2 56.7 63. 4 

Greenland : .4 .6 .6 .7 1.2 1.2 1-5 

Panama : .6 1.9 -- 1.3 .9 .8 2.5 

Argentina : 1.9 2.7 .1 .3 1-7 3«5 2.0 

Chile : 10.0 19.I 26.6 45.8 80.3 95.7 162.1 

Peru : 109.1 306.I 571. 3 838.4 1,175-0 1,278.4 1,562.0 

Belgium : 2.4 2.3 4.7 4.2 6.4 3.4 3.0 

Denmark 3/ : 54.8 77-7 35-4 47-1 68.0 74.5 77-1 

Faeroe Islands...: .6 .7 .9 1.2 2.2 1.9 1.8 

France : 4/ 1.1 .8 4.6 3.7 1.7 2.0 2.7 

Germany, West 5/.: 6.8 8.0 6.3 .9 9.5 6.0 7-7 

Iceland : 42.1 48.7 60.5 78. 0 76.8 114.8 138.8 

Netherlands : 6.7 9.2 6.2 5.2 6.6 3.9 7.9 

Norway : 148.0 98.3 112.4 lUl.6 65.9 113. 9 201.2 

Portugal : 1.3 .6 2.5 5.0 2.9 -8 4.8 

Sweden : .9 1.1 .3 .6 .3 .3 .2 

U.S.S.R : 4.1 5.3 4.4 5.4 4.1 3.7 6/4.0 

Angola : 72.8 56.5 49.7 55-5 35-9 30.8 6C.0 

Morocco : 13.0 16.0 15.3 20.9 17-6 22.0 24.1 

South Africa 3/7/: 78.9 H0.1 139-7 186.7 228.7 235-8 276.8 

Japan : 15.4 26.5 6.9 5-3 20.0 4.0 6.8 

Total :~ 615.2 839.I 1,083.9 1,488.4 1,853.9 2,054.1 2,610.4 

l/ Includes solubles and similar products. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Including solubles, 
dry-weight basis. 4/ 1957-59 average. 5/ Including small quantities of meat meal. 
6/ Estimate. 7/ Including the production of South Vest Africa. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign gevernments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research 
and related information. 



-18- 



FISHMEAL: Imports into specified countries, average 
1955-59, annual 1959-64 



: Average :::::: 
Country : 1955-59 • 1959 ■ i960 ; 1961 : 1962 : 1963 j 1964 1/ 



■1,000 short tons' 









0 1 

2.1 


b.4 


.2 


3.0 


)i 0. 
4.9 




3-9 


10.4 


lo.o 


13.0 


22.1 


30.7 


30.3 




107.7 


147.3 


133.5 


221.4 




386.5 


)l Po P 


• 








4.1 


c P 

5.0 


2.3 


0 / c 0 

2/ 5.0 




.2 




c 
.0 


.6 


-1 0 

1.0 


0 D 

2.8 


3.7 




2.9 


5.0 


)l ft 
4.0 


TO O 

12. y 


14 . O 


lo . 0 


ID .0 




12. ( 


14.1 


0)1 0 

24.0 


2b. 5 


00 O 
30.9 


33*4 


40. 1 




24.7 


32.9 


54.0 


44.0 


62. 0 


50.0 


4/70.O 




12. 0 


14. 0 


00 P 
20.O 


30.6 


17.1 


13.0 


20.5 




3*3 


0 0 
3«9 


7.2 


13.7 


17.es 


P c\ 
0.0 


TO £ 

ly.o 




30.5 


43.9 


35«i 


00.4 


90.9 


PJr 0 
04.3 


n c £ 
lip .0 


Germany, West 3/ • : 


120. 1 


lOO.l 




one 0 

295.3 




332.4 


)l oP 0 

430. y 




3A 


4.3 


k.k 


4.8 


5.8 


9.5 


11.1 


Italy : 


10.7 


14.6 


33-7 


34.3 


53.6 


67.5 


100.8 




PP 0 
OO.O 


110.1 


150.3 


170.9 


190.2 


193.7 


200. f 




O T 

2.X 


O O 

2.2 


7.1 


11. 0 


17o 


31.7 


2/p0.0 




c / 0 0 

5/ 3.2 


5-7 


10.1 


0 ), 
9.4 


10.2 


12.7 


14.0 




1.4 




10 ♦ 2 


14. O 


41. p 


P)l t 
04 . ± 


44.0 




13*7 


00 


i9o 


0)1 c 
24. p 


20.1 


33.0 


4 j.O 


Switzerland ^ /. . . : 


14.0 


17.0 


SO. 5 


27.4 


Si. 4 


32.0 


42.3 


United Kingdom. . . : 


127.2 


164.7 


I86.3 


257.6 


305.0 


310.5 


405.4 




1.8 


8.1 


13.9 


3.8 


3.1 


25.8 


6/31.4 


Rhodesia/ : 
















Nyasaland 7/. • • : 


4.9 


5.3 


h.l 


5.9 


5.4 


5.9 


9.1 




14.3 


13.3 


17.7 


13.1 


11.4 


11.3 


2/12.0 




3.6 


6.8 


11.6 


15.1 


16.8 


20.3 


9/17.6 








21.4 


25.7 


42.4 


92.9 


112.7 




3~8 




3.3 


10.3 


6.9 


2/ 7.0 


2/ 8.0 



Total : 618. 9 816. 5 1,036.8 1,372.7 1,652.7 1,908.1 2,357.5 



1/ Preliminary. 2/ Estimated. 3/ Includes siaall amounts of meat meal, kj January- 
November. 5/ 195^-59 average. Z/ January- June . 7/ Now the independent countries 
of Malawi, Zambia, and Rhodesia. 8/ Malay States and Singapore only. 9/ January- 
September. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 

related information. 



-19- 



WORLD PRODUCTION 
OF WHALE OIL 

World production of baleen whale oil during I965 (the 1964-65 
Antarctic season and the 1965 summer season) is forecast at 210,000 short 
tons, 16 percent below the 249,100 produced in 1964. The 1965 world sperm 
oil output also is forecast at a lower level- -155, 000 tons compared with 
171,900 in 1964- -down 10 percent. 

These estimates are based upon the assumption that production of 
baleen and sperm whale oil from whaling grounds outside tha Antarctic will 
not change significantly from that of 19-64. The most important of these 
grounds are in the North Pacific, where production (especially sperm oil) 
has increased in recent years because of increasing whaling activities by 
the USSR, in particular, but also by Japan and Canada. The USSR and Japan 
operated 4 and 3 pelagic expeditions, respectively, in the Pacific North 
during the 1964 summer season. 

The production of baleen oil in the 1964-65 Antarctic whaling season 
totaled 165,445 tons, 17 percent (or 33,967 tons) below the previous 
season's outturn. All countries registered a decline. Sperm oil production 
amounted to 54,453 tons, 18 percent (or 12,358 tons) below that of the 
previous season. All countries, except Norway, registered declines. 

The output for the Antarctic whaling season accounted for 80 and 39 
percent of the total world production of baleen and sperm oil, respectively, 
in 1964, as against 82 and 29 percent in 1963. 



WHALE OIL: Antarctic season production, 1962-63 to 1964-65 



Participating : 
country 


Baleen oil : Sperm oil 1/ 


1962-63 : 1963-64 : 1964-65 2/: 1962-63 : 1963-64 : 1964-65 2/ 


Pelagic whaling: : 

USSR 

United Kingdom. . 




124,865 105,133 92,822 
58,563 40,184 32,507 
34,636 37,940 32,802 
11,790 8,989 
: 12,535 


11,611 22,505 12,396 
17,671 31,428 30,019 
8,140 9,421 10,767 

: 3,278 2,888 

: 2,425 


. 242,389 192,246 158,131 


: 43,125 66,241 53,183 


South Georgia: 
Japan: : 

Leitk Harbor . . 


; — 3,628 2,772 
3,538 4,541 


277 950 
293 320 


7,166 7,314 


570 1,270 


Total Antarctic. 


242,389 199,412 165,445 : 43,125 66,811 54,453 



and from the Antarctic. 2/ Preliminary. 

The Norwegian Whaling Gazette, No. 4, April 1965, Oslo. 



-20- 



The 196^-65 pelagic season resulted in a total production of 158,131 tons 
of baleen oil and 53,183 tons of sperm oil, a decline of 18 and 20 percent, 
respectively, from 1963-64. The season ran from December 12, 1964, to April 7, 
I965. During the season, 15 factory ships (7 Japanese, 4 Soviet, and 
4 Norwegian) and 172 catching boats were in operation; 1 less factory ship and 
18 less catching boats than in the previous season. The Netherlands factory 
ship, which was sold to Japan in 196k, did not participate. 

Altogether the pelagic expeditions caught 6,984 blue whale units (BWU) as 
compared with 8,429 in 1963-64. The following table shows the maximum catch 
permissable and the actual catch obtained by the individual pelagic nations. 



Participating 
country 


: 1962-63 
: season 


: 1963-6^ 
: season 


: 1964-65 

: season 


1965-66 
season 


Quota \ Results 


Quota \ Results 


\ Quota \ Results 


Quota 


USSR : 


Rl n<3 "R1 up 

Whale Whale 
Units Units 

6,150 6,150 

3,000 2,816 

4,200 1,380 
900 458. 
750 502 


"Rl no Rl up 

Whale Whale 
Units Units 

4,600 4,600 
2,000 2,001 
2,800 1,485 
600 343 


Rl np Rl up 

Whale Whale 
• Units Units 

4,160 4,125 
1,600 1,586 
2,240 1,273 


Rl up 

Whale 
Units 

2,340 
', 900 
1,260 


Total : 


15,000 11,306- 


10,000 8,429 


8,000 6,984 


4,500 



NOTE: The blue whale is the statistical unit in relation to which smaller 
whales are expressed. One blue whale unit equals one blue whale, or two fin 
whales, or two and one-half humpback whales, or six sei whales. 



The Norwegian expedition thus achieved the poorest results in 1964-65, 
only 56.8 percent of their quota, while both the Japanese and the Soviet quotas 
were nearly filled. 

The two Antarctic land stations in South Georgia, Grytviken and Leith 
Harbor were operated by Japanese whaling companies in both the 1963-64 and 
1964-65 seasons. The output of baleen oil increased slightly to 7>3l4 tons 
and that of sperm oil to 1,270 tons during 1964. 



-21- 



At the seventeenth International Whaling Commission conference held in 
June, the maximum catch for the 1965 -66 Antarctic pelagic season was reduced to 
^,5C0 BWU from 8,000. According to the international quota agreement, the maxi- 
mum catch shall be apportioned as follows: Japan--2, 3*+0 units; Norway--l,26o 
units; and the USSR--900 units. 

At last season's yield of 22.6 tons per BWU, this would give an output of 
101,700 tons — 56,^+00 below 196^-65 --assuming all countries obtain their quota. 
Consequent to the reduction of the whaling quota the Japanese, reportedly, will 
send only 5 expeditions to the Antarctic during the 1965-66 season. This further 
reduction in the catch limit demonstrates the concern over diminishing whale 
stocks in the Antarctic. 

The USSR and Japan are firmly entrenched as the leading world producers of 
whale oil. Virtually all the Soviet output is retained for domestic use. Japan, 
besides satisfying her own domestic requirements, is the major world supplier of 
both baleen and sperm oil. Norway and the Republic of South Africa are also im- 
portant contributors to world supplies. The member countries of the European 
Economic Community, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the USSR, account 
for virtually all the world 1 s imports of whale oil. 



WHALE OIL: World production, annual 1961-6^ 



Country 


: 


Baleen 


oil 




Sperm oil 


i 1961 i 


1962 : . 


1963 


196k 1/ 


; 1961 ; 


1962 ; 


1963 ; 196U 1/ 




: 1 


,000 short tons 


: 1 


000 short tons 






. • 126.8 


±k3.k 


lko.1 


127.0 


: 3^-9 


37.3 


h-2.0 


51.2 




••: 65.7 


81.5 


81.1 


61.0 


: 27.6 


29.2 


52.0 


63.9 




• 126.^ 


9^.6 


3^-9 


38.3 


: Ik. 6 


lk.0 


9.2 


9.8 




• 2h.3 


13.6 


11.8 


9.0 


' 1.9 


3-3 


3.3 


2.9 




• 5^.6 


36.1 


12.5 




' 2.7 


3.7 


2.k 






..: 12.5 


5.8 


.7 




: 3-5 


h.5 


k.6 


5.6 




8.9 


6.6 


6.5 


k.6 


7.7 


11.5 


ll.k 


12.1 










.2 


ik.k 


12.6 


ll.k 


lk.1 


Chile 


• 1.6 


.3 


.k 


2.0 


7-1 


7.0 


5.3 


k.Q 






2.2 


2.k 


2.6 




• 9 


.8 


.6 






2.3 


2.3 


2.0' 


1.7 


1.5 


1.5 


1.6 




..: 2.6 


2.1 


1.0 


•T 


.k 


.k 


.2 


2/ 




..: 1.8 


1.1 


• 7 


l.k 


.k 


.3 


.3 


.2 




..: 2/ 








2.6 


2.8 


3-3 


3-0 




.8 


• 3 


.1 


2/-; 




2/ 


• 9 


1.0 




..: .5 


.1 


.1 


.2: 


• 5 


• 7 


• 5 


1.0 


Denmark (Faeroe 




2/ 


2/ 
















.1; 




.1 


.1 


.1 




. .: ^27.7 


390.1 


29U.6 


2^9.1: 


II9.9 


129.8 


lkcj.2 


171.9 



l/ Preliminary. 2/ Less than 50 tons. 3/ Including Ryukyu Islands. 



Source: The Norwegian Whaling Gazette, Oslo and International Whaling 
Statistics, Oslo. 

-22- 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
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WOR 

PRODUCTION AND TRADE 



Statistical Report 



CONTENTS 



AUGUST 1965 




WORLD SUMMARIES Page 
Production 

World Tobacco Production Down Slightly in 

Last Half of 1965 3 

1965 Wool Production Down Slightly 7 

Sesameseed Production Up in 1964 10 

World Exports and Production of Oilseeds, Oils 

and Fats at Record High in 1965 19 

Wheat Crop Below 1964 Record 30 

Trade 

Copra and Coconut Oil Exports 12 

Trade in Poultry Meat, 1964 12 

Sugar Trade Changes Little in 1964 16 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRALE 



Single copies free to persons in the United States 
from the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Rm. 59l8 South, Du-8-5^12 

Foreign Agriculture Circulars 

FC 11 -65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles I and 
IV, Public Law I480 

FFVS 7-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. Exports, April I965, with 
comparisons 

FD 7-65 Milk Production and Utilization in Principal Producing 

Countries in 196^ 

FD 8-65 World Butter and Cheese Production in I96U 

FFO lU-65 Gilbert and Ellice Islands Copra Situation 

FFO 15-65 India's Copra and Coconut Oil Situation 

FFO 16-65 World Peanut Production Sets New Record 

FCOF 3-65 World Coffee Crop Estimated to be Largest Since 1959-60 

FG 8-65 World Corn Crop Confirmed as Second Largest on Record 

FR 2-65 World Rice Crop 3 Percent Above Preceding Year's Record 

FFO 17-65 Mediterranean Basin Olive Oil Exports To Decline in 1965 

FFVS 8-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. exports, May, I965, with 
comparisons 

Reports 

FAS M-l6^ THE LIVESTOCK AND MEAT INDUSTRY OF AUSTRALIA. Discusses the 
problems and prospects of livestock production and marketing 
in a country that is responsible for about two -fifths of the 
world's wool exports and about one -eighth of its meat exports. 

FAS M-I65 THE ALMOND INDUSTRY OF SPAIN. July 1965, iilus. Discusses 
Spain as one of the leading producers and exporters of 
almonds, and tells how the United States has become more 
competitive in the almond world market. 

FAS M-166 ORIENTAL TOBACCO in the changing world of tobaccos. Amounts 
of oriental tobacco entering international trade have doubled 
over the 1935-39 average. July 1965. 

FAS M-I67 COTTON IN AFGHANISTAN. Cotton production has been gaining in 
importance. Cotton is now one of the country's most impor- 
tant export commodities. Illus. 



WORLD TOBACCO PRODUCTION DOWN 
SLIGHTLY IN LAST HALF OF I965 



Production of tobacco in countries harvesting during the last half of 
calendar year 1965 is estimated at 6,766 million pounds, down almost h per- 
cent from the 7; 037 million harvested in the same period last year. 

Smaller harvests in the United States, Greece, Turkey, Yugoslavia, 
Belgium, Italy, West Germany, Japan, and Poland more than offset increases 
forecast for practically all other countries harvesting during the last 
half of the current season. The smaller harvests indicated for the above 
mentioned countries are due to smaller plantings, except for Japan, where 
yields per acre were reduced by unseasonable weather. 

Larger harvests in Canada, Bulgaria, the USSR, Mainland China, Algeria 
Morocco, Tunisia, Cyprus, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Syria, Lebanon, and South 
Korea are attributed to larger plantings. Also, the rapid recovery made 
from the blue -mold incidence of recent past seasons is significant in 
Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, and for most of the Southwestern Asian countries 
This season, isolated recurrences of blue -mold in seed beds were reported 
in Greece, West Germany, Italy, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Turkey, Czechoslovakia 
Spain, Libya, Tunisia, Lebanon, Iran, and Syria, but actual crop damage in 
most of these countries has been negligible. 

Production by Areas 

North America : Harvest during the last half of I965 is forecast at 
2,l8l million pounds -- down d.h percent from the 2,380 million harvested 
last year. 

Total U.S. production (July estimate) is tentatively placed at 2,002 
million pounds -- down 10.1 percent from the I96U harvest of 2,227 million. 
The decline results from new limitations in the form of acreage -poundage 
quotas for flue -cured tobacco, and from basic acreage allotment cuts for 
all kinds of tobaccos, except for cigar type tobaccos and Perique. 

The Canadian crop is forecast at 179 million pounds -- up I6.5 percent 
from the 15k million harvested last year. Larger harvests of flue-cured 
and cigar tobaccos are expected to more than offset the sharp drop in 
hurley and moderate declines in other kinds of leaf tobacco. The I965 
Ontario flue -cured crop is currently forecast at 165 million pounds from 
88,000 acres, compared with the I96U harvest of 136.6 million pounds from 
73,500 acres. 

Europe : The I965 harvest is forecast at l,U8l million pounds -- down 
3.2 percent from the 1,530 million harvested last year but still 30 percent 
above the 1955-59 annual average of l,lk2 million. 



All countries in Weatern Europe expect to harvest smaller crops this 
season except for Austria, France, and Switzerland. Most of the decline 
is attributed to smaller plantings and unfavorable weather conditions. 

Harvest in Eastern Europe is forecast at 81+1+ million pounds or about 
k percent below last season's harvest of 878 million. Smaller crops in 
Yugoslavia and Poland due to reduced plantings more than offset increases 
forecast for practically all of the other countries in this area. 

The I965 harvest in the USSR is forecast at 530 million pounds, com- 
pared with 507 million in 196U. Larger plantings of oriental types of 
tobacco are expected to account for most of the increase over last season; 
whereas, the production of makhorka, a dark air-cured kind, is expected to 
continue its downward trend. 



LEAF TOBACCO: Production by kinds, estimated harvest in second half 
calendar year 1965, with comparisons -- farm sales weight l/ 



Kinds ; %H% ! 1963 2/ ; 196^ 2/ ; 1965 2/ 





: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




: pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 




..: 2,303,553 


2,1+19,61+9 


2,556,515 


2,385,239 




..: 578,^ 


88l,7l+9 


759,929 


760,250 


Other light 












69,833 


1+9,026 


62,671 


58,812 




..: 65M75 


609,563 


636,281+ 


638,726 


Oriental and 












..: 1,090,775 


1,368,^-73 


1,792,138 


1,718,831 




..: 1,18^,951 


98i+,299 


1,029,611+ 


1,009,392 






88,795 


91,965 


92,891 




..: 106,231 


101,973 


108,103 


101,826 




..: 6,095,761+ 


6,503,527 


7,037,219 


6,765,967 



1/ Farm sales weight is about 10 percent above dry weight normally reported 
in trade statistics. 2/ Preliminary. 



Africa : The tobacco harvest in the latter half of I965 is forecast at 
1+0.3 million pounds -- up 7«5 percent from the 37*5 million for last season 
but still slightly under the 1955-59 annual average of 1+2.2 million. In- 
creases are forecast for all countries in this area. 

Asia: All countries, except Turkey and Japan, this season expect to 
harvest larger crops. Harvest for this area during the last half of 1965 
is forecast at 2,533 million pounds or down about 2 percent from the I96I+ 
harvest of 2,582 million. 



Turkey expects a crop of 318 million pounds -- exceeded only by the 
196^ record harvest of 392 million. The decline in production was caused 
by reduced plantings in the low lands due to high rainfall and flooding 
conditions and to blue -mold destroying some seed beds. The harvest in 
Japan is placed at hky million pounds down h.3 percent from the 196^- 
harvest of h68 million. Continued cool weather adversely affected flue- 
cured yields and caused yields per acre for other kinds of leaf tobacco 
to decline slightly despite increases in plantings. 

The I965 harvest in South Korea is expected to set a new record of 
90.0 million pounds , compared with 87.^ million last year. Other 
countries expecting to harvest larger crops include Cyprus, Iran, Iraq, 
Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Mainland China. The I965 flue -cured harvest 
in Mainland China is expected to be slightly larger than last season but 
still below the 1955-59 annual average of 60^- million pounds. 



Production by Kind 



The harvest by kinds indicates declines for flue-cured, oriental, 
other light air-cured (including Maryland), and fire-cured types of 
tobacco; whereas, the production of the other kinds shows only slight 
changes from last season. 

Flue-cured production is forecast at 2,385 million pounds -- down 
6.7 percent from the I96U harvest of 2,557 million. The U.S. flue-cured 
crop is placed at 1,169 million pounds (July estimate) -- nearly 16 per- 
cent below the 1,388 million harvested in 196k. 



Total burley production is expected to equal last year's harvest of 
760 million pounds. U.S. burley production is placed at 619 million pounds 
(July estimate) compared with 620 million in 196^-. Other light air-cured 
(including Maryland) is estimated at 59 million pounds or nearly 6 percent 
below last season's figure of 63 million. 



Oriental and semi-oriental tobaccos harvested during the last half of 
I965 are forecast at 1,719 million pounds, exceeded only by the I96U high 
of 1,792 million. Production of dark air-cured types is currently esti- 
mated at 1,009 million pounds, or down slightly from the 196^ harvest of 
1,030 million. Harvest of fire -cured tobacco, estimated at 102 million 
pounds, is expected to be about 6 percent below last year's figure of 108 
million pounds. The harvests of light sun-cured and dark sun-cured types 
are expected to exceed the I96U totals slightly. 




- 6 - 



I965 WOOL PRODUCTION 
DOWN SLIGHTLY 



World wool production in 19&5 (including the 1965-66 season in the 
Southern Hemisphere) is estimated at 5,705 million pounds, down about 2 
percent from the previous year. 

The amount of wool available for movement into world trade from 
the major producing countries is expected to he slightly less than a 
year ago. Carry-over stocks of wool are at about the same level as a 
year ago. 

Australian production in 1965-66 is forecast to decline about 6 
percent to 1,69^- million pounds, the result of drought conditions 
occurring this year in New South Wales and Queensland. Not only will 
the clip per head in the affected areas be below average, but cold 
weather losses of weakened sheep are likely to be higher, while lamb- 
ings will also be reduced. Consequently, a smaller number of sheep 
will be shorn in the coming season. 

New Zealand production in 196^-65 amounted to about 625 million 
pounds. Estimates for the 1965-66 season place production at about 
650 million pounds, an increase of h percent. Exceptionally favor- 
able climatic conditions reportedly have caused good growth during the 
past year and midwinter sheep numbers are expected to show a sizable 
increase . 

Argentine wool production in 1965-66 is forecast at ^63 million 
pounds, up 13 million pounds from the previous season. Carry-over 
stocks are expected to be higher than a year ago. Exports during the 
remainder of the current season will be encouraged by the suspension 
of the export sales tax which has been extended until September 30. 

Early season estimates place Uruguayan production in 1965-66 well 
below the previous year. Drought conditions were prevalent in the 
major sheep areas in the past year and this is expected to reduce 
substantially the coming season's clip. 

South African wool production in 1965-66 is expected to drop 
about 2 million pounds below the previous year. This is the second 
year of declining wool production in South Africa. Continued drought 
and early snow and cold weather are expected to bring about this 
smaller clip. 



WOOL: Production in specified countries, greasy basis, average 1956-60 

annual I963-6I+ l/ 



; : ; : ; Percent 

.•Average ; ; ; 2/ ; change 

Continent and country :1956-60 ; 1963 : 196k ; 1965 : 1965 ; 1965 

; : ; : : 1956-60: 1§qT+ 

jMillion ;Million ;Million ;Million ; ; 

; pounds : pounds ; pounds : pounds : Percent ; Percent 
North America: ; 

Canada ; 7-7 6.8 6.3 6.0 -22 - 5 

United States 3/ ; 308.8 287. 1 26^.6 250.0 -19 - 6 

Mexico : 9.6 12.9 11.0 11.0 + k 



Total North America k/: 330.0 310.0 285. 0 270.0 -18 - 5 

South America: ; 

Argentina ; W.l +36.5 +50.0 +63. 0 +3 +3 

Brazil ; 60.+ 58.5 6l.2 6l.2 +1 

Chile : 1*8.7 53.8 55-6 57.3 +18 + 3 

Falkland Islands ; U.5 ^.8 +.5 + .5 

Peru ; 20.9 2+.2 22.0 22.0 +5 

Uruguay : 180.2 19^.0 189.6 180.0 — - 5 



Total South America k/: 78O.O 790.0 800.0 805.O +3 + 1 

Europe: : 

France ; 62.9 6l.7 62.0 60.0 - 5 - 3 

Germany, West ; 11. 5 10. 5 8.3 8.0 -30 - k 

Greece : 25.1 26.8 26.7 26.6 +6 

Ireland ; 21.2 26.2 26.9 27.6 +30 + 3 

Italy : 30. k 29.k 29.2 27.7 - 9 - 5 

Norway ; 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 

Portugal j 23.8 25.6 25.9 26.0 +9 

Spain : 72.6 81.3 80.7 79.^ +9 -2 

United Kingdom : 116.3 130.6 126.8 128. h +10 +1 



Total West Europe 1+/..: 385. 0 U15.O UlO.O kO^.O +5 - 1 

Bulgaria : 38.3 50.0 50.0 50.0 +31 

Hungary : 16.3 22.0 22.0 2k. 0 +kj + 9 

Poland ; 20. k 17.0 16.5 l6.0 -22 - 3 

Rumania : kk.6 52.5 53.0 53.0 +19 

Yugoslavia : 31.2 29.1 29.0 28.0 -10 - 3 



Total East Europe kj . : 180.0 195.0 200.0 200.0 +11 



Total Europe k/ : 565. 0 610.0 610.0 605.O +7 - 1 



U.S.S.R. (Europe & Asia) : 690.O 825. 0 753.0 727-0 +5 - 3 

(Continued) 



- 8 - 



WOOL: Production in specified countries, greasy 

annual 1963-64 l/ 



basis, average 1956-60 



; Average ; 

Continent and country ;1956-60 ; 1963 , 


: : 2/, 
; 1964 : 1965 


: Percent 
; change 


: 1965 ; 1965 


: 1956-60; 1964 


; Million ; Million 
; pounds : pounds 


; Million ; Million 
: pounds : pounds 


: Percent : Percent 



Africa: 





19.0 


19.0 


19.0 


19.0 








34.9 


34.0 


4o.o 


44.0 


+26 


+10 




7.8 


9.0 


9.0 


9.0 


+15 






: 5.2 


5.5 


5.5 


5.5 


+ 5 


— 




: 323.2 


322.9 


310.0 


308.O 


- 5 


- 1 




• 405.0 


405.0 


4oo.o 


400.0 


- 1 




Asia: 
















• 41.9 


41.9 


39.7 


41.9 




+ 5 




; 24.7 


25.O 


25.0 


25.O 


+ 1 




Turkey (Europe & Asia) . . . 


: 91.2 


92.6 


99.2 


101.4 


+11 


+ 2 




• 18.2 


18.7 


22.0 


29.8 


+64 


+35 




: 73.8 


75.0 


78.0 


80.0 


+ 8 


+ 3 




: 7.5 


3.2 


2.2 


2.2 


-71 






: 32.5 


32.5 


31.5 


32.5 











510.0 


525.0 


550.0 


+ 8 


+ 5 


Oceania: 


















1,781.7 


1,799.4 


1,693.9 


+ 7 


- 6 




...: 538.3 


616.0 


625.0 


650.0 


+21 


+ 4 






2,400.0 


2,425.0 


2,345.0 


+11 


- 3 






5,850.0 


5,800.0 


5,705.0 


+ 6 


- 2 



Hemisphere is combined with that produced in the season beginning July 1 or 
October 1 of the same year in the Southern Hemisphere. Pulled wool is included 
for most countries at its greasy equivalent. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Converted 
"pulled wool" to greasy basis at 1.7. 4/ Includes estimates for other pro- 
ducing countries. 5/ Includes Basutoland and South West Africa. 6/ Includes 
mainland China. I/Rounded, to nearest five million. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign government, other foreign source material, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research and related information. 



- 9 - 



WORLD SESAMESEED 
PRODUCTION UP IN 196^ 



World production of sesameseed in 196*4- is estimated at 1.7 million 
short tons, k percent above the previous year's estimate and 5 percent 
above the 1955-59 output. This increase was due almost entirely to 
substantial increases in output in the Sudan, India, Venezuela, Columbia, 
and Burma. These more than offset the decreased output in Mexico, 
Turkey, and Mainland China. 

Asia accounts for about two-thirds of the world's sesame output. 
Production in India in I96I+ is estimated to have risen 6 percent from 
the preceding year's output. The increase in production was mainly in 
Rajasthan and is attributed to an increase in acreage and to favorable 
weather during the growing season. 

No official information on the production of sesameseed in Mainland 
China has been available in recent years. However, production since 
1959 is believed to have trended downwards. The proportion of the total 
world's production of sesame accounted for by China declined from over 
ho percent for the 1950-5*+ period to 25 percent for the 1955-59 period. 
Elsewhere in Asia, sesameseed production increased last year in Burma, 
Pakistan, Thailand, and Syria, whereas in Turkey output declined with 
the reduction in sown acreage. 



Production of sesame in Africa, which accounted for an estimated 
one-fifth of the world's output in 196k, increased lk percent from the 
previous year owing to increased output from the Sudan. Production in 
the Sudan, which normally accounts for about one -half of Africa's out- 
put, increased 29 percent. In Nigeria and Tanzania, where the sesame 
crop is a commercial one grown primarily for the export market, pro- 
duction increased slightly in Nigeria but fell by half in Tanzania. 
Elsewhere in Africa, sesame is cultivated on a fairly large scale in 
Uganda, Ethiopia, and the United Arab Republic. 

In the Western Hemisphere, Mexico, Venezuela, and Colombia are the 
only sizeable producers. Production in Nicaragua and El Salvador has 
tended to decline in recent years with the expansion of cotton. Smaller 
sesame output in Mexico in I96I+ was attributed to its displacement by 
wheat in irrigated areas and by corn in non-irrigated areas. In 
Venezuela and Colombia, however, output has increased markedly under 
government programs and output in both countries was at record levels 
in 196*1. 



-10- 



SESAMESEED l/: Production in specified countries and estimated 
world total, average 1955-59, annual 1959-64 



: 

Continent and country . 


Average 
1955-59 


* 1 ocn 


i i960 


: 1961 


; 1962 


±^03 


1 Qfh O 
XyOH- £1 


: 












: 

North America: : 


















3.3 


: 3.9 


: 1.8 


; 1.5 


: .5 


! .7 


.4 




2.8 


: 3.0 


3-0 


3.4 


: 1.6 


: 1.0 


.8 




120.4 


: 138.3 


: 142.4 


161.8 


: 161.2 


164.7 


132.3 




8.1 


9.2 


9.0 


6.8 


6.4 


5.7 


5.2 




137.3 


: 156.6 


: 158.3 


175.5 


172.4 


174.9 


141.7 


South America: : 


















17.2 


: 19.8 


: 22.0 


: 25.I 


23.I 


38.6 


60.6 




16.7 


21.0 


: 17.9 


27.4 


31.0 


: 34.0 


51.7 




35.0 


li O O 

4<2.3 


: 41.4 


54.3 


59.0 


(4.4 


TTJT7T 

XJL/K 0 


Europe: : 


















H.3 


H.5 


: 9.4 


8.9 


7.1 


: 12.0 


8.1 




21.4 


22.0 


19.6 


19.0 


16.8 


21.8 


17.0 


Africa: : 


















41. 2 


: 45.0 


• kl Q 

• h-x. y 






: — 







6.4 


: 7.7 


q c; 






: — 







164.5 


: 197.7 


1 7 




• 1 79 k 


I68.7 


217.0 




17.5 


: 17.2 


> if, Q 


xx. p 


l6 7 
. XO. ( 


: 28.2 


30.0 




6.0 


: 6.6 


» ✓ ■ J 


1 0*0 


. 2.2 


: 2.2 





Central African Rep. 5/.'. 


2.0 


: 1.5 


1.5 




0 

• y 


: 1.9 







2.5 


: 2.5 


: 2.8 


: 2.8 




: — 







• 7 


: 1.2 


: 1.5 


2.0 


\ 2.1 


: 2.0 







8.1 


11.4 


: 10.6 


: 13.4 


: 9.7 


: 11.1 


5.2 




33.4 


: 35.1 


: 37.6 


38.1 




! 







1.9 


2.1 


: 1.4 


: 2.8 


: 4.4 


: 3.3 


3.5 




19.8 


23.2 


: 30.8 


23.I 


24.7 


22.5 


26.3 




313.4 


364.3 


313.7 


4o8.4 


329.7 


336.9 


383.6 


Asia: : 


















56.2 


: 74.1 


■ 71 Q 


ftfi 1 


ft7 k 


: 59.4 


78.4 




406.0 


425.0 








330.0 


300.0 




473.5 


407.9 


> OCO Q 


kl 7 ft 
H-X 1 • 0 


pxx. ? 


484.2 


513.9 




37.9 


38.3 




HX. X 




37.1 


38.1 




51.9 


: 51.3 


kft ^ 


kft K 


► k^ O 


44.1 


37.5 




16.8 


I8.5 




-1-0. I 


17 £ 
X( .O 


: 17.9: 


19.2 




8.3 


7.7 


k 1 


k 


O.p 


5.8 


6.1 




6.0 


: 5.4 


?.o 


5.5 


c; k 
?.4 


: 5.2 


4.6 




7.6 


: 11.1 


11.5 


7.2 




: — 


— 




2.1 


2.4 


2.3 


3.1 




: 3-3 


— 




3.3 


3.4: 


4.3 


5.0 


: 4.4 


: 2.7 


— 




1.9 


1.0 


1.7 


8.7 


13.0 








• 9! 


.4 


: .3: 


.4 


.4 


1, 
.4 


.6 




3.6- 


2.9 


2.0. 


2.5 


2.1 


1 9 
x. y 






13.5 


7.1: 


6.4; 


5.0 


5.6 


6.7 






11.5 


13.2 


12.1: 


6.6 










1,105.4 


1,074.0 


960. 0: 


999.8 


1,089.1 


1,028.0 


1,039.5 




1,612.5 


1,660.0 


1,493.0 


1,657.0 


1, 667.0 


1,636.0 


1, 698.0 



1/ Southern Hemisphere sesame crops, which axe harvested early in the calendar year are 
combined with those of the northern Hemisphere which are harvested in the latter months 
of the same year. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Includes estimates for the above countries for which 
data are not available and for minor producing countries. 4/ Includes USSR. 5/ Commercial 
crops only. 6/ Territory of Tanganyika, jj Unofficial estimates indicative of changes in 
the size of the crop rather than actual quantities harvested. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics 
of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural 
Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 11 - 



WORLD COPRA AND COCONUT 
OIL EXPORTS 



World exports of copra and coconut oil in 196^, provisionally estimated 
at 1,312,900 long tons (oil -equivalent basis), were virtually equivalent to 
those in 1963. An increase in coconut oil supplies almost offset the de- 
cline in copra supplies. 

World exports of copra during 196^ declined k percent from 1963 This 
mainly reflected the 13 percent (or 121,200 ton) decline in Philippine 
registered exports. The Philippine Republic accounted for 59 percent of 
world exports in 196^4- as against 6k percent in 1963- Unregistered ship- 
ments of copra from the Philippines have ceased to be an important factor 
in world copra trade although they continue on a significant scale from 
Indonesia. There were somewhat larger shipments of copra from Indonesia, 
Ceylon, Papua, and New Guinea in 196^ than in 19^3 • 

World exports of coconut oil rose 10 percent during 196^. Exports 
from Ceylon increased k^ percent (or 3^,500 tons) from those in I963. 
Registered exports from the Philippine Republic were 7 percent (or 1^,300 
tons) above the previous year's volume and accounted for 53 percent of 
world supplies in 196^. Supplies from Fiji were larger while supplies 
from Malaysia continued to decline. (Table pages 13 and 1^) 

WORLD TRADE IN 
POULTRY MEAT, I96IJ- 

Following a setback in I963, international trade in poultry meat in 
196^ reached a record high. Imports into the eight major world markets in 
196^ totaled 573 '9 million pounds, up 11. percent from the previous year. 
West Germany, by far the largest world market, accounted for 71 percent of 
the total world trade in poultry meat, as imports amounted to ko^ .k million 
pounds. This was 28 million pounds above the quantity imported in 1963. 
Of the countries exporting poultry meat to Weat Germany, Member States of 
the EEC accounted for about 50 percent of the total trade. Dutch shipments 
to West Germany were up nearly 9 percent in 196i+ totaling 1*4-3 million 
pounds. Belgium shipments to Germany more than doubled in 196*4- when com- 
pared with the previous year and French shipments were up about ko per- 
cent over 1963. West German purchases of poultry meat from the United 
States in l$6k were 92.8 million pounds, up about 19 percent from a year 
earlier, but only k"J percent of the record 17*4-. 1 million pounds shipped 
in 1962. Most of the U.S. increased trade occured in poultry parts as 
German imports of U.S. broilers reached a new low. The major factor in 
the upward trend in poultry meat consumption in West Germany in 196*4- was 
the high consumer prices of beef and veal. 

In 196*4- sharp increases in poultry meat trade with Japan were again 
noted. Japanese imports in 196*4- totaled 13.1 million pounds, a 7° percent 
increase over the previous year. The U.S. continued to supply most of the 
market accounting for about 11.6 million pounds in 196*4-. Also Canada, the 
United Kingdom, Austria, Italy and Peru showed sizable increases in the 
amount of poultry meat imported in 196*4-. (Continued on page 16) 



-12- 



Table 1. — COPRA: World exports, by principal exporting continents 
and countries, average 1955-59, annua.! 1958-64 



Continent and country 



Average : 
1955-59: 



1958 



1959 



I960 



1961 ' 1962 I 1963 y\ 1964 1/ 



REGISTERED EXPORTS 2/ 
Asia: 

Philippines , 

Indonesia 

West Irian. .............. 

Malay, Singapore 4/ , 

Sabah 4/ , 

Sarawak 4/ 

Ceylon , 

Other , 

Total Asia , 

Oceania: 

New Guinea , 

Papua , 

New Hebrides , 

Solomon Islands , 

French Oceania < 

Western Samoa. , 

Gilbert and Ellice Isl. . , 
Trust Territories (U.S.), 

Tongo Islands , 

Fiji , 

Other , 

Total Oceania , 

Africa: 

Mozambique , 

Zanzibar 

Seychelles , 

Togo , 

Nigeria 

Comoro Islands , 

Sao Tome and Principe. .. , 

Other , 

Total Africa , 

Americas: 

Mexico , 

Jamaica , 

Dominican Republic , 

Total Americas , 

World total , 

UNREGISTERED 5/ 

Philippines to: 

Sabah , 

Other , 

Indonesia to: 

Sabah , 

Other , 

World total , 

World total, regis- 
tered and unregistered: 



1,000 long tons 



: 813.0 


736.1 


652.3 


804.9! 


640.7: 


624.5! 


928.7: 


807.5 


: 203.3 


115. 1: 


129.2, 


163.6: 


231. 1: 


IO6.5: 


104.4: 


3/ 165.O 


: 4.9 


f- £ 

5.6 


4.9 


: 5.8: 


5.5: 


3/ 4.0: 


3/ 3.0 


3/ 3.0 


: -62.5 


-55.9' 


-27.0 


-5.5: 


-17. 8 


-44.2: 


-17.8- 


-16.2 


: 14.1. 


12.6 


13.7 


: 15.2 


18.7 


16.3 


17.5: 


16.1 


: .4; 


.1: 


-.3 


: -1.3' 


-1.5 


-.4 


-»2: 


3/ -.3 


: 46.2 


27.7 


42.6 


29.I 


54.9 


72.4 


43.1 


l-O T 

58.1 


: 1.9 


3-4 


L.6 


1. rr 

4.7 


2.0 


1.7 


1.5 


3/ 1.5 


: 1,021.3 




517.0 


1,016.7: 


933. 6 


950.5 


1,050.2 


1,034.7 


• 

: 61.1- 


55.8 


49.7 


52.1: 


67.1, 


58.8 


53.4 


58.4 


: 15.2 


15.3 


12.6 


15.4 


16.1 


14.9 


: 14.7 


15.8 


: 30.4 


33.0 


34.5 


: 23.5; 


31.9 


31.0 


35.1 


36.1 


: 20.6 


: 20.4- 


22.6 


: 19-7 


25.2 


24.1 


: 24.3 


24.6 


: 20.0 


17.1' 


19.3 


: 23.5" 


21.3 


26.4 


: 22.8 


24.5 


: 14.4 


10.1 


16. S 


: 14.6 


12.9 


12.8 


: 15.0 


14.8 


: 6.9! 


7.5 


8.0 


: 10.3: 


6.1 


7.3 


! 6.0 


: 5.6 


: 10.2 


8.7 


7.7 


: 10.1 


9.9 


14.1 


: 9.2 


: 11.3 


: 19.4 


03.8 


15.9 


! 16.2 


17.4 


8.7 


: 9.9 


: 10.8 


: 2.8 


.7 


.1 


: 2.5 


: 5.9 


: 6.9 


6.0 


: 6.7 


: 4.7 


4.1: 


4.5 


3.1 


3.1 


4.6 


•3/ 3.7 


:3/ 4.0 


: 205 . 7! 


lob. 5 


191.7 


191.0 






dUO* J. 


dxd . 0 


: 40.1 


: 43.7 


37.0 


• 40.1 


: 59.1 


: 52.0 


: 45.7 


: 43.1 


6.4 


10.0 


8.0' 


4.5 


: 7.4 


: 7.6 


: 11.5 


: 10.0 


: 5.5 


: 5.5 


: M 


: 4.6 


: 4.8 


: 5.7 


: 5.2 


! 7.0 


4.1 


3.0 


: 5.0 


: 3.4 


: 4.7 


: 1.9 


: 2.9 


: 3.7 


6.0 


5.4 


8.7 


: 6.7 


2.6 


: 1.5 


: 2.8 


: 7.8 


: 2.4 


2.6 


: 2.5 


: 3.2 


: 3.4 


3-5 


: 3.2 


: 3.2 


: 4.4 


5.0 


: 5.0 


: 4.7 


: 5.6 


: 6.4 


: 5.0 


:3/ 5.0 


: 7.3 


5.7 


9.2 


4.9: 


5.2 


: 3.3 


: 10.3 


:3/ 9-0 


: 76.2 


50.9 


79-7 


72.1 


92.8 


81.9 


86.6 


: 88.8 


: .2 


! --- 


: .8 


! — — — 


— — — 


: 4.6 


: 20.5 


: 16.4 


2.0 


1.5 


5.0 


: 4.4 


! 5.5 


: 3.0 


: .3 
» • j 

! 7.0 


:3/ 5.0 


: 2.2 


1.5 


5.8 


4.4 


: 5.5 


: 7.6 


27.5 


1 21.4 


: 1,305.4 


1,113. 6 


1,094.2 


: 1,254.2 


: 1,248.8 


: 1,279.9 


: 1,394.7 


: 1,357.5 


: 28.6 


: 41.0 


: 31.9 


'. 38.8 


! 29.1 


: 13.2 


: 5.3 


; 6.3 




: 66.0 


: 25.9 


: 129.3 


: 250.4 


: 37.7 


: .8 


: .5 




: 13.7 


: 13.8 


: 25.7 


: 20.1 


\ 15.2 


: 16.9 


: 10.4 




99-5 


: 52.8 


: 42.0 


: 23.6 


: 65.8 


: 35.1 


:3/ 15.0 


:' 155.2 


: 220.2 


: 124.4 


: 535.8 


: 353.2 


: 131.9 


: 58.1 


: 32.2 


.: 1,460.6 


! 1,333.8 


• 1,215.6 


: 1,520.0 


1,602.0 


: 1,411.6 


: 1,452.8 


: 1,389.7 



l/ Preliminary. 2/ Officially recorded shipments. 3/ Estimated. 4/ Net exports. 5/ Excess 
of imports from the Philippines and Indonesia over recorded exports to destinations listed, 
after allowances were made for the time shipments were afloat, for shrinkage, for loss, and for 
diversions enroute to destination. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of 
foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and 
Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 13 - 



Table 2. — COCONUT OIL: World exports, by principal exporting continents 
and countries, average 1955-59, annual 1958-64 



I iggfg | 1958 ; 1959 I i960 j 1961 j 1962 11963 j/j 1964 1/ 



Continent and 
country 



Asia: 

Philippines-registered. 

unregistered 2/ 

Indonesia-registered. . . 

unregistered 2j 

Malay, Singapore 3/.... 

Ceylon 

Sarawak 3/ 

Other 4/7. 

Total Asia 

Oceania: 

Fiji 

New Guinea 

Other 

Total Oceania 

Africa: 

Mozambique 

Zanzibar 

Other 

Total Africa 



1,000 long tons 



83. 6< 


! 89.6! 


64.4« 


; : 

59.2: 


• 

* 

72.8: 


137.9! 


212.1 j 


226.4 


2.6 


: 1.8 


2.6' 


.2: 


.2: 


.1« 


.1 • 


.1 


1.1: 
.5 


— 

: .6 


— 

■ 1.4 


— : 
2.3: 


— : 
.1: 


— • 
.2 


: .9 




79.8 


67.5: 


37.4< 


37.8: 


54.2: 


39.8 


! 3^.5 


19.9 


70.0 


1. i. -1 


69.4 


: 55.5: 


91.8: 


102.4: 


81.1 


: 117.6 


1.2 


; 1.4: 


• 1.2: 


1.5: 


3.1: 


1.8 


2.0 i 


'3/ 2.0 


c 

.D 


.7: 




• 5: 


2.0: 


2.0 


: 1.5 


-3/ 2.0 


239.^ 


205.9 


: 176.4 


• 157. 0: 


225. 0: 


254.2 


. 332.2 


368.6 


PO f, 




ill. Q 


"Ifl o« 

> XvJ • \J • 


• 
• 

O* 1 ♦ 


ifi P 


: 20.0 


! 22.8 


15.4 


• 23.3: 


: 23.7 


! 17.8: 


19.7: 


22.6 


: 23.1 : 22.7 


.9 


: 1.0 


.9' 


.2: 


.3: 


.1 


: .1 


: .1 


36.9 


: 46.1 


: 39.5' 


36.0: 


43.7: 


40.9 


: 43.2 


: 45.6 


6.3 


! 5.8- 


; 2.9 


1.8*: 


* 

3.1: 


3.2 


! 9.5 


\ 8.3 


3.3 


: 3.3 


: 1.5 


: 2.7: 


2.5: 


2.5 


: 1.2 : .8 


.5 


: .7 


: .8 


.3: 


.2: 


.2 


: .6 


: .8 


10.1 


: 9.8 


: 5.2 


: 4.8: 


5.8: 


5.9 


: 11.3 


1 9.9 



World total. 



286.4: 261.8: 221.1: 197.8: 274.5: 331.0: 386.7 : 423.5 



l/ Preliminary. 

2/ Excess of exports from the Philippines and Indonesia over recorded exports after 
allowances were made for time shipments were afloat, for loss, and for diversions 
enr oute . 

3/ Net exports. 

4/ Estimated. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 
related information. 



- 14 - 



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- 15 - 



The only major poultry meat exporting country which experienced a 
decrease in trade in 196^ was Denmark. However, Danish shipments, the 
majority of which go to West Germany, has been little affected by the 
high EEC poultry import levies until 196^. Under the first calendar 
year, 1963, of the EEC Poultry Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), Danish 
exports to West Germany declined only slightly, from 8^.9 million pounds 
in 1962 to 82.5 million in 1963. In 196^, however, Danish exporters felt 
the full effect of the restrictive EEC poultry CAP as shipments to West 
Germany dropped to 60.8 million pounds, down 26 percent from the previous 
year. 

In I96J+, the United States maintained its position as the leading 
exporter of poultry meat to all markets, with the Netherlands second and 
Denmark third. Total U.S. exports of poultry meat to all markets in 
196^- totaled about 231.2 million pounds, up 11 percent over the previous 
year but only 85 percent of the record 271 million pounds exported in 
I962. In I96U- United States shipments of poultry meat went to about 80 
countries and independent territories and were valued at $61.3 million. 
With the exception of very small amounts moved under P.L. kQo, Title I, 
all U.S. exports of poultry meat constitute dollar sales and all exports 
of these products move through regular commercial channels without bene- 
fit of subsidy. 

World trade in poultry meat in I965 will likely continue at a very 
high level as supplies of red meat, with the exception of pork, are 
expected to remain in short supply and prices are expected to increase. 
In the principal producing countries, poultry meat will again be in ample 
supply and priced attractively to consumers. 



WORLD SUGAR TRADE 
CHANGES LITTLE IN 196^ 

World sugar exports were very near the same level in 1^6h as in 1963. 
Exports amounted to 18.9 million short tons in 196^-, compared with 19.0 
million in I963. There were increases for North America, East Europe, 
Asia, and Oceania. Small declines were registered for West Europe and 
Africa, while there was a sizable decline in exports. from South. America. 

North America accounted for 38.7 percent of all exports in 196^, and 
was the largest net exporter. West Europe was the largest net importer 
however, the United States remained by far the largest single country 
importer in the world. The United Kingdom ranked second as an importer, 
while the USSR was third in this regard. On a net import basis, Japan 
ranks third. 

Cuban exports in 196^ showed a marked increase over 1963. A large 
part of the increase was accounted for by exports to the USSR. 

World consumption in 1965 is expected to rise more than in 196k. 
Trade in 1965 will probably be maintained at about the same level as in 
196^. 



-16- 



SUGAR, CEHTRIFUGAL RAW VALUE: International trade, average 1955-59, annua] 1962, 1963 and 1964 



Average 



Continent and country 



1955-59 



1962 



1963 



Exports 


Imports 


Exports 


Imports 


Exports 


Imports 


Exports 


Imports 


1,000 


1,000 


1 000 


1,000 


1 000 


1,000 


1 000 


1,000 


slior L tons 


snort tons 


short tons 


snort tons 


short tons 


short tons 


a. Vi r\ ^+ a 

BUUl V KAJLLO 


snort tons 


7 
f 


» 1 


' 26 


. 1 






34 




1 


717 


12 


832 


53 


830 


17 


84 5 






24 


p/ 


43 


p/ 


40 


* 0 


7 




21 




20 


i 


23 


2/ 


2_ 








?1 


2/ 


68 


0 


p/ 


11 


2/ 




p/ 


2 


2/ 




no 


12 






438 


p/ 


<% 

7 f O 


p/ 


14 


2/ 




f 


48 










. 




f 


10 


f 


1 Q 


f 










]j 


4,486 


c 
? 




P7 




21 


Q 


28 


0 


21 


Q 




ly 




0 


1 00 






0 


S 7PS 




0 


3 881 


0 


4 603 


Q 


7U 


f 


890 


£/ 


719 


2/ 


729 


2/ 


134 




100 


0 


182 


0 


17Q 


0 


19 


0 


38 


0 


40 


0 


15 


0 


349 




424 


0 


442 


0 


467 


0 


78 


0 


87 


0 


86 


0 


58 


0 


0 


8 


0 


8 


0 


7 


0 


7 


48 


0 


44 


0 


40 


0 


44 


0 


10 




2 


0 


1 


0 


1 


0 


170 


2/ 


188 


2/ 


211 


0 




0 


Q 




Q 


0 


y 


Q 


9 


7,656 


5,080 


8, 258 


5,525 


6,518 


5,335 


7,321 


4,461 


41 


2/ 


36 


0 




0 


50 


2/ 


0 




<J 


Oh. 


0 


10 


0 


0 


553 


0 

2/ 


491 


0 


581 


0 


P7Q 


0 


291 




2/ 


326 


2/ 


P7Q 


2/ 


0 


235 


0 


tig 


0 


292 


0 




20 


16 


76 


2/ 




0 


28 


0 


14 


5 


74 


1 


52 


3 


57 




6 


2 




6 


7 


0 


3 


0 


510 


2/ 




2/ 


547 


2/ 


468 


2/ 


0 


38 


0 


fs 


0 


55 


0 


ft 


35 


15 


0 


2/ 


36 


2/ 


0 


2/ 


1 


7 


3 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1,^71 


422 


1,555 


235 


- - - 

1,966 


361 


1,165 


211 


2 


34 


?/ 


^p 


?/ 


ll5 


2/ 




118 


57 




10 


& 


68 


ID8 


4l 


47 


2/ 




1 3 
J-j 


108 


54 


168 


20 


0 


173 




182 


Q 




0 


pi s 


646 


48q 


(OX 


474 




I1P5 




500 


13 


309 


46 


175 


5 


339 


17 


71 


0 


117 


0 


140 


0 


100 


0 


1P1 


0 


10 


0 


12 


0 


q 


0 


13 


6 


60 


25 


57 




48 


20 


S3 


85 


40 


2/ 


28 


12 


456 


2/ 


cMi 


0 


13 


0 


17 


0 


16 


0 


11 


60 


269 


14 


139 


19 


247 


7 


288 


1 


167 


1 


169 


1 


220 


1 


116 


2/ 


144 


2/ 


182 


2/ 


172 


2/ 


208 


1 


58 


0 


56 


1 


278 


f 


316 


2 


75 


4 


81 




105 


3 


100 


3 


229 


5 


270 


4 


224 


2 


232 


748 


2, 835 


38l 


2,4l4 


489 


2,817 


532 


2.547 


1,732 


5,079 


1, 330 


4,471 


1,721 


5,773 


1,585 


5,464 


12 


0 


70 


14Q 




141 




1 S7 


319 


0 


506 


165 


541 


165 


430 


55 


179 


1 1 


255 


354 


216 


270 


1 5Q 


8q 


58 


57 


96 


0 . 


162 


0 


171 


0 


254 


11 


854 


166 


255 


114 


604 


0 


0 


36 


57 


44 


48 


54 






18 


102 


29 


161 


30 


67 


15 


131 


84o 


217 


1,867 


1,039 


1,255 


811 


1,379 


432 


2,572 


5,296 


3,197 


5,510 


2,976 


6,584 


2,964 


5,896 



1964 y 



Borth America: : 

British Honduras : 

Canada .••••••...: 

Costa Rica : 

El Salvador : 

Guatemala : 

Honduras : 

Mexico : 

Nicaragua : 

Panama. 

United States 

Caribbean: : 

Antigua : 

Barbados : 

Cuba : 

Dominican Republic : 

Guadeloupe : 

Haiti : 

Jamaica : 

Martinique : 

Hetherlands Antilles : 

St. Kitts : 

St. Lucia and St. Vincent: 
Trinidad and Tobago : 

Other 3/ : 

Total Borth America. . . . ' 

South America: : 

Argentina : 

Bolivia : 

Brazil : 

British Guiana : 

Chile : 

Colombia : 

Ecuador : 

Paraguay : 

Peru : 

Uruguay : 

Venezuela : 

Other 3/ : 

Total South America. . . . \ 

Europe: : 
West : 

Austria : 

Belgium and Luxembourg. : 

Denmark : 

Finland : 

France : 

Germany, West : 

Greece : 

Iceland : 

Ireland : 

Italy : 

Malta : 

Hetherlands : 

Sorway : 

Portugal : 

Spain 4/ : 

Sveden : 

Switzerland : 

United Kingdom. : 

Total West Europe....; 

East: : 

Bulgaria : 

Czechoslovakia : 

Germany, East : 

Hungary : 

Poland : 

Rumania : 

Yugoslavia : 

Total East Europe....; 
Total Europe ' 



- 17 - 



SUGAR, CEHTRIFUGAL, RAW VALUE: International trade, average 1955-59, annua] 1962, 1963 and 196k (continued) 



Continent and country 



Average 
1955-59 



| Exports 


Imports 


Exports 


Imports 


Exports 


Imports 


Exports 


Imports 


: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1 000 


1,000 


1 000 


1,000 


; short tons 


stiort tons 


short tons 


WW ^ bUUB 


snort tons 


short tons 


snort tons 


snort tons 


2^6 


536 




2, 7k0 


1 oik 


1««3 


L.T7 

*f 1 




: 0 


231 


0 


217 


0 


21*6 


0 


236 


: 37 


0 


i-0 


0 


26 


0 


27 


0 


: 23 


1*2 


69 


lkl 


15 


92 


28 


22 


: 0 


7 


1 


5 


9 


$ 


13 


& 


: 0 


1*2 


0 


73 


0 




0 


59 


: 2l 


37 


2/ 


37 


2/ 


21 


2/ 


36 


: 0 


1 


0 


3 


0 


3 


0 


3 


: 0 


18 


0 


29 


0 


26 


0 


3k 


: 27 


2 


67 


2/ 


7 1 * 


2/ 


58 


21 


: 579 


0 


567 


0 


61*0 


0 


628 


0 


: 2k 


375 


11 


k5k 


9 


1*11 


- 


1*00 


: 12k 


K 


119 


2l 


138 


& 


92 


2/ 


: 0 


58 


0 


92 


0 


61 


0 




: 197 


0 


238 


0 


229 


0 


201* 


0 


: 0 


6k 


0 


*»3 


51 


7 


72 


21 


: 0 


10 


0 


22 


0 


15 


0 




1 


5 


i/ 


22 


0 


20 


0 


13 


: 2ko 




528 


sf 


6i*6 




6Ui 


: 0 


130 


0 


127 


0 


131 


0 


153 


2l 


22 


2l 


29 


3f 


12 


sf 


21 


: 0 


2 


0 


7 


0 


1* 


0 


5 


: 0 


80 


0 


110 


0 


66 


0 




: 1 


2 


k5 


1 


51* 


0 


1* 


21 




153 


18 


22k 


21 


212 


28 


233 


: 1,258 


1,281 


1,703 


1,636 


1,912 


1,372 


1,795 


1,171* 



1962 



1963 



1961* 1/ 



USSR (Europe and Asia). 
Africa: 

Algeria 

Angola 

Egypt 

Ethiopia 5/ 

Ghana 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Malagasy Republic .... 

Mauritius 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

Reunion 

Southern Rhodesia. . . . 

Sierra Leone 

Somali, Republic of . 
South Africa, Republic of: 

Sudan • 

Tanzania 

Togo 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

Other 3/ 

Total Africa 

Asia: 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Burma 

Ceylon 

China, Mainland 

China, Taiwan 

Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 6/ 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea, South 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Syria 

Thailand 

Turkey (Europe and Asia). 

Vietnam 

Other 1/ 

Total Asia 

Oceania: 

Australia 

Fiji 

lew Zealand 

Other 1/ 

Total Oceania 

Total world 



35 
0 
0 
0 

11* 
820 

0 

63 

1*9 

139 

0 
0 
0 

18 

0 
0 

2/ 

21 
3 

1,009 
21 

3 

17 

2 

76 



2,269 



780 

185 

21 

0 



965 



16,1*27 



1*7 

23 
27 

190 
97 
21 
13 

126 

56 
1 

298 
178 
76 
1,285 
39 
71 
29 
271* 
7U 

21 

53 

20 
2 
63 

m 



3,201 



13 



135 



28 
0 
0 
0 

186 
71*7 

0 

1*2 
1*20 

36 
0 
0 
0 
7 
0 
0 
0 

1*5 
0 

1,082 

0 

1*1* 
161* 

0 
111 



5k 
1*1 
28 
200 
1,031* 
0 
15 
236 
0 
0 
316 
259 
70 
1,651 
61 
57 
57 
320 
138 

K 

SI 
0 

53 
286 



17 

0 
0 
0 

21*1* 
762 
0 
37 
563 
125 
0 
0 
0 
3 
0 
0 
0 

13 

0 

1,195 

0 

59 
50 
0 
11* 



1*1* 
1*2 
17 
172 
561* 
0 
15 
232 
0 
0 
21*8 
162 
86 
1,628 
5h 
1*5 
1*1* 
312 
61* 
0 
75 

21 
0 
60 
161 



2,912 



"*,957 



3,082 



k,025 



1,287 
22l* 

21 
0 



2/ 

lT*7 

21 



1,263 
288 

21 
0 



20 



1,511 



168 



1,551 



15k 



15,950 



20,129 



20,771 



19,019 



19,086 



21 
0 
0 
0 
51*7 
899 
0 

1*8 
302 
111* 
0 
0 
0 

13 

0 
0 
0 
61* 
0 

1,279 

0 

5* 

153 
0 
11 



3,505 



1,38k 

3*5 

21 
0 



1,729 



18,956 



U.S. -Offshore Trade. 

Puerto Rico 

Hawaii 

Virgin Islands 

Guam 

Total 



2/ 5 
982 

956 

11 

0_ 

1,95"* 



1,950 
1/ 2 
0 

2/ i 
1,95k 



7/ 7 
90k 
1,08k 
11 

0 

2,006 



2,001 

2/ 3 
0 

JILL 

2,006 



U 8 
876 
1,033 
16 
0_ 

1,933 



1,928 
7/ 3 
0 

t 1 

1,933 



2/ 2 
793 
1,112 
16 

0_ 

1,923 



1/ Preliminary. 2/ Less than 500 tons. 3/ Includes trade of other countries not shown separately, k/ Canary Islands, Ceuta and 
Melilla considered provinces of Spain after January 1, 1953- 5/ Crop year. 6/ Iranian calendar year, jj Sugar and related products. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign 
source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and related Information. 



- IS - 



WORLD EXPORTS AND PRODUCTION OF OILSEEDS, 
OILS AND FATS AT RECORD HIGH IN I965 



The volume of oilseeds, oils and fats that will be traded on the 
world market in calendar year I965 is forecast preliminarily at a record 
10.8 million short tons, only fractionally more than the previous record 
of 196^. Currently, indications are that world exports may vary only 
slightly from last year's, despite the decline foreseen in exports from 
the United States, the source of over one-third of the world's total ex- 
ports. The slight increase now projected results from aggregate expansion 
in exports from countries other than the United States. 

U.S. exports may he down about 5 percent from the record of the 
previous year. This decline, the first since I96I, reflects a sharp 
reduction in exports of animal fats despite a moderate increase in ship- 
ments of edible oils. 

Also of significance in world trade this year are expectations of: 
(l) A moderate rise in U.S. exports of soybeans and soybean oil and a 
decline in cottonseed oil; (2) a marked expansion in exports of Canadian 
rapeseed; (3) a substantial gain in exports of Russian sunflowerseed and 
oil; (k) a resumption of sizable shipments of edible oils from Argentina 
and a sharp increase in exports of linseed oil from that country; (5) an 
increase in fish oil exports from foreign sources, such as Peru, Iceland, 
Chile and Denmark; (6) a sharp decline in net olive oil exports from the 
Mediterranean Basin; and (7) a marked decline in sperm oil and another 
substantial decline in baleen whale oil. 

World production in 19^5 is forecast at about 36.3 million tons, 2 
percent above last year's record. The expected net increase of almost 
570,000 tons will result from a modest gain in edible oils and a slight 
gain in animal fats, partially offset by small declines in the palm, 
industrial, and marine oils. 

Edible Vegetable Oils: Exports of edible vegetable oils this year 
will set a new record, presently forecast at almost h.k million tons. 
This would represent an increase of 7 percent from the previous high of 
196^- and would exceed the 1955-59 average by almost two-thirds. 

An above -agerage tonnage of cottonseed and cottonseed oil probably 
will be traded this year, although moderately less than the record move- 
ment of I96U. The United States supplies the major portion of the cotton- 
seed oil that enters world trade, and in l^)6h U.S. exports were boosted to 
a record level by large Public Law hQO foreigh donations from Commodity 
Credit Corporation stocks. Moreover, dollar sales were stimulated by the 
virtual elimination of the differential in prices of soybean and cotton- 
seed oils in the last quarter of 196^1-. The unusually low price premium 
of cottonseed oil in relation to soybean oil has continued to stimulate 
strong export demand this year, and U.S. exports, though down somewhat 
from last year, again are expected to reach a high level of approximately 
310,000 tons (calendar year). U.S. seed production from the I965 cotton 
crop was estimated as of August 1 at 6.1 million tons, down one percent 
from last year's. 

-19- 



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- 21 - 



Large export supplies of cottonseed resulting from increased production 
may give rise to increased exports from the Sudan, following the small volume 
of 1964. And increased cotton production in Nicaragua and Syria also may 
result in slightly larger exports of seed this year. 

Exports of peanuts and peanut oil in 1965 may be slightly larger than 
last year's, possibly exceeding the record level of 1963. Nigeria's exports 
are expected to decline for the second successive year, following two con- 
secutive years of reduced production. Purchases for crushing and export 
from the I96U crop are down from last year by more than 10 percent. In con- 
trast, exports from Senegal likely will increase in line with the moderate 
increase in purchases for crushing and export from the I96U crop. Under 
terms of the marketing agreement with France that country again has agreed 
to take the major portion of Senegal's exportable supply. 

India's exports of peanut oil have been banned since July 196^ and ex- 
ports of peanuts since January 1965. Whether some exports will be permitted 
before the end of the year remains to be seen. The 1965 peanut crop rose to 
a record high, but internal needs for edible oils are ever increasing and 
prices continue to rise. 

U.S. exports of peanuts and peanut oil are expected to exceed last year's 
high level as substantial quantities in excess of domestic needs are available 
from last year's above-average crop. 

Argentina will have a sizeable surplus of oil from the recent record 
harvest of peanuts. And, exports should be encouraged by the recent reduc- 
tion in index values, which brings the price of Argentine oil more in line 
with current world prices. 

The Brazilian Government has recently authorized the export of 105,000 
metric tons of peanuts from this year's large crop. Exports from both 
Brazil and Argentina were negligible in I96U. 

The steady expansion that has occurred in peanut production in recent 
years probably will continue this year. In the Southern Hemisphere, where 
crops already have been harvested, production set a new record in both 
Argentina and Brazil, but the outturn in South Africa was reduced by drought 
to about last year's level. In the Northern Hemisphere prospects favor 
expansion. U.S. production is up k percent from last year, according to the 
August 1 estimate. In India some increase can be expected in view of the 
pressing need for continued expansion and the efforts of various groups to 
promote such expansion. In Nigeria, the crop reportedly is two to three 
weeks late compared with 196^-, reflecting a late start in the rainy season. 
Conditions otherwise are said to be generally favorable. Improved cultural 
practices, seed and fertilizer, increased acreage and better transportation 
could bring about increased production if rains are sufficient and timely. 
In Senegal the target for commercial production in 1965-66 has been set at 
an alltime high of one million tons. And in Mainland China, the campaign 
to raise more hogs reportedly should be an effective motivation to expand 
peanut acreage this year. 



-22- 



Exports of soybeans and soybean oil this year are expected to be up, 
possibly about 10 percent from last year and to exceed 2 million tons, oil 
basis, for the first time. The United States again, as in recent years, will 
account for close to 95 percent of the total. Strong demand and record ex- 
port availabilities in the United States are expected to result in a total 
movement of beans and oil to foreign destinations in excess of 1.9 million 
tons, oil basis. 

Soybean exports from Mainland China, though relatively small, are ex- 
pected to increase substantially from last year's estimated 21 million bushels. 
The volume of soybeans that Mainland China has contracted to supply Japan 
this year plus some beans outside the agreement will mean that total shipments 
to that country will be up 3 "to h million bushels. Exports to other countries 
may increase slightly; movement of Chinese beans through the Suez Canal during 
January -May at h.l million bushels were 2.5 million more than in the compara- 
ble period last year. And the Brazilian Government has authorized exports of 
5.5 million bushels from the recent large harvest, in contrast to no exports 
of beans in 1^6k. 

This year's world production of soybeans probably will reach a new high. 
Soybean acreage for harvest of beans in the United States is up an estimated 
13 percent from last year's record, and bean production was estimated as of 
August 1 at a record 86k million bushels. It is conceivable, however, that 
Mainland China's crop may be slightly smaller than last year's. Acreage in 
Northeast China, the main area producing for export, may have been reduced 
by a prolonged dry spell. It also is likely that planting was delayed and 
growth was probably retarded until the advent of rains in late June and early 
July. Although total production may be only slightly less than in 196^, 
supplies for export reportedly may be significantly decreased if the expected 
decline in production in the Northeast occurs. 

Exports of sunflowerseed and sunflowerseed oil in 1965 will gain sharply 
from the reduced volume of last year yet are expected to remain below the 
I963 record. The gain chiefly reflects larger exports of both sunflowerseed 
and oil from the record Soviet crop harvested in 196^. Movements of oil from 
Argentina, following sharply increased availabilities from the harvest early 
this year, also will increase. These gains may be supplemented by larger 
exports of seed as such from Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Canada. 

World production of sunflowerseed in 1965 probably will decline signifi- 
cantly from the 196^ record but remain substantially above output in previous 
years. The decline, reflecting reduced production in the USSR, Uruguay, and 
Bulgaria, will partly offset gains in Argentina, Yugoslavia and Turkey, which 
have markedly expanded their sunflower plantings. 

In I965 exports of rapeseed and rapeseed oil also will rise sharply to 
a new high, exceeding the previous record of 195^. The expansion is due 
largely to the expectation of record shipments of seed from Canada and France. 
Canada, whose 19&5 rapeseed acreage has nearly quadrupled that of the annual 
average in the 1955-59 period, likely will attempt to expand sharply its 
exports of rapeseed from the unusually large crop now in prospect. France, 



-23- 



also, reflecting sharply increased seedings, is expected to harvest a record 
crop and will very likely achieve record net exports. Exports from Sweden 
and Denmark probably will decline slightly. 

World production of rapeseed will increase to a new high in I965 as a 
result of acreage expansion in Canada, France and Poland. The major pro- 
ducer, India, is expected to harvest a significantly larger outturn, 
reflecting both higher yeilds and acreage expansion. Mainland China, the 
second major producer, reportedly will exhibit some gain in outturn, re- 
flecting increased harvested acreage and largely reduced winter kill. 
Pakistan's production will be up slightly because of higher yields. In 
West Germany, output will increase significantly because of increased 
seedings, as well as higher yields. And, in Sweden output will increase, 
reflecting expanded winter crop acreage. Danish production will, however, 
decline because of reduced seedings. 

A relatively small decrease in world exports of sesameseed and oil , 
largely in the form of seed, is anticipated in 1965 as exportable supplies 
from the Sudan and Tanzania are likely to be down, offsetting slight 
increases from Nigeria and possibly Mexico. At present, it appears that 
the Sudanese exportable surplus will be some 15-20 percent below the 112,000 
tons exported last year. A greater reduction is forecast for Tanzania. The 
1965-66 Nigerian commercial crop, grown entirely for export, is expected to 
be well maintained. With production forecast at some 25 percent above 196^, 
Mexico may well have an exportable surplus of some magnitude. 

Trade in saf flowerseed and oil this year is expected to be down sharply 
from the high level of the preceding two years. Shipments from the United 
States, the leading exporter, during the first 6 months of this year were 
running some 6l,500 tons below the January-June level last year. This 
reflects the smaller crop harvested in 196^-. The state of the current 
safflower crop is uncertain but exports are likely to increase after 
August as new crop supplies become available. 

Production of saf flowerseed oil in 1965 is, however, expected to be 
only somewhat smaller than in the previous year owing to the marked in- 
crease in production from Mexico and Australia, which partly offset the 
reduction in the United States crop. 

World net exports of edible olive oil in I965 are expected to decline 
by one-third from last year's record volume. The indicated decline, ik 
percent below the annual average of the 1961-6^ period, chiefly reflects 
reduced movements from Spain, as well as estimates of an increase in intra- 
Basin trade due to larger imports by Italy and Portugal. This reduction in 
net trade results principally from the small oil outturn from 196^-crop 
olives. The decline will, in part, be offset by increased exports from 
Turkey, Jordan and Syria. Exports from Tunisia also are expected to in- 
crease from those of a year ago, reflecting increased availabilities. Im- 
ports into France will probably decline as a result of higher prices, thus 
freeing a somewhat larger volume for net exports from the Basin. 



-2k- 



Overall prospects for olive oil production in 1965-66 currently indicate 
a somewhat less than normal "on-year" outturn. This reflects adverse weather 
which in some major producing areas , notably Spain, has reportedly reduced 
the prospects for the crop to be harvested this year. 



World trade in corn -oil is of minor significance and is often not 
separately classified in trade statistics. In recent years the Netherlands 
and West Germany have been the largest known exporters. Exports trended 
upward from the mid-1950' s to a high of about 15,000 tons in 1962 but have 
since declined. Exports in 1965 are no "t expected to vary greatly from the 
estimated U,000 tons of I96U. 



The United States is the world's largest producer of corn oil as well as 
the largest importer. World production probably will increase slightly this 
year, reflecting an increase in the United States. 

Palm Oils: The modest decline from last year presently foreseen in 
exports of palm oils in 1965 is attributed mainly to the expected reduction 
in copra and coconut oil. 

This year's world exports of copra and coconut oil may be moderately 
less than the tonnage trade in 196^ Eainfall in the main coconut producing 
areas of the Philippines was, in general, more favorable to an increase in 
potential availabilities during 1965. Exports, however, declined h percent 
or 19,000 tons, oil basis, in the first 7 months of the year. -A resumption of 
the uptrend in coconut output appears to have been offset by typhoon damage 
to the coconut crop sustained in I96U. Taking into consideration copra 
arrivals into the two main Philippine copra ports, Manila and Cebu, the 
decline appears to have been confined to the north rather than the central 
and southern islands. The approach of the seasonal increase in production 
( from August ) , plus rainfall conditions, indicate satisfactory export 
supplies for the remainder of the year. The effects of the typoon last 
November remain obscure at present. Currently, exports of copra and coconut 
oil, oil basis, from the Philippines are expected to be down 5 percent. 

Copra production in Indonesia is expected to increase as a result of 
favorable weather throughout 196^. Exports may increase slightly. Report- 
edly, the government is making more efforts to allow producing regions to 
retain a larger share of export earnings. Malayan exports have remained 
at a low level reflecting a continued decline in production and reduced im- 
ports. Production in Ceylon is expected to decline because of failure of 
the north-east monsoon. This caused a severe drought in many areas of 
Ceylon's "dry-zone" during the last quarter of 196^ and the first quarter of 
1965 and widespread lack of sufficient rainfall in the first quarter of this 
year. Production, therefore, will be affected in later months of 1965. 
Sales for export through the Sales Room in Colombo declined 10,000 tons in 
the first four months of the year. 



-25- 



Although exports from Papua and New Guinea decreased 4,700 tons, oil 
basis, during the first 3 months of this year, supplies are expected to 
increase toward the latter part of the year. Higher prices for copra plus 
the relatively favorable growing season probably will lead to record 
1965-66 copra output. There was little change in exportable supplies from 
Fiji and other copra producing islands in the Pacific during the early 
months of I965. Exports from Mozambique declined 1,700 tons, oil basis, 
during January -March. A heavy surtax charge imposed on copra exports is 
likely to curtail exports from this origin. 

There are no indications as yet that exports of palm kernels and palm 
kernel oil will be significantly different from those of last year. 
Currently a decline in supplies appears likely. Exports during the last 
years averaged 27 percent of the total world copra and coconut oil exports. 

Exports of palm kernels from the Malay States and Sierra Leone during 
the first quarter were down 200 and 900 tons, respectively. Palm kernel 
oil exports from the Congo (Leopoldville) through March declined 2,400 tons, 
equivalent to 5,100 "tons °f kernels. Exports of kernels from Nigeria, how- 
ever, rose 4,500 tons during the same period. 

There is little indication that the supply in major producing countries, 
with the possible exception of the Congo, has increased since. Cumulative 
purchases of palm kernels in Nigeria through June were down 11,600 tons. 
A larger percentage of the relatively small Malayan supply may be crushed 
for domestic consumption, as in I963. 

World supplies of palm oil are expected to be slightly larger this year 
than last, reflecting primarily a higher level of output from Nigeria and 
the Malay States, offsetting reduced availabilities from the Congo (Leopold- 
ville) and Indonesia. 

There has been a marked increase in Nigerian and Malayan supplies. 
Cumulative purchases of palm oil in Nigeria through June rose 12 percent 
(l4,400 tons) and production in the Malay States rose 11,500 tons through 
March. Exports during the first quarter rose 9; 700 tons from Nigeria but 
those from Malaysia were at the same level as last year during this period. 

It appears likely that availabilities of palm oil from the Congo will 
be smaller this year. The sharp reduction of 19,800 tons in exports during 
January -March I965 reflects the disruption of marketings the previous year 
owing to civil disturbances. There may well be an increase in exportable 
supplies later in the year, however. 

Reduced shipments of palm oil from Indonesia appear likely in I965. 
Increasing consumption plus political disturbances have made further in- 
roads into exportable supplies from this source. 



-26- 



Exports of babassu kernels and oil from Brazil have been negligible in 
recent years because of the strong domestic demand for the oil. Total ex- 
ports amounted to only 700 tons in 1963. Exports may be stimulated this 
year with the considerably higher world market prices prevailing for lauric 
acid oils. 

Industrial Oils: Exports of industrial oils are expected to rise to a 
record level this year, exceeding last year's tonnage by possibly 10 percent. 
The expansion will be due to a sharp increase in shipments of flaxseed and 
linseed oil and a moderate increase in exports of castorbeans and oil. 

Present indications are that exports of flaxseed and linseed oil in 1965 
will exceed those of I96U by 10 percent or more. Argentine oil has moved out 
at a sharply accelerated rate, totalling 193*000 short tons through June-- 
88,000 tons more than in last year's comparable period. Shipments during 
the last half of the year from a reported exportable supply of 276,00 tons 
should be reduced considerably, but the total for the year may exceed last 
year's by some ^0,000 tons. The first official forecast of area seeded to 
flaxseed in Argentina for the 1965 -66 season is 3 million acres, up 2 per- 
cent from last year. 

Flaxseed and linseed oil exports from the United States are expected 
to surpass last year's by over 10,000 tons of oil. Carryover stocks of 
flaxseed on July 1 were 2.3 million bushels less than a year earlier, but 
with the 1965 crop at 29. 3 million bushels (August 1 estimate), up ^.9 
million bushels, total supplies are 2.6 million bushels above last year's. 

Exports from Canada, largely as seed, also may exceed those of I96U as 
export availabilities during the crop year just ended exceeded those of the 
previous year. With acreage up 13 percent this year and a continuation of 
the excellent crop prospects to date, production could approximate 26 million 
bushels, 7 million more than last year's outturn. 

Record exports of castorbeans and oil are expected this year, surpassing 
the previous high of 196^ by possibly 15,000 tons, oil basis. Production 
rose to an alltime high last year largely because of the record crop now 
reported to have been harvested in Brazil. This year's production in Brazil 
is expected to drop sharply, primarily because of a substantial decline in 
castor oil prices during the second half of I96U. This price decline report- 
edly resulted in reduced plantings during that period compared with a year 
earlier. In Bahia, unfavorable weather, particularly inadquate rain in the 
early growing season, has further hampered this year's crop. Moreover, also 
in Bahia, the large area planted in I963 is expected to give a normally 
reduced crop in its second, and last year of production. 

Castor oil exports from India are not expected to exceed the reduced 
level of I96U because of restricted availabilities, strong domestic demand, 
and continued high internal prices. Castorbean production in India is a 
relatively constant volume from year to year, according to official figures. 



-27- 



Thailand, the world's major exporter of castorbeans as such, may export 
somewhat more beans this year than last in view of the modest increase in 
production there. No significant change in exports or production is fore- 
seen in other castorbean producing countries this year. 

World tung oil exports this year are expected to decline slightly, 
reflecting reduced exports from Argentina and Paraguay despite anticipation 
of a further increase in exports from Mainland China. Aggregate shipments 
through June from Buenos Aires, which are presumed to represent all of the 
exports from Argentina and Paraguay, were about 10 percent below those in 
the corresponding period of I96U. Reduced 1965 nut harvests in both coun- 
tries resulted from frost damage in September l^Gh. These declines, how- 
ever, are expected to be partly offset by a further increase in exports 
from Mainland China as a result of increased oil output from 196^-crop nuts. 

An increased nut harvest in Mainland China this year, possibly 5 to 10 
percent above that of 196U-, is in prospect because of larger incentives 
being given to the peasants who harvest the nuts. The Chinese also claim 
significant acreage expansion, which could result in future gains in oil 
output . 

Animal Fats: Aggregate exports of animal fats will decline moderately 
from last year's record because of a significant reduction in the shipments 
of lard as well as some decline in the shipments of butter and tallow and 
greases. Total output of animal fats will, however, be a record volume. 

World trade in butter this year is expected to decline slightly from 
196^. Increased production in Western Europe coupled with increasing stocks 
in the United Kingdom and other Western European countries will reduce the 
needs for butter imports from Oceania and North America into those important 
markets. However, trade between countries of the European Economic Commu- 
nity (EEC) is expected to increase at the expense of trade with third 
countries . 

The outlook for butter production in 19^5 indicates a moderate in- 
crease. The output in Western Europe, especially in the EEC countries, will 
probably account for most of the increase. Higher prices for milk and other 
dairy products are expected to stimulate milk and butter production in this 
area during 1965. 

Estimates for I965 show world lard production up slightly from last year 
and at about the same level as it was in 1963. However, U.S. slaughter in 
I965 is expected to be somewhat below the 196^ volume. Trade in lard in 
196^ was well above 1963. The United States continued its dominance of the 
lard export market supplying about 70 percent of world exports. With de- 
creased production of lard in the United States in 19^5 world exports are 
expected to be down significantly. Increased European domestic production 
will result in decreasing import demand. 



-28- 



A small increase in world production of tallow and greases is expected 
in 1965 , due mainly to a possible increase in U.S. slaughter of cattle. 
The United States continued through 196^ to maintain its dominant position 
in the export market accounting for about two -thirds of world exports of 
tallow and greases. Trade in 1965 is expected to decrease slightly from 
I96U with smaller supplies being available for export from U.S. produc- 
tion. Overall trade in tallow and greases in 196k increased sharply over 
I963. The increase in U.S. exports in 196^ was due mainly to larger 
shipments to less developed countries and Japan. This is in contrast 
to earlier increases, which occurred mainly in developed countries. 

Marine Oils: World exports of marine oils will decline for the third 
consecutive year because of the further reduction in baleen whale oil 
supplies and the decline in sperm oil supplies. 

Whale oil production has declined again, reflecting the reduction in 
the catch limit imposed, but reflecting also the continuing reduction in 
whale numbers. The production of baleen whale oil during the 196^-65 
Antarctic season was some 3^000 tons less than in the previous season. 
The output of sperm oil also declined—by some 12,000 tons. All countries 
registered declines in the output of both baleen and sperm oil except 
Norway whose output of sperm oil rose slightly. 

Production of fish oil in 19&5 i s currently predicted to increase 
from that of 196k, but there is little indication that any sizable in- 
crease in output will occur. Production of herring oil from Norway and 
Denmark has shown an expansion in the early months of this year as has 
production of anchovy oil from Peru and Chile. There were reports of 
poor fishing off the coast of Peru in July, and currently fishing is 
restricted there. The fish oil situation will depend mainly upon the 
early commencement of favorable fishing conditions in the fall for Peru 
and in the summer for the United States. U.S. production of- menhaden oil 
through June was disappointingly small. 



World exportable supplies are expected to be somewhat larger this 
year. Carry-in stocks were at a minimum level in most exporting countries, 
except Peru and Iceland. Exports from a number of countries, including 
Peru, Iceland, Chile and Denmark increased in the early months of 1965 
from the corresponding period of a year earlier. Exports during the first 
5 months of 1965 from Peru increased 50,900 tons from the January -May 
level of 196^. Exports of menhaden oil from the United States, however, 
declined 22,000 tons through May as a result of poor production and 
depleted stocks. 



WORLD WHEAT CROP 
BELOW 196k RECORD 



World wheat production in 1965 -- with harvesting now well under way 
-- will be less than the bumper crop of 196^-, despite excellent crops in 
a number of the principal wheat growing countries. Barring unforeseen 
bad weather in the remainder of the season, production could reach the 
near-record level of I962. 

Record and near-record crops are in prospect in the main wheat 
countries of North America, Europe, and Africa and in some countries of 
Asia. Offsetting these good crops, however, are sharp decreases in the 
harvests of the Soviet Union and Communist China -- two of the three 
largest world producers of wheat -- and also in Australia. 

Production in the Soviet Union may be from 10 to 15 percent below 
the good 196^ harvest. Insufficient moisture seriously reduced the 
spring crop, which normally makes up about 60 percent of the annual 
production. Early forecasts were for a winter crop well above that of 
196^-, but as the season progressed, crop returns failed to meet the 
reported volume. 

■ 

Communist China's wheat crop also is significantly below last year's 
harvest. Growers were unable to plant all the intended winter wheat 
acreage, and yields are believed to be below the large outturn of 196^. 
The winter crop comprises about 90 percent of China's wheat production. 

Cool, wet weather has been more prevalent in a greater degree and 
in more countries of the Northern Hemisphere than in any recent years. 
This delayed crops of many countries generally from 10 days to two weeks. 
Although floods destroyed comparatively small acreages in a number of 
countries, the over all moisture resulted in very good crops over larger 
areas. Recently, continued cool, wet weather in some countries of 
Europe reportedly is reducing yields to some extent. 

Wheat production of Western Europe may exceed the high level of 196^- 
and preliminary data indicate it is comparable with the record crop of 
I962. France, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands are harvesting 
record crops, and West Germany has big crop. Italy's outturn, larger 
than first expected, has reached a near-record volume. Crops of Spain 
and Portugal were better than expected and are forecast larger than 
last year. 

Production of Eastern Europe, excluding the Soviet Union, is still 
uncertain, but is expected to be less than the record harvest of 196^-. 
Too much rain, resulting in floods, has been a problem in the Danube 
countries. While high levels of moisture apparently improved yields on 



-30- 



lands not hurt by floods, harvesting operations have been hampered by 
excessive moisture. Production is reported substantially increased in 
Poland while in Rumania and Bulgaria it appears at this time to be about 
on the level of average output during recent years. East Germany, 
Czechoslovakia, and Hungary have been particularly beset with moisture 
problems during the harvest which will result in reduced yields. Bad 
weather last fall brought reduced plantings of winter wheat in Yugoslavia, 
and latest reports are that 19&5 production is down about 15 percent. 

North America is harvesting bumper wheat crops. On the basis of 
August 1 conditions, the United States -- the second largest world pro- 
ducer -- will be 7 percent larger than the high I96U level. With adequate 
moisture over more than the usual area, yields are the highest on record. 

So far Canada's wheat season has been exceptionally favorable for the 
production of large crops. As in other northern countries the spring was 
late and wet. Prospects are for a record crop, though the ultimate yields 
still depend on how much ripened wheat can be harvested before frost sets 
in. Production in Mexico is reported down from the I96U record, but 
nevertheless will be a near-record crop. 

Production of several of Asia's principal wheat countries, other than 
Communist China, increased markedly over I96U. The crops of India and 
Pakistan are forecast at about 19 and 11 percent, respectively, over I96U. 
Good harvests are forecast in the Eastern Mediterranean area, including 
Turkey, Iraq, and Jordan. 

Total production of the African nations is forecast at about 10 
percent more than in 196k. In the North African countries of Algeria, 
Morocco, and Tunisia, crops are much improved over the poor harvests of 
196^. Production of Egypt is down moderately from the high level of last 
year. 

Although too early to determine the outcome of the South American 
crops, it is doubtful if wheat production this year would come up to the 
large volume of 196^. Argentina's acreage, contrary to pre -season pre- 
dictions of a decline in acreage, is now forecast nearly as large, or 
perhaps as much, as in 196^, when yields were unusually high. 

Drought has sharply reduced plantings of Australian wheat. New 
South Wales, which last year produced hi percent of the total crop, 
suffered a sharp cut in acreage. The drought was most severe in Queens- 
land, producer of 6 percent of last year's wheat. Offsetting the drought 
in eastern Australia is a million-acre increase in Western Australia, and 
conditions in the western states are reported to be very favorable. 



-31- 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20250 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



Official Business 



NOTICE 

If you no lo nger need this publication, 
check here / / return this sheet, 

and your name will be dropped from the 
mailing list. 

If your address should be changed, print 
or type the new address on this sheet 
and return the whole sheet to! 

foreign Agricultural Service, Rm, 5918 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D.C 20250. 



Apparently, wheat production in the principal exporting countries 
of the world may exceed that of I96U. Harvesting of the bumper U.S . 
winter wheat crop --76 percent of the U.S. crop -- was nearly com- 
pleted by August 1, except in the more northerly states. Prospects 
are for a record Canadian production; the size of the crop will be 
determined in the next few weeks. The French crop is about 500,000 
larger even than the I96J+ record harvest. Although it is too early 
to know the outcome of production in Australia and Argentina , it now 
appears that only in Australia is production expected to be seriously 
below the high level of 196^. 



-32- 



8. S. DEPT. 

umm ash 



OCT 22 




SEPTEMBER 1965 
CONTENTS 



WORLD SUMMARIES Page 
Production 

Molasses and Honey Production Up 3 

Coffee Crop Estimate Increases 7 

Large World Almond Crop Estimate 14 

Smaller World Filbert Crop Estimate for 1965 22 

Near Record World Bread Grain Production is 

Forecast , 25 

Stocks 



Exporting Countries July 1 Grain Stocks Show Decline . 10 

COUNTRY SUMMARIES 
Trade 

U.S. Exports of Flaxseed and Products Up Sharply. ... 12 



Argentine Grain Exports Increase in 1964-65 14 

U.S. Imports of Cordage Fibers Down in 1965 18 

Canadian Exports of Wheat and Flour Second 

Largest in History . 18 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 



Single copies free to persons in the United States 
From the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D. C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du -8-2^4-5 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars 

FC 12-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles 
I and IV, Public Law k8o 

FPE 2-65 U.S. Trade in Poultry and Eggs, 196^ 

FCAN 2-65 U.S. Trade in Canned Fruits and Vegetables 

FCAN 3-65 Australian Deciduous Canned Fruit Production Reaches 
Record Level in I965 

FG 9-65 World Mixed Feed Production Shows Rapid Growth 

FFVS 9-65 Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. exports, June I965, with 
comparisons 

FCB 2-65 A Review of the Cocoa Processing Industry in Producing 
Countries 

FS 3-65 World Sugar Trade Changes Little in 196^ 

FT 5-65 World Tobacco Production Expected to be Down Slightly 

in Last Half of I965 

FT 7-65 Summary of Tobacco Exports Shipments Under Government 

Trade Programs 



MOLASSES AND HONEY 
PRODUCTION UP 



World production of industrial molasses amounted to 3»5 "billion 
gallons in 196^-65. This was an increase of Ik percent over the high 
level of 1963-6^. Increases were recorded for all continents except 
Africa, which had a slight decline. North America accounts for about 
29 percent of total world production. The United States and the Soviet 
Union are the two largest country producers. 



Production of molasses continues to increase in the United States. 
Nevertheless, imports amount to nearly as much as production. For many 
years Cuba was the leading supplier and the No. 1 producer. Mexican 
production continues to increase at a substantial rate. 

While most European countries had a larger production in 196^-65 
than in 1963-6^, perhaps the most significant increase was made in 
France. Imports into France declined sharply, with the most significant 
decline being for Cuba. The greater part of French consumption goes 
into alcohol distilleries, with the remainder being used for yeast, 
livestock feed, and other products. 

Molasses production in India is estimated at 225 million gallons 
for I96U-65, an increase of kk million gallons over 1963-6^. It is 
estimated that 50 to 60 percent is used in the production of industrial 
alcohol and potable spirits. 

The 196^ production of honey in 16 selected countries was 675-5 
million pounds, compared with 6kk million in 1963. The 1955-59 average 
production was h^K.^ million pounds. Production in the United States, 
although by far the leading producer among these countries, showed a 
decline of ^.5 percent from 1963. Ample world supplies have resulted 
in a depressed export market in 1965. 

Canadian production of honey in 196^ decreased. Mexico and France 
had small increases, while substantial increases were registered by 
Argentina and Australia. 

The Mexican honey crop in 196^ was 6 percent larger than the previous 
year, but lower than the all-time high of 1962. The principal countries 
of export were the United States, Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands, 
Belgium, and the United Kingdom. Argentina's increase in the size of the 
crop amounted to ko percent for 196k, and the 19&5 crop is expected to be 
at about the 196^ level. Exports from Argentina during 196^ were approxi- 
mately U3 million pounds, with the heaviest importers being West Germany, 
United Kingdom, Italy, and France. 



HONEY: Production in specified countries, average 1955-59 
annual 1962, 1963 and 1964 



Country 


: 

: Average 


1962 


1963 ; 


1964 1/ 




: 1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 


• 1,000 




: pounds 


: pounds 


• pounds 


pounds 






: 272,788 


: 299,353 


. 285,744 






37,478 


: 47, 399 


• 66,138 






: 66,138 


: 56, 217 


; 59, 524 


_' 


37,051 


: 43,651 


: 32,679 


: 45,647 




. . . • 28,078 


: 30, 713 


: 42,100 


: 35,100 




. . . • 38, 581 


: 26,455 


: 28,660 


: 33,069 






: 8,818 


: 13,228 


: 22,046 






: 16, 535 


: 20,944 


: 21, 164 




. . . : 16, 337 


: 21, 305 


: 21,746 


: 19,841 






: 16,628 


: 16,535 


: 16, 909 




3/ 


: 12,992 


: 13,653 


: 16,382 






: 14, 330 


: 14, 550 


: 14,991 




6,526 


: 7,937 


: 8,377 


: 13,228 




11,715 


: 13,171 


: 13,680 


: 12, 242 




3/ 


: 7,454 


: 8,607 


: 9,480 




4,509 


: 6,570 


: 6,227 


: 4,000 




, , . : 1*94,278 

• 


; 602,963 


; 643,955 


; 675,505 



1/ Preliminary. 

2/ Crop year beginning July of previous year. 
3/ Hot available. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the 
basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other 
foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches 
and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research, and 
related information. 



- 4 - 



MOLASSES, INDUSTRIAL: World production, average 1955-56 through 1959-60 
annual 1962-63, 1963-6^ and 196U-65 1/ 



Continent and country 



Average 
1955=56 
through 
1QSQ-6Q 



1962-63 



1963-64 



1964-65 2/ 



: 1,000 
: gallons 
North America: : 

Canada 3/ : 8,655 

Costa Rica : 1,927 

Cuba 4/ : 297,324 

Dominican Republic : (25,338) 

El Salvador : 1,925 

Guatemala : 3, 615 

Haiti : (4,053) 

Jamaica : (15,520) 

Mexico : 86,937 

Nicaragua .: 6/ 3,l4o 

United States, Mainland. . . . . : 169, 104 

Hawaii : 53,084 

Puerto Rico : 57,106 

Other North America : (45,500) 

Total North America ; 773,228 

South America: :~" 

Argentina : 39, 331 

Brazil : (202, 600) 

British Guiana : (l4,84o) 

Chile : 1,127 

Peru 3/ : 40,864 

Venezuela 3/ : N.A. 

Other South America : (36,400) 

Total South America ; 335, l62 

Europe: : 

Austria : 11,638 

Belgium and Luxembourg : 17,502 

Denmark : l6,Ol4 

Finland : 2,453 

France : 76,473 

Germany, West : 82,54l 

Greece : N.A. 

Ireland : 4,638 

Italy : 66, 517 

Netherlands : 21,635 

Spain : 24, 627 

Sweden : 13, 310 

Switzerland : 1, 726 

United Kingdom : 45,109 

Total West Europe ; 384,183 



1,000 
gallons 

9,579 
3,821 
(180,000) 
58,196 

3,789 
7,500 
3,000 
(35,670 
131,485 
7,246 
242, 225 
55,373 
61,548 

(37,900) 



1,000 
gallons 

(10,600) 

3,977 
(174,300) 
60,032 
4,424 
8,000 
3,000 
30,750 
142, 728 

6,093 
286,816 
57,688 
64,400 
C?6,113 ) 



1,000 
gallons 

10,676 

3,933 
(250,000) 
60,875 
6,165 
8,000 
3,000 
31,402 
160,070 

5,612 
301,863 
(56,000) 

57,200 
(58,000) 



857,332 



908, 921 



1,012,796 



65,793 
230, 387 

23,677 
2,601 

47,994 

22,657 
(18,000) 



77,^32 
230, 762 
23,211 
4,006 
47,014 
27,131 
(21,750) 



85,528 
252,864 

21,540 
3,573 

46,827 

30,316 
(25,000) 



4ll, 109 



^31,306 



465,648 



11,59^ 
17,045 

8,935 
2,744 

74,923 
69, 116 
2,098 
7,613 
50,115 
19,667 
32, 826 
10,115 
1,480 
46,092 



15,659 
17,794 
17,981 

4,121 
88,409 
97, 587 

3,003 

6,852 
59,938 
17,794 
25,970 
11,613 

2,060 
44, 500 



15,977 
18,356 
21,540 
3,933 
109,574 
112,197 
4,670 
6,930 
59,938 
34,652 

32,333 
13,730 
2,435 
56,333 



354,363 



413, 281 



492,598 



- 5 - 



- continued 



MOLASSES, INDUSTRIAL: World production, average 1955-56 through 1959-60 
annual 1962-63, 1963-64 and 1964-65 l/ (continued) 



Continent and country- 



Average 
1955-56 
through 
1959-60 



1962-63 



1963-64 



I96U-65 2/ 



: 1,000 

: gallons 
Europe - continued: : 

Hungary : (16,504) 

Poland : (46,6l4) 

Rumania : N.A. 

Yugoslavia : 10, 462 

Other East Europe (83,800) 

Total East Europe : 157,380 



1,000 
gallons 

22,334 
62,935 
16,858 
11,426 
(97,000) 



1,000 
gallons 

28,460 

69,397 
20,229 
15,814 
(105,950) 



1,000 
gallons 

31,468 
88,034 
24,350 
16,108 
(110,000) 



210,553 



239,850 



269,960 



Total Europe. 



541,563 



564,916 



653,131 



762,558 



USSR (Europe and Asia) * (24l,&00) 



(330,000) 



(328,600) 



(400,000) 



Africa: : 

Angola : 2,423 

Egypt 5/ : 27,665 

Mauritius : 21,274 

Mozambique : N.A. 

South Africa, Republic of...: (38,400) 

Other Africa : (39,800) 



3,048 
33,615 
23,018 

9,365 
59,372 
(56,700) 



2,775 
31,885 
28,018 
13,111 
60,621 

(54,550) 



3,126 

29,969 
21,312 
3/11,051 
" 63,807 
(55,ooo) 



Total Africa. 



129,562 



185,118 



190,960 



184,265 



Asia: : 

China, Taiwan : 32,321 

India : 149, 2l8 

Indonesia : (36, 292) 

Japan 3/ : N.A. 

Philippines : (57, 540) 

Thailand : 6/ 10,849 

Turkey. : (16,359) 

Other Asia : (55,000) 

Total Asia 

Oceania: 

Australia 

Fiji 



31,447 
140,293 
29,969 
12,175 
83,553 
20,6o4 

19,273 
(86,000) 



31,320 
180,564 
34,652 
12,269 
101,480 
24,350 
22,481 
(74,500) 



34,090 
224,768 

32,779 
11,800 

113,882 
37,461 
34,933 

(85,000) 



357,579 



423,314 



481, 616 



574,713 



51,654 
(9,120) 



63,299 
12, 306 



56,250 
14,985 



68,750 
15,359 



Total Oceania. 



60,774 



75,605 



71,235 



84,109 



Total world * 2,439,668 



2,847,394 



3,065,769 



3,484,089 



l/ In each country the year of production is the same as that for centrifugal 
sugar production. Production has been estimated by groups of countries known to 
produce centrifugal sugar, but for which insufficient data are available to show 
production for each country. Figures in parentheses are Foreign Agricultural 
Service estimates. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Calendar year; first year mentioned in 
heading. 4/ Includes hi -test molasses. J?/ May include edible molasses. 
6/ 3 year average. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 
related information. 



- 6 - 



COFFEE CEOP 
ESTIMATE INCREASES 



The Foreign Agricultural Service estimates that the 1965-66 
world coffee crop will total 76.8 million hags, of which 62.0 million 
will be exportable. This is the highest crop since i960. This second 
estimate of the 1965-66 crop is up slightly from the June estimate and 
considerably larger than the small 1964-65 crop for which total and 
exportable production are estimated at 51.8 and 37-2 million bags, 
respectively. 

The 1965-66 crop in North America is estimated to be slightly 
larger than previously expected, primarily due to increased estimates 
for Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. In Costa Rica, 
damage from nat?aral causes in recent years was apparently less than 
first thought, with the result that both the 1964-65 and 1965-66 
crops are larger than estimated earlier. 



The 1965-66 estimates for total and exportable production in 
South America are 43.7 an( i 3^«^ million bags, respectively, or more 
than double 1964-65 levels. The total 1965-66 Brazilian crop is 
now estimated at 33*0 million bags, as compared with revised figures 
of 10.0 million and 28.2 million for I96U-65 and 1963-64. These 
earlier years were revised due to heavier-than-expected registrations 
in 196^-65, a part of which was I963-6U coffee held over to the new 
year in the expectation of better prices. The official coffee year 
in Brazil is July 1 to June 30. 

African production is expected to total 17.8 million bags in 
I965-66, of which 17.0 million is estimate"! as exportable. Production 
in the Ivory Coast is expected to reach a record high level, while 
the output in Uganda in both 1964-65 and I965-66 is now estimated to 
be down considerably from previous expectations. Prolonged dry 
weather is reportedly the major factor in this production drop. 



Exportable production in the smaller producing countries is 
estimated to be as follows (with comparable 1964-65 estimates in 
parentheses), in bags of 132.276 pounds each: Jamaica. 20,000 
(15,000); Puerto Rico 25,000 (25,000); Bolivia 20,000 (20,000); 
Paraguay 40,000 (40,000); Surinam 8,000 (8,000); Dahomey 28,000 
(28,000); Gabon 18,000 (19,000); Ghana 48,000 (48,000); Liberia 
58,000 (58,000); Nigeria 33,000 (33,000); Congo (Brazzaville) 
14,000 (l4,000); Sao Tome and Principe 5,000 (5,000); Sierra Leone 
90,000 (90,000); Spanish Guinea 110,000 (110,000); New Caledonia 
30,000 (30,000); Papua and New Guinea 80,000 (80,000); Portuguese 
Timor 33,000 (33,000). 



GREEN COFFEE: World total production for the marketing year 1965-66, with comparisons l/ 



Continent and country 



Average 

1955/56- 

I959/6O 



1962-63 



1963-61+ 



196U-65 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama ••••«.•••••. 
Trinidad & Tobago . 



1,000 
bags 2/ 



734 
713 
549 
1,436 
1,357 
600 
321 
1,716 
376 
27 
1+1+ 
1*27 



3/ 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

1,050 
650 
570 

1,650 

1,900 
590 
1*10 

2,200 
505 
73 
60 
1*16 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

1,100 

690 
2,000 
1,790 
530 
395 
2,855 
^50 
80 
75 
314 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

825 
600 
675 
1,900 
1,600 
555 
420 
2,650 
560 
85 
75 



Africa: : 

Angola .....: 1,41*3 

Burundi 6/ : 7/ 

Cameroon 8/ : "505 

Central African Republic : 3/ 1*1 

Congo (Lepoldville) 1,195 

Ethiopia : 1,100 

Guinea o : 9/ 114 

Ivory Coast : 2,130 

Kenya : 1*1 5 

Malagasy Republic : 902 

Rwanda 6/ : 7/ 

Tanzania 10/ : 375 

Togo : 122 

Uganda : 1,508 

332 



3,100 

110 
825 
105 
1,100 
1,1*90 

215 
3,350 
635 

1,000 

85 

1*70 
177 

2,945 

1*00 



2,800 

250 
900 

210 
1,100 
1,600 
175 
4,350 
71*0 
835 
li*5 
545 
230 
2,900 
1*29 



3,200 
200 
950 
150 
800 

1,550 
170 

3,500 
775 

1,050 
155 
560 
200 

2,700 
1*1*2 







10,07'* 


10,754 


10,296 


11,079 


South America: 
















27,000 


28,200 


10,000 


33,000 






7,500 


7,800 


8,100 


8,000 






800 


700 


800 


865 






770 


815 


870 


880 




....: 835 


850 


890 


800 


850 




63 


121+ 


128 


128 


128 






37,01*1* 


38,533 


20,698 


43,723 







16,007 


17,209 


16,402 


i 17,751 


Asia and Oceania: 
















: 1,020 


: 1,21*0 


: 1,065 


1,180 






: 2,330 


: 1,900 


: 2,200 


2,000 






: 550 


: 655 


: 700 


: 675 






: 82 


: 80 


: 90 


: 100 






280 


: 319 


: 337 


: 337 




. . . ; 2, 521 


; l*,262 


; 1*,194 


4,392 


1*,292 




58,306 


i 67,387 


': 70,690 


: 51, 788 


: 76,81*5 



countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. 2/ 132.276 pounds 
each. 3/ 2-year average, k/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, Martinique, and Puerto Rico. 
3/ Includes Bolivia, British Guiana, Paraguay, and Surinam. 6/ Prior to 1962-63 was shown as Ruanda- 
Urundi. 7/ Shown in Congo ( Leopoldville ) prior to 1959-60. Combined exports for Rwanda and Burundi in 
1959-60 totaled 160,000 bags. 8/ Beginning with 1961-62 includes West Cameroon. Prior to 196I-62 
this area was identified as Southern Cameroon and its production was included with Nigeria. 9/ l-y^ 5 ? 
average. 10 / Prior to I96U-65 year was shown as Tanganyika. Now includes Zanzibar as well. 11/ In- 
cludes Cape Verde, Comoro Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Congo (Brazzaville^ Sao 
Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 12/ Includes Malaysia, New Caledonia, New 
Hebrides, Papua and New Guinea, Portuguese Timor and Vietnam. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 8 - 



(KEEN COFFEE: World exportable production for the marketing year 1965-66, with comparisons l/ 



Continent and country 



Average 

1955/56- 

1959/60 



1962-63 



1963-64 



1964-65 



2nd 
estimate 
1965-66 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti .. 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 



1,000 
bags 2/ 



1,000 
bags 2/ 



1,000 
bags 2/ 



1,000 
bags 2/ 



Trinidad & Tobago 
Other 4/ 



Total North America 



9j 



Africa: : 

Angola : 

Burundi 6/ : 

Cameroon 8/ : 

Central African Republic : 3/ 

Congo (Leopoldville) : 

Ethiopia 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Malagasy Republic 

Rwanda 6/ 

Tanzania 10 / 

Togo 

Uganda 

Other 11/ 

Total Africa 



1,427 

1/ 
396 
37 

i,i64 
850 
105 

2,063 
399 
812 

1/ 
369 
121 
1,454 
308 



3,050 
105 
805 
100 

1,050 

1,150 
200 

3,300 
615 
900 
80 

455 
175 
2,930 
367 



2,750 
245- 
875 
205 

1,050 

1,250 
160 

4,300 
720 
735 
140 
530 
225 

2,885 
396 



3,1^5 
195 
920 
145 
750 

1,200 
155 

3,450 
755 
950 
150 
545 
195 

2,685 
408 



Asia and Oceania: 

India 

Indonesia 

Philippines . . . 

Yemen 

Other 12/ 



Total Asia and Oceania 



World exportable production 



1,000 
bags 2/ 



658 


930 


970 


685 


780 


207 


50 








421 


420 


540 


525 


545 


1,327 


1, 540 


1,885 
1, 580 


1,780 


1,950 
1,690 


1,158 


1,700 
425 


1, 390 


435 


: 365 


390 


420 


262 


335 


320 


340 


375 


1,369 


1,250 


1,855 


1,600 


1,800 
455 


334 


460 


405 


510 


3/ 10 


19 


26 


25 


30 


37 


53 


68 


65 


70 


171 


122 


55 


63 


68 


6,389 


7,304 


8,069 


7,373 


8,183 



South America: 
















20,000 


21,200 


3,000 


25,800 






6, 500 


7,200 


7,000 


6,800 






630 


525 


615 


675 






605 


630 


670 


675 






370 


395 


300 


345 




: 44 


73 


77 


72 


72 






28,178 


30,027 


11,657 


34,367 



3,04o 
220 
970 
170 
950 

1,215 
155 

4,450 
800 
785 
l60 
560 
220 

2,885 
407 



; 9, 505 


15, 282 


16,466 


15,648 


16, 987 


: 223 


365 


620 


425 


530 


1,120 


2,080 


1,600 


1,850 


1,650 


: 74 


72 


70 


80 


90 


: 63 


135 




147 


147 


I 1,480 


2,652 


2,429 


2, 502 


2,417 


• 48,473 


53,416 


56,991 . 


37,180 


61,954 



countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. Exportable production 
represents total production minus consumption, except for Brazil prior to 1959-60 which was based on 
"registrations" of current crop minus port consumption and coastwise shipments. 2/ 132.276 pounds 
each. 3/ 2-year average. 4/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico. 5/ Includes 
Bolivia, British Guiana, Paraguay and Surinam. 6/ Prior to 1962-63, was shown as Ruanda -Urundi. 
7/ Shown in Congo (Leopoldville) prior to 1959-65. Combined exports for Rwanda and Burundi in 1959-60 
totaled 160,000 bags. 8/ Beginning with 1961-62 includes West Cameroon. Prior to 1961-62 this area 
was identified as Southern Cameroon «nri its production was included with Nigeria. 9/ 3-vear average. 
10 / Prior to 1964-65 year was shown as Tanganyika. Now includes Zanzibar as well. 11/ Includes Cape 
Verde, Comoro Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Congo (Brazzaville), Sao Tome and 
Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 12 / Includes Malaysia, New Caledonia, New Hebrides, 
Papua and Hew Guinea, Portuguese Timor and Vietnam. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 9 - 



EXPORTING COUNTRIES' JULY 1 
GRAIN STOCKS SHOW DECLINE 



Total grain stocks in the four leading exporting countries on 
July 1, I965, were about 11 percent below the level of a year earlier. 
This is the lowest level since 1955 and 7 percent below the 1955-59 
average. 

An estimated total of 126 million short tons of wheat, rye, barley, 
oats, and corn for the current season is 15 million tons below stocks on 
July 1, 196^. The principal change was in corn, which declined 13*5 
million short tons. Other grains changed moderately, with wheat and rye 
gaining and barley and oats declining. A 19 percent decrease in U.S. 
corn stocks was the dominant factor, accounting for 87 percent of the 
net change. 

In addition to the five grains under consideration, the United 
States held iQ.k million tons of grain sorghums on July 1, and Argentina 
about 800,000 tons. 

Present grain stock levels plus expected production are adequate to 
meet a somewhat larger import demand expected in the current season. 

Reports of poor wheat crops in the Soviet Union and Communist China 
indicate increased import needs in those 2 countries this year. While 
Western Europe's wheat production is moderately above last year's crop, 
their import requirements may be higher than last year as a result of 
weather damage at harvesttime. 

Even with substantial diversions of weather-damaged wheat to feed 
use, particularly in Europe, larger world feedstuff requirements are 
expected to increase total feed grain imports in the current season. 

Total U.S. supplies of wheat for 1965-66 are estimated at 2,177 
million bushels, only 1^ million bushels lower than a year earlier. 
Canada's supply of 1,315 million bushels at the beginning of its I965-66 
season was 12 percent above that of last year, due principally to larger 
production. 

A breakdown of July 1 stocks by country shows the U.S. total of 
86 million short tons accounting for 68 percent of the total for the 
k countries. This is the smallest volume since 1955 and only 66 percent 
of the I96I record stock level. Wheat stocks at 819 million bushels are 
the lowest since 1953; while those of corn at 1,926 million bushels are 
the lowest since 1956. Rye stocks are up rather sharply, while oats and 
barley are both down. 

July 1 grain stocks in Canada are estimated at 22 million tons, 
down from 23 in 196^-. Wheat and rye stocks are up slightly. Barley and 
oats are moderately lower. 

(Continued on page 12) 



-10- 



GRAINS: Estimated stocks in principal exporting countries, July 1, 1950-1965 







itye 


! Dcii xey 


. fla + c 1 / 


! (_/0rn 


• 10T>a.X 




• Mill i nn 

• 1 1XX J LU1 1 


> M"i 1 ~) 1 nn 


► M"i 11"! on 

» li.J__LX.LUIi 


» MIIIt nn 
■ 1 1 xxxx W 1 1 


» Mi 1 1 i nn 
. 11XXXXUI1 


» 1 nnn 

; X^VJVJU 




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■ ^6 R72 




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xp 


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11 6 

JXU 


1 91 7 

X, 7X ^ 


91 c l7R 


1 Qff) 


• 1 11 )i 


i n 


1 67 

XU ( 




t , pit 


11 R ^96 

XXU , P7U 


1961 


• l iill 


111 
Xt4 


1^1 
x;jp 




2,8l6 


110 Jj)i2 


1 0A9 


. i 799 


ft 
O 


1 ?), 


977 




XXO,5jo 


1 96 ^ 


. 1 iqt; 


7 


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2 11 
£ , xxp 


i m i 7fl 


1 96)i 


om 


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9 


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11 ^ 


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10? 26? 


iq^ 0/ 


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1 X 
J- 9 


1 0? 




1 926 


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up, upu 
















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1 ^7 


1 69 
xu^ 


7A 


26 O^R 




6 in 


i n 

Xw 


1 )i0 


i ^n 

XJU 


9/ 


?)i 7^n 


1961 


61i5 


9 
7 


110 


lk5 


1/ 


• 25 187 


1 96? 






7n < 


no 




16 J16R 


1 96 1 


^?o 


p 




180 


T/ 


21 120 

£.X, P^U 


1 96) 1 


^i^ 


ft 
u 


i ^ 


?i n 

l. X\J 


17 
p/ 


21 0R)i 


1 96^ 9 / 


• • s 99 j • 


Q 


1 n^ ■ 


1 

xop 


91 




ill OXIlcl • 
















1 D7 


16 


21 


19 

97 


91 

7X 


7 ll)i 

1 , PP"4 




1^8 


19 


27 


35 


119 

x^7 


10 172 


1 960 


1 )i0 


?n 


22 


21 

<-9 


1 J i0 


9 576 
7 , p i lj 


1961 


100 


10 ! 


20 


iiO 


1U0 


8.120 


1 96? 


• 7n • 


1 n • 


1 ^ 






7 1 20 

I , XCU 


1 96^ 


oc; 


R 


1 Ji 


2^ 


12^ < 


7 11 0 
1 ) pxu 


1 96) 1 


1 7^ 


i n 

XVJ 


90 


in 


160 


10 9 7 0 


1 96<^ 9 / 


?6)i 


9 < 

7 ! 


9 • 


2n « 


1 18 
x 


12 L?6 

Xc. , L4 1 \J 


nUO L*I cLXXd. ; 
















Tin 


J/ ! 


9 < 

7 ; 


90 


1/ > 


1 8l6 

p , upu 


JlfoT>aco 1 Q^C t^Q 




P/ ! 


1 7 • 


U0 


9/ 


5 018 


i QAn 




7/ 


1 ? < 




l"/ ' 


^ 1^8 

P 5 PPU 


1 96l 


1 ^0 


7/ 


25 


IiO 


1/ 


5 . 7ii0 


1 QA? 


oft 


7/ 


i c; 


ic; 


9/ 


1 R60 


i 96^ 


1 


7/ 


?n 


1^ 

99 • 


T/ - 

p/ 


^,690 




117 


7/ 




60 


7/ 
P/ 


L 758 




1 6l 


7/ 


i 




T/ - 


5 682 


10 oclX t 














A -Trcir*2 cro "I Q^n_^)i 


• i nR6 


1R 


?n)i 




1 lii7 


81 Ii79 




• 1 Q7£ . 


)i9 






2 0% 


115 0ii6 


i o6n 


• 9 99Q 


)if> 
uu 




ii65 


2,662 


158 280 


1961 


' 2,306 


33 


328 


550 


2^956 


169,689 


1962 


..: 1,915 : 


2U 


221; 




2,618 


lu3,98I) 


1963 


..: 1,965 : 


20 : 


286 s 


51U 


2,2U0 


137,it98 


196U 


..: 1,728 : 


23 


301 


615 


2,517 


lUl,07ii 


1965 2/ 




31 


227 


i;95 


2,06Ii 


126,223 



1/Canadian oats in bushels of 3h pounds; data for other countries in bushels of 3? pounds. 
2/Preliminary estimates. 3/ Production small and remaining stocks believed negligible. 
Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of 
foreign governments, other foreign source material, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches 
and Foreign Service ©fficers, results of office research, and related information. 



- 11 - 

m _ 



Grain stocks in the 2 Southern Hemisphere exporting countries on 
July 1 are in a different category from those in North America. In 
Southern Hemisphere countries these are mid-season supplies which must 
cover all needs to the end of the current crop season and for carryover. 
Thus, stocks of small grains in Argentina and Australia are for con- 
sumption or export up to December 1 and corn to April 1 of the following 
year, the beginning of the new season. In contrast, July 1 stocks in 
North America approximate the year-end carryover of small grains. Stocks 
represent actual carryover into the new season in the United States, while 
in Canada the marketing season starts August 1. For corn, the U.S. 
marketing season begins October 1. 

Argentina's grain stocks remaining on July 1, 1965, are estimated at 
12 million tons compared with 11 million a year earlier. With individual 
increases in exports for all grains in the year ending June 30 , stocks of 
wheat alone showed a gain. 

Mid-season wheat stocks in Argentina are 50 percent higher than 
those of July 1, 1964, but the outlook for the crop to be harvested be- 
ginning in November is for a somewhat smaller outturn. Similarly, 
Australia's July 1 stocks are up sharply, with the prospect for the 
upcoming crop to be considerably lower. 

Grain stocks of 5*7 million tons in Australia were about 1 million 
tons above those of a year ago. An increase of 46 million bushels in 
wheat stocks is largely accounted for by a sizable gain in the wheat 
crop in 1964. 

U.S. EXPORTS OF FLAXSEED 
AND PRODUCTS UP SHARPLY 

Exports of flaxseed, linseed oil, and linseed cake and meal from 
the United States in the marketing year beginning July 1, 1964, rose 
sharply from exports of recent years. Flaxseed exports at 6.5 million 
bushels exceeded those of a year earlier by over 80 percent and were 
the largest since i960. Virtually all went to Europe with over one- 
half to the Netherlands. From the time of the first exports under the 
payment -in-kind (PIK) program in April I965, through June, the end of 
the marketing year, exports of flaxseed totaled about 2 million bushels. 

Exports of linseed oil at 19.9 million pounds were almost 40 per- 
cent above those of 1963-64 and were also the largest since i960. Nearly 
60 percent of the total went to Europe, principally to the Netherlands. 
Oil exports under the PIK program through June were nearly 14 million 
pounds . 

Linseed cake and meal exports totaled 80,279 tons, over 2.4 times 
the tonnage of 1963-64. Moreover, this was the largest quantity exported 
since 1955 • Virtually all of the cake and meal also moved to the 
European market, almost 70 percent to the Netherlands and nearly 20 per- 
cent to West Germany. 



-12- 



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>1 



- 13 - 



ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORTS 
INCREASE IN 196^-65 



Argentina exported a total of 9,^-35,900 metric tons of grain in 
196^-65, '^3 percent more than in the previous year and 86 percent above 
the exports of 5,068,000 tons in 1962-63. Feed grain exports, which 
comprised 5^ percent of the total, increased 36 percent while bread 
grains gained 53 percent. 

Italy was Argentina's largest customer, taking 3^ percent of their 
total grain exports last year. Italy's purchases were principally feed 
grains, including 2.k million tons of corn. 

Other ranking receivers -- the Netherlands, Brazil, the United 
Kingdom, and Communist China -- took predominantly wheat. The countries 
of the European Common Market took 57 percent of all exports -- 77 per- 
cent of feed grains and 33 percent of bread grains. 

All grains shared in the increased exports. Wheat shipments, at 
^,25^,000 tons were up 53 percent; rye at 96,000 up 39 percent; corn 
3,i4l-2,000 up kO percent; oats ^91,000 up 71 percent; barley Wf6,000 up 
^9 percent; sorghums 707>00O up less than 1 percent. Brazil was the 
leading taker of Argentine wheat at 962,000 tons, and the Netherlands 
took the most rye, 50,000 tons. Italy led in corn (2,^30,000 tons), 
oats (167,000) and barley (332,000). Japan was the largest buyer of 
grain sorghums at 301,000 tons. 

LARGE WORLD 

ALMOND CROP ESTIMATE 

The 1965 world commercial almond crop is tentatively estimated at 
132,800 short tons shelled basis, up slightly from last year's 130,^00- 
ton crop and well above the 11^, 100-ton average. The crop, however, is 
well below the record 155,500-ton harvest in I96I. Total supplies 
(including stocks) in producing countries for the 1965-66 marketing 
season are indicated at 150,000 tons, somewhat above I96U-65 supplies. 

Both foreign and U.S. production are above the I96U and 1959-63 
average levels. All foreign producers, except Spain, have larger crops 
than in I96U- and all are above average. The U.S. crop, at ^-2,600 tons, 
exceeds the previous record harvest of ^2,200 tons in 1959* 

Stocks in producing countries are estimated at 17,200 tons. This is 
well above the I963 and I96H levels but substantially below the 1959-63 
average . 

Exports from the six major producing countries during the 196^-65 
season are estimated at 77,100 tons - the highest level since 99,900 tons 
were shipped in I96I-62. Average exports for 1958-62 by these six coun- 
tries totaled 67,700 tons. 

(Continued on page 16) 



GRAIN! Argentine exports by country of destination, July-June 1963-64 and July-June 1964-65 



Destination 


t 

i Wheat 
: 


: ■ Rye 
: 


1 

t Corn 


: Oats 


: Barley 


: i 
• Sorghums , 

: i 


Total 




i 

: Metric 


: Metric 


: Metric 


: 

: Metric 


I 

i Metric 


j Metric , 


Metric 




i tons 


: tons 


t tons 


i tons 


i tons 


t tons 


tons 



July-June 1963-64 i 

United States ! 

Canada , . . , t 

Barbados t 

Brazil s 6ft6,363 

Bolivia 4,000 

Paraguay 19,204 

Peru '. 250,633 

Uruguay 

Venezuela . 

EEC : . 

Belgium-Luxembourg ...... K 31,382 

France J 75,464 

Germany, West J 252,724 

Italy J 191,469 

Netherlands J 94.479 

Total EEC 645.518 

Austria : 

Bulgaria : 

Czechoslovakia 44,782 

Denmark : 

Finland w 

Germany, East : 17,585 

Poland : 11,300 

Portugal ; 11 ,176 

Spain t 

Sweden : 

Switzerland : 4,460 

United Kingdom 87,151 

Yugoslavia ; 

U.S.S.R 9,632 

China, Mainland 988,029 

Israel : 

Japan t 

Vietnam j ^ 

Total ; 2,780.13? 
July-June 1964-65 : 

United States : 

Canada : 

Barbados I 100 

Bolivia : 18,770 

Brazil : 961,921 

Chile : 20,976 

Colombia > 44,085 

Cuba s 

Dominican Republic ' 4,200 

Ecuador i 100 

Mexico , : 

Martinique '• 

Paraguay : 20,439 

Peru I 314,503 

Trinidad > 

Uruguay 21 ,450 

Venezuela 38,053 

EEC: i 

Belgium-. Luxembourg ; 103,256 

France : 233,247 i 

Germany, West : 173,766 

Italy : 302,816 

Netherlands = 545 .098 

Total EEC : 1.368.183 

Austria 1 ~ 

Cyprus ! 9,923 

Denmark : — 1 

Finland 1 57,575 1 

Germany, East — : 

Hungary : — 1 

Norway '• 81 ,093 

Portugal ! 39,266 

Spain ! 61 ,488 

Sweden : 1,021 ' 

Switzerland : 5,883 ! 

United Kingdom : 498,439 1 

U.S.S.R ! 16,100 

Yugoslavia ! 

China, Mainland ; 598,110 

Japan : 2,200 

Israel ; 11,770 

Lebanon 7,000 

Saudi Arabia ; 6,719 

Singapore / 431 

Mozambique . : 38,403 

Malagasy, Rep .' 

Nigeria . ! 3,760 ' 

South Africa. Rep, of 11,989 ' 

Total ! 4,253,950i 

Equivalent 1,000 bushels 156,306 

Compiled from El Cereallsta. 



50 
100 



5,254 

20,627 
11 ,507 
8.737 



19,142 , 
1,091 ! 



10,693 
146 



163,802 
8,560 
58,429 
1 ,563,860 
273.532 



46.125 " 2.068.183 



12,625 



6,497 



2,036 

54,711 
115,743 
40, 343 



nr..-.?? ' 



7,515 



4,081 
6,050 
86,016 
128,205 
4.300 



228.652 



4,450 

16,582 



2,000 
25 



3,719 : 



48,382 

13,691 
65,168 
956 

193,639 

10,105 
11 .430 



9,204 
12,581 



5,230 



27,514 



' r n%' 1 2.451 .574 ■ 286.534 



6,716 

5,571 
913 
49.502 



3,413 
24,492 

! 

4,400 

978 
65 



12,111 
1 ,465 

35,763 

1 ,140 

672 i 
28,321 



144,485 
17,831 
77,104 
2,430,343 
248.114 



13,156 



10,000 

300 



20,638 



1 ,473 



31,055 



205 
1 ,047 



2,600 



96,959 
700 
78,642 
20,330 
146.682 



343.31 3 



100 



41 ,750 



8,000 
740 

2,070 
124,703 
480 

14,296 
40,385 
121 ,943 



300.133, 701.635 



10,155 



2.917.877 



— 2T7770" 

117 
4,180 
1,634 
61 ,296 
7,827 

133,799 

9,381 
1 1 5 ,000 

1 ,962 

91 ,041 
14,086 



390 



5,300 
1 ,000: 
102,589: 
1 67 ,083: 
161 .497. 



364 
75 
1 ,578 

30 



— : 

1 ,050; 

3,230: 

44,055: 
331 ,583: 
19.500: 



318 

500 



22,455 i 
1 ,615 
115,194 
14,238 
48.731 



437.469 398.368: 202.283 



20,85 3 



2,444= 
14,473= 



3,500: 



8,096 



9,653 
1 2,750 
2,286 



1 ,825 
2,760 



57,614 
70 
300 
121 ,808 i 

1,350 
14,172 
300,750 



500 



96,050 ) 3,442,432' 490.78 3 445.857. 706.329: 



3,781 



135,521 



33,812 



20,478 



27,326 



-15- 



U.S. exports of almonds during the year ending July 31, 1965, 
totaled 9,500 tons, shelled equivalent, virtually unchanged from the 
record high I963-6U level. Exports for 196^-65 consisted of 9,199 
tons shelled and 516 tons in shell, the respective totals for 1963-6^ 
were 9,lQk and 626 tons. 



U.S. imports of almonds were negligible with only ikO tons of 
shelled, 1 ton of in shell, and 73 tons of blanched almonds entering 
during the 196^-65 season. Total 1963-6^ imports were 119 tons 
shelled and 66 tons blanched. 



Prices of foreign almonds have remained relatively strong with 
shelled unselected Baris closing the season at 67.9 cents a pound 
after having fallen to 6l.2 cents in April. The monthly average has 
remained above 60 cents since April 1963. 



ALMONDS, SHELLED BASIS: Estimated commercial production 
in selected countries, average 1959-63 and 1963-65 crop years 



Country 



Average 

; 1959-63 ; 


1963 


I96U : 


Preliminary 
1965 


: Short 
: tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


Short 
tons 


: 7,300 


5,500 


7,200 


7,700 


: 37,600 


14-2,000 


39,000 


Ho, coo 


: 3A00 


3,ioo 


k,koo 


7,200 


3,200 


1,300 


3,500 


H,300 


: 29,800 


31,000 


35,000 


31,000 


: 81,000 


82,900 


89,100 


90,200 


: 33,100 


3k, 500 


ia, 300 


k2,6GO 


• ldA,100 


117, to 


130, to 


132,800 


\ 21,800 


7,600 


11, to 


17,200 


: 135,900 


125,000 


iij.1,800 


150,000 



Iran 



Morocco , 
Portugal 



l/ Source: Almond Control Board. 



-16- 



ALMONDS, SHELLED BASIS: Exports from selected countries, 
average 1958-62 and 1961-64 crop years l/ 

Country : Average : ^ : ^ : ^ : Preliminary 

• 

: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons tons 



Iran : 5,300 7,000 6,600 1,800 3,300 

Italy : 27,300 48,000 20,600 33,400 32,000 

Morocco : 2,000 1,200 1,100 1,500 3,100 

Portugal : 3,100 5,000 3,900 2,1+00 2,700 

Spain : 24,900 33,800 15,000 23,000 26,500 



Total foreign..: 62,600 95,000 47,200 62,100 67,600 



United States : 5,100 4,900 4,700 9,500 9,500 



Grand total : 67,700 99,900 51,900 71,600 77,100 



l/ Iranian series revised to a September 23 - September 22 crop year basis: 
Morocco- -calendar year following year shown; all others--year beginning 
August 1. 



iilM)NDS, SHELLED, UN3ELECTED: Monthly average prices f.o.b. Bari, 
Italy marketing seasons 1960-64 



Month ; 1960-61 | 1961-62 J 1962-63 ] 1963-64 : 1964-65 

• • ______ • • • 



• 

• 


U.So 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


• 
• 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


• 
• 


per 


per 


per 


per 


per 


• 
• 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


• 

September, o ., : 


47.8 


38.7 


65.2 


64.4 


64.7 




46.9 


38.2 


66.0 


69.3 


63.7 




46.5 


39.4 


69.6 


66.6 


61.9 




46.0 


41.9 


68.5 


62.6 


62.0 




46.2 


45.0 


69.0 


64.9 


63.1 




45.6 


45.8 


67.0 


63.2 


63.2 




42.4 


49.4 


60.9 


62.5 


62.5 




41.1 


47.3 


58.9 


61.2 


61.2 


May O.0»00...»«»0«»»0...0«.«. • 


42.0 


61.3 


62.3 


63.5 


63.0 




44.2 


63.7 


65.0 


65.2 


65.2 




43.0 


60.7 


61.9 


65.1 


66.3 




42,1 


62.8 


61.1 


66.2 


67.9 



- 17 - 



U.S. IMPORTS OF CORDAGE 
FIBERS DOWN IN I965 



Vegetable cordage fibers imported into the United States in January- 
June 1965 fell to 55 > 208 long tons valued at $11.6 million. This was a 
drop of k percent in quantity and 31 percent in value from the comparable 
period of 196^. Compared with the last 6 months of I96U, it was 6 per- 
cent larger in quantity but 11 percent less in value. 

Sisal accounted for the drop in total quantity in I965, although 
the other fibers gained somewhat. Both sisal and henequen totals were 
lower in value, but abaca increased in value from the comparable semester 
in 196^. ' 

Total imports of miscellaneous fibers in January-June 19&5 increased 
in both quantity and value from January-June 196k, but fell from July- 
December. Kapok accounted for the largest change from each semester. 

The Philippines and Brazil continue to be the leading sources of 
all cordage and miscellaneous fiber supplies for the United States. 
East Africa and Mexico also furnish comparatively large amounts. These 
four countries supplied 73 percent of the value in January- June I965. 

Asia was the principal source of supply with $6.7 million, compared 
with $5 million from the Americas and $2.1 million from Africa. 

The average unit value of these fiber imports was lower in 
January-June I965 "than in the comparable period of 196k except for istle; 
and was lower for all fibers than for the calendar year 196k. 

The United States depends upon imports for its supply of hard and 
miscellaneous vegetable fibers. Since early 1^6k, adequate world and 
domestic supplies caused prices to fall for most of these fibers, as 
did smaller purchases by U.S. consumers in recent months. 



CANADIAN EXPORTS OF WHEAT AND 
FLOUR SECOND LARGEST IN HISTORY 

Canadian exports of wheat and flour during the 196^-65 fiscal year, 
while somewhat under those for last year, were still the second largest 
in history. The million bushels shipped in this fiscal year repre- 
sented a decrease of 21 percent under the 552 million bushels shipped 
during 1963-6^, but the amount was still substantially greater than any 
other year. 

The largest single segment of shipments went to the Asiatic coun- 
tries. Out of ikO million bushels exported to this area, 65 million 
bushels were destined for Communist China--75 percent more than last year. 
Another 52 million bushels were destined for Japan--7 percent more than 
before. 

(Text continued on page 22 
tables pages 20, 21) 



-18- 



SPECIFIED VEGETABLE FIBERS: U.S. imports for consumption of hard and miscellaneous 
fibers, quantity and value, January-June I965 with comparisons 



Fibers 



Calendar year 



1963 1/ 



1964 1/ 



January- June 

"l964 * 1965 

: Preliminary 



Hard fibers: 



Henequen 2/ 

Abaca 

Istle 



Total 



Miscellaneous: 

Kapok , 

Coir , 

Crin vegetal , 
Other, n.e.s. 

Total , 



Total quantity 



Long tons 
70,700 
20,292 
28,026 
6.963 


t Long tons 
66,221 

! 16,330 
26,299 
875 


x Long tons : 

: 34,751 : 
: 8,522 : 
: 13,688 : 
: 438 : 


Long tons 

27,729 
11,215 
15,740 
524 


TPS Qfil 


TOO TPS 


• ? 1 , y?y 1 


ss ?o8 


11,966 
1,279 
85 
3,315 


13,004 
648 
60 
3,813 


: 4,259 : 
: 170 : 
: 25 : 
: 1,515 : 


2/ ^932 
2/ 520 

37 

ll 3,748 


16,645 


17,525 


5,969 : 


9,237 


142,626 


127,250 


: 63,368 ! 


64,445 



Hard fibers: 

Sisal 2/ o : 

Henequen 2/ : 

Abaca ; 

Istle 



1,000 
dollars 

18,080 
3,819 
8,636 
1.348 



Total 



31,883 



1,000 
dollars 
16,978 
3,580 
9,100 
170 



29,828 



1,000 
dollars 

9,731 
2,061 
4,862 
67 



1,000 
dollars 

4,794 
1,637 
5,090 
94 



16,721 



11,615 



Miscellaneous: : 


4,046 
103 
7 
818 


: 4,319 

! 80 
! 6 
832 


i 1,487 

!■ 30 
! 2 
376 


: 1,510 

55 

! 3 
576 




4,974 


5,237 


1,895 


2,144 




36,857 


35,065 


18,616 


13,759 


Principal countries of origin : 
for all above fibers : 


1,000 
dollars 


1,000 
dollars 


1,000 
dollars 


1,000 
dollars 



Philippines : 8,l64 

Brazil : 6,350 

East Africa 4/ : 5,599 

Mexico : 5,36l 

Haiti : 3,432 

Thailand : 3,426 

Malagasy Republic : 952 

Other Africa : ^2,128 

Other Asia : 1,299 

Other America : 78 

Europe and Oceania : 68 



8,294 
7,192 
^,913 
3,900 
2,892 
3,506 
1,045 
2/ 1,387 
1,768 

57 
111 




4,733 
2,391 
1,010 
1,844 
745 
1,300 
468 
578 
631 
15 
44 



1/' Data for I963 and 1964 not comparable because of changes in classifications beginning 
September 1, I963. 

2/ Imports from Mexico, Cuba, and El Salvador include little sisal and their total repre- 
sents total henequen; imports from all other countries represent total sisal. 
3/ Estimated. 

4/ Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. 
5/ Principally Mozambique. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Compiled from reports of the U. S. Department of Commerce. 



- 19 - 



WHEAT AND FLOUR: Canadian exports by country of destination, July 1963-June 1964. and July 1964-June T96>5 



July 1963-June 1964 



Destination 



July 1964-June 196s 



Wheat 



Flour 1/ 



Total 



Wheat 



Flour 1/ 



Total 



: 1 ,000 

: bushels 

Western Hemisphere: 

United States : 1 ,046 

Miquelon and St. Pierre : t — 

British Honduras : 

Costa Rica , : 

Honduras : 

El Salvador 874 

Guatemala : 208 

Nicaragua : 

Panama : 

Bahamas : 

Barbados 2/ 

Bermuda : 

Cuba : 6,329 

Dominican Republic : 355 

French West Indies : 

Haiti 

Jamaica : 10 

Leeuard and Windward Islands : 

Netherlands Antilles : 

Trinidad and Tobago : 

Argentina : 

British Guiana : 

Chile : 

Colombia : 

Ecuador : 1,146 

Peru : 731 

Surinam : 

Venezuela : 7.029 

Total : 1 8 , 228 

Western Europe: : 
EEC : 

Belgium and Luxembourg : 1 5 , 566 

Frtmce : 5,374 

Italy : 4,121 

Netherlands : 3,544 

West Germany : 36.141 

Total : 64.746 

Other Western Europe: : 

Austria 1 ,191 

Denmark : 21 

Finland : 726 

Gibraltar : 

Greece : 

Iceland : 

Ireland 2,733 

Malta 1 ,094 

Norway : 1 ,703 

Portugal : 411 

Spain : 

Sweden : :22 

Switzerland : 7,413 

United Kingdom : 76,136 

Total : 91 ,450 

Eastern Europe: '• 

Albania : 2,940 

Bulgaria : 5,757 

Czechoslovakia : 6,570 

Eastern Germany '• 

Hungary : 

Poland , : 11 ,879 

U.S.S.R : 187,222 

Yugoslavia : 7,422 

Total : 221,790 

Total Euro Tie : 377,986 



1 ,000 
bushels 

972 

19 

39 
618 

63 

12 

18 
311 
161 
314 
168 
122 
6,095 

75 
2 

115 
1,658 
1 ,067 

156 
1,484 

36 
7 

1 

61 
73 

2/ 



13.647 



196 

1 

7 



204 



32 
14 



2/ 
116 



11 .881 



12.055 



21 ,210 



?1 ,210 



1 ,000 
bushels 

2,018 
19 
39 
618 
63 
886 
226 
311 
161 
314 
168 
122 
12,424 
930 
2 

115 

1 ,668 
1 ,067 
156 
1 ,484 

36 
7 
1 

1 ,146 

792 
73 
/.029 



1 ,000 
bushels 



53 
84-4 
352 
415 

78 



8,444 
897 



367 
1 ,183 
938 

.632 



31 .875 



23.216 



15,762 
5,374 
4,122 
3,551 

36.141 



64.950 



15,973 
5,594 
3,894 
5,624 

21 .657 



52 ., 742 



1 ,191 
26 
726 
32 
14 
5 

2,733 
1 ,094 
1 ,703 
527 

24 
7,413 
88.017 



1 ,660 
343 



1 ,906 
1 ,432 
1 ,601 



44 
4,304 
71 .740 



1 ,000 
bushels 

1 ,000 
21 
43 
869 
48 
2 
38 
2 
32 
292 
191 
128 
4,532 
76 
7 
27 
1 ,644 
995 
258 
1 ,451 
1 

53 
1 
1 

82 
72 
1 



11 .917 



160 

7 
6 



173 



103.505 



83.030 



2,940 
5,757 
6,570 



11 ,879 
208,432 

7,/,?? 



5,399 
5^582 

26,245 
9,309 
3,614 
17,842 
32,723 



?/ , 3,oon 



1 0 2, 71 4 



^,4.69 



411 ,455- 



2.38,436. 



3 
18 
3 



2/ 
117 



10.142 



10.287 



2,928 



2,9 28 



1 ,000 
bushels 

1 ,000 
21 
43 
869 
101 
846 
390 
417 
160 
292 
196 
128 
12,976 
973 
7 
27 
1 ,652 
995 
258 
1,451 
1 

53 
1 

368 
1,183 
1 ,020 
72 
9,6 33 



11,122 



13.3W 



16,133 
5,594 
3,901 
5,630 

21 .657 



52.915 



1 ,660 
2 

343 
3 
18 
3 

1 ,906 
1,432 
1 ,601 
117 

46 
4,304 
81 .882 



9? , 317 



5,399 
7,582 
26,245 
9,309 
3,614 
17,842 
35,651 



105,6/,2 



?51 ,B7/, 



- 20 - 



WHEAT AND FLOUR: Canadian exports by country of destination, July 1963-June 1964 and July 1964-June 1965 (Continued) 



Destination 


■ r^r 

: Jul 

: Wheat : 


v 1VD5— June 1 ✓ 
Flour 1_/ i 


A/ 

Total J 


Jul 

Wheat : 


v 1964-June 1965 
Flour "\J : 


Total 




: 1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 




: bushels : 


bushels : 


bushel s 1 


bushels * 


1 jC.i'. J — ■ * 


bushels 


Asia: 










40 • 


/ft 

4° 






36 : 


OA 








1 » 

i • 


1 1 




2/ : 

SB 


2/ 






n£. 


1 55 ! 


171 « 


1 37 * 


330 






1 ,068 : 


1 r»Ad • 
1 ,Uoo * 

791 « 


6 , 870 ; 




6,870 






07 






143 s 


143 






A ! 


4 : 




2 - s 


2 










1 ,065 s 




1 ,065 






1 • 


I 




10 i 


10 






£j • 


TO 

*-7 


350 i 


15 S 


365 






A? 


62 




283 \ 


283 








1,119 


077 


TQ1 : 


1 290 








355 


2,629 




■c ,0^7 






g 


7 j 1 1 

r )4 I I 


A ?1 T 


1 i 
1 ? i 


6,314 






22 






13 








807 


Aco 


4 


656 






' 1 


1 




1 


1 






359 


359 




170 






44 


44 


~~~ 


t 116 


lit) 








36,921 


64 , 60 4 












51 1 










671 


864. 


1 ,535 


: 837 


705 


1,542 




in 007 


112 


4S,099 


: 51 ,627 


35 


51 ,662 






c 
? 


j 










41 1 




41 1 


: 638 




638 




on c -in 




100 .961 


136.655 


: 2.883 


1 39 538 


Africa: 


















' 0 


! A 




: a. 


A. 






39 


: 39 


















- .?? 








04 


: A/ 




• 17 7 

14/ 


s 1 /7 
1 4 r 












■ 20 


» 20 






: A 


: a 

• D 




! AT 










: -1 nco 




: -j A£)5 


■ 1 An*; 






: Aft 

■ Do 


1 £>g 




: AT 
0.? 








i 1 8 


: 71 7 


597 


! A 
D 


i Ana 






: ftT 

• oj 






• "\08 


! 108 






r 7 






■ 1 

I 


I -j 






455 


• 

' 455 




514 


> C1 / 






! 3 


: 3 




• 1 Q 


► 1 Q 
1 7 






! 150 


150 




1 41 


141 









— 





| 3 


: 3 






: 38 


• 1 40 


35 


41 


• 7A 






• 11 


! 1 1 




* 7 












! Q 




! 9 














! 2 1 ; 






: 5 


s 1 ,525 


: <, , 0 / \J 




I 2 , 870 




off 






: 40 


: 3 


: 51 






: 2.028 


: 4.377 


: 3,55? . 


: 2.825 


: 6.334 


Oceania ; 


3 












Fi 1i 




: 6 


: 6 




: 6 : 


; A. 






: 2 


: 2 




: 1 


1 






: 2 


: 403 


: 190 


: 8 


: 198 






: 10 


411 


: 190 


: 15 


: 205 








s 2.875 


: 1 .270 




: 1 . 270 






: 52.578 


: 551 .954 


: 403.376 


: 31 .028 


: 434.404 



1/ Grain equivalent. 2/ Less than 50 bushels. 3_/ Includes bagged seed wheat. 



Complied from records of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada. 



- 21 - 



Approximately 10 6 million "bushels were earmarked for the Soviet Bloc. 
This includes 36 million to the USSR as compared with 208 million last 
year. The drop in shipments to this country was the most important single 
factor in bringing about the decrease in overall Canadian shipments. 
Another 26 million bushels were destined for Czechoslovakia. 

Another lk6 million bushels of wheat and flour went to the Western 
European area. Over-all shipments to the EEC decreased 19 percent with 
the reductions noted in amounts going to Italy and West Germany. Ship- 
ments to Belgium-Luxembourg, France, and the Netherlands were up slightly. 
Over 8l million bushels or 87 percent of the European total of wheat and 
flour went to the United Kingdom, slightly less than the 88 million 
bushels reported in the 1963-6^ fiscal year. 

In the Western Hemisphere, the largest amount of wheat and flour was 
destined for Cuba. Out of 35 million bushels exported to this area, 
13 million bushels were earmarked for Cuba. 

Noted grain shipments dropped almost 20 percent during the past 
12 months. This decrease was not evidenced in all areas, however. 
Exports to countries in the Soviet Bloc outside of the USSR were sub- 
stantially larger yin I96U-65 than in 1963-6^. Over 26 million bushels 
were destined for Czechoslovakia as compared with slightly less than 
7 million the previous year. Eastern Germany and Hungary, not importers 
of Canadian wheat in 1963-6^, were to get almost 13 million bushels this 
year. The largest customer for Canadian wheat grain was the United 
Kingdom; exports to this country, while slightly under those for last 
year, totaled 72 million bushels. Another 6k million bushels went to 
Communist China. Exports to Japan were third largest, amounting to 
52 million bushels. 

Canada's flour exports during the 196^-65 fiscal year were kl per- 
cent under those for the 1963-6^ year. Nearly all of the decrease was 
due to smaller purchases by the Soviet Union which in turn diverted less 
than half as much flour to Cuba this year as compared with the 1963-6^ 
year. 



SMALLER WORLD 

FILBERT CROP ESTIMATE FOR I965 

The I965 commercial filbert harvest by the four main producing coun- 
tries is estimated at 169,200 short tons, unshelled basis. This would be 
about two-thirds as large as the record 259> 000-ton 1^6k crop but still 
above the 163, 900-ton average. There is also a heavy carryin of I96U- 
crop Turkish filberts. 

Turkey, which had a record shattering 200,000-ton harvest in 196^-, 
has a much smaller I965 crop, estimated at 83,000 tons. The Spanish 
harvest is set at 22,000 tons - well above last year's 18,000 -ton crop 
and the 16,800-ton average. Italy's crop is forecast at 57>000 tons as 
compared to 33*000 tons in 196^- and an average of if 9, 000 tons. 



-22- 



FILBERTS: Exports from selected countries, average 195&-62, 
and 1961-6^ marketing years 

Type and Country j g|| j 1961 j 1962 j 1963 j P ^*g 



: Short Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons tons 
Unshelled : 

Italy : 13,200 13,200 13,300 lU,300 

Spain : 900 1,000 TOO 1,300 

Turkey : 900 200 300 TOO 



Total : 15,000 lk,k00 1^,300 16,300 



Shelled : 

Italy 8,100 10,900 8,100 7,100 

Spain 5,000 ^,500 U,300 5,900 

Turkey ; 1+5,800 1+3,900 U6,800 53,500 

Total : 58,900 59,300 59,200 66,500 



Unshelled Equivalent : 

Italy : 31,000 37,200 31,100 29,900 27,500 

Spain : 11,900 10,900 10,300 lU,300 15,900 

Turkey : 92,500 88,000 103,300 107,700 120,000 



Total : 135,^00 136,100 lW+,700 151,900 163,1+00 



FILBERTS^ UNSHELLED: Estimated commercial production in 
specified countries, average 1959-63 and 1963-65 crop years 

: Average : : Preliminary : Forecast 

Co^try ; 1959-63 : 1963 : 1961i- : 1965 



: Short Short Short Short 

: tons tons tons tons 

Italy : 1+9,000 6l,000 33,000 57,000 

Spain : 16,800 22,000 18,000 22,000 

Turkey : 90,1+00 100,000 200,000 83,000 



Total foreign : 15^,800 183,000 251,000 162,000 



United States : 9,100 6,900 8,000 T,200 



Grand total : 163,900 189,900 259,000 169,200 



- 23 - 



Exports from the Mediterranean countries during the I96I+-65 season, 
according to preliminary data, reached a record 163,1+00 tons. The previous 
record was 151,900 tons in I963-6I+. Spanish exports, forecast at 15,900 tons 
for the year ending September 30, 1965, will be somewhat above the ll+,300 tons 
shipped the year before the one-third above average. Italy, on the other hand, 
will have shipped only 27,500 tons during the I96U-65 season—down from the 
29,900-ton 1963-6^ season and the 31,000-ton average. Most of the increase in 
world filbert trade in recent years has been due to a fairly rapid increase in 
Turkish exports which are indicated at a record 120,000 tons for the I96I+-65 
season. Turkey's I963-6I+ exports totaled 107,700 tons while the 1958-62 
average was 92,500 tons. 

U.S. imports of shelled filberts totaled 2,173 tons during the ten months 
October 196^-July 1965. During the entire I963-6I+ season, imports totaled 
2,671 tons. As usual, imports of inshell filberts were negligible. 

Prices of shelled Kerassundes (f.o.b. Turkish port) have ranged narrowly 
between hh and 1+9 cents per pound during most of the season but closing the 
season at 51 •! cents per pound. This is the lowest the market has been in 
5 years but it is still remarkably stable and a fairly high level in light of 
the record I96I+ Turkish crop. Extremely tight control of export prices by the 
Turkish Filbert Coop, Fiskobirlik, and the Turkish Government has evidently 
been responsible for the market stability. 

The heavy carryover of Turkish filberts will undoubtedly have some depress 
ing effect on the market for new crop nuts. However, much depends on how the 
carryover will be disposed of by the Turkish Government. 



FILBERTS, SHELLED, KEFASSUNES: Prices, f.o.b. Turkish port 
first week each month I96O-6I+ marketing seasons 



First week of 


1960-61 


1961-62 ! 


1962-63 


1963 -61+ ! 


I96U-65 




U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




per 


per 


per 


per 


per 




pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


October 


1+7.0 


53.7 


62.5 


60.3 


1+5-1 


November 


50.2 


59.^ 


6k. 1 


58.1 


^5.7 


December 


^9.5 


59.7 


62.9 


53.3 


1+1+.8 


January 


50.8 


63.8 


62.5 


55.2 


^5-1 


February 


5^.9 


6^.8 


61.6 


52.7 


1+6.7 


March 


5M 


63.5 


61.0 


50.8 


1+1+.8 


April 


5^.3 


6k.Q 


60.6 


1+8.9 


kk.l 


May 


1+8.6 


58. 1+ 


58.1+ 


1+6.1+ 


^3.5 


June 


1+8.9 


57.5 


57.2 


1+8.3 


I+7.0 


July 


50.8 


5^.3 


57.8 


1+7.6 


U8.3 


August 


52.7 


57.8 


57.5 


I+6.7 


I+8.9 


September : 


5I+.0 


57.2 


60.3 


^5.7 


51.1 



-21+- 



NEAR -RECORD WORLD BREAD GRAIN 
PRODUCTION IS FORECAST 



World production of bread grains in I965 is expected to "be second in 
volume only to the record crop of 196k, according to the first estimate 
of Foreign Agricultural Service. 

The first estimate for the new season of world combined crops of 
wheat and rye is forecast at 280 million metric tons cc-mpared with 2Qh 
million tons in 196^, and the previous near-record crop of 270 million 
tons in 1962. 

The prospective world wheat crop is 2 percent below the 196^ record 
harvest, and lk percent larger than the average of 1955-59* The decline 
from a year ago is due mainly to reduced crops in the USSR and Mainland 
China, two of the three largest producers of wheat. 

Wheat production in the non-communist areas which accounts for about 
two-thirds of world production is 5 percent larger than last year's 
record harvest and 11 percent more than in 19^3 • Sharp increases resulted 
in a record crop in North America. Asia, Europe, and Africa also have 
record harvests. 

Generally speaking, weather in the Northern Hemisphere was favorable 
for the production of winter wheat. Acreages were increased last fall, 
and winterkill, was at a minimum. However, the spring was late, with 
cold and rainy weather, which delayed growth in many countries. Above 
normal rainfall continued through the summer, and harvesting of both 
winter and spring wheat was delayed. This cut down on the high yields 
expected to be harvested in a number of countries of the Northern 
Hemisphere. 

Latest wheat crop estimates for the United States and Canada indi- 
cated exceptionally large harvests. As of September 1, the U.S. crop 
was forecast at 5 percent above the good harvest of I96U; its near-record 
crop is the largest since the record of 1958* Based on August 15 con- 
ditions, Canada's record crop of 760 million bushels is 160 million more 
than in 196^, and 5 percent larger than the previous record of 1963. 
This is due to record yields since acreage declined 5 percent from that 
in 196^. Unfavorable weather developments in both the United States and 
Canada since release of the latest crop reports could reduce wheat crop 
estimates to some extent. Mexico also had a record crop. 

Western Europe's wheat production is forecast at 3 percent more than 
in 196^. Acreage was at a record level. Despite late harvests, serious 
losses by flooding, and some lodging of grain, overall yields are well 
above average, and record yields per acre have been and are being harvested 
in several countries. 



-25- 



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Record wheat crops are "being produced in France and the United 
Kingdom where acreage increased by 3 and 16 percent, respectively, and 
yields per acre were above average. A near-record wheat crop is ex- 
pected in Italy. Principal countries affected by the cool, rainy 
season and late harvests were West Germany, Austria, and Belgium. Crops 
of Spain and Portugal were larger than expected and considerably above 
the poor harvests of 196^, but were below average. 

Total wheat production of Eastern Europe increased moderately over 
the high level of I96U. Very good harvests were in prospect in Bulgaria 
and Rumania. In Czechoslovakia production may be about the same as the 
large 196^ crop. These good crops were partially offset by declines in 
East Germany, Poland, and Yugoslavia. 

Wheat production of the USSR reportedly declined from 15 to 20 
percent below the good crop of 196^. The winter wheat outturn was 
larger than average. However, the spring crop was severely damaged 
by dry, hot weather later in the season. 

Despite a 10-percent drop in the wheat production of Mainland 
China, Asia's wheat harvest showed a moderate increase. Record crops 
in India and Pakistan were 22 and 7 percent larger than the good harvests 
harvests of the preceding season. Production in the Middle East in- 
creased 8 percent over I96U-. Good crops were harvested in Turkey, 
Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon. 

In Mainland - China, unfavorable weather at the time of planting 
limited the wheat acreage possibly up to 90 percent of the year before. 
This apparently reduced wheat production by about the same extent. 

Countries in North Africa also had good wheat harvests, especially 
Morocco and Egypt. Production in Tunisia was larger than the small 
crop of 196^-, but was less than in 19&3 • 

Early season prospects in the Southern Hemisphere are for possibly 
smaller crops than the exceptionally large production of 196^-. It is 
too early in the season to know the extent of the area to be planted in 
South America. Prospects indicate a small decline in acreage. So far 
weather has been generally favorable for another good season for wheat. 

Wheat acreage of Eastern Australia was sharply reduced by drought, 
especially in New South Wales, producer of kl percent of last year's 
crop, and in Queensland. However, a million acres more were planted 
in Western Australia, and conditions there are favorable for the 
harvesting of a very good crop. 



-29- 



World rye production exceeded that of by 3 percent and was the 

largest in four years although acreage, approximating 196k, was at the 
reduced level of recent years. 

The USSR., East Europe, West Europe, and North America account 
for 96 percent of the prospective world production of rye. Substantial 
increases in output are forecast in the USSR, and Poland -- the two 
largest producers -- where acreages reportedly increased and estimated 
yields per acre are higher than in 1964. 

Canada has a significant increase in rye production; acreage was up 
10 percent and yields were the highest on record, according to August 15 
conditions. U.S. acreage, however, declined 15 percent. Above -average 
yields per acre resulted in a U.S. crop nearly as large as the good 
harvest of 1964. 

Europe's rye production declined by 6 percent. The crop of Western 
Europe was 15 percent below the 1^6h level and is nearly a fourth less 
than the 1955-59 average. Its rye acreage continued the decline of recent 
years, being 3 percent below that of 196k, about k percent less than in 
1963; anc ^ 25 percent below the 1955-59 average. Eastern European rye 
production declined only slightly from a year ago. 



-30- 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20250 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

U. «. DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE 



Official Business 



NOTICE 

If you no longer need this publication, 
check here / / return this sheet, 

and your name will be dropped from the 
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and return the whole sheet to: 

Foreign Agricultural Service, Rtn. 56 2 5 r 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington. D.C. 202S0. 



WORLD AGRICULTURAL 
PRODUCTION AND TRADE 

Statistical Report 





OCTOBER 19G5 



CONTENTS 



DEC 10 ^ 

CURHEHI SERIAL RECORD* 



WORLD SUMMARIES Riga 
Production 

Currant Pack Again Short 3 

Raisin Pack Largest on Record 5 

1965-66 World Cocoa Bean Crop Second Largest of Record . 8 

Northern Hemisphere Apple and Pear Production II 

Soybean Production at Record High 14 

Slight Increase Indicated for 1965 and 1966 

World Hog Slaughter 17 

Cotton Crop in 1965-66 Equal To Record of 1964-65 L9 

Cottonseed Production at Last Year's Record Level 25 

Barley and Oats Production Forecast Lower 28 

COUNTRY SUMMARIES 
Trade 

U.S. Wheat Exports Down in 1964-65 21 

U.S. Feed Grain Exports Break Record 24 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 



Single copies free to persons in the United States 
From the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Km. 5918 South, Du-8-2M+5 



Foreign Agriculture Circulars 

FC 13-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles 
I and IV, PL kQO 

FC lU-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles 
I and IV, PL k8o 

FD 9-65 World Trade in Dairy Products Up Again in I96U 

FFO I8-65 U.S. Exports of Soybeans, Edible Oil Cakes and Meals Continue 
at Record Rate 

FDAP 2-65 Common Market Reference Prices for Deciduous Fruits 

FVF 5-65 U.S. Imports of Vegetable Fibers for Cordage Down in 
Early 1965 

FS 5-65 Molasses and Honey Production Up 
FT 6-65 World Cigarette Output Up 



Foreign Agricultural Service Special Reports 

The Foreign Agricultural Service publishes special reports on foreign 
agricultural situations particularly relating to agricultural commodity 
and trade policy developments. A revised listing was issued September 
I965 and is available to the public. 



WORLD CURRANT 
PACK AGAIN SHORT 



The 1965 dried currant pack - in Australia, Greece, and South Africa 
tentatively estimated at 107,500 short tons - is slightly helow average 
though larger than the 1963 and 196^ packs of 93,300 and 99,500 tons, 
respectively, which were appreciably helow average. 

The estimate of I965 production is still tentative because of un- 
certainty over the actual outturn of the all-important Greek pack. In 
early September, the Autonomous Currant Organization (A. S. 0.) of 
Greece estimated the pack as close to 93,000 short tons. However, other 
sources do not believe the pack to be any larger and possibly smaller 
than the I96U pack of 86,000 tons. Average production (1959-63) is 
100,600 tons. Rains in the latter part of August, particularly in south- 
western Peloponnesus, caused considerable damage to the fruit both on the 
vines and in the drying yards. Industry assessments of the extent of the 
damage apparently differ. The crop is also late. 

Reports from Greece indicate important technological advances are 
taking place in cultural practices. Most of the vineyards in 1965 were 
reportedly machine -cultivated. Mechanized spraying is becoming more 
widespread. Giberillic acid and growth regulator ^-C.P.A. were applied 
on several hundred acres in I965 and their use is expected to expand 
sharply. Though technology is improving, acreage remains about constant: 
a few hundred acres are planted annually while approximately an equal 
area of old vineyards is uprooted each year. New vineyards are planted 
on wider rows so as to facilitate mechanical cultivation. 

The Australian crop, harvested in early 1965, of 13,600 was sub- 
stantially above the 5-year average of 10,U00 tons and was the largest 
since I96I (lU, 500 tons). Production in the Republic of South Africa 
continued to be minor. 



DRIED CURRANTS: Estimated commercial production in specified 
countries average 1959-63, annual 1962-65 



Country 


1959-63 \ 1962 : 1963 : 196k • 1965 




Short Short Short Short Short 
tons tons tons tons tons 

10,^00 8,700 7,500 12,600 13,600 
100,600 120,000 85,000 86,000 93,000 

900 800 800 900 900 




South Africa, Republic of. 
Total 


111,900 129,500 93,300 99,500 107,500 



The volume of Greek exports of roughly 68,000 tons in 196^-65 was 
virtually the same as in I963-6I+ and again below average. However, 
Australian exports of 7,800 tons in calendar 196^ were appreciably higher 
than the exceptionally small volume of 3,600 tons exported in 1963. The 
Australian trade has forecast a good export year for 1965 with dried cur- 
rant shipments to exceed 8,000 tons. The Greek supply and quality situa- 
tion are too uncertain to enable a meaningful forecast of 1965-66 exports. 



DRIED CURRANTS: Exports from specified countries 
average 1959-63* annual 1961-64- 



Country 


: Average 
• 1959-63 


1961 


; 1962 


; 1963 


; I96U 






• Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 






tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


Australia: 














(Year beginning Jan. 


!)•■ 


6,000 


9,300 


U,800 


3,600 


7,800 


Greece: 














(Year beginning Sept. 


D- 


71,500 


71,500 


8l,7CO 


66,900 


1/68,000 



l/ Preliminary 



Greek currant prices in 196^-65 were even higher than the exceptionally 
high prices of I963-6U. With 1965-crop "security prices" set by the Greek 
government 1.5 cents above those for the 196^ crop and with the doubts pre- 
vailing over the size of the 1965 pack, early 1965-crop prices are well 
above those of a year earlier. 



GREEK DRIED CURRANTS: Prices, c & f London, 
average, July 1962-65 



Type 



January price 



1962 



1963 



196^ 



1965 



Vostizza (Aegion) 

Pyrgos 

Kalamata 



U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


U.S. 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


per 


per 


per 


per 


pound 


pound 


pound 


pound 


13.8 




16.3 


IT. 9 


12.0 


11.6 


15.2 


16.7 


11.8 


11.6 


15.1 





-h- 



WORLD RAISIN PACK 
LARGEST ON RECORD 



The I965 world raisin pack is tentatively estimated at 678,700 tons, 
the largest crop on record. This estimate is about 116,000 tons larger 
than the I96U pack and about 1^0,000 tons above the 5 -year average 
(1959-63). The previous postwar high was 577,900 tons in 1959. 



RAISLNS: Estimated commercial production, 
average 1959-63, annual 1963-65 



Country 



Average 
1959-63 



1963 



I96I4- 



Fo re cast 
1965 



Short 
tons 



Short 
tons 



Short 
tons 



Short 
tons 



Australia: : 

Lexias : 8,600 7,800 

Sultanas : 70,000 6l,800 

Cyprus : 9,200 2,000 

Greece : 63,800 59,000 

Iran : 59,800 65,000 

South Africa, Republic of : 7,200 8,500 

Spain : 12,000 11,600 

Turkey : 87,600 66,000 

Foreign total : 318,200 281,700 

United States : 220, to) 2/266,000 

Grand total ': 538, 600 2/51^7,700 



8,900 
9^,700 

d,koo 

77,500 

39,ooo 
9,500 
12,500 
80 , 000 



11,800 
93,000 

1/ 9,200 
90,000 
65,000 
9,700 
11,000 

120,000 



330,500 ^09,700 



232, hoo 3/269,000 



562,900 678,700 



1/ 1959-63 average; I965 estimate unavailable. 2/ Includes ^9,CC0 tons 
substandard rain-damaged raisins. 3/ Includes official estimate of 
25^-; 000 tons of natural raisins and unofficial estimate of 15,000 tons of 
golden bleached. 



It appears that foreign production may amount to 1+09,700 tons, or 
91,500 tons above average and 79,200 tons above last year's pack. At 
this writing there is still some uncertainty about the ultimate size of 
the I965 Greek, Iranian, and Turkish packs. There is little doubt that 
these packs are well above average but there is considerable diversity in 
estimates from different sources, some being higher and others lower than 
here published. Australia, early in the year, harvested another exception- 
ally large crop. Only Spain has a smaller crop than last year. 



The California pack of 269,000 tons is the largest since 1952 and 36,600 
tons above the I96U pack. It is the third consecutive bumper pack produced in 
California, but only a shade larger than the I963 crop before the latter was 
damaged by rain at drying time. 

Raisin stocks, September 1, I965, in the producing countries of the 
Northern Hemisphere totaled about ^3,000 tons, nearly all in the United States. 
Though 17,000 tons heavier than the September 1, I963, and 196^ stocks level, 
the I965 carryin roughly approximates the September 1, I962, carryin and is 
below that of September 1, i960. The Australian carryin on January 1, 1965 of 
13,^-00 tons (Sultanas and Lexias) was larger than usual and was exceeded, in 
recent years, only by the I963 carryin. It appears probable that the conclusion 
of the I965 marketing season will be marked by exceptionally heavy carryout 
stocks - in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. 

Exports in the 196^ marketing year by the 8 producing countries listed are 
estimated at 309,100 tons, an increase of 28,200 tons, or 10 percent over the 
I963 marketing year. Substantial increases were registered by Australia, 
Greece, and Turkey while Iranian exports declined sharply in consequence of a 
short crop. U.S. exports of 55,600 tons were virtually the same as in the 
previous year. At 309,100 tons, the 196^ marketing year exports were slightly 
above the average (1959-63) of 301,600 tons. 



RAISINS: Exports from 8 leading producing countries, 
average 1959-63, annual 1961-6^ seasons l/ 



Country 


: Average : 
: 1959-63 : 


1961 


1962 


1963 


Preliminary 
196k 




: Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 




: tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 




,: 60,i+00 


56,900 


7^,200 


57,700 


78,100 




.: 56,000 


52,700 


87,000 


57,300 


69,000 




.: 37,700 


1+2,000 


3^, 000 


1+5,500 


25,000 






78,900 


91,100 


55,000 


67,200 


Cyprus, S. Africa, Spain . . 


.: 16,700 


19,100 


19 , 000 


9,300 


li+,200 



Foreign total ; 2^7,200 2k-S, 600 305,300 22^,800 253,500 

United States I 5^00 65, to 1+5,000 56,100 55,600 

Grand total : 301,600 315,000 350,300 280,900 309,100 



l/ Marketing season beginning August and September for Northern Hemisphere 
countries and January for Southern Hemisphere countries. 



-6- 



Based on estimates by the trade in each of the major raisin- 
producing countries, it appears that about 375>0O0 tons may be exported 
in the I965 marketing year. This would be roundly 66,000 tons above the 
I96U level and 73*000 above average. It would also exceed the recent 
high of 350,000 tons exported in 1962. 

None of the above statistics include the exports of minor exporters 
such as Argentina and Chile, nor the exports of Afghanistan, which are 
believed to be substantial but are not readily ascertainable. 

World raisin prices continued strong during the I96U marketing 
season. Compared with July I96U quotations (in London), July I965 prices 
were slightly higher for Turkish and Australian, appreciably higher for 
Iranian, and slightly lower - though still at a relatively high level - 
for Californian raisins. Minimum export prices set June I965 under the 
second International Sultana Agreement are substantially the same for 
1965-crop Australian, Greek, and Turkish raisins as for the 196k crop. 



RAISINS: Prices, landed, duty paid London 
average, July 1961-65 



Origin and type 



July price 



1961 



1962 ; 1963 ; 196k 



1965 



Turkey: 
No. 9 . 
No. 10 



Greece: 

No. 2 

No. k Natural 



Australia: 
h- Crown 
5 -Crown 



Iran: 

Maragha/Urmia 



California: 

Natural Thompson Seedless. 



15.8 
16.0 



16. k 
17.2 



15.2 
17.6 



U.S. Cents per pound 



13. k 12.6 17.0 17.2 
13.8 13.0 17. k 17.6 



17.^ 

12. k 17.2 



13.8 13.0 17.2 IJ.k 

Ik.h 13.2 17.6 17,6 



11.6 10.2 lk.0 It 



0.0 



17.2 19.0 19.6 19.2 



I965-66 WORLD COCOA BEAN CROP 
SECOND LARGEST OF RECORD 



The 1965-66 world cocoa bean crop is forecast at 1,^-20,000 metric 
tons and will be the second largest of record. Production this season 
is expected to be about 6 percent below the record 196^-65 harvest of 
1,51^200 tons, because of less favorable weather conditions in many 
of the major West African producing countries. Latin American pro- 
duction, and crops in the Asia and Oceania regions are expected to be 
larger. Production this year will be 1^ percent above the I960/6I- 
196^/65 average and 60 percent above the 1955/56-1959/60 level. 

The 196^-65 world cocoa crop was 22 percent above the previous 
record I963-6U harvest. This phenomenal rise in production is attri- 
buted to exceptionally favorable growing conditions in West Africa, 
coupled with new plantings coming into bearing, and from the results 
of intensive campaigns against disease and pests in recent years. 

Africa : African production is forecast at 1,06^,900 tons, down 
10 percent from the record 196^-65 outturn. African production alone 
last year exceeded total world output for every season prior to 1963-6^. 
Recent investigations have revealed considerably more new plantings 
had been made in the past than previously had been known, particularly 
in Ghana, Nigeria, and in the Lvory Coast. 

Weather conditions for the current African main-crops have been 
good, but not as ideal as those experienced last season. Low world 
prices has forced Ghana -- the world's largest producer -- to curtail 
disease and pest control measures. The full impact of this action 
will not be apparent until the 1966-67 crop, and those thereafter. 

Production in Cameroon is expected to exceed the large I96U-65 
outturn of 90*000 tons. More care in controlling pod-rot has been 
instrumental in the continuation of the rising trend in production. 
The government reduced producer-prices for the I965 mid-crop to 
U.S. 9-2 cents per pound, compared to 15.6 cents per pound received 
for the I96U-65 main-crop. The 1965-66 main-crop price has been set 
10.1 cents per pound. 

Ghana's crop is forecast at 500,000 tons, down Ik percent from 
the 196^-65 record harvest of 580,000 tons. Weather conditions have 
been less favorable this season and virtually no spraying for capsid 
control has been done during 1965. However, the swollen-shoot cam- 
paign is still in operation, and approximately 3*5 million affected 
trees have been removed since August of 196^-. The Eastern Region 
has been particularly hard -hit by this disease, and production for 
this area is expected to be down sharply in 1965-66. Reportedly, 
current new plantings now being made in Ghana are about keeping pace 
with the number of trees being removed for disease control and 
old-age . 



COCOA BEANS: World total production for crop year 1965-66 with comparisons l/ 



Continent and country 



Average 




■ 


* 


' s r\ 




Forecast 


1955/56- 


: 196O-6I 


: 1961-62 


: 1962-63 


\ 1963-64 


: 1964-65 


1965-66 


1959/60 










: £/ 




1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


metric 


: metric 


: metric 


: metric 


metric 


metric 


metric 


tons 


: tons 


: tons 


: tons 


. tons 


■ tons 


tons 


9.4 


: 11.1 


: 12.3 


: 11.0 


: 11.8 


: 12.0 


11.0 


2.4 


: 2.8 


: 2.3 


: 2.3 


: 1-7 


: 2.0 


: 2.0 


34.0 


: 35-2 


: 35-0 


: 37-0 


: 38.9 


: 40.0 


40.0 


1.5 


: 2.4 


: 2.4 


: 2.1 


! 2.7 


: 2.7 


: 2.8 


1.8 


: 2.1 


: 2.2 


: 2.1 


: 2.4 


: 2.8 


: 3-2 


2.7 


: 2.5 


: 2.4 


2.5 


: 1-7 


: 2.5 


: 3-0 


13.8 


: 16.5 


21.0 


: 26.0 


: 17.2 


: 21.5 


22.0 


1-5 


: 1.4 


: 1.2 


: .6 


• 7 


! .8 


! -9 


8.4 


: 7-0 


: 6.5 


: 6.4 


! 5-2 


: 4.5 


! 5-0 


1.6 


: 1.5 


: 1.6 


1.5 


1.5 


1.4 


1.5 




ft? c 


fl£ Q 
OO. y 


on 

? 


fto ft 






2.2 


:' 2.0 


: 2.0 


! 2.0 


2.0 


! 2.0 


! 2.0 


173-4 


122.0 


116.0 


111.0 


122.7 


, 115.6 


' 138.0 


12.5 


: 14.3 


15.0 


13.5 


14.5 


15.5 


17.0 


32.0 


41.6 


40.0 


42.0 


36.O 


46.0 


44.0 


2.1 


! 3-5 


! 3-8 


4.0 


i 4.2 


: 4.4 


: 4.5 


.2 


: .2 


: .3 


: .3 


• 3 


! -3 


: -3 


15.5 


12.1 


12.4 


14.6 


22.3 


20.1 


21.0 




1 OK 7 


1 fto 


lft7 It 


POP 0 




ft 


.4 


.4 


.4 


! .4 


•3 


: .4 


: .4 


60.7 


71.5 ! 


73-0 


76.2 


87-9 


90.0 


93-0 


• 3 


.6 


•9 


.7 


.8 


• 9 


.8 


4.5 


5.8 


5-8 


i 6.2 


6.6 


: 6.0 


6.2 


23.O 


25.3 


26.0 


31.5 i 


33.4 


35-6 


36.O 


2.6 


i 4.1 


2.4 


3.7 


4.0 


4.2 


4.5 


258.4 


439.2 


416.0 


428.4 


450.0 


580.O 


500.0 


6I.3 


93-8 


84.8 , 


102.4 


97.2 


140.5 


130.0 


.8 


.8 


• 9 


1.0 


1.0 


: 1.0 


1.0 


.4 


! .5 : 


.6 


•5 


• 5 


: -5 


• 5 


127.0 


198.4 


193.9 


178.8 


219.6 


298.0 


265.0 


9-0 


10.5 i 


10.5 


10.5 


9-0 


9-5 


9-5 


2.7 . 


3.0 . 


3-9 


3.5 ! 


3-5 


• <+. 0 


4.0 


6.5 


12.8 


11.3 


9-1 : 


13.7 


17.0 


14.0 


551 .o 


ft£v 
00 ( . i 


ft^n 1l 
030.4 




Q07 ^ 


1 TP.7 




2.7 


2.6 : 


2.4 


2.5 


2.1 


2.2 


2.3 


1.4 


1.0 : 


.8 


1.1 


1.0 


1.0 


: 1.0 


3.6 


7-6 : 


10.7 : 


14.2 


17.0 


21.0 


25.0 


.9 


• 7 • 


.8 


.8 . 


.8 


.8 


.8 


2.0 i 


3-6 : 


3.2 


3-4 


3-5 : 


3-7 


3-8 


3-8 


3.6 : 


4.4 


3-6 - 


4-9 


3-8 


4.0 


14.4 : 


19.1 : 


22.3 


25.6 . 


29-3 


32.5 


36.9 


887.O 


1,164.6 ■ 


1,129.1 . 


1,157-4 : 


1,242.6 


1,514.2 . 


1,420.0 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Grenada 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Mexico 

Panama 

Trinidad and Tobago . . . 
Other North America %J . 

Total North America . 

South America: 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Surinam 

Venezuela 



Total South America 



Africa : 

Angola 

Cameroon 4/ 

Congo, Brazzaville 

Congo, Leopoldville 

Fernando Po and Rio Muni 

Gabon 

Ghana 

Ivory Coast 

Liberia 

Malagasy Republic 

Nigeria 5_/ 

Sao Tome and Principe . . . 

Sierra Leone 

Togo 6/ 



Total Africa 

Asia and Oceania: 

Ceylon 

Indonesia 

New Guinea and Papua 

New Hebrides 

Philippines 

Western Samoa 



Total Asia and Oceania 



World total 



l/ Estimates are based on a crop year of October 1 to September 30. 2/ Preliminary, jj Includes Dominica, 
Guatemala, Guadelopue, Martinique, Nicaragua, and St. Lucia. 4/ Beginning with 1961-62 includes former 
British Southern Cameroons. 5_/ Prior to 1961-62 includes former British Southern Cameroons. 6/ Includes 
some Ghanaian cocoa marketed through Togo. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source material, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 9 - 



The producers -price for the 1965-66 main crop has "been set at U.S. 
9.3 cents per pound, compared with 11.7 cents received for the I965 mid- 
crop and 12.6 cents per pound paid for the I96U— 65 main crop. Farmers 
are no longer subject to "voluntary" contributions levied for the Develop- 
ment Plan and the Agricultural Credit Bank. In addition, the government 
announced that subsidies for spray material will be discontinued after 
present stocks have been depleted and that cocoa farmers will no longer 
be subject to personal income taxes. 

The Ivory Coast crop is estimated to be 8 percent below the record 
harvest of 1^0,500 tons last season. Extensive new plantings may become 
limited, as officials are now increasing emphasis toward the production 
of palm oil, rubber and cotton. Producer prices have been set at U.S. 
10.1 cents per pound, a reduction of 2.8 cents from last season. 

Production in Nigeria is forecast at 26^,000 tons, 33*000 tons 
under the record 196^-65 crop. Rainfall has been above average during 
July through September, resulting in a somewhat higher incidence of pod- 
rot. Disease and pest control measures thus far, have not been reduced 
as they have been in Ghana. Prices paid to farmers this season will 
undoubtedly be lowered from the U.S. 15 cents per pound level paid for 
the 196^-65 crop. 

South A merica; A larger Brazilian crop will boost South American 
-production to 226,800 tons, up 11 percent over the previous year. Most 
other producers of this region are also anticipating good crops. 

The Brazilian crop is forecast at 138,000 tons, up 22,UC0 tons over 
the 196^-65 level. Prospects for the October-April Bahia main-crop con- 
tinue to remain favorable, indicating a possible harvest of 1.3 million 
bags (78,000 tons). The May-September 1966 - Bahia Temporao crop is 
estimated at 900,000 bags, (5^-, 000 tons), or about the same as the I965 
outturn. Production from other States usually amount to 100,000 bags 
(6,000 tons) . 

Production in Ecuador is expected to be slightly under the bumper 
196^-65 harvest of ^6,000 tons. Weather conditions last season were 
exceptionally good, and together with the new disease resistant varieties 
coming into bearing, produced the largest crop in over ko years. 
Venezuelan production is estimated at 21,000 tons, up somewhat from the 
previous season, but still below the large 1963-6^- crop. Continued dry 
weather has limited the prospects of a further rise in production this 
year. 

North America : The North American crop is expected to approximate 
the 196^-65 harvest of 90,200 tons. Production levels in this region 
have remained relatively unchanged in recent years because of the lack 
of significant new plantings and the absence of disease and pest control 
measures . 



-10- 



The Costa Rican crop is expected to "be down slightly this year; 
however, production in the Dominican Republic will probably remain at the 
Uo,COO-ton level. The Mexican harvest is forecast at 22,000 tons, 
slightly above the previous season, but well below the record 1962-63 
crop of 26,000 tons. 

Asia and Oceania : Production in Asia and Oceania is expected to 
reach 36,900 tons, an increase of 13 percent over the preceding year. 
Larger crops are anticipated by most producers of this region. 

The harvest in New Guinea and Papua is forecast at 25,000 tons up 

^,000 tons over 196^-65. The continuation of new trees coming into 

bearing has been responsible for the rather sharp upward trend in 
production. 

NORTHERN HEMISPHERE 
APPLE AND PEAR PRODUCTION 

Apples : The Northern Hemisphere production of dessert and cooking 
apples in I965 is estimated to be about 9 percent below last year. 

Rains and cool weather during the spring of this year adversely 
affected output in many European countries. In addition, a series of 
wind storms and heavy rains during the summer months reduced the crop in 
Italy, Europe's leading producer and exporter, to a level about 1^ per- 
cent below last year. This marks the first reversal in the upward trend 
in the production of Italian apples since 1957* West Germany, the second 
largest producer in Europe, is again, for the second year in succession, 
expecting a relatively small crop. Alternating highs and lows have been 
quite characteristic of West Germany's production. France is the only 
major European producer expecting a larger crop than last year. The con- 
tinuing increases in new bearing acreage in France have more than offset 
losses resulting from the unfavorable weather during the spring. 

The commercial apple crop in the United States is now estimated at 
13^ million bushels, 5«2 million below last year but still well above 
average. Commercial production in Canada, however, is larger than in I96U. 
The record large crop in the Province of Quebec and a further increase in 
Nova Scotia have more than compensated for reductions in Ontario and 
British Columbia. 

Pears : Pear production in the Northern Hemisphere for 1965 is now 
estimated to be 26 percent below last year and 12 percent less than in 1963. 

Virtually every country in the Northern Hemisphere is expecting a 
smaller crop than last year. The largest single reduction can be attributed 
to the United States where production is now expected to be only about 65 
percent of last year. This reduction, however, was confined to Bartlett 
pears, which are marketed heavily during the summer and early fall months. 
Production in Canada is only about one-half the I96U volume. 

In Europe, the combined pear crops in the three leading producing 
countries -- Italy, West Germany, and France -- are down approximately 
19 million bushels or 23 percent from last year. All other European coun- 
tries, with the exception of Norway, are anticipating small crops. Norway's 
production is about equal to that of last year. 

-11- 



APPLES: Production of dessert and cooking varieties 
in specified Northern Hemisphere countries, 
average 1955-59, annual 1963-65 l/ 



Continent and Country *■ 


Average : 
1955-59 : 


1963 


196k 


1965£/ 


• 


Million « 


MIlMnn ; 


Million • 


Million 


• 
• 






'RiiaVlA ]fl « 

jPMJPUB XO « 




• 

North America i 












16.0 : 


23.0 ■ 


20.0 : 


21.7 




2.9 ! 


3.5 J 


4.5 : 


4.6 




116.2 : 


125.7 : 


139.2 : 


134.0 


• 


135.1 ; 


152.2 ; 


; 163.7 : 


160.3 


Europe : 




: 10.8 - 








11.7 


n.i 1 


10.4 


Belgium- Luxembourg* 


8.2 


6.2 


: 8.7 • 


: 8.0 




4.4 


3.8 


: 4.3 - 


: 4.5 




20.2 


: 45.3 : 


47.7 


: 48.7 




54.7 


90.1 ! 


: 55.9 

* y y 9 y 


: 54.3 




3.9 : 


: 6.1 


7.3 


i 7.7 






: 107.3 


: 109.4 


: 94.6 




12.5 


: 12.9 


23.5 : 

» y w y 


13.6 




2.7 




2.6 


2.4 




9.6 


16.2 


; 12.4 


t 11.5 




9.0 


10.0 


: 12.0 


: 7.5 


Switzerland 4/... : 


8.7 


: 8.2 


: 10.0 


: 8.2 




22.8 


24.4 


30.0 


: 24.7 




9.5 


: 12.9 


7.3 


6.9 


• 


242.4 


; 356.5 


J 342.2 


i 303.0 


• 

Total specified countries,! 

• 


377.5 


; 508.7 


i 505.9 


! 463.3 



l/ May include some cider varieties in countries not reporting 

separately. 
2/ Preliminary. 
3/ Commercial crop. 

5/ Revised series. Excludes apples utilized for cider, Juice, and 
livestock feed. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the has* 3 of 
official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source 
materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 12 - 



PEARS: Production of dessert and cooking varieties 
in specified Northern Hemisphere countries, 
average 1955-59, annua] 1963-65 l/ 





Average : 
1955-59 : 


1063 


1964 


19652/ 


* 
• 


Million : 


Million ! 


Million : 


Million 


• 
• 


Bushels 


Bushels : 


Bushels : 


Bushels 


• 

North America : 












1.1* i 


1.7 : 


2.0 : 


1.0 




.8 : 


.9 : 


1.2 : 


1.2 




29.9 : 


19. k \ 


30.0 : 


19*5 


• 
• 

• 










• 
• 

Europe : 






\ 2.8 






1.9 ! 


! 2.4 j 


\ 2.3 


Belgium- Luxembourg. »..«•: 


5.1 : 


: 2.2 : 


: it/ 3.1 


: V 2.0 




.3 : 


.3 


.4 


: " .3 




7-8 s 


: 1^.7 


: 14.5 


: 12.5 




15.0 


: 18.7 


: 21.3 


: 13.1 




1.8 


: 2.0 


: 2.3 


: 2.1 




20.6 


: k2.h 


i ^7.7 


: 38.6 




k.k 


: U.7 


1 6.4 


: 4.1 




.k 


: .3 


t .3 


1 .3 




k.2 


: 7.0 


: 7.1 


1 6.0 




l.k 


: 1.9 


t 2.2 


s 1.5 




1.5 


: 1.5 


: 1.7 


: 1.3 




2.7 


1 2.9 


: 3.1 


: 2.7 




2.9 


3.5 


; - : 'd 


2.2 


• 


70.0 


i 10^.5 


i 117.1 


I 89.O 


Total specified countries.! 


102.1 


126.5 


1 150.3 


S 110.7 



1/ May include some cider varieties in countries not reporting 

" separately. 

2/ Preliminary. 

3/ Commercial crop. 

%J Belgium only. 

5/ Revised series. Excludes pears utilized for eider, juice, and 
livestock feed. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of 
official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source 
materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 13 - 



WORLD SOYBEAN PRODUCTION 
AT RECORD HIGH 



World production of soybeans in 1965 is estimated tentatively at a 
record 1.2 billion bushels, one-sixth above that of last year and more 
than one -third above the 1955-59 average. By far the major portion of 
the expected net gain of 172 million bushels from 196^ is in the United 
States. However, among minor producing countries, a sharp increase 
occurred in Brazil, and the crop in the Soviet Union is believed also to 
be up sharply from last year's. In contrast, indications are that this 
year's crop in Mainland China is down slightly. 

On the basis of October 1 conditions, soybean production in the 
United States is estimated at 861.9 million bushels, one-fourth above 
last year's record crop and three-fourths above the 1955-59 average. The 
record outturn is the result of a record large acreage for harvest and 
above average yields in about two -thirds of the states. The expected U.S. 
average yield of 2^-. 9 bushels is 2.1 bushels above last year's and 2.2 
bushels above the 1955-59 average yield. Prospective production declined 
somewhat in September in the North Central Region with increases in Ohio 
and Indiana more than offset by deterioration in northwestern and central 
areas, where cool temperatures and excessive moisture throughout the month 
delayed maturity of the crop. Frosts occurred earlier than usual late in 
September acr»ss western and northern areas. Early September rains from 
"Hurricane Betsy" imp roved the crop, especially in Ohio where soils had 
been dry. 

Canada also expects a record crop this year. Based on yields indi- 
cated as of September 15, 8.0 million bushels will be produced, almost 
one-sixth more than last year's outturn and almost one-third above the 
1955-59 average. Acreage rose to a record high, reflecting an increase 
from last year of almost one -sixth, and the expected average yield of 30-3 
bushels per acre is 0.1 bushel above last year's. 

Soybean production in Mainland China is tentatively estimated at 250.0 
million bushels, or slightly below the revised estimate of the I96U out- 
turn. Soybean acreage in Northeast China, the main area producing for 
export, may have been reduced by the long, dry season. It also is likely 
that planting there was delayed. Growth probably was retarded until the 
advent of rains in late June and early July. Consequently, yields and 
total production in the Northeast could well be reduced below those of 
196^. Acreage in North China and in the rest of China is believed to be 
about the same as last year's. Although total production in China may be 
only slightly less than in l$6k f supplies for export may be significantly 
decreased if the expected decline in the Northeast actually occurs. 

As a result of information which has just recently become available 
regarding soybean production in Mainland China, production estimates for 
I963 and I96U and the acreage estimate for 196^ have been revised down- 
ward from previous estimates. Apparently the average yield of soybeans 
in recent years has remained relatively low compared with that of other 
crops, and whatever changes have occurred have been the result of 



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HHrtW OJ H 

^aIla! 



h so SO so OJ ro OJ H 



O OJ 

sis 



OJ H 

3Si 



O so no 
ojso d 



OS t— l OJ OJ O CO o 

OJ H I OS O NO t"~- no 
H r-i H H 



H CO O O H OJ 



lAOOVOminiAt- 



) O CO CO O OS OJ \H flO 

J co oj -SF^t-a-H soicvJhh 



\4H OJ-d-fOOJ H lAiASD 

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iH OJ SO SO fO OJ L 
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si d 



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&3 



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33 c 

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j p -a 

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lj P 

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f *H -P 

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i s- 



- 15 - 



differences in weather conditions. Moreover, it appears that the 
price paid for soybeans by the state has been relatively unfavorable 
compared with the price paid for grains. The natural consequence 
has been that the peasants have allocated available inputs of ferti- 
lizer to grains at the expense of soybeans. Another probable result 
has been that acreage devoted to soybeans likely has remained static 
and the recovery from the "Leap Forward" period has lagged more than 
had previously been believed. 

During the last decade Japan j s acreage to soybeans declined 
each successive year from a year earlier, and the decline continued 
in I965 --by almost one -sixth. 

Increased damage from diseases and insects in recent years has 
resulted in low average yields that have discouraged soybean pro- 
duction and encouraged diversion to feed crops. Moreover, the 
deficit payment program provided by the government has not been suf- 
ficient to offset the factors discouraging soybean production. More 
favorable weather this year than in 196^, however, increased average 
yields, and production is placed at virtually the same level as in 
196^, about 9 million bushels. This, however, is less than one -half 
the volume of production a decade ago. 

Official figures which have become available confirm the early 
indication that 196^ was not a good year for soybeans in the Soviet 
Union . With improved conditions this year, yields are higher, and 
production is expected to approximate 16.5 million bushels, the 
largest volume since the record I7.I million bushels produced in 1962. 

Soybean production in Brazil has expanded from an average of 
k.6 million bushels during 1955-59 "to an estimated alltime high of 
16.6 million bushels in 1965* This year's crop, harvested from 
February through May, was almost 50 percent above last year's and 
over 3« 5 times the 1955-59 average. Excellent weather and expanded 
area accounted for the increase. While over 90 percent of the crop 
is grown in Rio Grande do Sul, production in Parana has become of 
increasing significance in recent years. 

Production of soybeans in other South American countries is 
comparatively small. In Colombia the crop has, since i960, become 
relatively important to the edible oil industry. Production rose 
substantially in I965 from a year earlier. Many farmers reportedly 
diverted land from cotton to soybeans because of better net returns 
from the latter. In Argentina , production has increased sharply 
from the 1955-59 average, but it declined in 196^ and again this 
year from the record level of 1963. 



-16- 



SLIGHT INCREASE INDICATED FOR 
I965 AND 1966 WORLD HOG SLAUGHTER 



Hog slaughter in 33 reporting countries during I965 is indicated to 
show a 2 percent increase over last year's 262 million head. The steady 
upward movement in world hog slaughter noted since the mid-1950' s is 
expected to continue also in 1966 according to forecasts made for those 
same countries. This year's hog kill is 16 percent larger than the 
1956-60 average level. 

In North Americ a, 1965 slaughter is expected to he 8 percent below 
last year while 1966 forecasts indicate a further 3 percent decline from 
this year. Gains in all other areas of the world, however, offset this 
cyclical downswing. In the current U.S. hog cycle peak slaughterings 
were recorded during 1963. Since then, the number of hogs killed in 
the United States "by far the largest single producer of the 33 report 
ing countries has continued to decline. It is expected that a furthe 
reduction will be noted next year as well. Canadian hog slaughter in 
I966 is forecast at a somewhat higher level than this year's indicated 
kill. 

Four South American countries are expected to register a 3 percent 
gain over last year's reduced slaughter. A further 3 percent increase 
is forecast for I966 over this year's level. Argentina's hog slaughter 
has been moving upwards since a cyclical low reached in 1963. Brazil -- 
largest South American pork producer -- began its upturn only this year. 

European hog slaughter in I965 is expected to be 8 percent above 
last year's heavy kill. All reporting countries, except Spain and 
Portugal, show substantial gains over last year's already large output. 
Pork and pork products are abundant in Europe this year. In fact, it 
is largely for this reason that U.S. exports of pork and lard have been 
running at considerably reduced levels during 1965. Next year, fore- 
casts indicate a still further, but less substantial, increase of 
2 percent over I965. Major pork producers in Western Europe are West 
Germany, France, United Kingdom, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Italy. 
In Eastern Europe the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, and Yugoslavia 
are among the major producers. Recent beef shortages throughout Europe 
have undoubtedly added impetus to expanding hog production. 

South Africa's hog slaughter has been advancing at a slow but 
gradual pace since I963. 

In Asia (excluding Communist China) indications are that I965 
slaughter will be 9 percent above last year. A further 10 percent 
increase over 1965 is forecast for next year. 

Oceania also is expected to slaughter 7 percent more hogs this 
year than last. New Zealand's decline is offset by Australia's 1^ per- 
cent increase. For 1966 a further increase is forecast for Australia 
while New Zealand slaughter is expected to continue its downtrend. 



-17- 



HOGS: Number slaughtered in specified countries, average 1956-60, 
annual 1962, 1963 and 196*4-, indicated 1965 and forecast 1966 l/ 

















Percent 


change 


Country 


; Av6ra,g€{ 
; 1956-60; 


1962 


1963 


1961+ 


Indi- 
cated 
1965 


Forecast 

1966 


iye>5 ; 

of : 
196I+ : 


±yoo 

of 
1965 




; Thou- ; 
; sands : 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Percent : 


Percent 


North America: 


: 82,1+65 


7,61+8 
3,2U6 
83,5^3 


7,601 
3,3^6 
87,252 


8,301 
3,368 
86,1+20 


8,200 
3,1+50 
79,000 


8,1+90 
3,550 
76,000 


- 1 

+ 1+ 

- 9 


+ 4 
+ 3 
- 1+ 




: 93,101 


94,1+37 


98,199 


98,089 


90,650 


88,01+0 


- 8 


- 3 


South America: 




1,995 

ft ftoo 

0,032 

1,192 

306 


1,950 

ft eft 0 

0,503 

1,172 
307 


2,100 
8,250 
1,103 
302 


2,300 

ft iCr\ 
O, 3b0 

1,110 

280 


2,500 
0,470 
1,140 

265 


+10 
+ 1 
+ 1 
- 7 


+ 9 
+ 1 
+ 3 
- 5 






12,325 


12,012 


11,755 


12,050 


12,375 


+ 3 


+ 3 



Europe : ; 
Western : 
EEC ; 

Belgium and Luxembourg : 2,654 3,208 2,81+6 2,681+ 2,95 0 2,81+5 +10 

France : 13,61+0 16,753 15,81+3 15,681+ 17,600 17,300 +12 

Germany, West ; 19,604 23,1+60 23,024 24,l69 25,350 24,900 + 5 

Italy : 4,61+5 4,790 4,1+35 5,3*+6 5,850 5,938 + 9 

Netherlands : 4,262 .5,129 5,102 5,1+57 6,500 6,500 +19 



Total EEC : 44,805 53,340 



51,250 53,31+0 



Austria : 2,770 3,192 3,251 3,337 

Denmark ; 8,235 10,508 10,600 11,300 

Ireland ; 1,292 1,685 1,656 1,672 

Norway ; 68l 842 805 833 

Portugal : 1,056 l,06l l,l6k 1,150 

Spain ; 2,610 2,676 3,403 3,800 

Sweden ; 2,982 3,201 2,996 3,079 

Switzerland ; 1,383 1,511 1,563 1,663 

United Kingdom \J : 10,356 12,079 12,204 12,794 



58,250 

3,1+50 
12,000 
1,760 
895 
1,048 
3,300 
3,101 
1,900 
14,003 



57,1+83 



3,550 
11,400 
1,800 
869 
1,050 
3,800 
3,240 
1,800 
15,200 



Total Western Europe : 76,170 90,095 



Eastern ; 

Czechoslovakia h/ ; 4,759 5,326 5,271 

Germany, East Wj. : 6,931 6,215 6,800 7,8l5 

Hungary ; 4,373 5,000 4,600 

Poland ; 11,996 14,26l 12,356 12,041 



Total Eastern Europe 5/. 



Africa: 
South Africa, Republic of. 

Asia: 



Total 5/ : 9,230 



Oceania: 

Australia 

New Zealand jj . 

Total 



+ 9 



+ 3 
+ 6 
+ 5 
+ 7 
- 9 
-13 
+ 1 
+14 
+ 9 



S,892 92,968 99,707 100,192 + 7 



14,560 15,000 +21 



- 4 

- 2 

- 2 

+ 2 



+ 3 

- 5 
+ 2 

- 3 

+15 
+ 1+ 

- 5 
+ 9 



+ 3 



33,388 


36,937 


-35,135 


1 f 

36,156 


39,910 


1+1,600 


+10 


+ 4 


109,558 


127,032 


124,027 129,124 


139,617 


141,792 


+ 8 


+ 2 


968 


1,005 


991 


997 


1,040 


1,050 


+ 1+ 


+ 1 


2,100 
2,870 
4,260 


2,557 
6,244 
5,1+30 


2,555 
5,389 
5,51+6 


5,700 
5,800 


6,400 
6,300 


7,300 
6,900 


+12 
+ 9 


+14 
+10 


9,230 


14,231 


13, +90 


14,060 


15,265 


16,770 


+ 9 


+10 


1,964 
816 


2,572 
835 


2,310 
921 


2,375 
1,002 


2,700 
927 


2,900 

880 


+11+ 
- 7 


+ 7 
- 5 


2,780 


3,1+07 


3,231 


3,377 


3,627 


3,780 


+ 7 


+ 4 


226,397 


252,437 


251,950 257,402 


262,249 


263,807 


+ 2 


+ 1 



Total specified countries 5/. 

1/ Numbers represent slaughter of both imported and home-grown hogs. 2/ Excludes slaughter in Alaska, 
Hawaii and Virgin Islands. 3/ Government inspected, hj Commercial slaughter. 5/ Includes an allowance 
for missing data for countries shown. 6/ Revised series, jj Year ending September 30. 

Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source 
material, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and other representatives abroad, results of office 
research and related information. 

- 18 - 



WORLD COTTON CROP IN 1965-66 
EQUAL TO RECORD OF 1964-65 

The world cotton crop for 1965-66 is estimated at 52.0 million 
bales (480 pounds net), the same as last season's record outturn, 
hut 19 percent ahove the 1955-59 average of 43.9 million bales. 
Foreign Free World production this season is estimated at an all- 
time high of 23.2 million bales, up 0.4 million from 1964-65 . This 
is the sixth consecutive year that a new foreign Free World produc- 
tion record has been set. Principal increases in 1965-66 production 
are expected in Pakistan, India, and Iran. Among the countries where 
1965-66 crops are likely to be smaller are Mexico, Nicaragua, El 
Salvador, and Turkey. 

Total area devoted to the 1965-66 world crop is estimated at 
81.6 million acres, an increase of 0.3 million from a year earlier 
and the highest since 1956-57* The current world acreage and pro- 
duction estimates indicate an average lint outturn this season of 
306 pounds per acre, compared with 307 in I96U-65. 

Mexico's 1965-66 crop is down somewhat from the 1964-65 pro- 
duction of 2.4 million bales, principally because of a decline in 
planted area in the high-yielding districts of Sonora-Sinaloa. 
Matamoros continued to decline in importance as a cotton area this 
season. Planted area in the Altamira, Delicias, and Juarez dis- 
tricts increased in 1965-66. 

Cotton area in Central America is down somewhat from the record 
890,000 acres in 1964-65. In El Salvador, applications for planting 
licenses indicate cotton area may be down 60,000 acres from a year 
earlier. In Guatemala, applications for planting licenses were 
4 percent above the 1964-65 level. In Nicaragua, a severe shortage 
of rainfall in the Pacific Coast area is expected to reduce yields 
sharply. 

In the Middle East, production in Turkey reached a record 
1.5 million bales in 1964-65 but is expected to decline this season 
because of heavy rain damage to the crop in the Aegean region. 
In Iran, favorable weather and adequate irrigation water have con- 
tributed to an expected record outturn of over 600,000 bales this 
season. In India, reported excellent growing weather in August and 
September is expected to contribute to a near-record crop this season. 

In Pakistan, weather and soil moisture conditions have been 
favorable and could result in a 1965-66 crop considerably larger 
than last season's outturn. However, the actual size of the crop 
will depend heavily on the extent of damage caused by recent 
hostilities, especially around Lahore. Although no official crop 
estimates are available in the U.A.R., the Egyptian crop may be 
10 percent or more above the 1964-65 level, largely because of a 
substantial increase in planted area. 

(Continued on page 21) 



-19- 



COTTON: Acreage, yield, and production in specified countries, average 1955-59, annual 1964 and 1965 1/ 



Continent and country 



Acreage 


Yield 


Production il 


Average 


















1955-59 


! 1964 


1965 2/ 


1955-59 . 


1964 


1965 2/ 


1955-59 i 


1964 


1965 2/ 


1 000 


1 000 


1 000 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


i , Uvu ; 


1, uuu 


1, 000 


acres 


acres 


acre8 


per acre 


per acre 


per acre 


bales 


bales 


bales 


14 613 


14 060 


13 632 


428 


*»1 7 
31 / 






1 C 1 OA 


13, 1j7 


107 


300 


240 


673 


560 


600 


151 


350 


300 


48 


225 


250 


600 


666 


672 


59 


312 


350 


14 


35 


38 


343 


686 


695 


10 


50 


55 


2,270 


1,935 


1,980 


430 


594 


558 


2,032 


2,395 


2,300 


209 




nft 


** *- J 


ftftft 




1 ftA 








5 




175 


192 




4 


2 




17 325 


1 7 000 


16 590 


428 




JJ7 




1 ft ftAQ 


1 ft A^l 
10, O J 1 


1 323 


1 350 


1 350 


196 


222 




539 


625 




4 320 


5 750 


5 750 


166 


175 


179 


1 490 


2 100 


2 150 


224 


375 


390 


330 


384 


394 


158 


300 


320 


44 


45 


45 


142 


213 




13 


20 




133 


225 


225 


159 


128 




44 


60 




588 


650 


650 


423 


476 


443 


518 


645 


600 




i i n 

1 1U 


Tin 




262 


262 


28 


60 


60 


6 691 


8 520 


8 537 


200 


215 


215 


7 7Q7 


i fti A 

J , OlO 


ftl 7 


383 


350 


350 


338 


425 


425 


270 


310 


310 


104 


40 




208 


264 




45 


22 




454 


490 


465 


221 


348 


377 


209 


355 


365 


219 






153 






70 






33 


25 


28 


175 


230 


257 


12 


12 


15 


1,430 


1, 090 


1,068 


218 


345 


346 


648 


784 


770 


5 266 


6 100 


6 000 


616 


645 


624 


6 750 


8 200 


7, 800 


1 90 
1^7 


100 




130 


96 




35 


20 


25 


128 


175 




120 


206 




: 32 


• 75 


80 


365 


370 




82 


60 




62 


46 


: 48 


570 


740 


740 


84 


106 


117 


100 


164 


180 


848 






138 






243 


30 




102 


135 




56 


71 




12 


20 


25 


16 


40 


50 


270 


396 


422 


9 


33 


. 44 


744 


77*1 


775 


106 


93 


111 


164 


150 


180 


790 


800 




100 


126 




164 


210 


200 


45 


118 




117 


240 




. ii 


59 




100 






139 






29 


75 


. 75 


784 


1,110 




306 


292 


— 


500 


675 




370 


500 




171 


235 




132 


245 


: 250 


1 858 


1 672 


1 950 


467 


665 




1 807 


2,315 






2 150 




88 


80 




307 


360 


325 


8 698 


O 9 OA 


9 538 


202 


237 


243 


3 653 


4, 588 


4 832 


^7 


65 


65 


298 


199 




23 


27 




1 79 

X.I i 






1 Qft 


240 


230 


68 


175 


180 


i 7 


40 


► =ift 


169 


540 


576 


g 


45 


. go 


JJO 


Ovu 




106 


79 




74 


90 




1 A AOft 
If, *f*U 


1 1 nnn 

11, uuu 


1 1 ^ftft 




249 


242 


7 360 


5 700 


5 800 


10 710 
17, / J. 7 


17, ouu 


19 800 


i 97 


119 


124 


3 991 


4 900 


5 100 




7Hv 


' 940 


225 


271 


319 


307 


530 


625 


1 97 


75 




170 


192 




45 


30 




13 


34 


43 


738 


988 


893 


20 


70 


: 80 








129 






56 


: 18 


! 20 


3,490 


3,660 


3,670 


189 


! 229 


242 


1,376 


1,747 


1,850 


623 


708 


: 740 


340 


549 


535 


441 


810 


825 


1 CSfi 
lult 


1 7ft 


1 7n 


216 


209 


212 


45 


74 


: 75 




1 Aftft 


i Ann 


228 


429 


405 


734 


1 500 


1, 350 


41 588 


39,295 


39,826 


168 


193 


195 


: 14,578 


15,760 


: 16,164 


80, 998 


81,301 


! 81,559 


: 260 


: 307 


! 306 


43,886 


52,017 


: 52,034 


46,223 


. 49,871 


50, 157 


: 173 


220 


: 222 


■ 16,647 


22,829 


: 23,192 


20,162 


17,370 


17,770 


: 339 


387 


: 370 


14, 226 


14,008 


. 13,683 



NORTH AMERICA: 

United States 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

West Indies 



SOUTH AMERICA: 
Argentina. . . . 



Colombia. . 
Ecuador. . . 
Paraguay . . 
Peru...... 

Venezuela. 



EUROPE: 

Greece...... 

Italy 

Spain 

Bulgaria.... 
Yugoslavia.. 
Total 4/. 



U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia): 



AFRICA: 

Angola. 

Cameroon. 

Central African Republic... 

Chad..... 

Congo, Leopoldville 

Kenya 

Morocco 

Mozambique.......... 

Nigeria 

Rhodesia, Malawi, & Zambia. 
South Africa, Republic of.. 
Sudan 

Tanzania. .................. 

U.A.R. (Egypt) 

Uganda 

Total 4/ 



ASIA AND OCEANIA: 

Aden 

Afghan is tan. .... 

Aus tral la...... ..........I 

Burma. 

China, Mainland. : 14,420 

India.., 
Iran. . ., 
Iraq .... 
Israel., 

Korea, Republic of .......: 

Pakistan., 
Syria...., 
Thailand. , 

Turkey : 1.543 



Total 4/ : 41.588 



World total 4/. 



Communist countries ijj . 



1/ Years refer to crop years -beg inning August 1 in which major portion of crop was harvested. 2/ Preliminary and partly 
estimated. 3/ Production in bales of 480 pounds net. 4/ Includes estimates for minor-producing countries not listed above 
and allowances for countries where data are not yet available. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other 
foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research 
and related information. 



- 20 - 



The 1965-66 Brazilian crop is estimated at 2,150,000 "bales, up 
slightly from last season's 2.1 million-hale outturn. The increase is 
"based principally upon a 950, 000 -hale Northern crop, up 150,000 bales 
from a year ago. Little information is availahle on the Southern crop 
which has just been planted. No expansion in acreage is indicated. 

The United States crop of 15,159>000 hales (October estimate) is 
21,000 bales below 196^-65 production, but 16 percent above the 1955- 
59 average. Although harvested acreage in 1965-66, at 13,632,000, is 
3 percent below last season's acreage, the average yield of 53^- pounds 
per acre is again another alltime high. Twenty-four percent of the 
U.S. crop was ginned hy Octoher 1, ahout the same as in 196^. Esti- 
mated I965 production of American-Egyptian is placed at 8^,300 bales, 
compared with 119,800 in 196U. 

Production in Communist countries is estimated at 13-7 million 
hales, down about 0.3 million from 196^-65. The crop in the USSR is 
expected to he down about O.k million bales from 196^-65 because of 
slightly smaller area and lower yields caused by a shortage of irri- 
gation water in some areas. Mainland China's crop may be up slightly 
due to an increase in acreage. 

WHEAT EXPORTS 
DOWN IN 196^-65 

United States exports of wheat, wheat flour (grain equivalent), 
and wheat products totalled 730 million bushels by the end of the 
196^-65 fiscal year, 131 million bushels less than the total for the 
I963-6U fiscal year. Record crops in most areas, particularly in 
Europe, were largely responsible for this severe drop in U.S. exports. 
France harvested a record crop. West Germany, the United Kingdom, the 
Netherlands, and Italy had much greater production. In addition, the 
USSR anticipated considerably greater harvests of winter wheat. Even 
though the harvest in the USSR was better than during 1963-6^, they 
still imported sizable amounts from other countries. The U.S. did 
not share in this market primarily due to the regulation requiring 
50 percent to be shipped in U.S. vessels. Therefore, U.S. exports to 
the European area were less than half of the amount reported in the 
previous year. Shipments to the USSR dropped from 6k million bushels 
in 1963-6^ to 2 million bushels in 196^-65; shipments to the satellite 
countries were correspondingly less in I96U- 65 with only Rumania and 
Yugoslavia taking more wheat than in I963-6U. Exports to the EEC 
countries decreased to 29 million bushels during the current 12 -month 
period as compared with 71 million bushels in the previous 12 months. 
Less than half of the amount of U.S. wheat went to the United Kingdom 
this year than before. 

(Continued on page 2k) 



-21- 



WHEAT AND FLOUR \J : U.S. Exports by Country of Destination, 
July 1963—June 1964 and July 1964-June 1965 



July 1963-June 1964 



July 1964-June 1965 



Flour 2J 



Flour £/ 



Western Hemisphere: 

Canada 

Mexico 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone 

Costa Rica 

EL Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras , 

Nicaragua 

Panama Republic 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Dominican Republic 

French West Indies 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward and Windward Islands 

Netherlands Antilles 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Total 

Western Europe: 

EEC: 

Belgium-Luxembourg 

France 

Germany, West 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Total 

Other Western Europe: 

Austria 

Azores , . 

Cyprus 

Denmark . . . „ 

Finland 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Malta 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Trieste 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Total 

Eastern Europe: 

Czechoslovakia 

East Germany 

Hungary 

Poland 

Rumania .............•*•••••• 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Total 

Total Europe 



1 ,000 
bushels 

2/ 
2 
5 

3 

1 ,037 
2,026 
775 
533 
900 
kJ 
71 

1,586 

1 ,489 
10 

1 

5 

1H 
45,656 

3,195 
5,559 
813 
1 ,000 
5,931 



1 ,000 
bushels 

210 
1 ,809 
275 
3 

1 ,124 
155 
104 
127 
202 
283 
16 
127 



200 

1 ,152 
93 
412 

1 ,255 
13 

3,783 
388 

1 ,128 
836 
543 
332 
150 
333 
432 
40 



1 ,000 
bushels 

210 
1 ,811 

280 
3 

1 ,127 
1 ,192 
2,130 
902 
735 
1 ,183 
16 
154 

1,766 

1 ,689 
1 ,162 

93 
413 
1 ,260 

13 
3,897 
46,044 
1 ,128 
4,031 
6,102 
1,145 
1 ,150 
6,264 
432 

40 



1 ,000 
bushels 

1/ 
25 



2 

973 
1 ,824 
892 
481 
1 ,042 
2 
14 

893 

1,766 
1 

2 
26 

1 

39,826 
11 
5,112 
4,974 
849 
1 ,238 
3,011 



10.096 



1 ,000 
bushels 

220 
901 
212 
5 

958 
140 

98 
114 
135 
168 
13 
89 
1 

333 
5 
73 
1 ,067 
75 
294 
1 ,046 
5 

4,941 
880 
1 ,152 
1 ,776 
476 
91 
25 
411 
389 
39 



81 .828 


15,967 


97.795 


73.061 


16.370 


8°.431 


8,191 


19 


8,210 


1 ,381 


7 


1,388 


11,210 


4 


11,214 


6,534 


9 


6,543 


14,726 


12 


14,738 


3,410 


8 


3,418 


4,170 


2,737 


6,907 


3,184 


2,248 


5,432 


28.707 


1.183 


29.890 


11,633 


861 


12.494 


67 P 004 


3.955 


70 r 959 


26.T42 


3.133 


29.275 


116 




116 








332 




332 


501 




501 


1 ,538 


47 


1,585 








19 


1 


20 


Ti 


4 


4 


209 


U 


209 


959 




959 




3 


3 




7 


7 


1 ,989 


2,100 


4,089 


792 


1,124 


1,916 


11 


356 


367 


10 


369 


379 


385 




385 


783 




783 










32 


32 


4,608 


20 


4,628 




6 


6 


6,017 


452 


6,469 


4,479 


850 


5,329 


4,022 


9 


4,031 


1 ,508 


577 


2,085 


583 


13 


596 


42 


17 


59 


9,207 




9,207 


1,305 


U 


1 ,305 




— 






16 


16 


6,028 


437 


6,465 


11 ,727 


261 


11 ,988 


19.010 


231 


19.241 


8.512 


532 


9.044 


54.074 


3.669 


57.743 


30.618 


3.795 


34.413 


1,312 




1 ,312 








4,460 




4,460 








6,663 




6,663 




— 




39,728 


775 


40,503 


1 ,246 


805 


2,051 








41 




41 


64,383 




64,383 • 


1 ,677 




1 ,677 


10.196 


1 .285 ! 


11 ,481 


47 .982 


2.044 


50.026 


126.742 


: 2.060 


: 128.802 


50 .946 


2.849 


53.795 


247.820 


9.684 


257.W 


107.706 


9.777 


117.483 



WHEAT AND FLOUR Tj: U.S. Exports by Country of Destination, 
July 1963-June 1964 and July 1964-June 1965 (Continued) 



July 1963-June 196a 



Flour 2/ 



July 1964-June 1965 



Flour 2/ 



Asia: : 

Aden : 

Afghanistan ; 

Arabia Peninsula States : 

Bahrein . : 

Burma : 

Cambodia : 

Ceylon : 

India : 

Indonesia : 

Iran : 

Iraq 

Israel > 

Jordan • : 

Kuwait 

Laos 

Lebanon : 

Macao : 

Malaysia 

Pakistan : 

Palestine : 

Philippines : 

Saudi Arabia : 

Syrian Arab Republic : 

Thailand : 

Vietnam : 

Nepal s 

Hong Kong : 

Japan : 

Korea : 

Nansei and Nanpo Islands : 

Taiwan s_ 

Total 

Africa: l~ 

Algeria : 

Libya 

Morocco : 

Sudan : 

Tunisia : 

U.A.R. (Egypt) 

Angola : 

Gambia : 

Burundi and Rwanda : 

Cameroon ■ 

Canary Islands ■ 

Congo (Leopoldville) : 

Gabon : 

Ghana : 

Guinea : 

Liberia : 

Madeira I 

Mauritania , : 

Nigeria ! 

Sierra Leone : 

Senegal : 

Spanish Africa n.e.c : 

Togo 

Western Africa n.e.c : 

Western Portuguese Africa ■•»■•! 

British East Africa .: 

Ethiopia ^ 

French Somallland .: 

Kenya : 

Malagasy Republic Z 

Mozambique .* 

Somali Republic . : 

Tanzania * 

Republic of South Africa .: 

Zambia .:_ 

Total 

Oceania: : 

World Total 

Other products i_ 

Grand Total : 



1 ,000 
bushels 



10 
4,031 



162,893 
14 

904 
5,869 
7,278 
987 
32 
4 
45 

122 
59,734 

8,506 
140 



196 
72,146 
23,807 

749 
9.151 



13,708 
276 
2,759 
2,044 
3,014 
35,323 
1,063 
19 



1,163 
127 



7 

1 ,060 

2,567 
12 

45 



116 
17 

11 
7 
537 
1 
6 

5,222 



6?,y .i_ 



~r 



756,244 



1 ,000 

bushels 



90 
384 



1,438 
188 
478 
1,174 
140 
77 
3,997 
794 
96 
1 ,195 
152 
125 
29 

546 
3,514 

87 
3,018 

669 
2,652 
1,138 
557 
1 ,193 



2-3.764 



1 ,000 
bushels 

34 
4,032 
200 
384 



1,438 
163,081 
492 
2,078 
6,009 
7,355 
4,984 
826 
100 

1 ,240 
152 

247 
59,763 

9,052 
3,654 

87 
3,024 

865 
74,798 
24,945 
1 ,306 
10.344 



3?'i.49g 



767.497 



1 ,086 
277 
2,823 
1,856 
195 
33,222 
87 
99 
4 
62 
6 

3,127 
7 
172 
14 
120 
60 

54 
58 
1 

U 
U 
815 
104 
62 
40 
55 

20 
3 

26 
41 



44,510 



94.000 



94.000 



14,794 
553 
5,582 
3,900 
3,209 
68,545 
1 ,150 
118 
4 
62 
1 ,169 
3,254 
7 
191 
14 
127 
1,120 

2,621 
70 
46 
U 
14 
1 ,062 
104 
178 
57 
'55 
11 
27 
540 
1 

32 
5,263 
A85 



114,365 



ST- 



850.244, 



1 ,000 
bushels 



1 ,901 

55 



2 

215,605 

9 

10,339 
31 

6,474 

26 

624 

36 
64,546 

7,541 
591 



111 

3 

138 
60,392 
15,328 

755 
13.073 



4,360 
8,311 

2,827 
5,500 
33,095 
794 



1,333 
63 



1 

669 



2,734 



1 ,000 
bushels 



136 
447 
A/ 

1 ,400 
321 
25 
199 
596 
152 
3,385 
821 
122 
1,110 
105 
88 
61 
U 
493 
4,279 
56 i 
95 
3,565 

532 
371 
3,956 
546 
641 



310 
2 

3,603 
2,735 
400 
19,417 
99 
9 
11 
84 

1,979 
7 
82 
669 
133 
33 
3 
25 
207 
28 
1 
9 
23 
40 
41 

39; 
6 
30 I 
13 

44 i 

40 



60.911 



5Z 11 .5 5 3 



6-S9.26C 



861 ,497 



ESSE 



30,123 



mi 



_2U0J£ 



Ttrr 



719.149 



64 9 .921 



^q,B8Q 



; y io.6bi 



729.840 



1/ Data includes shipments for relief. 2/ Grain equivalent. 

Ij Less than 500 bushels. 5/ Includes wheat flour not wholly U.S. 

cereal foods ready to be cooked, and prepared mixes. Beginning 

and rolled wheat for relief. 



Transhipments through Canada have been included in data for countries of ultinate destination . 
, semolina, macaroni and spaghetti products, bakery products, cereal foods ready to eat, 
with January 1, 1965, Includes frozen bakery products, bulgar wheat (relief and other) 



Foreign Agricultural Service, Compiled from reports of the U.S. Department of Commerce. 



- 23 - 



The overall volume of wheat and flour going to the Asiatic countries 
was up 11 percent this year. The increase was largely spread among India, 
Iran, Lebanon, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, and Taiwan, even though 
many of these countries also had larger wheat crops during the current 
fiscal year. Japan, previously one of our largest dollar markets, took 
only 6l million bushels of wheat and flour as compared with the 75 mil- 
lion bushels previously reported. Japan's production of wheat increased 
this year due to favorable growing and harvesting conditions. Shipments 
to the African countries, on the other hand, dropped from 11*4- million 
bushels at the end of 1963-6*4- to 91 million bushels by the end of 196*4-65. 
Exports of wheat and flour to Brazil, the largest U.S. market in the 
Western Hemisphere, also dropped considerably. 

Shipments of grain amounted to 639 million bushels during the 196*4—65 
fiscal year, as compared with 756 million bushels during the 1963-6*4- fiscal 
year. Over 33 percent of the 196*4—65 total went to India. 

U.S. flour exports (grain equivalent) also down, totalled 80 million 
bushels, of which 19 million bushels, or 2k percent, was destined for the 
United Arab Republic. 

During the 196*4—65 fiscal year, the United States also exported about 
11 million bushels of wheat products, or slightly less than the same 
volume reported for the 1963-6*4- fiscal year. 

July exports of wheat and flour indicated an upward trend as exports 
for the month increased to 71 million bushels as compared to 58 million 
bushels for July 196*4-. 

U.S. FEED GBAIN EXPORTS 
BREAK RECORD 

The 18 million metric tons of feed grains and related milled products- 
exported in the 196*4—65 fiscal year represented the largest amount of 
such commodities ever exported from the United States. This amount also 
represented an increase of 12 percent over last year's exports. Largest 
single feed grain commodity exported was corn, of which 1*4- million metric 
tons was shipped to all destinations as compared with 12 million metric 
tons the previous year. Sorghums exports were up 19 percent. In con- 
trast, shipments of oats and barley were somewhat less than previously 
reported. 

The rapidly developing livestock industries in Western Europe and 
Japan again created the largest markets for U.S. feed grains. Over 
7 million metric tons were destined for the EEC, almost 2 million metric 
tons to the United Kingdom, and over 3 million metric tons to Japan, as 
compared with 5 million metric tons to the EEC, somewhat less than 
2 million metric tons to the United Kingdom, and a little more than 
2 million metric tons during the 1963-6*4- fiscal years. Exports to the 
EEC, the United Kingdom, and Japan totalled 12 million metric tons, 
excluding products, or 69 percent of the total for the United States. 



-2k- 



Table A shows exports of feed grains by country of destination, 
comparing the fiscal year 196^-65 with fiscal year I963-6U. Shipments 
of feed grains to Canada include a substantial quantity for transship- 
ment to other destinations. 

Table B shows the quantities and destination of feed grains inspected 
for export from Canadian ports, and exports from Table A adjusted to a new 
total which reflects transshipments during July 196I4— June 1965, as compared 
with July 1963-June 196^. Inspections for export through Canadian ports 
increased approximately 7 percent in the past twelve months. Almost all 
of the commodities inspected for export for this purpose were destined for 
the EEC and the U.K. 

Corn exports totalled lk million tons, over 97 percent of which was 
comprised of corn for grain, seed corn, except sweet corn, and corn grain 
for relief. Largest single market for U.S. corn was Japan, to which over 
2 million bushels were destined. Almost 7 million tons went to the EEC 
and the United Kingdom. 

Shipments of oats dropped from 82,880 metric tons in the I963-6U 
fiscal year to 67,355 metric tons in the current fiscal year. Almost all 
of the oats for grain went to the Netherlands. 

Barley exports, including malt, decreased approximately 15 percent by 
June 30, I965, as compared with the total exported by June 30, 196k. Japan 
provided the largest market for U.S. barley grain. Approximately 18 per- 
cent of the total was destined for that country, 17 percent for West 
Germany, and 13 percent for the Republic of Korea. 

Over 3 million metric tons of sorghum was exported from this country 
during the 196^-65 fiscal year. Approximately h"J percent of which went 
to the EEC and 30 percent to Japan. 

WORLD COTTONSEED PRODUCTION 
AT LAST YEAR'S RECORD LEVEL 

World production of cottonseed in the marketing year beginning August 
1, 1965* is estimated at a record 25.2 million short tons, virtually the 
same as the previous record of I96I+ but almost one -fifth above the 1955-59 
average. Major increases from 1963 are presently indicated for India, 
Pakistan, Iran and Mainland China. Principal decreases expected are in 
the Soviet Union, Turkey, Nicaragua, Mexico, El Salvador and Peru. 

North American cottonseed production may be slightly less than that 
of last year mainly because of reduced cotton crops in Mexico, El Salvador, 
and Nicaragua. The decline in Mexico is attributed principally to a 
reduction in planted area in the high -yielding districts of Sonora-Sinaloa, 
although the total area to cotton in Mexico increased from last year. In 
El Salvador, the decline is due to reduced area to cotton, while in 
Nicaragua the decline is attributed to reduced yields resulting from a 
serious shortage of rain. 



-25- 



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- 27 - 



The October estimate places cottonseed production in the United States 
at 6.25 million tons, "based on average bale weight and seed-lint ratios. 
This is virtually the same as last year's production but one-sixth above 
the 1955-59 average. While cotton acreage was down 3 percent from a year 
earlier, the average yield per acre set a new record. 

Early indications are that cottonseed production in South America 
will not vary greatly from the level of the 2 previous years. Increases 
foreseen in Brazil and Colombia probably will be offset by decreases in 
Argentina and Peru. 

Similarly, the relatively small production in Europe is not expected 
to change significantly from that of last year. Virtually the only 
expansion is in Spain, where the outturn is expected to be only slightly 
larger than last year's sharply reduced production. 

Cottonseed production in the Soviet Union is estimated at 3*7 mil- 
lion tons, 5 percent less than in 1^6k. The decline is attributed to a 
slightly smaller area and lower yields resulting from a shortage of 
irrigation water in some areas. 

The moderate gain foreseen in Africa this year is due largely to the 
expansion that may occur in the United Arab Republic as a result of a 
substantial increase in planted area. 

Asia 1 s cottonseed output is expected to be slightly above last year's 
with increased cotton production in India, Mainland China, Iran and 
Pakistan, partially offset by a reduced outturn in Turkey. The record and 
near-record production foreseen in Iran and India, respectively, and the 
moderate expansion estimated for Pakistan are attributed, in general, to 
favorable weather and soil moisture. However, in Turkey, heavy rain 
damage in the Aegean area was responsible for the considerable reduction 
from last year's record outturn. Mainland China may have an increased 
output of cottonseed this year as a result of the increase in cotton 
acreage . 

WORID BARLEY AND OATS 
PRODUCTION FORECAST LOWER 

Combined production of barley and oats in 19&5 is forecast at 133 
million metric tons, as compared with 135 million tons in 1^6k } according 
to forecasts of the Foreign Agricultural Service. 

World barley production in 19^5 is forecast at U,080 million bushels, 
h percent less than the 196^ crop. Acreage showed a decline of 7 percent 
while yield is up 2 percent. Notable reductions in the crop are indi- 
cated in the Soviet Union and Oceania, with all other regions showing gains. 

Canadian barley production at 220 million bushels is 32 percent higher 
than in 196^. Both acreage and yield contributed to the increase. The 
United States barley crop is estimated at koQ million bushels, up 1 percent 
although h percent below the 1955-59 average. Acreage was d^wn 11 percent, 
but yield gained 13 percent to a record U-2.8 bushels per acre. 
(Continued on page 3M 

-28- 



COTTONSEED: Production in specified countries and the world, 
averages 1950-54 and 1955-59, annual 1962-1965 





: Year beginning August 1 1/ 


Continent and country 


Average 


1962 


1963 


1964 2/ 


1965 2/ 




1950-54 


1955-59 










1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




short 


short 


short 


short 


short 


short 








tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


North America: 
















5,808 


5,370 


6,139 


6,192 


6,225 


6,251 




25 


72 


151 


161 


168 


144 




11 


32 


134 


160 


167 


187 




1 


5 


11 


17 


27 


29 




640 


975 


1,164 


1,012 


1,150 


1,104 




44 


94 


173 


209 


280 


230 




4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 




6 , 535 


6 560 


7,785 


7,765 


8,035 


7,965 


South America: 
















283 


275 


312 


230 


319. 


306 




794 


715 


1,104 


1,104 


1,008 


1,032 




37 


84 


200 


179 


160 


171 




30 


22 


26 


28 


31 


31 




240 


' 277 


360 


334 


344 


320 




7 


15 


15 


19 


32 


32 




1,400 


1,400 


2,030 


lj.905 


1,910 


1,905 


Europe : 
















70 


138 


209 


219 


158 


158 




17 


24 


10 


13 


12 


11 




30 


100 


248 


214 


170 


175 




45 


37 


36 


24 


29 


16 


Total 3/ 


210 


323 


5 20 


490 


390 


380 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 


2,845 


3,240 


3,215 


3,890 


3,935 


3,745 


Africa : 
















175 


221 


352 


229 


341 


340 




772 


830 


956 


956 


1,049 


1,170 




13 


18 


15 


13 


10 


13 




) 


32 


26 


23 


23 


24 


Chad 


> 69 


51 


77 


84 


84 


92 




113 


124 


38 


31 


15 


15 




75 


84 


69 


87 


76 


92 




58 


84 


123 


112 


107 


102 


Rhodesia, Malawi, and Zambia... 


7 


6 


12 


16 


30 


31 




28 


67 


89 


110 


125 


128 




148 


157 


151 


161 


184 


166 


Total 3/ 


1,505 


1,740 


2,035 


1,960 


2,205 


2,345 


Asia and Oceania: 
















99 


164 


227 


283 


283 


334 




14 


24 


20 


13 


16 


21 




126 ■ 


235 


368 


374 


433 


441 




318 


376 


551 


586 


765 


683 




2,755 


4, 120 


2,350 


2,630 


3,190 


3,250 




31 


38 


67 


98 


98 


101 




51 


41 


50 


36 


50 


50 


India 


1,906 


2,235 


2,744 


2,912 


2,744 


2,856 




39 


29 


14 


9 


9 


" 10 




673 


702 


862 


989 


891 


944 




17 


24 


33 


33 


40 


40 




1 


2 


5 


8 


22 


29 


Total 3/ 


6,045 


8_,030 


7,375 


8,045 


8,615 


8,845 


Estimated world total 3/... 


18,540 


21,290 


22,960 


24,055 


25,090 


25,185 



\l Years shown refer to years of harvest. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Includes estimates for the above 
countries for which data are not available and for minor producing countries. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Data for countries other than the United States, the United Arab 
Republic, and the Sudan were calculated from lint-production estimates. 



- 29 - 



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- 33 - 



In Western Europe, barley production increased for the ninth 
consecutive year to a record 1,326 million bushels; acreage was also 
at a record level. The crop in the United Kingdom went up 6 percent 
to a record 3^5 million bushels. Production also increased markedly 
in France and Greece but was lower in Austria, Denmark, West Germany, 
and Spain. 

The barley crop in Eastern Europe is forecast at 31^- million 
bushels, up 6 percent, with larger crops indicated in Bulgaria, 
Hungary, Poland and Yugoslavia. 

The crop in the Soviet Union is expected to be substantially 
below the exceptional crop of 196k, although above the level of 19&3. 
The Soviet acreage is also considerably lower than last year. 



Barley production in Asia and Africa is indicated slightly 
higher than a year earlier, with improved crops in the Middle East 
and North Africa. While it is early to forecast production in the 
Southern Hemisphere, in South America there is promise of a normal 
crop, but early season drought has cut the acreage sharply in 
Australia. 



The I965 world oat crop is forecast at 3*075 million bushels, 
showing a gain of 5 percent. Acreage is down slightly, following a 
continuous decline since 195^» 

Oat production in Canada was up 18 percent from a year earlier, 
with larger acreage and a record yield of 48.7 bushels per acre. The 
United States crop was 13 percent higher although still 22 percent 
below the 1955-59 average. Acreage was down 5 percent, to continue 
a 7-year decline. Yield was at a record 51,k bushels per acre. 

In Western Europe, oat production and acreage declined to 
continue a long-term trend. Notable changes were gains in Finland 
and France and declines in West Germany, Sweden, and the United 
Kingdom. The crop in Eastern Europe is indicated up about 7 percent, 
with good crops in Poland and Yugoslavia, although still below the 
5-year average. Oat production in the Soviet Union is forecast 
moderately higher than last year. The South American crop is 
expected to be about the same as a year earlier, and that of Australia 
somewhat lower. 



TOUTED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSTAGE AND PEES PAID 

U. i. DVAITMMT OF AOtlCOLTUM 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 20250 



Official Business 



NOTICE 

If you bo lo ng or need this publication, 
chock here / / rotnrn this abeet, 

mi roar name will be dropped from tha 
mailing list. 

If row addraaa eboald ba chang ad, prist 
or type tba new addraaa on tfaia abeet 
and return tba wbola abaat tot 

foreign Agricnltoral Service, Rb. 5918 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Waabington, D.C. 30250. 



2r 



WORLD AGRICULTURAL 
PRODUCTION AND TRADE 

Statistical Report 




NOVEMBER 1965 



CONTENTS 



DEC 1 



1965 



WORLD SUMMARIES Page 
Production 

World Prune Pack Again Large 3 

Average World Walnut Crop 5 

Milk Production in 1965 Up 2 Percent 7 

Cotton Crop to Exceed Consumption Again in 1965-66 . 9 

Jute Production Larger in 1965 11 

Large 1965-66 World Sugar Crop Forecast 13 

Peanut Production Slightly Below Last Year's Record. 17 

Flaxseed Production Largest in 9 Years 21 

Rice Crop Forecast Is Below 1964-65 Record 26 

Corn Crop Forecast at Record Level 27 



COUNTRY SUMMARIES 

French Exports of Wheat and Flour Set Record 



24 



NEW PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U. S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 

Single copies free to persons in the United States 
From the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U. S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D. C. 20250, Rm. 5918 South, Du-8-2445 



FOREIGN AGRICULTURE CIRCULARS 

FC 15-65 World Cotton Production in 1965-66 At Last Season's Record 

Large World Coffee Crop Expected in 1965-66 
Foreign Market for Poultry and Eggs 
Record U.S. Dry Pea Exports 



FCOF 5-65 
FPE 3-65 
FDP 8-65 
FFVS 11-65 



Grass and Legume Seeds: U.S. Exports, August 1965 With 
Comparisons 



FG 11-65 Exporting Countries' July 1 Grain Stocks Show Decline 

FDAP 3-65 Trade in Boxed Bananas Accelerated in 1964 

FLM 6-65 World Lard Production and Trade 



WORLD PRUNE PACK 
AGAIN LARGE 

The 1965 dried prune pack in the 8 countries which account for virtually 
all of the world's exports is estimated at 221,200 short tons, or 10 percent 
above the 5-year (1959-63) average though appreciably below the postwar- 
record 1964 pack of 248,200 tons. 

Foreign production is about 20,000 tons less than last year's large pack 
and is also appreciably below average. Argentina, France, and Yugoslavia 
have packs that are down from last year and below average. 



PRUNES, DRIED: Commercial production in selected countries, 
average 1959-63, annual 1962-65 



Country 




. Average . 


1962 


: 1963 


: 1964 


. Preliminary 












lyoj 






: 1,000 


1 ,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1 ,000 






: Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 






: tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 






: 7.0 


7.7 


6.9 


10.5 


4.7 






: 4.5 


3.7 


5.9 


5.1 


5.3 






: 5.6 


5.7 


5.5 


5.6 


5.6 






: 8.6 


13.2 


8.3 


8.3 


7.7 






: 1.3 


1.3 


1.5 


1.3 


1/ 


South Africa , 


















: 1.8 


1.8 


2.0 


1.7 


2.6 






: 29.3 


. 31.0 


24.0 


34.0 


19.0 


Foreign total 




: 58.1 


64.4 


54.1 


66.5 


46.2 






142.1 


152.7 


133.1 


181.7 


2/ 175.0 






'■ 200.2 


217.1 


187.2 


248.2 


221.2 


1/ Estimate not available 


; 1959-63 average 


used for 


foreign total. 


2/ California only, 


estimate for Ore 


gon not 


yet available; 195 


8-62 average 


for Oregon 2,800 


tons . 












The U.S. pack, 


thoug 


h probably 


slightly smaller 


than the 


1964 pack, is 


substantially above 


avera 


ge. It is 


almos t 


entirely 


due to the 


U.S. pack 


that world production is 


above avera 


ge this 


year: The largeness of the U.S. 


crop more than offsets the smallness 


of the 


foreign 


pack . 





-3- 



The above figures on world production do not include the packs of 
Rumania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Iran, and other countries in the Middle East. 
Reliable data for the first two are not available and production in each of 
the others is of minor magnitude. 

World exports of dried prunes in 1964-65 rose sharply and were the 
largest since 1957-58. At 87,500 tons, the 1964-65 export movement was 
nearly 13,000 tons above the 1963-64 movement and 17,000 tons above average. 
Chile, France, and Yugoslavia suffered export declines in 1964-65 which were 
more than offset by substantial U.S. and Argentine export gains. Argentine 
exports in 1964 may have been the largest in Argentina's history, totalling 
8,400 tons. (Brazil took 5,000 tons of this quantity.) U.S. exports in 
1964-65 increased by nearly 12,000 tons over the previous marketing year 
and were the largest since 1957-58. U.S. prune prices reacted in the fall 
of 1964 to the exceptionally heavy crop just harvested and export sales 
surged upwards. 



PRUNES, DRIED: Exports from principal producing countries, 
average 1958-62, annual 1961-64 1/ 



Country 


\ Average 
i 1958-62 


1961 


: 1962 


: 1963 


. Preliminary 
1964 




: 1,000 
: Short 
: tons 


1,000 
Short 
tons 


1,000 
Short 
tons 


1,000 
Short 
tons 


1 ,000 
Short 
tons 


South Africa , 


..: 4.2 
1.6 

..: 3.2 
• . : .8 

• • : .6 

21.7 


3.3 
2.3 
3.3 
1.2 

.1 

16.6 


4.4 
2.2 
3.3 
.9 

.2 

2 9. .5...,. 


4.3 
1.8 
2.9 
1.0 

.2 
24.4 


8.4 
2.1 
2.5 
2/ .3 

.3 

21 22.0 




'. 32.1 


26.8 


40.5 


34.6 


35.6 




'. 38.3 


44.1 


42.5 


40.1 


51.9 




..: 70.4 


70.9 


83.0 


74.7 


87 .5 



1_/ Year beginning January 1 in Argentina, Australia, Chile, and the Republic 
of South Africa; August 1, 1958-62 Average, subsequent years October 1 in 
France; September 1 in the United States and October 1 in Yugoslavia. 



2/ Estimate. 



-4- 



The 1965-66 outlook is for another year of heavy exports. World 
exports may approximate the 87,000 tons shipped in 1964-65. However, 
U.S. exports are expected to exceed the 1964-65 export movement by 
several thousand tons. Not only is the California supply again large 
and California prices again at the attractive levels of late last 
season but prices of foreign competitors have generally risen in wake 
of a shorter crop. 

AVERAGE WORLD 
WALNUT CROP 

The 1965 commercial walnut crop in the world's main producing 
countries (exclusive of the Soviet Bloc and Communist China) is 
estimated at 160,000 short tons, in-shell basis. This is 10 percent 
below 1964 but virtually the same as the 1959-63 average. 

For the 7 specified foreign walnut producers , the 1965 harvest 
is estimated at 81,600 tons, 3,900 tons below average and 6,100 
tons below the 1964 crop. The foreign crops were all smaller than 
in 1964 except in Iran and Italy where the harvest was slightly 
higher than in 1964. U.S. walnut production, at 78,400 tons, was 
7 percent above average but 13 percent below the large 1964 crop. 

Walnut exports in 1964-65 for the 7 major exporting countries 
(again excluding the Soviet Bloc and Communist China) are estimated 
to have totaled 48,200 tons in-shell basis. This is 7 percent above 
1963-64 but 5 percent below the 1959-63 average. Foreign countries' 
exports in 1964-65 are estimated at 44,600 tons. 

U.S. exports of walnuts in 1964-65 (October - September) 
totaled 3,600 tons in-shell basis (2,866 tons in-shell and 291 tons 
shelled) compared with 1,730 tons (1,327 tons in-shell and 161 tons 
shelled) in 1963-64. U.S. imports of walnut kernels in 1964-65 
totaled 1,330 tons compared with 1,345 tons in 1963-64; imports of 
in-shell walnuts are negligible. 1965-66 exports should be up 
because of increased emphasis on exporting. 

Foreign walnut prices are, for the most part, little changed to 
somewhat higher than a year ago. French prices are substantially 
higher, especially for larger sizes which are in extremely short 
supply. Indian prices are somewhat higher but those of Italian 
walnuts are virtually unchanged and may even weaken. U.S. prices 
are down partly as the result of a larger carryin and a somewhat 
larger total supply than in 1964-65. A large pecan crop also has 
contributed to the price decline. 



-5- 



WALNUTS, UNSHELLED BASIS: Estimated commercial production in 
selected countries, average 1959-63 and annual 1963-65 



Country 


I Averace • 

: 1959-63 : 


1963 ; 

• 


196U ; 


Pre"! 1 ml ha *rv 
1965 




• 

: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




: Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 




: tons 

• 


tons 


tons 


tons 




• 

— . _ 1 


30.0 


33-5 


26.0 




to Q 


13*0 


14- .0 


11 .0 




5.1 


3.5 


3.0 


4.0 


T+- c, 1 i r 








oh. r\ 






7-5 


3.9 






O 1. 


7-0 


9-5 


o.O 




3.6 


4.0 


3.8 


3-7 






87.0 


87.7 


81.6 




• 


83.1 


89.7 


78.4 


• 


170.1 


177. h 


160.0 



1/ Not available; 1959-63 average used for foreign total. 



WALNUTS, UNSHELLED BASIS: Exports from selected countries, 
average 1959-63 and 1961-64 crop years l/ 



Country 


: Average 
: 1959-63 


: Revised : 
: 1961 : 


1962 : 

• 
• 


1963 ; 

• 


Estimated 
1964 




• 
• 

: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




: Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 


Short 




: tons 

• 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 






12.1 


17.5 


15-9 


19.3 






14.0 


8.6 


9.2 


8.9 






3.0 


3-7 


2.3 


1.5 






16.4 


14.8 


10.1 


9.8 






5-7 


6.3 


3-9 


3-5 






•5 


1-7 


1.8 


1.6 




• 

• 


51.7 


52.6 


43.2 


44.6 




• 


1.3 


1.4 


1.7 


3.6 




« 


53.0 


54.0 


44.9 


48.2 



l/ Crop year beginning October 1 in France, Italy, Turkey, Yugoslavia and the 
United States, and March 21 in Iran. 

- 6 - 



UORLD MILK PRODUCTION 
IN 1965 UP 2 PERCENT 



An increase of about 2 percent in world cow's milk production is 
forecast for 1965 on the basis of preliminary estimates of production in 
36 countries which normally account for about 85 percent of the world's 
supply. Output in these countries is expected to reach approximately 
647 billion pounds, compared with 632 billion pounds in 1964. 

In Western Europe, the principal producing area, overall production 
of cow's milk will probably be up about 3 percent. Despite a decline in 
cow numbers in several countries, production is believed to have increased 
in all countries in that area except Norway. 

A gain of 5 percent is anticipated in Eastern Europe. Smaller 
production is expected in Hungary and Rumania, where herds were reduced 
because of hoof and mouth disease. In Yugoslavia, production is expected 
to be just under the 1964 level. 

In South America, present indications are that milk production for 
the year will be up about 4 percent. Only in Argentina and Chile is out- 
put expected to be below that of a year ago. 

Production in Oceania probably will be down approximately 2 percent. 
In Australia, drought conditions in the first half of the year necessi- 
tated the slaughter of many dairy animals. Milk production is estimated 
at 7 percent below 1964, the smallest output since 1961. In New Zealand, 
on the other hand, conditions were favorable, and production rose 4 per- 
cent over that of the preceding year to establish a new record. 

In the Western Hemisphere, milk production will probably be down 
about 1 percent. In both Canada and the United States, smaller cow 
numbers and dry weather affected production. 

Compared with the 1956-60 average, cow's milk production in the 
36 countries will be up 11 percent. In Western Europe, output will be 
about 14 percent higher. Production in Eastern Europe is expected to be 
about 12 percent above the average. 

In South America, production will probably be about 19 percent higher. 
In Oceania, output is expected to exceed the average by 10 percent. 

In the Western Hemisphere, an increase of 4 percent over the 1956-60 
average is anticipated. 



-7- 



Cows' milk: Estimate of 1965 production in important producing countries, 

with comparisons 



Countries < 


Average : 
1956-60 : 


1963 ; 


Annual 
1964 1/ ! 


1965 1/ ; 


1965 
compared 
with 
1964 




rijLxxxon , 
puunus « 


jyi i 1 1 ion : 
poiinus 


rO_L_LXOn ! 
puunus ; 


Mil T A r\r\ . 

m 1 1 ion : 
pouncis . 


Itercent 




17,407 : 


10,432 : 


10,491 : 


T ft D 1 C" 

lo,345 : 


99 




5,0/0 ! 


7, nil : 


ft T l^A 
0,150 


ft Aac" 


T AA 

100 




too c'nn , 

123,500 : 


1 oc* Ann 


T oA c*oft 

120,590 


T OC* t^AA 

125,500 


1 OA 

: 99 


Austria 


a ai n 
6,040 : 


o,722 


A ftnc* 
6,095 


: 7,055 


T AO 

: 102 




0,320 ' 


ft 7A0 
0,709 


O Ann 

o,903 


9,350 


» T AC* 

: I0i> 




11,033 


T T OT 0 
11,213 


TT C?-3d 

11,535 


T T 7Acf 
11,705 


T AO 
102 


Finland 


7 t t ft 
( ,110 


: 0,205 


1 ft 

: 0,435 


, p Aaa 
! 0,0UU 


T AO 


France - - 


1 no 1 

46,037 


c'e' ft I o 

: 55,o42 


£r! At 

: 55,ol5 


c^A f£r\ 

: 5o,750 


T AO 

102 


Germany, west ————— 


00 AaK 

39, ouu 


l.£ A1.A 

45>°4u 


: 45,922 


),A 7),A 

40, f4U 


■ T AO 




001 


"1 1 nn 

1,109 


1,140 


T TlC* 

: 1,145 


T AT 

: 101 


T,. n 1 _ _ J 


t 5*973 


A I.T ft 

: 0,410 


A At 1. 
0,014 


: 7,055 


T A7 

: 107 


Italy —————■•—•■—••—■-— 




TO Aftl. 

: 19,004 


T A AAft 

: 19,U00 


TO \.tt 

: 19,455 


1 T AO 

: 1U2 


Luxembourg — — — — 


» 0 / 1 .nn 

:2/ 40? 


■ Li n 
! 419 


: 425 


: 445 


T AC* 

: 105 


Netherlands — — — — 


13,033 


T £ 1 c'A 

15,456 


: 15,335 


: 10,100 


T AC* 

: 105 


Norway 


■a £AA 

3,500 


■3 Aftft 

! 3,000 


. 3,002 


: 3,045 


■ AO 

: 99 


Sweden - - ~~ 


: 0,05 ( 


, ft ), aa 


, Q AAQ 


: 0,115 


■ T AT 

: iui 


Switzerland — — 


A 1 r*T 

s 6,451 


A ftT 1 

! 6,014 


A Al c" 

: 0,045 


: 7,145 


T Aft 

: lOo 


United Kingdom — — — 


oA I.Ao 

: 26,463 


: 29,012 


oft 1 Ao 

: 2o,402 


: 29,o35 


T Ai. 

: 104 




: l,31o 


: 1,750 


: 1,770 


■ n Don 
t 1,020 


l no 

: 103 


Czechoslovakia --------- 


ft ol.c" 

: o,245 


•7 *7nO 

: 7,793 


: 0,047 


: 0,^00 


i r\\. 


Germany, East 


1 1 *70 *7 

s 11*737 


1 1 nl.n 

11,049 


■ T T AAO 

: U , 003 


■ TOT OC' 

: 12,125 


: lOu 


Hungary 


. o / 1. oo a 
:2/ 4,220 


: 3,953 


I. T C?A 

: 4,15o 


. oft Aa 
! 3,000 


■ no 

: 93 




• 25,574 


07 00 a 
27,930 


> 0*7 *7AO 

: 27,703 


07 ftftA 

: 2 (,000 


. T AT 

: iui 


^mania 


■ I. I.*7l. 

: 4,474 


C*T O 

! 5,512 


£ AAA 

: 5 , 000 


: 5,335 


ol. 

: 94 


USSR — — ~— • —■.——■— •» 


nil Aao 

: ill , 009 


Til. £ OA 

: 114,039 


T T A Al.ft 

: 119 , 040 


■ T 0*7 ft*7A 

: 12f,0f0 


T A7 

: 10/ 


Yugoslavia -————————- 


J 4,751 


1 XI T 


1. *7ftA 

: 4,700 


1 "7) A 

! 4, 740 


rtn 

! 99 


Japan 


: 3,3ou 


■ A Aft"? 


A Aoft 
: 0,090 


■ 7 AliA 

: ( , U40 


T At' 


Argentina 3/ ————————— 


TAT ft7 

: 10,10 ( 


. T A C*0 O 

: 10,533 


t a At h 

: 10,01^ 


. T A OT C* 

: 10,215 


oA 

: 90 




TAT 7A 

: 10,1(0 


■ TO OOA 

: 12,22U 


T O I.Otf 

: 12,435 


. 1. / TO AAA 
.4/ 13,900 


> T T O 

: Lid 




: 1,799 


t 2,295 


: 2,500 


:~ 2,200 


1 88 


Colombia 


: 4,021 


: 4,040 


: 4,190 


. 4,410 


: 105 




: 885 


: 1,110 


: 1,135 


: 1,160 


: 102 


Uruguay 


: 1,501 


: 1,658 


: 1,600 


: 1,625 


: 102 


Venezuela 


:2/ 894 


t 1,200 


: 1,324 


; 1,430 


: 108 


Australia 


14,005 


: 15,305 


: 16,000 


: 14,825 


: 93 


New Zealand 5/ 


:2/ 11,522 


: 12,114 


: 12,603 


: 13,135 


: 104 


Total of above 

countries 


! 580,770 


: 622,152 


: 631,805 


i 647,460 


i 102 



1/ Preliminary. 2/ Less than a 5-year average. 3/ Milk for commercial use only; 
milk consumed on farms and milk fed not included. h/ Attache's estimate in early 
1965. 5/ Years ending May 31. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, .other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research and 
related information. 



- 8 - 



WORLD COTTON CROP TO EXCEED 
CONSUMPTION AGAIN IN 1965-66 



The world cotton situation in 1965-66 is marked by an excess of 
production over consumption for the fourth successive year, by an 
increase in trade, and by prices in world import markets lower than 
those of a year ago. The world carryover on August 1, 1965, and this 
season's crop give a world supply of nearly 80 million bales. 

World cotton production in 1965-66 is estimated at around 52.0 
million bales, about the same as last season's record outturn and 
19 percent above the 1955-59 average. Foreign Free World production 
is forecast at 23.2 million bales, up 0.4 million from the level of 
a year ago, and at a record high for the sixth successive year. 
Principal increases in 1965-66 production are expected in Pakistan, 
Iran, and the UAR. Among the countries where 1965-66 crops are 
likely to be smaller are Mexico, Nicaragua, El Salvador, India, and 
Turkey. Production in Communist countries is estimated at 13.7 
million bales, down about 0.3 million from 1964-65. All of the 
expected decrease is in the USSR, where acreage is down slightly and 
a shortage of irrigation water has reduced yields in some areas. 
The U.S. crop of 15.1 million bales, including city crop, is only 
slightly below 1964, despite a reduction in harvested area of 0.4 
million acres. 



World cotton consumption is estimated at a record 50.8 million 
bales in 1965-66, up 1.1 million from last year. Consumption out- 
side the United States is estimated at 41.5 million bales for 
1965-66, up 1.0 million from a year earlier. Cotton consumption in 
Communist countries is placed at 16.2 million bales -- up 0.5 mil- 
lion from 1964-65. This estimated increase is distributed about 
equally between the USSR and Mainland China. In the foreign Free 
World, consumption is estimated at 25.3 million bales, an increase 
of 0.5 million from 1964-65. More than half of the expected 
increase in foreign Free World consumption this season is in net 
exporting countries. Of the net importing countries of the foreign 
Free World, only India is likely to consume substantially more 
cotton than in 1964-65. Consumption in most other importing coun- 
tries is expected to be at or slightly below last season's level. 
Cotton consumption in the United States in 1965-66 is estimated at 
9.3 million bales, 0.1 million more than last season and the 
largest domestic offtake since 1952-53. 

The excess of world cotton production over consumption in 
1965-66 is expected to add more than a million bales to the esti- 
mated August 1, 1965, carryover of 27.6 million bales. This 
represents a stock buildup of nearly 9.0 million bales in four 
years since 1962-63. Nearly all of the buildup has been in the 
United States, despite the fact that U.S. production has remained 
about stable during that time. 



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- 10 - 



World cotton exports in 1965-66 are forecast at 17.3 million 
bales, an increase of about 0.6 million from 1964-65 totals. The 
expected increase in world trade in 1965-66 is attributed to a con- 
tinued high level of consumption abroad, along with the fact that 
many net importing countries reduced raw cotton stocks to about 
minimum levels last season and therefore will import on at least a 
replacement basis this season. Cotton exports from the United States 
are now estimated at 4.0 million bales, compared with 4.1 million in 
1964-65. Large crops in foreign Free World producing countries this 
season will provide an estimated exportable supply of 11.7 million 
bales, the largest ever recorded. Net exports from the Free World 
to Communist countries in 1965-66 are estimated at 2.4 million bales 
compared with 2.0 million in 1964-65. 

Price quotations for U.S. Middling 1-1/16 inches in Liverpool 
averaged around 28.00 cents per pound in October, about 30 points 
below a year ago. Prices of most foreign growths of equivalent 
quality are now equal to the U.S. price or below it. Selling pres- 
sures have tended to weaken prices for some foreign growths . Extra 
long staple prices, c.i.f. Liverpool, are about steady, a reflection 
of an agreement between Sudan and UAR to "hold prices". Sudanese 
and Peruvian cotton is currently being offered at prices averaging 
nearly 7 cents per pound below those of October 1964. Prices of 
Egyptian cotton average about 3 cents per pound below October 1964. 

WORLD JUTE PRODUCTION 
LARGER IN 1965 

World production of jute in 1965 is estimated at 5,371 million 
pounds compared with 5,119 million pounds in 1964, an increase of 
5 percent. India and Pakistan are the principal producers, accounting 
for 89 percent of total output in 1965. 

Pakistan's jute production in 1965 rose to 2,520 million pounds, 
an increase of 18 percent over the unusually low 1964 output. The 
increase in the production estimate for Pakistan this season is 
mainly the result of a larger area harvested -- 1,888,000 acres as 
compared with 1,660,000 acres in 1964. 

India's 1965 jute crop, in contrast to that of Pakistan, is down 
5 percent from 1964, as harvested acreage declined from 2,079,000 to 
1,800,000. Total production of jute and mesta in India in 1965 is 
estimated at 2,880 million pounds, compared to 3,043 million pounds 
in 1964, and 3,198 million pounds in 1963. 

Thailand's production of jute in 1965 -- 16 million pounds -- 
is little changed from that of the preceding two years. Output of 
kenaf , however , rose to 661 million pounds in 1965 -- up one-fourth 
from 1964 and 5 times the average output during 1956-60. Most of 
Thailand's kenaf is exported as raw fiber and it has become an 
important factor in world trade. 



-11- 



Table l.--Jute: Estimated world production, by specified countries, and 
production of certain allied fibers in India, Thailand and Brazil, 

average 1956-60, annual 1963-65 





• 


Year 


01 nsrvesL 




f"V"M iv"| -f- -ytrt r 
\AJ UX1 U XJ 


: Average • 
• iV.?o-oo . 


1963 1/ ; 


1964 1/ ; 


1965 2/ 




: 1,000 : 


1,000 ! 


1,000 ! 


1,000 




: pounds ; 


! pounds : 


, pounds : 


. pounds 


JUTE: 


• 












; 2 , 350 , 000 : 


2 , 131 , 202 : 


2,520,000 




* t *~7 £.r\ £Qr\ 


: 2,454,319 : 


, 2,412,403 : 


: 2,2o0,000 




• 70 ^ 


; 00,000 : 


i 100,000 : 


: 110,230 




• oft C\£j~7 


21,092 , 


3o,371 


! 35,274 






24,640 


\ 24,o40 


: 24,700 




Q r\Q.C 


: 15,212 


; 15,^32 


: 15,650 






: 90,000 


: 90,000 


: 5^,000 




• • • : 573 


: 7,573 


: 8,818 


: 8,818 


T 7" • - J. T\T_ M 




2,950 


> )i linn 
! 4, 4uy 


: 4, 409 




. . . : 163 


! 992 


; 1,102 


i 1,323 


.To 7~vq yi 


1 Q6P 


1 osft 


1 146 


• 1 1 OP 






> cxj<o y s^y 




■31 s o44 




• 

4,599,714 


: 5,337,225 : 


: 5,118,521 


i 5,370,550 


KENAF (MESTA): 


• 
• 










132,276 


: 466,71^ 


: 529,104 


661, 380 




520,799 


: 7^3,601 


! 63O, 441 


: 600,000 




37, W 


i 32,760 


: 43,298 


: 44,092 



l/ Revised. 2/ Preliminary, Includes estimates for Mainland China, the 
Soviet Union and other countries for which data are not readily available. 

it/ Includes estimates for other allied fibers. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports 
of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office 
research, and related information. 



- 12 - 



Brazil's production of jute and malvaceous fibers in 1965 totaled 
154 million pounds, up 11 million pounds from 1964 output. The production 
of most other minor producing countries remained about the same as during 
the preceding year. 

Pakistan remains by far the principal source of raw jute fiber 
available to importing countries with July-June 1964-65 shipments total- 
ing 1,544 million pounds, down 7 percent from 1963-64 exports. Ten 
countries -- namely the United Kingdom, India, China (Mainland), Belgium, 
France, Germany, Japan, United States, Burma, and Spain -- received 73 
percent of 1964-65 sales. 

Thailand's exports of kenaf, or Thai jute, rose to 357 million pounds 
in 1964, up 29 percent from 1963 shipments. Exports, in 1965, are 
expected to be substantially higher than last year's. In 1964, Thailand's 
kenaf shipments went to 38 destinations, the more important markets being 
Japan, Belgium, West Germany, France and the United Kingdom. 

Wholesale prices of raw jute, New York market, during the first half 
of calendar 1965 were 3 to 4 cents a pound above corresponding levels of 
1964 due largely to uncertainties regarding supplies for the current 
season. However, prices weakened somewhat in the third quarter. Raw jute 
prices reacted very little during the Pakistani- Indian conflict, although 
prices for jute goods rose considerably. 

The first session of the Consultative Committee of the FAO Study 
Group on Jute, Kenaf and Allied Fibers was held in Rome, September 1-3. 
On an informal non-binding basis, major producing and importing countries 
developed guidelines for stabilizing prices and promoting a more orderly 
movement of supplies. 

LARGE 1965-66 WORLD 
SUGAR CROP FORECAST 

The first (November) Foreign Agricultural Service forecast of the 
1965-66 world sugar crop places production at 70.0 million short tons, 
raw value. This would be second in size only to the high record produc- 
tion of 1964-65. The revised estimate for 1964-65 is 72 million tons. 

Larger crops are forecast this season (1965-66) for such large pro- 
ducers as Mexico, Brazil, India, and the Philippines. Smaller crops are 
being realized in the United States, USSR, West Germany, and the Union of 
South Africa. Many of the smaller producing countries are continuing to 
increase their production as they attempt to reach self-sufficiency or 
export larger quantities . 

Sugarcane is expected to account for about 59 percent of total world 
production, with sugarbeets accounting for about 41 percent. Production 
in the Free World in 1965-66 is expected to account for 68 percent of the 
total, with the Sino-Soviet Bloc accounting for 32 percent. On a conti- 
nent basis, North America, Africa, and Oceania show little change from the 
previous year, South America and Asia show substantial gains, while both 
East and West Europe and the USSR show sizeable declines. 



-13- 



CEWTRIFUGAL SUGAR (raw value) l/: Production in specified countries, average 1955-56 
through 1959-K), annual I963-6I+ through 1965-66 Zj 



Continent and country \ 


A TrO T°Q (TP 
1QCC 


1963-6^ 


1964-65 


1965-66 3/ 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


North America (cane unless : 


short tons 


short tons 


short tons 


short tons 


otherwise indicated): : 












151 


159 


lot) 


lt>5 




1, 300 


2,097 


0 oflr> 
20U 


2, 54l 


United states : 












0 r\AA 

2,000 


3,09* 


3,320 


3, 000 




572 


1,183 


1,147 


1,100 




1,013 


1,179 


1, 200 


1, 200 




1,036 


909 


097 


1,000 


TJ J __J T- 1 n *~ «4» 4-Vta T T C* . 


11 


lu 


1, 

4 


10 




12 


31 


37 


42 




1, h 
44 


100 


110 


115 




51 


00 


lift 
U-O 


1 0)1 
l£:4 




*7t\ 
l<-> 


159 


I50 


155 




17 


: 30 


■3)1 

3* 


1.3 

: ^3 




Ol 


105 


123 


123 




O 






: o> 




AA^ 
->,°°3 


; 4, *HAJ 




0, ow 




AAq 


: 9(0 


. yuu 


: yuu 




140 


; 104 




: 207 






itA 




p 7n 
: (U 




J+19 


: 531 


567 


: 571 




8^ 


: 68 




An 




205 


: 255 


: 201 


: 314 




T A -J 

103 


I lOO 




: 212 


Leeward & Windward Islands • : 


Ok 




59 


t>3 


» : 


14,488 


16,010 


18,621 


; 18, 720 


South America (cane unless ; 










otherwise indicated) : : 












yuo 


► 1 T C7 

: -L,J-5f 


l,0fl 


1, 227 




JJL 


101 


05 


An 

: 00 




3,110 


3,620 


4,152 


: 4, 577 


T-k. f J. J _1_ /~1 - « J - . . - 


330 


290 


: 375 


: 3<j0 




4U 


> no 

119 


133 


15" 


n amV4 n ■ 


<=9( 


399 


LAA 
400 


' po4 




93 


130 


130 


192 




30 


4l 


56 


50 




Ann 
ouu 


OD4 


AAi 
001 


onii 
9*J4 




10 


lb 


10 


17 




27 


Mi 
44 


A)i 

04 


74 




on^ 
20? 


339 


3 Oil 


434 




5,859 


7,120 


7,871 


8,675 














eOc 


355 


3D? 


cue 




393 


*HJp 


DO f 






353 


li n 0 


4 fU 








°P 


(D 






30 


C*7 

5( 


cn 


op 




1,571 


O oi ft 

dy d±0 




2,pfO 




1, >90 


0 oofK 

C.) d.£LO 


Jiu 




0 




73 






J <rO 


J.OU 


1? f 


1 Ik 




1,271 




1 nor, 


X, .d±U 




490 




(LKJ 


OUU 


Portugal : 












13 


18 


18 


18 


Snain .f pane and tteet^ * . ■ 


14-70 


448 


578 


586 




314 


272 


295 


276 




1*0 


50 


61 


67 




818 


900 


1,130 


1,002 




7,769 : 


9,105 1 


10,635 : 


9,470 



- Continued 



- 14 - 



CEHTRIFUGAL SUGAR (raw value) l/: Production in specified countries, average 1955-56 
through 1959-60, annual 1963-64 through 1965-66 2/ - continued 



Continent and country 



Average 
1955-56 
through 
1959-60 



1963-64 



1964-65 



1965-66 3/ 



1,060 
short tons 



Europe - continued : 

Albania jj : 

Bulgaria jj : 

Czechoslovakia 7/ : 

Germany, East 7/ . : 

Hungary : 

Poland : 

Rumania : 

Yugoslavia : 



1,000 
short tons 
12 
137 
860 
804 
332 
1,152 
214 

219 



Total East Europe. 



Total Europe. 



USSR (Europe and Asia) 

Africa (cane unless otherwise indicated): 

Ethiopia 

Egypt 

Congo (LeopoldvlUe) 

Kenya jj 

Tanzania Jj 8/ 

Uganda 7/T. 

Malagasy Republic 

Mauritius 

Mozambique. 

Reunion 

Southern Rhodesia 

South Africa, Republic of 10/ 

Swaziland 

Other Africa 11/ 

Total Africa 



Asia (cane unless otherwise indicated): 

Iran (beet and cane) 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) (beet) 

China: Mainland (cane and beet) 

Taiwan 

Burma 

India 12/ 

Indonesia 

Japan (beet; incl. cane beginning 1959-60). 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 13/ 

Thailand 

Other Asia (cane and beet) 14/ 

Total Asia 

Oceania (cane): 

Australia 

Fiji 



Total Oceania. 



World total ( cane )...... 

World total (beet) 

World total (cane and beet). 



1,000 
short tons 
12 
170 
1,191 
822 
512 
1,570 
343 
375 



3,730 



11,499 



5,632 



35 
340 
31 
29 
28 
89 
55 
612 
165 
219 
9 

989 
93 



2,694 



119 
4o8 
836 
963 

38 
2,737 
903 

86 
174 
1,356 

23 
102 

33 



7,778 



1,428 
210 



1,638 



29, 324 
20,264 



49,588 



1,000 
s hort tons 
12 
270 
1,201 
883 
540 
1,975 
420 
395 



**,995 



14,100 



6,475 



73 
421 
^5 
59 
66 
145 
127 
756 
167 
280 
140 
1,265 
94 
182 



3,820 



222 
565 

1,150 
916 
60 

3,470 
725 
256 
333 

1,856 
141 
194 
127 



10,015 



1,883 
359 



2,242 



34,379 
25,403 



59,782 



5,696 



16,331 



11,270 



76 
472 
33 
41 
72 
147 
129 
612 
220 
280 
172 
1,395 
114 
154 



3,917 



222 
876 

1,318 
953 
60 

4,215 
715 
308 
329 

1,736 
270 
37^ 
144 



11,520 



2,132 
330 



2,462 



38,897 
33,095 



71,992 



~\J Centrifugal sugar, as distinguished from noncentrifugal, includes cane and beet sugar produced 
by the centrifugal process, which is the principal kind moving in international trade. 2/ Years 
shown are crop-harvesting year 6. For chronological arrangement here, all campaigns which begin not 
earlier than May of one year, nor later than April of the following year, are placed in the same 
crop-harvesting year. The entire season's production of each country is credited to the May/April 
year in which harvesting and sugar production began. 3/ Preliminary. 4/ Includes Antigua, St. Kitts 
and St. Vincent. St. Lucia discontinued January 1, 1954. ^/ Danish beets exported to Finland, Sweden 
and West Germany, in terms of sugar, not included in the production for those countries. 6/ Ho sugar 
produced prior to 1961-62. jj Production refers to calendar year for the first of the two years 
indicated. 8/ Formerly Tanganyika, beginning 1964-65 includes Zanzibar. 9/ Prior to 1964-65 included 
Malawi and Zambia. lO/Beginning 1962-63 Swaziland reported separately. 11/ Other Africa includes 
Algeria, French Somaliland, Somali Republic, Sudan, Angola, Congo (Brazzaville), Liberia and Tunisia. 
12/ Includes Khandsari. 13/ Prior to this issue, included in "Other Asia". 14/ Other Asia includes 
Afghanistan, Israel, Syria, South Vietnam, Iraq, Lebanon, Ceylon and Nepal. 



- 15 - 



NOMCENTRIFUGAL SUGAR l/ : Production in specified countries, average 1955-56 
through 1959-60, annual 1963-64 through 1965-66 2/ 



* 


Average 








Continent and country 


1955-56 
through 


; 1963-6^ 


1964-65 


1965-66 3/ 




1959-60 








• 


1,000 


: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


: 


short tons 


: short tons 


: short tons 


short tons 


North America: : 












30 


: 27 


: 20 


: 20 




70 


: 40 


: 40 


4o 




147 


: 132 


: 132 


132 




25 


: 23 


: 22 


22 




4 


5 


5 


4 




276 


; 227 


; 219 


218 


: 

Asia: : 












l60 


: 157 


: 160 


160 




545 


: 242 


: 242 


242 




24 


: 24 


: 24 


: 24 




3,950 


: 6,063 


: 6, 6l4 


6, 6l4 




303 


: 330 


: 330 


330 




26 


: 25 


: 13 


9 




1,258 


672 


650 


672 




70 


: 52 


: 63 


63 




50 


154 


165 


165 




21 


36 


40 : 


4o 




6,407 


7,755 


8,301 


8,319 


• 

South America: : 












486 \ 


715 I 


728 j 


716 




26 : 


40 : 


40 : 


40 




30 : 


16 - 


17 : 


17 




71 : 






Id 




613 ; 


813 ; 


827 ■ 


815 


Total of above countries..] 


7,296 ; 


8,795 ; 


9,347 ; 


9,352 



1/ Noncentrifugal sugar includes all types of sugar produced by other than 
centrifugal process which is largely for consumption in the relatively few areas 
where produced. The estimates include such kinds known as piloncillo, pane la, 
papelon, chancaca, rapadura, jaggery, gur, muscovado, panocha, etc. 
2/ Years shown are crop-harvesting years. For chronological arrangements here, 
all campaigns which begin not earlier than May of one year, nor later than April 
of the following year, are placed in the same crop-harvesting year. The entire 
season's production of each country is credited to the May-April year in which 
harvesting and sugar production began. 
3/ Preliminary. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of 
U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research 
and related information. 



- 16 - 



Weather conditions were generally favorable for the 1965-66 crop. 
Although much of Western Europe experienced a damp and cool summer, there 
was improvement as harvesting time approached. Acreage reportedly was 
significantly less this year for Western Germany, France, Austria and 
Denmark. Sizeable gains in acreage were made for the Netherlands, Italy, 
and Spain. Although there was a prolonged dry period in Cuba, it is 
expected that the crop outturn will be about the same level as a year 
earlier . 



Acreage in the United States was restricted by government action in 
1965 (1965-66 crop), and was about 10 percent less than the 1964 level for 
sugarbeets and about 13 percent less for sugarcane. This, coupled with 
hurricane damage in Louisiana, accounts for a smaller crop in the United 
States. The total area of sugarbeets for factory use in the USSR this 
year is reported at 3.92 million hectares (9,686,320 acres), compared to 
4.11 million hectares (10,156,000 acres) in 1964. Weather and poor 
cultivation in major regions were significant yield depressants. However, 
higher fertilizer inputs probably held yields above average levels. 

World production in 1965-66 will exceed consumption requirements by 
some 5 million tons. Therefore, stocks will be increased considerably as 
the world surplus sugar situation continues. 

WORLD PEANUT PRODUCTION 

SLIGHTLY BELOW LAST YEAR'S RECORD 

World production of peanuts in 1965 is tentatively estimated at 17.4 
million short tons, unshelled basis. This is slightly below the record 
18.0 million tons estimated to have been produced in 1964 but one-sixth 
above the 1955-59 average. The final estimate of this year's production, 
however, could reach or even exceed last year's record if the actual 
decline in India's crop turns out to be less than the presently indicated 
1.3 million tons. Declines indicated for a number of other countries, 
including Mainland China, Rhodesia, Niger, Indonesia, South Africa and 
Mali, in comparison, are relatively minor, tonnagewise. 

Partially offsetting the overall declines are increases in Brazil, 
Argentina, Nigeria, the United States, Malawi, Zambia, Mozambique, Senegal 
and some other countries . 



The estimated expansion from 1964 in North American peanut production 
of 11 percent or 140,000 tons stems largely from the increased output in 
the United States. At the November 1 estimate of 1,214,655 tons, U.S. 
production exceeds last year's outturn by 10 percent and the 1955-59 avera 
by more than one half. Acreage picked and threshed rose 2 percent and the 
indicated average yield of a record 1,691 pounds per acre exceeds the 
previous record of 1964 by 122 pounds. 



-17- 



A significant increase is expected in Mexico's crop this year. The 
Mexican Government is taking a greater interest than previously in peanut 
production and is distributing information to farmers on improved methods 
of cultivation, the use of commercial fertilizers and such. In the state 
of Coahuila, particularly in the depressed cotton area of Laguna , the 
government may finance peanut production. Increased output is expected 
in the major producing state of Jalisco following a decline last year 
resulting from increased corn planting. 

The gain of an estimated one-third in South American peanut produc- 
tion from the crops harvested early this year, compared with last year's 
reduced outturn, occurred in Argentina and Brazil. From a record acreage 
Argentina harvested 484,000 tons of peanuts, one-third more than in 1964 
and 85 percent above the 1955-59 average production. 

Brazil reportedly produced a record 730,000 tons of peanuts, also 
from a record acreage. This volume was 40 percent above the 1964 out- 
turn and was almost 2-3/4 times the 1955-59 average. 

Early indications are that Africa will produce somewhat more peanuts 
than last year's output. Generally favorable weather has prevailed both 
in Nigeria and in Senegal which, together, normally account for almost 
one-half of Africa's total production. Purchases by the Nigerian Market- 
ing Boards for export and crushing are tentatively forecast at 840,000 
short tons (750,000 long tons) shelled basis, compared with purchases of 
760,400 tons (678,935) from the 1964 crop and record purchases of 976,000 
tons (871,516) from the 1962 crop. On the basis of this forecast, total 
production may approximate 1,475,000 short tons, unshelled basis, 8 per- 
cent above last year's output but 12 percent below the record tonnage of 
1962. 



Firm estimates for Senegal's 1965 acreage and production are not yet 
available. Indications at this early date are that the commercial crop 
will exceed last year's and approximate the record of 1961, providing the 
favorable conditions of September-October continue through the remainder 
of the year. Moisture conditions reportedly have been good. A tentative 
forecast of commercial production for export and crushing is about 990,000 
short tons (900,000 metric tons), unshelled basis, compared with 952,000 
tons (864,000) from the 1964 crop and the alltime high of 994,000 tons 
(901,764) from the 1961 crop. Total production thus may reach 1,100,000 
tons or slightly more than last year's outturn. 

Drought again, as in 1964, reduced peanut production in South Africa 
and the estimated 218,000-ton outturn reflects a decline of 7 percent 
from a year earlier. 



-18- 



PEANUTS l/: Acreage and production In specified countries and the world, 
averages 1950-54 and 1955-59, annual 1963-65 



Continent 




Acreage 


2/ 




Production 


and cQuntrv I 


Average 








Average 








LL950 - 5^1955 -59 


1963 


1964 


1965 3/ 


1950-54 


1955 .59 


1963 


1964 


1965 3/ 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




acres 


acres 


acres 


acres 


acres 


short 


short 


short 


short 


short 














tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


tons 


North America: : 
























1,718: 1,501 


1,1*09 


1,405 


1,437 


76^ 


799 


1,0111 1,102 


1,215 




136: 163 


193 


150 


188 


78 


92 


110 


83 


110 




kj 2k: 30 




— 





6l 


9 


— 







Dominican Republic . ... 1 


4/ 68 


117 


124 


124 


— 


24 


Sr 


53 


eft 

50 


... 


Estimated total ^/•'• m 




1,825 


1,810 


1,765 


1,835 


870 


960 


l, 200 


1,270 


1,1*10 


South America: : 
























336 


526 


658 


851 


940 


15* 


261 


344 


367 


484 




339 


6/ 1*86 


6/1,01*5 


6/1,060 


6/1,147 


161 


270 


666 


518 


730 




33 


48 


51* 


49 


52 


13 


18 


22 


21 


22 




19 


20 


23 


19 


16 


6 


6 


8 


8 


1 


Estimated total 5/. : 


750 


1,125 


1,825 


2,030 


2,205 


345 


570 


1,060 


935 


1,255 


Europe: : 
























6 


5 


7 


7 


— 0 


5 


5 


7 


6 







11 


13 


12 


11 


— 


9 


12 


13 


12 







20 


18 


13 


— 


— 


14 


10 


9 


— 





Estimated total ex-: 






















eluding U.S.S.R.^/: 


50 


45 


1*0 


40 


40 


30 


30 


30 


30 


30 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 


24 


k/ 1 


"77 


7/ 


7/ 







it 


— IT 


" iT 


Africa: : 


















316 






103 


399 


81*3 


1,000 





25 


129 


301 





United Arab Republic: 


29 


38 


55 


52 


53 


23 


34 


50 


51 


55 






kj 9k 










it/ §/ 5 


kj 22 


38 


33 






320 


328 


301 


310 


— 


90 


110 


112 


115 





Chad, Congo (Brazza- : 






















ville), Central 1 






















African Rep. and 
























556 




— 





101 


193 





... 




Congo, Leopoldville. . . : 


705 


692 











196 


193 


99 


95 


"88 




275 


335 








72 


80 


85 


90 






136 


y 137 










49 


J+5 


115 









136 


— 











30 


kj 28 


12 


16 


16 




57 


102 








— 


21 


31 


35 


36 


39 


Mali : 


411 




620 


640 


620 


103 


124 


127 


1A5 


130 










— 


— 


20 


40 


41 


3 1 * 


95 




313 


690 


787 


736 


— 


72 


162 


243 


219 


181 






it/3,500 







— 


851 


1,103 


1,535 


1,360 


1A75 




1 













166 


117 


190 


Rhodesia (Southern : 
















180 















— 


— 








173 


135 


Zambia (northern : 






































107 


14 


55 




1,684 


it/2,175 


2,595 


2,645 


2,645 


600 


kj 925 


995 


1,075 


1,100 




188 










3a 


22 


31* 


30 


31 




379 


425 








184 


186 


179 








445 


k/ 550 


<V, ?73 




6/ 777 


144 


204 




234 


218 


Estimated total 5/. : 


9,335 


12,165 


14,720 


14, U6? 


14, 035 


2,905 


4,075 






5,210 


Asia: : 
























k 


12 


10 


6 


: 10: 7 


17 


14 


10 


14 



Turkey (Europe and 





12: 


20: 


23: 


22: 




12 


23 


25= 


25 


26 




'♦,295: 


5,8l4: 


.4,005: 


4,645: 1 


',795 


2,4^5 


3,065 


2,095: 


2,5|j> 


2,490 




726: 


905 : 6/1, 48936/1, 600 : 6/1 


-,785 


189 


267 


361: 






210: 


248: 


241: 


249: 




1 67 


96 


101: 


128 




India : 


11,859: 


14,717: 


16,825: 


17,476: 17,500 


3,812 


5,000 


5,7^9: 


6,808 


5,500 




714: 


816: 


855: 


964: 


990 


346 


379 


3^9: 


446 


1*15 




59: 


91: 


152: 


155: 


164 


31* 


76 


167: 


151 


162 




61: 


71: 


48:< 


y 62: 


64 


17 


20 


12: 


16 


17 




178: 


221: 


202:< 


ii 229:6/ 


237 


85 


123 


137: 


132 


138 


Estimated total ex-: 






















eluding U.S.S.R 5_/: 


18,190! 


23,030! 


24,035! 


25,595: 26,005 


7,025 


9,135 


9,10o! 


10,700: 9,490 




21: 


39: 


36: 


44:6/ 




10 


19 


18: 


26 


26 


Estimated world : 






















total 5/ : 


30,325! 


38,23o! 


42,466! 


W+,339: W.765 


H,l?5 


14,790 


16,718! 


17,976 


17,420 



1/ Peanuts in the shell. Southern Hemisphere peanut crops, which are harvested from April to June, are 
combined with those of the Northern Hemisphere harvested from September through December of the same year. 
2/ Harvested areas as far as possible. 3_/ Preliminary, kj Less than 5 years. %J Includes estimates for 
the above countries for which data are not available and for minor producing countries. 6/ Planted area. 
Jj Less than 500 acres and 500 tons. 8/ Exports. 9_/ Commercial crop. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 19 - 



A serious drought reportedly also has reduced the peanut crop in 
Rhodesia. Production in Zambia exceeds the small outturn last year but 
will not reach early expectations mainly because of damage from the 
Rosette disease. Reportedly, large quantities will have to be imported 
during 1966 to meet the rapidly expanding needs of the domestic crushing 
industry. About 75 percent of Zambia's peanut production is confectionery 
grade peanuts for overseas markets. In contrast to the reduced outturn in 
Rhodesia and Zambia, production in Malawi in 1965 is expected to be up 
significantly. 

Mali expects reduced peanut production this year because of some 
shift in acreage from peanuts to grain in the Bamako region. The shift 
reflects inadequate grain supplies last year of some peanut producers. 

In view of present predictions of reduced crops in India and Mainland 
China, total production in Asia is expected to be at least 10 percent less 
than it was last year. Trade sources in India now believe that the peanut 
crop will not be as large as expected earlier despite a substantial acreage 
increase and may approximate 5.5 million tons compared with last year's 
record of 6.8 million. Rains were deficient early in the season in the 
important growing areas of Gujarat and in other areas. Then showers badly 
needed for the development of the crop failed to materialize. As of late 
October there had been little or no rain since early September in Gujarat. 

In Mainland China, the recovery in grain production since 1962 
reportedly has permitted the government to devote more attention to 
expanding the acreage in peanuts and other oilseed crops . Peanuts have 
received considerable emphasis in China in connection with the campaign 
to raise more hogs. Both vines and peanut meal are used as hog feed. 
However, despite a considerable rise in peanut acreage over the last few 
years, production still remains below the 1957 level. Press reports 
early in the year indicated that there would be another significant in- 
crease in peanut acreage in 1965, with the increase largely in South 
China, as has been the pattern in the last few years. The most important 
increase was in Kwangtung, the major producing province of South China. 
Despite the acreage increases in the south and the governments efforts to 
develop peanut production, the national acreage increased only slightly 
this year. Acreage in Shantung, China's leading peanut-growing province, 
declined more than 8 percent. And, because of the drought that persisted 
in these areas since last winter, Liaoning , Hopei, and Honan, as well as 
other areas in the north, are believed to have had significant losses in 
acreage . 

Weather in northern areas reportedly was generally unfavorable with 
water- logging in some areas and a persistent drought during the entire 
season in the North China plains. Weather in South China has been rated 
as normal. 

Consequently, on the basis of the above and other related data the 
1965 crop is placed at 2,490,000 tons from 4,795,000 acres, reflecting a 
slight decline in production from a slightly increased acreage, compared 
with 1964. 



-20- 



WORLD FLAXSEED PRODUCTION 
LARGEST IN 9 YEARS 



World production of flaxseed in 1965 is expected to reach the largest 
tonnage since 1956. The tentative estimate of 145 million bushels is 
10 percent above last year's reduced outturn and the 1955-59 average. 

The estimated 13 million-bushels increase from last year is attributed 
largely to the sharp expansion in the United States and in Canada, offset 
partially by reduced production in Argentina, Brazil, and Australia. 

This year North American countries have grown an estimated 18 million 
bushels of flaxseed more than they did last year. Production in the 
United States at 34.5 million bushels exceeds that of last year by more 
than 40 percent or 10 million bushels but is only slightly larger than the 
1955-59 average. Acreage for harvest declined 3 percent, but average 
yields at 12.6 bushels per acre are the highest on record. The often-dry 
Dakotas , which this year have produced almost 80 percent of the total 
crop, had generally adequate moisture this year and frost held off until 
late September. 

Canadian production at an estimated 28.0 million bushels exceeds 
last year's outturn by 38 percent or 8 million bushels. This is the 
second largest flaxseed crop in Canadian history, exceeded only by the 
35 million bushels produced in 1956. Acreage increased from last year 
by 13 percent, and the average yield per acre at 12.5 bushels is 2.2 
bushels above last year's yield. 

South American flaxseed crops to be harvested late this calendar 
year may be somewhat smaller than last year's relatively good outturn. 
Area seeded in the Argentine at 3.2 million acres reflected an expansion 
of 11 percent from that of the previous year. Early in the season lack 
of rain in some areas and very low temperatures over a long period in 
some areas necessitated resowing. However, normal growing conditions, 
in general, have prevailed of late and, should these conditions be 
maintained the remainder of the season, production may approximate 
30 million bushels. Nevertheless, the crop is not expected to reach 
last year's 32 million-bushel outturn when abandonment was below normal 
and average yields were above normal . 

The Ministry of Agriculture expects Brazil's production to be down 
to about 1.2 million bushels compared with 2,1 million last year, chiefly 
because of the recent rains in Rio Grande do Sul , where over 95 percent 
of the crop is grown. However, with favorable weather, particularly 
adequate rain, the remainder of the season, the outturn could exceed 
that figure. In Uruguay acreage seeded to flaxseed is believed to have 



-21- 



increased from last year as the Government Loan Program announced 
on April 30, by the Bank of the Republic, includes loans to farmers 
for seeding flaxseed. Consequently, the trade expects production 
to approach 3 million bushels or 150,000 more than last year's 
output . 

Flaxseed production in Europe is tentatively placed at 7.8 
million bushels, 1.1 million below that of last year but slightly 
above the 1955-59 average. While data for a number of countries, 
particularly those of Communist controlled Eastern Europe, are 
still incomplete, present indications are that production may have 
expanded significantly in Poland, the largest European producing 
country, but declined sharply in France, the second largest pro- 
ducing country. 

Annual production in the Soviet Union in recent years is now 
believed to have been 17 to 18 million bushels, and this year's 
outturn probably approximated that volume. 

Africa' s annual flaxseed production is around 3 million 
bushels. Most of this is grown in Ethiopia, but reliable data for 
that country's production are not available. This year's outturn 
in other countries, largely Morocco and the United Arab Republic, 
is estimated at about last year's level. 

Flaxseed production in Asia is up an estimated 10 percent from 
1964, largely the result of the expansion in India. At 16.9 million 
bushels, India's harvest early in 1965 was 12 percent above last 
year's reduced outturn. Favorable weather during seeding time, plus 
increased domestic demand and high prices for linseed and other 
vegetable oils, reportedly induced an expanded acreage. Flaxseed 
production also increased in Pakistan and Japan but declined in 
Turkey . 

Australia's above-average flaxseed production of the last 
2 years , which resulted from attractive guaranteed prices to pro- 
ducers , has provided that country with a supply nearly adequate to 
cover requirements for 2 years. Under the guaranteed price system 
the bulk of the supply had to be taken over by the crushers. The 
Linseed Crushers' Association, consequently, announced that it 
would accept contracts for only limited quantities from this year's 
crop and that the guaranteed price would be reduced. Crushers hope 
to keep alive the interest in flaxseed production despite the 
reduced allocation under contract. It is expected, however, that 
producers will be reluctant to grow flaxseed again under the "boom- 
and-bust" conditions of recent years. Rather, the majority is 
likely to go back to wheat growing. 



-22- 




n 



- 23 - 



FRENCH EXPORTS OF WHEAT 
AND FLOUR SET RECORD 



French exports of wheat and flour (grain equivalent) totaled 4.6 
million metric tons during fiscal year 1964-65 72 percent more than 
the 2.7 million tons during 1963-64. An increase in acreage and pro- 
duction of wheat during 1964 was a contributing factor in greater wheat 
exports . 

Exports of wheat as grain made up 86 percent of the total amount 
shipped. East Germany, Communist China, Italy, and Poland were the 
largest markets and accounted for 38 percent of the total amount of 
exports . 

Exports of French flour for 1964-65 totaled 641,000 tons and were 
34 percent higher than those of 1963-64. Most of the increase took 
place in larger shipments to Communist China, North Korea, Ceylon, and 
the United Arab Republic. Considerably smaller shipments than those of 
a year ago went to the USSR. 

Wheat and flour exports to the Western Hemisphere increased from 
85,000 tons in 1963-64 to 121,000 tons during 1964-65. All countries 
in this area, except Chile and Peru, took substantially increased 
quantities . 

Shipments of wheat and flour to the European countries totaled 2.6 
million tons compared with 2.0 million tons for the previous year. East- 
ern European exports were 1.3 million tons and accounted for half of the 
European total. The total exports to Western Europe were down 26 percent. 
Smaller shipments to Belgium- Luxembourg , West Germany, Austria, Denmark, 
and the United Kingdom accounted for most of the decline. However, this 
was partly offset by increased shipments to Italy, the Netherlands, 
Norway, Portugal, and Switzerland. 

Exports to the Asiatic countries during 1964-65 totaled 919,000 tons 
compared with 283,000 during the same period a year earlier. Substantial 
increases were noted in Communist China, Ceylon, and Syria. Shipments to 
North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Japan, Israel, and the Philippines 
totaled 342,000 tons compared to none last year. 

French exports to African countries totaled 982,000 tons nearly 
four times as high as the 256,000 tons shipped during 1963-64. Most of 
the African countries showed substantial increases. Shipments to Algeria, 
United Arab Republic, Tunisia, and Morocco totaled 625,000 tons compared 
with none during 1963-64. 

Production of wheat is forecast to reach a new record level during 
1965. With domestic consumption expected to be about the same as a year 
ago, 1965-66 exports are expected to continue to climb and exceed those 
of a year earlier. 



-24- 



WHEAT AND FLOT]R: French exports by country of destination, July-June 1963-64 and July-June 1964-65 



July '^T 1 J-jLT.e Eg 



Flour 

Jrair. 
Equlv.) 



Flour 
(Grain 
Equlv.) 



: Metric 

Western Hemisphere: ; 

West Indies 229 

French West Indies — 

Central America ■ — 

British Guiana : — 

French Guiana : 

Chile — 

Peru — 

Surinam ..........•..•■•••.•■•■•■■..■...<.....; — 

Venezuela •: — 

Total 22?_ 

Westera Europe: : 
EEC ; 

Belgium-Luxembourg 184,037 

Italy 105,610 

Netherlands 70,515 

West Germany 135.783 

Total 495.945 

Other Western Europe: : 

Andorra : — 

Austria : 53,491 

Brit. Terr, in Europe 2,870 

Cyprus : — 

Denmark 102,221 

Ireland 13,404 

Norway : 7,188 

Portugal 18,732 

Switzerland 123,493 

Dnlted Kingdom -■ -.- 

Total Si-: .°6: 

Eastern Europe: : 

Bulgaria 12,716 

Czechoslovakia 13,400 

East Germany 49,441 

Hungary 51,120 

Poland 354,481 

U.3.SJI — 

Total 481.158 

Total Europe v . j .E42.V' 

Asia: ; 
Sino Bloc ; 

China, Communist : 187,194 

Korea, North : — 

Vietnam, North — 

Total 1P7.134 

Other Asia: 

Aden : — 

Saudi Arabia : — 

Cambodia — 

Ceylon — 

Iran : — 

Japan : — 

Jordan , : — 

Israel : — 

Indonesia : — 

Philippines — 

Syria : — 

Malaysia • : — 

Others : — 

Total — 

Total Asia 187.194 

Africa: : 

Algeria .; — 

United Arab Republic — 

Libya — 

Tunisia. — 

Morocco — 

Sudan ; 8,064 

Senegal 139,381 

Cameroon — 

Congo (Brazza) : 6,950 

Ivory Coast ^ 11,410 

Malagassy Republic — 

Zanzibar' ........ .7.^• — 

Others 1 .428 

Total 167.23 

Oceania: 

unspecified ••< 

World Total : 2.198.219 

Equivalent. 1.000 bushels 1 80.771 



446 
24.719 



184,483 
105,610 
70,515 
160.502 



22,627 
335,067 
131,439 

86.077 



521 .110 



1,845 



4,357 
c: :■- 



13.052 



1,845 
53,491 
2,870 

102,221 
13,404 
7,9U 
18,732 

127,850 



r-z.--Z' 



9,849 
4,492 
21,220 
50,440 
83,893 
220,353 
252.575 



,20- 



12,716 
13,400 
49,441 
51,120 
354,481 



59,415 
18,756 

723,046 
81 ,863 

310,7.64 



34,311 



42^33 



221,505 
9.21? 



7,138 



2,784 
13,559 



5,671 

4,258 
14,226 

•s-'jqo 



52.087 



^■617 



7,138 



2,784 
13,559 



5,671 

'4,258 
14,226 
_i^20_ 



-:2.:~ 



282.811 



340,232 
55,897 



: ;-o,-2? 



18,483 



188,718 
27,334 



24,137 
46,413 



325.9CO 



4,354 



8,574 

13,704 
6,392 

18,156 
9,515 
2?.??7 



16,638 
139,381 
13,704 
13,342 
11,410 
18,156 
9,515 
29.765 



228,346 
71,487 

54,957 
149,201 

71 ,363 
157,571 

15,702 

5 

17-595 



102, 51 



73 
21.053 



2- .12; 



2,139 



3.389 



41 ,031 
15,150 



56.181 



3,466 
420 
4,835 
99,673 



2,934 
1,496 
9,197 
11,821 
7.066 



• - . • : 



197.039 



121,571 
4,864 



22,843 
2,179 
274 
2,142 
19,180 
42.668 



2.677.6Q2 



3.853.736 



640 .784 



, 4.594.520 



9S.387 



145. 273 



23.545 



168.81S 



- 25 - 



WORLD RICE CROP FORECAST 
IS BELOW 1964-65 RECORD 

World rice production in 1965-66 (August-July) excluding Communist China, North 
Korea, and North Vietnam, will be almost 3 percent below the 1964-65 record har- 
vest, according to the first forecast of the Foreign Agricultural Service. Output 
is expected to decrease appreciably in Asia and Europe, but new record crops are 
forecast for Africa, North America, and Australia. 

Rice acreage in 1965-66 is off slightly from a year ago. Yields per acre are 
above average, but less than the high level of last year, when crop conditions 
were unusually favorable. 

The preliminary forecast of production in 1965-66 is 164.1 million metric 
tons of rough rice compared with 168.8 million in 1964-65, and 164.8 million in 
1963-64. For 2 years, increased acreage and good weather have brought production 
up substantially from 1962-63, when 152 million tons were harvested. Average 
production in 1955-56/1959-60 was 132.8 million tons annually. 



Asia's estimated crop is forecast at least 3 percent below the 1964-65 record 
production. Poor monsoon rains in India have reduced yield prospects in several 
states, and production is expected to be below average. India produces a third of 
the Free World crop. Harvests of Pakistan and Indonesia will not be as large as 
last year's bumper crops. 

However, Japan and the Philippine Republic have good harvests, and the crops 
of Asian countries normally having surpluses for export—Thailand , Burma, and 
Cambodia--are forecast larger than in 1964-65. 

Africa is the only continent having an increase in rice acreage, and produc- 
tion is expected to increase about 5 percent. This is due mainly to additional 
acreage in Egypt, where a record crop is expected to moderately exceed the large 
1963 harvest. 



A new record crop is being harvested in North America. In the United States, 
the principal producer, acreage approximated the 1964 level. However, as the 
result of new record yields harvested per acre, U. S. production increased 
4 percent. 

Weather in Europe was unfavorable for rice production. Total acreage of both 
Western Europe and Eastern Europe declined 5 percent, and reduced yields per acre 
resulted in crops 8 percent below 1964 and about 15 percent less than the average. 
Production declined this year in all countries of Western Europe, except Spain. 

It is too early in the season to know the outcome of South America's 1966 
crops. Early indications point to a reduction in the acreage of Brazil and 
Argentina, but elsewhere acreage may be as large or larger than in 1964-65. Good 
crops are reported in Colombia, Surinam and Venezuela, which harvest rice in the 
latter part of the year. 

Australia expects to increase acreage again and a new record crop is forecast 
for the April-May 1966 harvest. 

Generally good crops are expected in most of the world's exporting countries, 
but it is doubtful if the surplus available for export in Free World countries, 
after meeting domestic requirements, will meet the volume of 1965. 

-26- 



WORLD CORN CROP 
FORECAST AT RECORD LEVEL 



World corn production in 1965 will be a record 8,150 million 
bushels , according to preliminary estimates of the Foreign Agricul- 
tural Service. This is 5 percent above the 1964 crop level and about 
1 percent higher than the previous alltime high, of 1963. 

A 16 percent increase in the U. S. outturn is the principal 
change, with Soviet Union production estimated at a substantially 
lower level than that of the previous year. 

Combining the corn forecast with earlier anticipations for 
barley and oats, a total outturn of 340 million metric tons of these 
three feed grains is indicated. This is 2 percent larger than the 
1964 total and just above the 339 million tons record of 1963. 

North America' s corn production is estimated at 4,535 million 
bushels , 15 percent higher than in the previous year and 85 million 
bushels above the 1963 alltime high level. U. S. production is 
estimated at a record 4,128 million bushels, up 579 million bushels 
from last year and 1 percent above the previous peak crop of 2 years 
ago. U. S. yields were at a record of 72.1 bushels per acre. Mexico 
and Canada both improved on their past largest output, of 1964, with 
gains of 3 percent and 13 percent respectively. 

The corn crop in Western Europe is an estimated 9 percent higher 
than in 1964. Production increased 60 percent in France but declined 
10 percent in Spain and 38 percent in Portugal. 

Preliminary estimates indicate smaller output in Eastern Europe , 
with Yugoslav down 15 percent and Rumanian and Bulgarian also smaller 
than a year earlier. 

Corn production in the Soviet Union is forecast approximately 
20 percent lower than in 1964, with acreage substantially reduced. 

Asia' s output is estimated moderately larger than in 1964. 
Indonesia has a considerably larger crop; that of India is somewhat 
smaller . 

The outlook is good for increased production in Africa , although 
it is early to estimate the outturn in the Southern Hemisphere where 
some of the principal producers are located. 

South America's corn production may well be lower unless Brazil 
is able to equal the exceptionally large crop of 1964. 



-27- 



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20250 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

U. «. DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE 



Official Business 



NOTICE 



If you no longer need this publication, 



mailing list. 

If yomr address should be changed, print 
or type the new address on this sheet 
and return the whole sheet tot 

foreign Agricultural Service, Rm. 5918 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D.C 20250. 




WORLD AGRICULTURAL 
PRODUCTION AND TRADE 

V ^,:,, > Statistical Report 




CONTENTS 
DECEMBER 1965 



ftr £. BUT, OF HSRICUtHIBf 

JAN 17 

PB8EII SEMAL lEWft^ 
Page 



WORLD SUMMARIES 



Production 

Tobacco Production Down Slightly 3 

Record World Hops Crop 11 

1965-66 Coffee Crop Still Larger 13 

Potato Production Lower in 1965 19 

Mediterranean Olive Oil Output To Ri6e in 1965-66... 19 

Castorbean Production Second Largest of Record 23 

Wool Production Down 3 Percent in 1965 26 

Breadgrain Crop at Near Record Level 29 

Rapeseed Production at Alltime High 41 

Trade 

World Trade in Cotton Declines in 1964-65 8 

World Pepper Trade 43 

COUNTRY SUMMARIES: 

Australia's Barley and Oats Exports Slightly Higher. 13 
Argentine Grain Exports High in Julv-September. . . . . . 17 

U.S. Rice Exports Down in 1964-65 35 

U.S. Exports of Wheat and Flour Show 15 Percent Gain 37 
Australian Wheat and Flour Exports Decline 37 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE 




NEN PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO U.S. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE 

Single copies free to persons in the United States 
fro™ the Foreign Agricultural Service 
U.S. Deportment of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250, Rn. 5918 <=outh, Du-8-2445 



FOREIGN AGRICULTURE CIRCULARS 

FC 16-65 ''orld Cotton Supply and Denand Situation and Outlook 
FC 17-65 l.'orld Cotton Trade Flay Increase in 1965-66 

FC 18-65 Status of Cotton Purchase Authorizations Under Titles I and IV, 
Public Lav 480 

FP 3-65 'orld Rice Crop Forecast is Pelow 1964-65 Record 
FDP 9-65 U.S. Bean Exnorts Continue to Fluctuate 
FFVS 12-65 Grass and Legume Seeds 

FCB 4-65 Near Record '.'orld Cocoa Bean Crop Expected--! 'orld Trade to Increase 
FS 6-65 New Sugar Legislation Extends the Present Act Throurh 1971 
FS 7-65 Larce 1965-66 World Su^ar Crop Forecast 
REPORTS 

FAS r i-l 68 THE BEEF EXPORT TRADE OF CENTRAL AMERICA. November 1965, 12 pp. 

In the past 7 years, Central American countries have increased 
beef production about 70 million pounds; most of this f*ain has 
reached the United States, some as lover-grade meat. 



WORLD TOBACCO PRODUCTION 
DOWN SLIGHTLY 



The I965 world tobacco harvest is placed at 9,879 million pounds — 
down 3.7 percent from the 196^ record high despite a small increase in 
planted area. Yields of oriental tobacco in Eastern European countries 
were adversely affected by unfavorable weather conditions, which also 
reduced final outturns in Japan, Australia, and the Republic of South 
Africa. 

Smaller harvests in such important producing countries as the 
United States, Rhodesia, Greece, Turkey and the Philippines resulted 
mainly from reduced plantings. In some major producing countries, 
however, including Brazil, Colombia, Thailand, Pakistan, South Korea, 
and Mexico larger plantings plus generally favorable weather conditions 
resulted in record or near-record harvests. 

The I965 world tobacco crop is of sufficient size to provide more 
than ample supplies to meet world demand plus some additional stock 
buildup. This is true not only for the light cigarette types (flue- 
cured, oriental, burley) large stocks of which are available from 
previous harvests in producing and importing countries, but also for 
the dark types utilized mainly in production of cigars and dark-type 
cigarettes. 

Blue-mold damage in I965 was negligible, except for Australia, 
Poland, Hungary, Italy, and Spain. 

Production by Continent and Area 

All continents produced less tobacco in I965 than in 196k } except 
South America, where both larger plantings and favorable weather resulted 
in an increase in the final outturn. 

North America : Reduced plantings in the United States resulted in a 
smaller harvest and offset larger crops in practically all other coun- 
tries in the area. Area production totaled 2,^02 million pounds and 
was down 9«^ percent from the 1964 figure of 2,651 million. 

South America : Increased plantings in conjunction with favorable weather 
resulted in record crops for Brazil, Colombia, and a near-record harvest 
in Venezuela. Continued dry weather during the growing season somewhat 
reduced yields in Argentina and Uruguay. Production for the area at 
713 million pounds was only slightly under the I963 hig& of 22$- million. 

Europe : Both smaller plantings and adverse weather reduced the harvest 
in Western Europe this season. Most of the reduction in acreage occurred 
in oriental types grown in Greece. Planted acreages of all types of leaf 
tobaccos were increased in the Eastern European (including the USSR) 
countries this season but adverse weather reduced final outturns in 



-3- 



practically all of those countries. The smaller harvest of oriental 
leaf in Yugoslavia was due mainly to the 15 percent cut in plantings. 
Total area production for Europe (including USSR) was 1,906 million 
pounds, compared with 2,069 million last year. Oriental leaf accounted 
for almost 85 percent of the decline. 



Africa : Reduced plantings of flue-cured tobaccos in Rhodesia and 
Zambia resulting from an agreed cutback due to the disastrously low 
prices received for the record 196^ crop accounted for most of the 
decline in this area's production. In 1965, it totaled $16 million 
pounds --down 8 percent from the 196^ figure of 562 million. Also, 
drought reduced yields in the Republic of South Africa. 

Asia : Area production totaled U,310 million pounds — slightly under 
the 196^ harvest of ^-,37° million. Smaller crops in Turkey, the 
Philippines and Japan more than offset record harvests in Pakistan, 
Thailand, Taiwan, South Korea and Iran. Both India and Mainland China 
had larger crops than in 196^ with the latter country's harvest 
believed to be exceeded only by the 1959 high. 

Oceania : Both smaller plantings and adverse weather reduced this area's 
production from the 196^- figure of ^3»5 million pounds to 32.6 million 
this season. 



Production by Kind 

A smaller world harvest of flue-cured, oriental, and other light 
air-cured (including Maryland) types more than offset increases recorded 
in the production of the other kinds of leaf tobacco. 

The 1965 world harvest of flue-cured tobaccos, at 3>531 million 
pounds, was down 7 percent from the 196^ high of 3>797 million but 
still the second largest on record. A crop of this magnitude is still 
in excess of world requirements which resulted in additional gain in 
stocks and world exports for this kind of tobacco. 



Smaller flue -cured crops harvested in the United States, Rhodesia, 
India, and Zambia, among the principal exporters of this kind of leaf, 
more than offset record harvests in Brazil, Thailand, Taiwan, Pakistan, 
Tanzania, and Mainland China. Unofficial rep^^s indicate that Mainland 
China may once again enter the export market. Other countries also are 
making strenuous efforts to produce additional quantities for export. 



Production of burley tobaccos, at 822 million pounds, was slightly greater 
than the 8l6 million produced in I96I+. The increase this season was produced 
in countries that export practically their entire crops — Rhodesia, Zambia, 
Greece, and Malawi. Also, the larger harvests in Italy, Brazil, and South 
Korea means larger supplies available for export in direct competition with U.S. 
leaf. This may be offset somewhat by smaller crops in Japan, Canada, and Mexico. 

Both smaller plantings and adverse weather reduced the I965 world harvest 
of oriental tobaccos which totaled 1,5^-9 million pounds, second only to the 
I96I+ high of 1,802 million. The I965 harvest was still in excess of world 
requirements. Stocks in both producing and importing countries will set new 
highs. Producing countries will intensify efforts to increase exports through 
bilateral trading agreements. 

The I965 harvest of dark tobaccos, particularly the cigar types, rose 
significantly from the previous year. The reports on SnolcirJjS an< ^ health and 
the U.S. embargo against further imports of Cuban leaf in early 1962 has caused 
many countries to expand the production of this kind of leaf tobacco as rapidly 
as possible. Production in I965 for export was slightly in excess of annual 
requirements which will result in a buildup of these kinds of tobaccos. With 
cigarette sales rising again, any further increases in production of cigar 
types may result in further stock accumulation. 



LEAF TOBACCO: World production by kinds, average 1955-59, 
annual 1963-1965* farm sales weight 1/ 





Average \ 








Kinds ° - 




1963 2/ j 


196I4- 2/ ; 


1965 2/ 




1955-59 : 






1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 




2,918,985 


3,375,901 


3,796,975 


3,530,887 




597^00 


93^,605 


8l6,U76 


821,518 


Other light : 












101,^91 


79,635 


99 


96,031+ 




801,557 


762, 1U6 


756,182 


799,968 


Oriental and semi -oriental . : 


1,106,362 


1,389,768 


1,801,507 


1,5^8,627 




1,996,588 


1,96^,597 


1,973,759 


2,002,699 




856,087 


9^,635 


871,287 


926,386 




lto,639 


153,657 


11+1,127 


153,071 




8,519,109 


9,601+,91+U 


10,256,727 


9,879,190 



~Tf Farm sales weight is about 10 percent above dry weight normally reported 

in trade statistics. 
2/ Preliminary; subject to revision. 



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- 7 - 



WORLD TRADE IN COTTON 
DECLINES IN 196^-65 



World trade in cotton was estimated at 16.7 million bales in 196^-65 
(August-July) . This represents a decline of about 7 percent from the all- 
time record of 18.0 million bales exported in the preceding year. U.S. ex- 
ports in I96U-65 declined more than the total as foreign countries increased 
their shipments. The lower level of world cotton trade in 196^-65 is 
attributed mainly to a general reduction in raw cotton stocks in importing 
countries during that season. Moreover, a few major consuming countries in 
Western Europe used less cotton in 196^-65 than a year earlier. Prospects 
for the current season indicate a slight increase in world cotton trade. 
Consumption is expected to continue at a relatively high level in importing 
countries; and in most of those countries, there is little margin for 
further reduction in raw cotton stocks. 

Exports - World cotton exports in 196^-65 were estimated at 16.7 mil- 
lion bales, compared with 18.0 million in 1963-6^ and 16.7 million for the 
most recent five seasons. Exports from foreign non-Bloc countries were 
placed at 10.8 million bales in I96U-65, an increase of 0.3 million from 
the preceding season and second only to 1962-63 when 11.0 million bales 
were shipped. In Mexico, U.A.R., Syria, and Turkey exports in 196^-65 
exceeded the preceding year's level by 10 percent or more. Shipments were 
also higher in Central America and in many countries of Africa in 196^-65. 
Among the foreign non-Bloc countries where exports were substantially 
smaller in 196^-65 than a year earlier were Sudan, Pakistan and Greece. 

The United States exported ^-.2 million bales of cotton in 196^-65, or 
only about three-fourths of the amount shipped in 1963-6^. Among the 
factors contributing to the sharp decline were (a) increased cotton supplies 
in foreign exporting countries, (b) a sharp reduction in raw cotton stocks 
by importing countries, and (c) a lower level of mill consumption in a few 
major importing countries of Western Europe. 

Exports from the USSR, the only major cotton exporting country of the 
Communist world, are estimated at 1.8 million bales, compared with 1.7 mil- 
lion bales in 1963-6^. 

Imports - As a group, Western European countries continued to be the 
largest import market for cotton, and in 196^-65 accounted for 38 percent 
of the estimated world total of 17.1 million bales. France, West Germany, 
Italy, and the United Kingdom — the four largest markets in Western Europe-- 
imported about k.2 million bales of cotton in 196^-65. Around one -fourth 
of this amount was purchased from the United States. 

Asian countries also accounted for about 38 percent of the total world 
cotton imports in 196^-65. Principal non-Bloc importers in Asia were Japan, 
India, and Hong Kong. Those three countries imported about k.6 million 
bales during the 196^-65 season, nearly one -third of which was from the 
United States. Japan alone imported more than a million bales from the 
United States in 196^-65 to remain, by far, this country's best cotton 
customer. 

-8- 



COTTON: International trade, average 1955-59, annual 1962-64, 
Year beginning August 1 

(1,000 bales of 480 pounds net) 



Country 



: Average 


1955-5y 


: 1962 


: 1963 


1964 1/ 


Exports 


: Imports 


: Exports 


: Imports 


: Exports 


: Imports 


: Exports 


Imports 




: 351 


! 0 




331 


: 0 


: 466 


: 0 


420 




: 0 


, 292 




0 


304 


• 0 


■ 255 


o 


A A 




221 




0 


• 269 


i 0 


i 283 


: 0 




i i 


: 1,897 




1 


: 1,426 


: 1 


1,616 


: 1 




: 0 


: 288 




0 


• 402 


: 0 


: 525 


0 




; 138 


: 3,429 




137 


: 5,775 


: 135 


: 4 , 1 95 


! 118 




14 


29 




10 


36 


10 


55 


11 




504 


6,156 


479 


: 8,212 


612 


: 6,929 


550 


: 
: 

26 


14 


216 




23 


! 100 


• 33 


1 


73 


0 


4 


0 




6 


: 0 


6 




6 


418 


0 


1, 145 




0 


1, 023 


i o 


1, 050 


i o 


0 


78 


0 




118 


0 


• 120 


0 


135 


: 6 


42 


115 




2 


: 54 


: 19 


60 


6 


0 


1 


0 




7 


0 


10 


i o 


5 


32 


o 


32 




0 


! 47 


: 0 


41 


: o 


441 


0 


590 




0 


510 


0 


468 


0 


0 


37 


0 




15 


• 0 


: 34 


0 


35 


0 


7 


0 




14 


0 


36 


: 0 


30 


: 0 


2 


0 




0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


s 

: 923 


185 


2, 098 


185 


1, 734 


258 


1, 620 


290 


* 

: 0 


115 


0 




106 


i 0 


117 


0 


121 


: 0 


422 


0 




359 


0 


369 


0 


350 


: 0 


39 


0 




40 


0 


38 


0 


44 


< 0 


72 


0 




76 


0 


72 


0 


74 


0 , 


1, 316 


0 




1,282 


0 


1, 335 


0 


1, 084 


0 


1,448 


0 




1,297 


0 


1,450 


0 


1, 293 


160 


10 


238 




9 


263 


10 


167 


46 


: 0 


17 


0 




26 


0 


25 


0 


25 


0 : 


867 ; 


0 




1,063 


0 


1, 103 


0 


850 


: 0 ; 


349 : 


0 




351 


0 


393 


0 


359 


: 0 , 


21 


0 




20 


0 


21 


0 


22 


0 : 


218 ■ 


o 




355 


o 


322 


Q 


433 


0 


253 


100 




6 


60 


60 


20 


137 


0 


128 . 


0 




95 


o 


98 


o 


81 


0 ■ 


188 


0 




186 


o 


208 


o 


195 


0 • 


1,442 


o 




1,017 


o 


1, 223 


o 


960 


0 ■ 


183 


o 




360 


o 


350 


o 


380 


: 160 j 


7,088 ; 


338 


6,648 


323 


7, 194 


187 


6,454 


: 5 : 


4 : 


4 • 




1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


: 0 : 


90 


0 




190 


0 


200 


0 


190 


: 0 : 


34 : 


0 




45 . 


0 


50 


0 


55 


: 0 : 


411 : 


0 




500 


0 


450 


0 


550 


: 0 : 


434 : 


0 




465 


0 


475 


0 : 


450 


: 0 : 


226 : 


(1 

U « 




270 


0 


285 


0 


300 


: 0 • 


481 . 


0 i 




505 . 


0 


647 


0 


671 


: 0 : 


201 : 


0 : 




325 


0 


300 


0 


300 


: o . 


42 : 


0 




69 


0 


69 


0 . 


52 


: 5 : 


1.923 : 


4 : 


2-370 


6 


2.477 


6. 


2.569 


: 1 > 540 : 


600 


1,500 ; 


750 


1,700 


700 


1,800 


600 



North America: 

Canada 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Mex ico 

Nicaragua 

United States 

Others 

Total 

South America: 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Peru. 

Uruguay. 

Venezuela 

Others 

Total. 

Europe : 

Austria 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany, West 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland. 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Total Western Europe. 

Albania 2/ 

Bulgaria 2/ 

Cuba 2/ 

Czechoslovakia 2/ 

Germany, East 27 

Hungary 2/ 

Poland 

Rumania 7.1... 

Others. .7 

Total Eastern Europe. 

U.S.S.R. (Europe & Asia) 2/: 



(Continued) 



- 9 - 



COTTON: International trade, average 1955-59, annual 1962-64 -- cont'd. 
Year beginning August 1 



(1,000 bales of 480 pounds net) 





Average 


1955-59 


1962 


1963 


1964 1/ 


Country • 


Exports 


Imports 


Exports 


TmpoT* tS 


Expor ts 


Imp or ts 


Exp ox ts 


Tnmnf t* a 

S.3H I J \J S. L.B 


Africa: : 




















30 


0 




U 


9 0 
Z Z 


U 


15 


0 




446 


0 


J y\J 


r\ 
u 


DZU 


n 

KJ 


_>y_> 


0 




199 


0 


ZO 


n 
u 




n 

U 


10 


0 




3/ 


15 


o 


20 


n 
u 


?n 
£v 


t\ 

u 


ZD 




T, 366 


0 


1, 361 


0 


1, 372 


0 


1, 558 


0 




7 




17 


17 


19 


14 


30 


25 




141 


0 




0 


115 


0 


168 


0 


N ig er ia •••••••*..••.•»••* 


146 


o 


141 


0 


145 


0 


120 


0 


South Africa, Republic of; 


5 


46 


7 


108 


2 


95 


10 


100 




508 


0 


787 


0 


720 


0 


475 


e 




43 


0 


93 


0 


115 


0 


125 


o 




188 


13 


178 


8 


235 


8 


227 


39 




3,079 


85 


3,214 


153 


3.297 


137 


3,333 


189 


















Asia and Oceania: : 




















39 


0 


69 


0 


100 


0 


125 


o 




0 


89 


0 


93 


o 


116 


o 


110 




58 


2 


70 


10 


36 


0 


60 


o 




0 


3 


0 


7 


o 




0 


7 




180 


310 


o 


350 


40 


800 


40 


/ \J u 




0 


159 


o 


247 


0 


294 


0 


288 




0 


313 


o 


554 




627 


0 


^AQ 




309 


498 


287 


746 


231 




zuu 


f.7 




0 


39 


o 


46 


0 




u 






187 


0 


220 


0 


326 


0 


^ ?n 






25 


3/ 


9 


Q 


j 


0 


c 
j 






3/ 


23 


15 


?Q 
£y 




A 7 








0 


2, 702 


o 


3 070 


0 


3 167 


0 


T Al A 
HID 




0 


206 


o 


^9A 


n 
U 


Z / U 


U 


zou 




7 


21 


15 


35 


8 


23 


0 


25 




464 


10 


683 


9 


689 


4 


485 


: 9 




0 


68 


0 


164 


0 


170 


0 


: 120 




383 


0 


614 


0 


608 


0 


726 


: 0 




3/ 


5 


0 


42 


0 


44 


0 


: 80 




246 


0 


568 


0 


587 


0 


773 


0 




33 


15 


45 


54 


43 


85 


40 


74 




1^931 


4,463 


2,595 


5,, 780 


2,683 


6,257 


2.787 


i 6,436 




14, 912 


14,848 


15, 905 


16,365 


17,955 


17,635 


16,662 


. 17,088 


















Non-Bloc . . . . . : 


13,187 


12,015 


14,401 


12,895 


16,209 


13,658 


14,816 


13,219 


Sino Soviet Bloc 4/...: 


1, 725 


2,833 


1,504 


3,470 


1,746 


3,977 


1,846 


3.869 



1/ Preliminary and partly estimated. 

2/ Compiled from statistics of exporting countries. 

3/ Less than 500 bales. 

4/ Eastern Europe, U.S.S.R., Mainland China, Cuba, North Korea, and North Vietnam. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign governments, other 
foreign source material, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research, 
and related information. 



- 10 - 



Sino-Soviet Bloc countries imported an estimated 3.9 million bales of 
cotton in 196^-65, compared with 4.0 million in I963-6U. Purchases by USSR 
and Mainland China as well as some other Communist countries were slightly 
lower than a year earlier. Net imports by those countries totaled about 
2.0 million bales, compared with 2.3 million in I963-6U. 

Outlook for 1965-66 - World cotton exports during 1965-66 are currently 
forecast at 17.3 million bales, up 0.6 million from last season. The 
expected increase in trade this season is based on a continued high level 
of consumption in net importing countries. The low stock level in those 
countries will require that imports be at least on a replacement basis 
during the season. Larger exportable supplies in foreign producing coun- 
tries in 1965-66 will likely keep the United States from sharing in the 
increased world trade in cotton. United States exports are now estimated 
at k.O million running bales, a level slightly below 196^-65 shipments. 
Exports from the USSR in 1965-66 could exceed last year's level as reports 
from that country indicate another record crop. 

RECORD WORLD 
HOPS CROP 

Continuing trends toward larger acreage and higher yields, I965 world 
hops production is estimated at a record 212. k million pounds from 175,800 
acres — an average of 1,208 pounds per acre. The 196^ crop is now set at 
205.6 million pounds from 17^,000 acres. This is an upward revision from 
past estimates and reflects larger crops in the USSR and eastern Europe 
than previously reported. Nearly all of the I965 acreage increase occurred 
in West Germany where the area under hops rose 9 percent. Since these 
first year plantings produce only lightly, the big increase in the German 
crop should take place next year. 

A cool wet summer reduced yields in all of western Europe except 
the United Kingdom where yields rose in spite of poor weather. The 
weather also delayed harvest by 10 days - 2 weeks but did not generally 
appear to reduce quality. The wet weather also contributed to an abnormally 
high disease hazard and spraying programs had to be stepped up accordingly. 

World beer production during 196^-65 is estimated at about U36 million 
barrels (31 gallons each), up 7 percent from the h08 million level of 
1963-6^-. Assuming a world hopping rate of .U5 pounds per barrel and con- 
tinued expansion of world beer production at the present rate, world 
requirements of 1965 crop hops should be about 210 million pounds. If cur- 
rent estimates prove correct, this would allow a slight rebuilding of 
stocks. 

The European hops market remains relatively strong in spite of the 
record crop. The majority of the crop (80 percent in West Germany) was 
sold prior to harvest. This and the rapid growth in European demand for 
hops accounts for the strength in that market. In the United States, the 
spot market is weak but the market for future crops is stronger than a 
year ago. 



-11- 



HOPS: Production in specified countries, 
average 1955-59, annual 1962-65 l/ 



Country ' 

• 


Average : 
1955-59 : 


1962 " 


106"? • 


Revised 
1964 


Preliminary 
: 1965 


• 
• 


1 000 


1 000 


1 000 

X y \J\J\J 


1 000 

X y WW 


1 000 

X y \J\J\J 


• 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


• 


1,375 


1,1*56 


1,455 


1,523 


1,436 




43,58l 


44,231 


51,422 


53,378 


55,451 


■ 


221 


305 


274 


269 


209 


• 


123 


265 


342 


331 


320 






P 7ll1 




j, i°j 


J , *JOVJ 




4,398 


3,485 


5,104 


5,351 


4,630 




33,960 


33,977 


39,808 


40,456 


42,400 




728 


1,823 


2,576 


2,927 


3,197 




27,663 


29,883 


30,955 


28,269 


29,098 


• 


H 


794 


i,oi4 


1,300 


1,323 




12,491 


15,642 


19,859 


15,186 


16,314 




1,524 


3,250 


5,852 


5,795 


5,842 




P7^ 


QOQ 




i nfto 


1 1 OP 

X y J-SJC 




2,827 


4,641 


5,710 


6,724 


7,716 




ft ftP 


7Pft 


7Qk 


1 PI "3 


1 PI 7. 




6,332 


11,574 


10,406 


13,470 


12,346 


• 


10,108 


13,200 


13,200 


15,400 


15,400 


• 

South Africa, Republic of...: 


25U 


159 


201 


133 


153 


Totiom . 




3,o±o 


4, 3yd 




o,<= fo 




3,670 


3,689 


3,767 


2,224 


2,894 




1,059 


888 


664 


662 


1,036 




146 


138 


145 


141 


141 




156,675 


177,394 


202,113 


205,651 


212,357 



1/ Production shown by calendar year of harvest for both Northern and Southern Hemispheres. 
2/ Hot available. 
3/ 1959 only. 

4/ Includes Mexico, Switzerland and Sweden. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics 
of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural 
Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research, and related information. 



- 12 - 



1965-66 COFFEE CROP 
STILL LARGER 



The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) now estimates that the 1965-66 
world coffee crop will total "jQ, 2 million bags, of which 63.^ million hags 
will he exportable production. This is about 2 percent above FAS's 
October estimate. The 1965-66 crop is thus approaching the record crop of 
78.9 million bags in 1959-60, and possibly could surpass it. The small 
I96U-65 crop was estimated to be 51«7 million bags, of which 37*1 million 
was exportable. 

The 1965-66 crop in North America is even higher than previously 
estimated, principally due to larger crops in Costa Rica and Guatemala. 
December estimates are also up in El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, and 
Nicaragua, although production in the latter country is still below the 
previous year's. Overall production in North America is 12 percent above 
I96U-65 crop. 

The 1965-66 estimates for total and exportable production in South 
America are hh.J and 35 million bags, respectively. This is up slightly 
from the September estimate, chiefly due to an increased estimate for 
Brazil where the crop is now set at 3^-0 million bags. Some sources 
believe this might go even higher. In 196^-65 total output in South 
America was set at only 20.7 million bags, including 11.6 million 
exportable. 

African production continues to increase and is now expected to total 
17.9 million bags, as compared with 16.2 million in I96U-65. The respective 
figures for exportable production are 17.1 million, as compared with 15.^ 
million a year earlier. The biggest increase came in the Ivory Coast, 
Africa's largest coffee producer and the third-largest in the world. 

In light of the fact that export quotas under the International 
Coffee Agreement now total 4 5 million bags, and considering that coffee 
which moves outside the Agreement, it now appears that world coffee stocks 
will increase some 13 to Ik million bags in 1965-66. Most of this stock 
increase will be in the producing countries. 

AUSTRALIA'S BARLEY AND OATS 
EXPORTS SLIGHTLY HIGHER 

Australia's exports of barley and oats in I96I+- 65, at 718 million 
metric tons, showed a gain of 2 percent over exports of 1963-6U. At the 
same time, barley exports declined 13 percent, while those of oats gained 
by 21 percent. Fifty-two percent of the 196^-65 shipments went to 
European destinations and 3^ percent to Asia. 

Combined barley and oats exports to Europe declined 8 percent; barley 
was 31 percent lower and oats were up 2h percent. Shipments to the Common 
Market were 9 percent higher, with both grains gaining similarly. Receipts 
by the United Kingdom were off sharply because of reduced barley purchases. 



-13- 



GREEN COFFEE: World exportable production for the marketing year 1965-66, with comparisons l/ 



Continent and country- 



Average 

1955/56- 

I959/6O 



1962-63 



1963 -6k 



196U-65 



3rd 
estimate 
1965-66 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama •••• 

Trinidad & Tobago . 
Other V 



1,000 
bags 2/ 



658 
207 
1+21 
1,327 
1,158 
1+35 
262 
1,369 
33** 
10 
37 
171 



3/ 



Total North America 



South America: 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other 5/ 

Total South America 



6,389 



23,360 
6,550 
k22 
251 
1+72 
kk 



31,099 



Africa: : 

Angola : 1, 1+27 

Burundi 6/ : 7/ 

Cameroon 8/ : 396 

Central African Republic : 3/ 37 

Congo (Leopoldville) : l,l6k 

Ethiopia : 850 

Guinea : 9/ 105 

Ivory Coast : 2,063 

Kenya : 399 

Malagasy Republic : 812 

Rwanda 6/ : jf 

Tanzania 10/ : 369 

Togo : 121 

Uganda : 1, k'yk 

Other 11/ : 308 



Total Africa 



9,505 



Asia and Oceania: 

India 

Indonesia 

Philippines 

Yemen 

Other 12/ 

Total Asia and Oceania 



223 
1,120 

l'k 

63 



1,1(80 



World exportable production 



kQ,k!3 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

930 
50 
1+20 
1,51*0 
1,700 
1+25 
335 
1,250 
1+60 
19 
53 
122 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

970 

5k0 
1,885 
1,580 
365 
320 
1,855 
1+05 
26 
68 

55 



1,000 
bags 2/ 

685 

525 
1,880 
1,390 
385 
365 
1,630 
525 
25 
65 
59 



1,10k 



8,069 



7,53** 



20,000 
6,500 
630 
605 
370 
73 



21,200 
7,200 
525 
63O 
395 
77 



3,000 
6,900 
715 
670 
290 
72. 



28,178 



30,027 



11,61+7 



3,050 
105 
805 
100 

1,050 
1,150 

200 
3,300 
615 
900 
80 
^55 
175 
2,930 
367 



2,750 
21+5 
775 
205 

1,050 

1,250 
160 

4,300 
720 
735 
lltO 

530 
225 
2,885 
39 6 



3,11*5 
195 
870 
11*5 
750 

1,200 
155 

3,450 
655 
950 
150 
560 
195 

2,585 
398 



15,282 



16, 366 



15,1*03 



365 
2,080 

72 
135 



620 
1,600 

70 
139 



1+60 
1,850 

80 

114-7 



2,652 



2,1+29 



2,537 



53,^16 



56,891 



37,121 



1/ The coffee marketing season begins during the second half of the calendar year starting in some 
countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. Exportable production 
represents total production minus consumption, except for Brazil prior to 1959-60 which was based on 
"registrations" of current crop minus port consumption and coastwise shipments. 2/ 132.276 pounds 
each. 3/ 2-year average, k/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico. 5/ Includes 
BoliviaJ British Guiana, Paraguay and Surinam. 6/ Prior to 1962-63, was shown as Ruanda -Urundi. 
7/ Shown in Congo (Leopoldville) prior to 1959-60. Combined exports for Rwanda and Burundi in 1959-60 
totaled l60,000 bags. 8/ Beginning with I96I-62 includes West Cameroon. Prior to 1961-62 this area 
was identified as Southern Cameroon and its production was included with Nigeria. 9/ 3-year average, 
lo/ Prior to I96I+-65 year was shown as Tanganyika. Now includes Zanzibar as well. 11/ Includes Cape 
Verde, Comoro Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Congo (Brazzaville), Sao Tome and 
Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 12 / Includes Malaysia, New Caledonia, New Hebrides, 
Papua and New G uine a, Portuguese Timor and Vietnam. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related Information. 



- 14 - 



GREEN COFFEE: World total production for the marketing year 1965-66, with comparisons l/ 



Average 

1955/56- 

1959/60 


: 1962-63 


1963-61+ 


1961+-65 


3rd 
estimate 
1965-66 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


1,000 
bags 2/ 


713 
51+9 

1,1*36 
1,357 
600 
321 
1,716 
376 
3/ 27 
1* 
1+27 


1,050 
650 
570 
1,650 
1,900 
590 

1+10 

2,200 
505 
73 
60 
1+16 


1,100 
1+75 
690 

2,000 
1,790 
530 
395 
2,855 
1+50 
80 
75 
311* 


825 
600 

675 

2,000 
1,600 
550 
1+1+5 

2,680 

575 
85 
75 

325 


1,000 
1+75 
700 

2,100 

2,000 
585 
1+90 

2,950 
550 
90 
70 
3^5 


8, 300 


10,071+ 


10,75^ 


10,1+35 


11,355 


28, 300 
7,360 
521 
321+ 
835 
63 


27,000 
7,500 
800 
770 
850 
12i+ 


28,200 
8,200 
700 
815 
890 
128 


10,000 

8,000 

900 

870 
800 
128 


3i+,ooo 
8,000 
900 
880 
825 
128 


37, ^3 


37,0l+l+ 


38,933 


20, 698 


W,733 



Continent and country- 



North America: 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . . . 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Trinidad & Tobago 

Other k/ 

Total North America 



South America: 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other 5/ 

Total South America 



Africa: : 

Angola : 

Burundi 6/ : 

Cameroon 8/ : 

Central African Republic s 3/ 

Congo (Leopoldville) : 

Ethiopia : 

Guinea : ?/ 

Ivory Coast ....: 

Kenya : 

Malagasy Republic .: 

Rwanda 6/ : 

Tanzania 10/ •••••••••••.••••••••.••••: 

Togo ....77 

Uganda . : 

Other 11/ 

Total Africa 



1,1*3 
7/ 
1+05 
1+1 

1,195 

1,100 
lli+ 

2,130 
1+15 
902 

2/ 
375 
122 
1,508 
332 



Asia and Oceania: 

India 

Indonesia ..... 
Philippines . . . 

Yemen 

Other 12/ 



Total Asia and Oceania 



World total production 



3,100 
110 
825 
105 

1,100 

1,1+90 
215 

3,350 
635 

1,000 

85 

1+70 
177 
2,91*5 

1+00 



2,800 
250 
800 

210 
1,100 
1,600 
175 
^,350 
7*+0 
835 
H*5 
5^5 
230 
2,900 
1+29 



3,200 
200 
900 
150 
800 

1,550 
170 

3,500 
675 

1,050 
155 
575 

200 

2,600 



; 10,082 


16,007 


17,109 


16,157 


17,891+ 


712 


1,020 


1,21+0 


1,100 


1,090 


: 1,3^3 


2,330 


1,900 


2,200 


2,000 


: 199 


550 


655 


710 


725 


88 


82 


80 


90 


100 


! 179 


280 


319 


337 


337 


j 2,521 


l+,262 


l+,19l+ 


M37 


l+,252 


: 58,306 


67,387 


70,990 


51,727 


78,231* 



countries like Brazil as early as July 1 and in other countries about October 1. Exportable production 
represents total production minus consumption, except for Brazil prior to 1959-60 which was based on 
"registrations" of current crop minus port consumption and coastwise shipments. 2/ 132.276 pounds 
each. 3/ 2-year average. 1+/ Includes Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico. 5/ Includes 
Bolivla7 British Guiana, Paraguay and Surinam. 6/ Prior to I962-63, was shown as Ruanda -Urundi. 
7/ Shown in Congo (Leopoldville) prior to 1959-60. Combined exports for Rwanda and Burundi in 1959-60 
totaled 160,000 bags. 8/ Beginning with I96I-62 includes West Cameroon. Prior to 1961-62 this area 
was identified as Southern Cameroon and its production was included with Nigeria. 9/ 3-year average. 
10/ Prior to I96U-65 year was shown as Tanganyika. Now includes Zanzibar as well. — 11/ Includes Cape 
Verde, Comoro Islands, Dahomey, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Congo (Brazzaville) ,~Sao Tome and 
Principe, Sierra Leone, and Spanish Guinea. 12 / Includes Malaysia, New Caledonia, New Hebrides, 
Papua and New Guinea, Portuguese Timor and Vietnam. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 15 - 



Barley and Oats: Australia's exports by country pf destination, 
July-June 1963-64 and 1964-65 1/ 



July-June 1963-64 



Country of destination 



Barley 



Oats 



Total 



Julv-June 1964-65 



Barley 



Oats 



Total 



Metric 
tons 



Western Hemisphere: : 

United States .• 

Barbados : 

Ecuador : 

Jamaica : 

Panama, Republic of : 

Peru : 

Other countries : 

Total Western Hemisphere . .: 
Western Europe: : 
EEC: : 

Belgium-Luxembourg s 

Germany, West : 

Italy ; 

Netherlands : 

Total EEC : 

Denmark ' 

Norway .* 

United Kingdom ' 



Eastern Europe: 

Germany, East 

Poland 

Yugoslavia 

Total Eastern Europe . . . 

Total Europe 

Asia: 

Bahrein 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Hong Kong 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Korea, South 

Kuwait 

Malaysia 

Philippines, Republic of 

Qatar 

Saudi Arabia 

South Arabia 

Taiwan 

Trucial States 

Other countries 

Total 

Sino Bloc: 



Total Asia 

Africa : 

Mauritius 

Mozambique 

Rhodesia and Nyasaland 

South Africa 

Tanganyika 

Other countries 

Total Africa 

Total Oceania: 

Other countries 



Metric 
tons 



Metric 
tons 



Metric 
tons 



Metric 
tons 



Metric 
tons 



23,777 : 
— : 

: 


676 : 


23,777 ' 
676 : 


: 


408 : 
874 ' 
9 : 


408 
874 


i 


193 i 
: 

114 : 


193 : 
: 

114 1 


53 : 
: 


30 : 
76 i 


9 
83 
76 


23.777 


983 : 


24.760 : 


5? ! 


1,397 i 


1,450 


, 

11 ,780 
25,782 
79,248 


— 

85,867 
13,894 
60.799 ! 


: 

97,647 
39,676 ! 
140.047 


26,651 
52,845 
48.659 


255 ! 
129,390 
20,880 ! 
22.260 ! 


255 
156,041 
73,725 
70.919 


116.810 


160.560 


277.370 


128.155 


172.785 ! 


300.940 


2,761 
2,950 
114.277 


3,085 
4.056 


5,846 
2,950 
118 r 333 


2,164 
32,781 


12,320 ! 


2,164 
45 r 101 


2?6 r 798 


167,701 


404.499 


163,100 


185, 1Q5 


348,205 






: 
: 


10,554 
12,309 


10,554 
12,309 
1 










22.864 


22.864 


236.798 


167.701 . 404.499 


, 163,100 . 207,969 


371 ,069 


232 
— 

117,884 
— 
345 

3,042 


1 

! 834 
1,222 
: 569 
. 7,610 

i 364 
: 2,764 
: 1,126 

i 41 


! 1 ,066 
: 1,222 
: 569 
: 125,494 

\ 709 
: 2,764 
: 1,126 

\ 3,083 
•' 266 


306 

! 36 

! 255 
1 

\ 154,054 

: 1,016 
: 8,211 
: 45 
i 18 
: 219 
: 6,115 
: 194 

: 369 
10 


1 

1 5 
1 44 
s 139 
: 732 
i 1,144 
: 503 
t 13,956 

s 267 
: 3,917 
: 2,013 
i 

: 63 
• 20 
: 3 


331 

: 44 
s 175 
s 987 
1 1 ,144 
503 

: 168,010 
i 1,016 
i 8,478 
: 3,962 
: 2,031 
: 219 
: 6,178 
: 214 
: 3 
: 369 


1 21 .769 


: H,53C 


: 136,299 


: 170.848 


: 22.806 


193 654 


I O f DOO 


: 100,067 


: 118.755 


: 5,109 


1 

: 41 .930 




140.457 


: 114.597 


: 255,054 


: 175.957 


: 64.736 


: 240.693 


264 
1 ,182 


: 268 

s 1,403 
•• 8,861 


'• 268 
« 264 
5 2,585 
: 8,861 


» 50 
I 793 


! 321- 
254 

! 1,017 
5 8,340 
207 

26 


! 321 
304 

: 1,810 
: 8,411 
! 207 
: 26 


1.446 


: 10.532 


5 11.978 


: ^ 


10.165 


11 .079 








17 


3 r 020 


3,037 


238 
402.716 


5 7J 8,704 
: 302.517 


: 8,942 
: 705,233 


: 1/11,523 
« 3 , il,564 


: 1/79,504 
: 366,791 


! 91,027 
« 718,355 



1/ Preliminary. 2/ Includes 8,263 "For orders." 2/ For orders. 



- 16 - 



Australian trade to Asian countries was lower by only ih 
thousand tons, however, there was a heavy swing to "barley and away 
from oats. Japan's takings of 168 thousand tons, up 3^- percent, 
represented nearly a quarter of the total business. Shipments to 
Communist China were off by 60 percent. 

Forty-four percent of barley exports went to Japan, with 
other important business being confined to Western Europe. West 
Germany took 35 percent of the oats shipments, while 57 percent 
went to Europe. 



ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORTS 
HIGH IN JULY -SEPTEMBER 

Argentina exported 3*1 million metric tons of grain during 
the first quarter of the fiscal year 1965-66. Wheat exports con- 
tinue at a near record level and comprised 65 percent of the total 
grain exported. During the past several months Argentina has had 
spectacular success in exporting most of her excess supplies of 
grain. Larger wheat and rye shipments more than offset declines 
in shipments of other grains. 

Wheat exports totaled almost 2.0 million tons during this 
period and was the best quarterly record in over 25 years. They 
were more than three times as great as the 625,000 tons shipped 
during July - September I96U. This huge increase was attributed 
largely to increased shipments to Communist China and the USSR. 
Shipments to Brazil, Peru, Chile, Spain and the United Kingdom 
also showed substantial increases. However, this was partly off- 
set by the decreased shipments to the Common Market countries, 
East Germany and Republic of South Africa. 

Corn shipments totaled 955,000 tons and showed a decrease 
of 17 percent from the 1.2 million tons shipped during July - 
September 1^6k. Declines occurred for most destinations. 
In contrast the USSR took 21,000 tons compared with none during 
the same period a year earlier. 

Exports of rye totaled 21,000 tons and showed an increase 
of 17 percent over the 18,000 tons for the same period last 
year. 

Exports of oats, barley and grain sorghums totaled 116,000 
tons during July - September — down 71 percent from the U01,000 
tons shipped a year earlier. This decrease reflects the small 
harvests of these grain in 196^. 



-17- 



GRAIN: Argentine exports by country of destination, July-September 1964 and July-September 1965 



Destination 



Rye 



Barley 



Sorghums 



Metric 

' tons 
Jaly^-September 1964: : 

United States . '• — 

Barbados . . ! — 

Brazil ., , ... ! 245,940 

Cuba : — 

Paraguay 9,587 

Peru : 77,565 

Uruguay 1 6,850 

Venezuela ! 10,1 60 

EEC: ! 

Belgium-Luxembourg * 16,900 

France . ! 45,279 

Germany, West '• 3,826 

Italy ! 31,715 

Netherlands ' 94,039 

Total EEC ! 191.759 

Austria 1 — 

Denmark * — 

Finland ! 

Germany, East ' 21,516 

Hungary ! 

Norway : 7,140 

Spain 1 384 

Sweden : 

Switzerland : 

United Kingdom • 36,439 

Yugoslavia ! 

China, Communist j 5,743 

Japan : — 

Singapore . : 

Republic of S. Africa ! 11.989 

Total ; 625,072 

July-September 1965: 

Barbados ! 70 

Brazil '. 315 ,058 

Bolivia J 3,999 

Chile i 66,125 

Paraguay '. 900 

Peru J 105,349 

Trinidad i — 

EEC: J 

Belgium-Luxembourg . . . . ^ 1 , 230 

France _ 23,795 

Germany, West ', 12,195 

Italy l_ 100,642 

Netherlands ^ 29.940 

Total EEC 167.802 

Austria , 

Cyprus < 10,292 

Norway < 15,953 

Spain 33,140 

Switzerland j 1 ,000 

Sweden j — 

United Kingdom „• 104,557 

U.S.S.R i 425,592 

China, Communist t 719,181 

Japan j 

Formosa t 5,681 

Mozambique 1 11,400 

Angola t 8,536 

Republic of S. Africa ...1 — 

Total i 1,994,635 



Metric 
tons 



2,251 

850 
500 
5.800 



9.401 



2,080 

2,838 
3,400 



17.719 



2,400 
4,635 
9.343 



16. 378 



4,244 



Metric 
tons 

3,398 

500 

19,737 



12,577 



63,207 
6,649 

48,842 
771 ,451 
101 .234 



991 .38? 



Metric 
tons 



5,662 



500 

6,799 
35,035 
29,415 



Metric 
tons 



4,161 



4,080 
58 



4,789 
34,453 

7,031 
38,149 

1 ,962 
33,616 

4,741 



71 .749 



7,952 
54,969 
900 



63.821 



10,542 



3,800 



1 .156.474 



92.553 



68.782 



305 



2,000 
448 

35,458 
2,390 
23,040 
744,234 
71 .34? 



650 



4,217 



876.467 



2,200 
27,952 
4.441 



4,320 
34,541 



1 ,203 



39,762 
5,582 

6*219 
20,965 

2,500 



3 4 .5 93 



38.861 



1 ,438 



3,429 
400 



Metric 
tons 



482 



250 



15,457 
375 
56^670 
4,800 
16.716 



94.018 



19,419 



31 ,961 
950 
14,172 
78,062 
500 



239.814 



47 

630 
375 
2,594 
3,997 
9.833 



17.429 



1 ,000 
723 
25 
2,072 



10,461 



20,673 



_25_ 



955.451 



3.6. 681 



/■ft, 907 



31 ,982 



3.086.329 



1 



Compiled from EL Cerealist^. 



- 18 - 



POTATO PRODUCTION 
LOWER IN I965 



Potato production for certain specified countries in 19^5? 
estimated at 5,01+0 million hundredweight (100 lbs, ) was 7 percent 
"below the large I96U crop "but only 2 percent less than the 1955-59 
average. Production decreases in Europe and the USSR more than 
offset an increase in North America. 

North American potato production for 1965 was l6 percent above 
the 196^ crop and 19 percent larger than the 1955-59 average. In 
the United States , increases in both acreage and yields resulted in 
a 1965 crop of 290 million cwt . , 21 percent higher than last year and 
l8 percent above average. Production in Canada, kk.9 million cwt., 
was 6 percent below 196k but 11 percent greater than average. 

In Western Europe both acreage planted to potatoes and produc- 
tion were 5 percent less than in I96I+. In West Germany, Western 
Europe's largest producer, a reduction in both planted acreage and 
yield resulted in a 19^5 crop of 398-9 million cwt., 12 percent less 
than last year and 26 percent below average . Smaller crops were 
also harvested this year in Austria, Belgium -Luxembourg, Denmark, the 
Netherlands, and Portugal. Among those with larger crops were Finland, 
France, Spain, and the United Kingdom. 

Eastern European production was 11 percent below I96I+ but 10 per- 
cent above average. This was due primarily to varying yields, as 
acreage planted to potatoes in 1965 was approximately the same as 
I96U and only slightly above average. 

Potato production for 19^5 in the USSR, the world's largest 
producer, was 1,653-^ million cwt., 10 percent below last year but 
only 3 percent below average . 

MEDITERRANEAN OLIVE OIL 
OUTPUT TO RISE IN 1965-66 

Production of pressed olive oil in 1965-66 in the major producing 
countries of the Mediterranean Basin is forecast at over 1.2 million 
short tons --one -sixth above the relatively small outturn of 196I+-65 
but 8 percent below the four-year 1961/62 - I96I+/65 average. 

Major factors influencing this 1965-66 forecast include: (l) 
physiological "on-year" production increases in the major producing 
countries of Southern Europe- (2) prospects of somewhat less-than- 
average on-year outturn in both Spain and Italy, reflecting inade- 
quate moisture during the growing season; and (3) a sharp increase 
in production in Greece due to relatively favorable weather condi- 
tions and reduced dacus fly infestations . 



- 19 - 



POTATOES: Acreage and production in specified countries, 
average 1955-59, annual 1964-65 



Continent 
and 
Country 



ACREAGE 



PRODUCTION 



Average 


! 1964 


J 1965 1/ 


: Average 


! 1964 




1955-59 


• 1955-59 


; 1965 1/ 


1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


' Million 


• Million 


Mi 1 1 1 on 

• rJJ.JLJLJ.UU 


acres 


: acres 


: acres 


: Cwt. 


: Cwt. 


: Cwt. 


308 


: 281 


: 299 


\ 40.6 


: 47.7 


i 44.9 


101 


: 128 


: 130 


: 4.5 
• ^ • y 


9 4 


• Q 7 

• y- 1 


1,380 


: 1.294 


: 1.413 


245.7 




• PQO il 
. &.y\j . *r 


1,789 


: 1.70^ 


: 1,842 


: 290.8 






44o 


: 389 


: 371 


: 73.9 


1 75.8 


59 3 


219 


: 161 


133 


44 7 


4o 3 


28 8 


221 


13^ 


: 104 


38 2 


P6 7 


• 90 n 

■ c W . \J 


222 


176 


: 180 


28 5 


18 7 




2.490 


1.705 


1. 599 
• , yyy 




254 7 


?6^ 9 


2.. 122. 


2,104 


1.935 


535 8 
> Joy ,KJ 


UsU 7 


^q8 q 


99 
yy 


122 


122 


10 1 


1 3 Q 


J- j • c - 


292 


183 


173 


51.6 


37.0 


^8 5 


956 


860 


867 


77 6 


84 3 


84 7 


^57 


309 


306 


8l 7 


90 6 ' 

y^j . w 


71 L 


138 


121 


121 


24.9 


17.7 


24.5 


217 


26l : 


235 


23.6 


23.8 


17.6 


921 • 


699 : 


949 


93.6 : 


87.O : 


94.6 

y ■ w 


295 


201 ' 


182 ! 


33. 5 


27.3 : 


27.5 


i4o 


106 : 


101 : 


32.2 ■ 


29.8 : 


26.5 


849 


778 : 


739 : 


143.2 


155.7 : 


158.5 


10,578 ■ 


8,528 ■ 


8,117 


l,6l6.9 


1,438.0 : 


1, 359. 3 


1,516 


1,260 : 


1,260 : 


172.9 : 


lS6.fi : 


132.3 


1,967 : 


1,840 : 


1,841 : 


262.8 : 


283.8 : 


279.2 


6,785 : 


7,030 ! 


7,030 • 


752.5 ' 


1,060.4 : 


925.9 


683 1 


791 : 


74l : 


58.0 : 


62.2 : 


60.0 


1,313 : 


1,591 ' 


1,597 : 


122.5 : 


102.9 : 


102.0 


22,844 : 


21,040 : 


20,586 : 


2,985.6 j 


3,116.1 ; 


2,858.7 


2^.292 : 


21,004 : 


21,004 : 


1.701.1 ■ 


1.845.2 : 


1.653.4 


511 : 


545 • 


524 ■ 


69.1 • 


86.3 : 


83.8 


529 • 


442 : 


503 • 


30.9 : 


32.9 : 


54.9 


461 : 


540 : 


520 : 


21.8 : 


28.7 : 


26.5 


200 : 


210 : 


210 : 


16.1 : 


17.1 : 


14.8 


26 : 


37 : 


40 : 


1-7 : 


2.7 : 


2.9 


1,216 : 


1,229 : 


1,273 : 


70.5 : 


81.4 ': 


99-1 


49,652 : 


45,521 : 


45,229 : 


5,117.1 : 


5,425-5 : 


5,o4o.o 



North America: 

Canada , 

Mexico 

United States, 



Total 

Europe : 

Austria 

Belgium-Lux. . 

Denmark , 

Finland , 

France , 

Germany, West . . 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland. . . . 
United Kingdom. 



Total Western Europe, 

Czechoslovakia 

Germany, East 

Poland 

Yugoslavia 

Other Eastern Europe 2/ . , 



Total Europe 3/, 



U.S.S.R. ... 
Asia: 

Japan 

South America: 

Argentina. . . 

Brazil 

Chile 

Venezuela. . . 



Total : 1,216 



Grand total : 49,652 



1/ Preliminary. 

2/ Bulgaria, Rumania and Hungary. 
3/ Excluding U.S.S.R. 

4/ Data are for the fiscal year ending in the year shown. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics 
of foreign governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural 
Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research, and related 
information . 



- 20 - 



Spain ' s production is expected to be about 360,000 tons, sharply 
above the relatively small outturn of 196^-65, yet below the 1961/62 - 
I96U/65 average. This estimate, somewhat above the previous forecast, 
( Foreign Agriculture, October 11, 196k) } reflects abundant October 
rains and mild temperatures in the major producing areas where moisture 
supplies by mid-summer were abnormally low. In the Spanish provinces 
where olives are already being harvested and crushed, oil yields are 
reported at above 20 to 22 percent. In the Andalusian area the bulk 
of harvesting begins in late December and in some areas continues until 
March. Consequently, climatic conditions during the next few weeks 
could have some effect on final production. Although exports may 
increase somewhat this season from those in 196J+-65, they are expected 
to remain significantly below those in previous years. 

Italian olive oil production this season, according to semi-official 
sources, is forecast at one-fifth above the revised official estimate 
of last year's "off-year" outturn. Because of a rather cold wet 
spring throughout Italy, foliation was delayed. This, together with 
a drought in late June and July, particularly in Southern Italy, is 
expected to result in an outturn somewhat below the annual average 
outturn for the 1961/62 - 196^/65 period. This in part also reflects 
some reduction in olive tree acreage, which has declined since 1962. 
However, production apparently will, for the second consecutive year, 
exceed that in Spain- -traditionally the leading producing country. 

The Greek o utturn of olive oil in 1965-66 appears likely to increase 
by nearly one-half from that of a year ago. This forecast is somewhat 
below that previously published ( Foreign Agriculture , October 11, 1965). 
The downward revision reflects a lack of rain during the August -November 
period, which resulted in some fruit drop and shrinkage. Insect attacks 
were very limited this season. This may have been due in part to the 
fact that there was more extensive aerial spraying for control of the 
dacus fly than in previous years. 

Portuguese o live oil production in 1965-66 is forecast to be one- 
third above that of last year yet sharply below the average of recent 
years. This is based upon the estimate of olive fruit yields since no 
official forecast of olive oil production is yet available. Abundant 
rainfall in October was reported following a prolonged drought, which 
resulted in premature ripening and a considerable fruit fall. Despite 
the indicated rise in production this year, a significant volume of 
olive oil will probably be imported for domestic consumption. 

Turkish production will decline sharply this year from that of a 
year ago. The decline chiefly represents a reduction from tree ex- 
haustion following the large output in I96U-65. Production in recent 
years has trended upward, reflecting newly cultivated groves. Most 
of the olives used for crushing are grown in the Aegean and Eastern 
Mediterranean districts and harvesting, which starts in October, 
continues through about the end of January. 



- 21 - 



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- 22 - 



A sharp reduction in Lebanese and Syrian production is in prospect 
for 1965-66 largely "because of the cyclincal "off-year". Wide 
fluctuations of production in both countries has been accented by un- 
favorable growing conditions and dacus fly infestations. Future ex- 
pansiom.of production is anticipated in Jordan because of additional 
acreage planted to olive trees in 1965. 

Tunisian output is expected to decline by more than one-third 
following the relatively high production in each of the two previous 
years. There have been no current reports of damage from "bacterial 
knot" which last year was reported to have infected groves in the 
northern section. Although this disease is considered serious, it 
can be kept in check by pruning the galls and applying of a hydro- 
carbon emulsion. The government continues to attempt to expand olive 
oil production through encouraging the use of improved management and 
cultural practices as well as replacing poor bearing trees and estab- 
lishing new olive tree plantations. 

3%QQl& I'AHG^S? Q# 

World production of castorbeans in 1965 is estimated at about 
779>000 short tons. While this estimate represents a decline of 15 
percent from the alltime high of 196k, it is still the second largest 
of record, exceeding the 1955-59 average by h2 percent. The decline 
from last year is due largely to the reduction foreseen in Brazil's 
crop. 

North American production is expected to approximate last year's 
as the outturn in the United States is believed to be about the same 
as that of 19$+, and Mexico's crop is up only slightly. There are no 
official estimates of U.S. production of castorbeans. Well-informed 
sources, however, are of the opinion that about 50,000 acres were 
planted this year compared with 55^000 to 60,000 acres last year. Of 
this about 4i+,000 acres are in Texas, about U,500 in Nebraska and the 
remainder in Kansas and New Mexico. A larger acreage was planted on 
dry lands this year than in many years. In view of the dry year in 
Texas, much of the dryland area yielded only about 800 pounds per acre 
in contrast to a ton or more on irrigated lands. Moreover, in 
Nebraska, yields were low because of early frost. Although much of 
the U.S. crop has not yet been harvested, total production is expected 
to approximate 27,000 to 30,000 tons. 

While Mexican production has been increasing slowly, no rapid 
rise is foreseen in the near future. At an estimated 10,250 tons the 
1965 outturn is only marginally above that of the previous year. 



- 23 - 



CASTORBEANS: Production in specified countries amd the world, 
averages 1950-54 aad 1955-59, annual 1962-65 



Continent aad country 


* Avei 


'age 


1962 


1963 ! 


1964 1/! 


1965 1/ 




: 1950-54 ! 


1955-59 I 










! Short J 


Short ! 


Short ! 


Short ! 


Short '. 


Short 




'. toas ', 


toas ', 


toas 


toas ', 


toas ! 


toas 


North America: 














Uaited States 2/ 


•3/13,449 S 


9,293 i 


16,850 ; 


32,195 i 


30,000 s 


30,000 






5,677 i 


9,205 ■ 


9,H5 : 


10,095 . 


10,250 






1,949 ! 


1,643 


1,378 • 


929 ! 


— 






17,305 . 


26,035 


^3,025 j 


41,360 ; 




South America: 


















4,788 ! 


6,725 


6,725 ! 


5,400 









185,977 ! 


248,000 


264,398 1 


440,000 


290,000 






17,431 ' 


24,360 


25,353 : 33,070 


34,170 






7,615 


15,400 


13,000 




— 






6/ 1,945 


8,240 


8,520 ' 


8,818 


— 






216,655 


303,625 


319,095 


498,390 


346, 670 


Europe : 


• 














.; 787 , 


126 


6 


! 6 . 


8 








3,936 


805 


; 48o 










1,841 


1,960 












12,434 


12,455 


. 15,765 


14,330 








4.651 


6.10s 


4.750 . 4.000 


! 4.400 


Estimated total 5/ 




t 23,015 


, 20.850 ; 21,929" 






10.140 6/35.000 


6/40.000 


6/60.000 6/70.000 


Africa: 






i : 










! 15,650 


: 11,000 


: 11,000 










; 3,595 


! 6,600 t 7,800 












. 5,000 


: 5,000 » 7,300 


! 9,900 






'3/ 4,270 


' 1,435 


'• 1,215 










: 790 


• 1,255 


: 1,100 










t 5,278 


: 4,906 


s 8,221 


! 5,469 


! 






' 1,153 


: 1,815 


: 1,427 


= 699 








: 2,367 


s 1,789 


: 2,604 


! 1,143 








:^/l6,755 


: 10,000 


: 15,000 


: 17,000 








^70,286 


' 65,890 


: "9<5,590 


! 81,615" 
1 ; 


: 82,500 


Asia: 






■ 1 




pj 11,1 — L J-J — m 






: 13,228 


: 11,000 


: 11,000 










: 126,612 


: 110,891 


: 110,891 


i 112,876 


l 111,220 






: 4,400 


: 2,240 


: 2,240 








. : 1,21*5 


: 1,185 


: 2,715 


: 2,870 


: 3, HO 








: 3,585 


: 7,840 


: 8,400 


: 10,080 


: 10,305 




. : 11,280 


: 29,665 


: 48,085 


: 58,310 


: 39,680 


: 37,475 


Estimated total 5/ 


176.840 


: 208.700 


: 219.180 


■ 231.060 


! 217.830 


: 214 f 185 


Estimated world total 5/. 


.! 501.285 


: 549,290 


: 673,280 


! 752,785 


• 920,045 


i 778,760 



1/ Prelimiaary. 2/ Figures for 1956-63 are estimates submitted by the Baker Castor Oil Compaay. Figures 
for 1964 and I965 are FAS estimates. 3/ Less than 5 years. 4/ Castorbeaa exports from Haiti year eadiag 
September 30. 5/ Includes estimates for the above countries for which data are not available and for minor 
producing countries. Totals for Asia and world totals include rough estimates for Mai aland China based on 
average production prior to World War II of about 55,000 toas. 6/ Exports of castorbeans. 7/ Exports of 
castorbeans and castor oil, bean basis. 8/ Estimated. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official statistics of foreign 
governments, other foreign source materials, reports of U.S. Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related informatioa. 



- 24 - 



Production in South America is estimated at almost one -third less 
than last year's, largely on the basis of the reduced outturn in Brazil. 
At the present expectation of around 290,000 tons Brazil's production 
would he one-third below the alltime high of ^0,000 tons produced in 
1964 but still above that of any year prior to 196k. Rainfall and 
growing conditions in both the Parana' - Sao Paulo and the Northeast 
regions reportedly have been about normal though less favorable than 
the practically ideal conditions that prevailed in 196k. However, 
while there may not have been much new planting for the 19&5 crop 
the second and third crops, or "folhas", from the previous year's 
increased plantings will still be harvested in many areas. None of 
the unusual combinations of factors that caused the large increase in 
196k have existed this year. Aside from ideal weather, major factors 
resulting in the record 196^- crop were: (l) Increased plantings in 
the Parana' - Sao Paulo region was prompted by favorable castor prices 
at the time this area had just suffered major damage to its economic 
pillar- -the coffee crop; and (2) increased acreage in the northeastern 
states, where castor is grown in association with sisal, has been in 
conjunction with the expanded sisal acreage stimulated by favorable 
price support schemes for that crop. The new minimum price support 
scheme for the 1965-66 sisal crop was not expected to materially increase 
the castorbean acreage on new lands because of a current oversupply of 
sisal . 

Ecuador's production, virtually all for export, reportedly is up 
slightly from last year's outturn. 

Europea n castor production is centered largely in Rumania and to 
a lesser extent in Yugoslavia. Production in 19^5 in each of these tw 
countries is believed to be about the same as the previous year's 
levels . 

On the basis of information which has become available only 
recently, estimates of castorbean production in the Soviet Union in 
recent years have been revised sharply upward. Official estimates 
indicate that acreage rose from 2^7,000 acres in 1962 to ^20,000 in 
196^ and a further increase is believed to have occurred in 19^5 • If 
average low yields have prevailed, production has moved upward from 
an estimated 35,000 tons in 1962 to possibly 70,000 in 1965. This 
volume would indicate that the Soviet Union ranks third in production, 
among the world's producing countries, exceeded only by Brazil and India. 

While many countries in Africa produce castorbeans, data for 19&5 
crops are incomplete, in the basis of export figures Tanzania probably 
is the leading producer, having exported a record 30,000 tons in 19&3 
and almost l6,000 in 196U. Production in South Africa is around 17,000 
tons while that in Ethiopia is about 10,000 tons. The Sudan is believed 
to have produced a record outturn of about 10,000 tons this year. Castor 
is a relatively new cash crop for farmers in the G ash Delta of the Sudan. 



- 25 - 



The somewhat -reduced castorbean production in Asia in 1965 is due 
to the slightly smaller outturn in India and the moderate reduction in 
Thailand. Indian castorbean production from the two crops harvested 
from November 196^ through April 1965 was estimated by the Government at 
lll,22i tons, one percent less than the previous year's outturn. Trade 
estimates of Indian castor production normally are at least 25 percent 
higher than the estimates of the government as the latter do not include 
a large portion of the crop interplanted with other crops . The decline 
was attributed to a decrease of about 6 percent in planted acreage. Most 
of the acreage reduction (in Andhra Pradesh) was due to inadequate rain 
at planting time. 

India's 1965-66 crop to be harvested early in I966 is estimated by 
the trade to be about 10 percent less than the I96U-65 outturn as most 
of India's crops were adversely affected by a failure of rains last 
September . 

Castorbean production in Thailand,, the world's leading exporter of 
castorbeans as such., is reported at 3T;^T5 tons . This is 6 percent less 
than last year's and over one-third less than the record outturn of 1963 • 
The decline from last year is attributed to unfavorable prices early in 
the year. Pakistan's crop is estimated at 10 , 305 tons, slightly above 
last year ' s . 

WORLD WOOL PRODUCTION 
DOWN 3 PERCENT IN I965 

World wool production estimates for 1965-66 have "been revised 
downward to 5^570 million pounds, a drop of 3 percent from the pre- 
vious year. 

The major reason for the lower output estimate is the drought in 
Australia. The second estimate of the season places production at 
l,6l7.9 million pounds, 76 million pounds below the forecast made at 
the beginning of the season. Also, the final estimate of production 
in the 196^-65 season has been revised downward to 1,79^-0 million 
pounds. Thus, it is now estimated that output will be down from 
the previous season by 8 percent. 

Another reason for reduced world production is the estimated drop 
in the Argentine clip, now expected to fall below the level of the 
previous year, also because of dry weather which reduced fleece 
weights in the provinces of Buenos Aires, La Pampa and Chubat. 

Dry weather continued over wide areas of South Africa during the 
growing season and is estimated to have lowered the clip by about 1 
percent. Uruguay also expects less production for the same reason. 

Among the 5 major Southern Hemisphere Producers only New Zealand 
expects to produce more wool in 1965-66 than in the previous year. 
Weather has been favorable and sheep numbers have continued to expand. 



- 26 - 



WOOL: Production in specified countries, greasy basis, average 1956-60 

annual 1 963 -65 l/ 



Percent 



Continent and country; 1956-60 ; 1963 : 1964 : 1965 ; 1965 1 1965 

: : : : : 1956-60 ; T96T 

; Million : Million ;Million ; Million ; ; 

; pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds : Percent : Percent 
North America: ; 

Canada ; 7.7 6.8 6.3 5-8 -25 - 8 

United States 3/......: 308.8 287. 1 264.6 250.0 -19 - 6 

Mexico : 9.6 12.8 13.7 15.4 +60 +12 



Total No. America 4/: 330.0 310.0 285. 0 275.0 -17 - 4 
South America: ; 

Argentina ; 448.1 421.0 443.1 427. 7 - 5 - 3 

Brazil .: 60.4 58.5 62.8 6l.5 +2 - 2 

Chile 48.7 53.8 55.6 56.2 +15 + 1 

Falkland Islands ; 4.5 4.8 4.5 4.5 

Peru ; 20.9 24.2 22.0 22.0 +5 

Uruguay : 180.2 194.0 189.6 I85.O +3 - 2 



Total So. America 4/: 78O.O 775.0 795.0 775.0 - 1 - 3 

Europe : ; 

France ; 62.9 6l.7 62.0 60.0 - 5 - 3 

Germany, West ; 11.5 10.5 8.3 8.0 -30 - 4 

Greece : 25.I 24.4 24.1 24.0 - 4 

Ireland : 21.2 26.0 26.6 27. 0 +27 + 2 

Italy ; 30.4 29.4 29.2 27.7 - 9 - 5 

Norway : 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 

Portugal : 23.8 25.6 25.9 26.0 +9 

Spain ; 72.6 81.3 80.7 72.8 — -10 

United Kingdom : H6.3 130.6 126.8 127.1 +9 



Total West Europe 4/: 385. 0 410.0 405.0 395.0 +3 - 2 

Bulgaria 36.6 52.3 52.9 54.0 +48 +2 

Hungary ; 15.7 20.9 21.6 22.0 +40 + 2 

Poland ; 20.5 l6.1 16.3 17.6 -14 + 8 

Rumania : 43.7 49.8 54.7 55. 1 +26 + 1 

Yugoslavia : 31.5 27.8 26.9 24.3 -23 -10 



Total East Europe 4/: 175.0 195.0 200.0 200.0 +14 

Total Europe 4/ : 56O.O 605.O 605.O 595.0 +6 - 2 



USSR (Europe & Asia) . . . : 69O.O 813.5 76O.6 716.5 +4 - 6 

(Continued) 



- 27 - 



WOOL: Production in specified countries, greasy basis, average 1956-60 

annual 1963-65 l/ 



(Continued) 



Continent and country 



Average 
1956-60 



1963 



1964 



2/ 



1965 



Percent 
ch ange 
1965 
1956-60 



1954" 





•Million 


• Mi 1_1 inn 


•Million 

« i 1-1- JLJuX Ull 


•Million 








; pounds 


:pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


:Percent 


:Percent 


Africa: 
















19.0 


19.0 


19.0 


19.0 




-- 




: 34.9 


34.0 


1+0.0 


44. 0 


+26 


+10 




: 7.8 


9.0 


9.0 


9.0 


+15 


— 




: 5.2 


5.5 


5.5 


5.5 


+ 6 


— 


South Africa, Rep. of 5/ 


: 313.9 


322.9 


313.0 


3H.0 


- l 


- 1 




: 395.0 


1+05.0 


1+00.0 


405.0 


+ 3 


+ 1 


Aql a • 
















• kl.9 


41.9 


39.7 


41.9 


— 


+ 6 




: 24.7 


25.O 


25.0 


25.0 


+ 1 


MM 


Turkey (Europe & Asia) . 


: 91.2 


92.0 


94.0 


9^.0 








: 10.2 


lo. 7 


20.5 


33.1 


+02 


+25 


India .«..<«..«.. 


7^.8 


75 .0 


78.0 


77.2 


+ 5 

T J 


_ 1 




: 7.5 


3.2 


2.2 


2.2 


-71 






: 32.5 


32.5 


32.5 


32.5 








: 510.0 


510.0 


530.0 


545.0 


+ 7 


+ 5 


Oceania: 
















:l,578.8 


1,781.7 


1,794.0 


1,617.9 


+ 5 


- 8 




: 538.3 


616.8 


623.3 


640.0 


+21 


+ 4 




•2,120.0 


2,1+00.0 


2,1+20.0 


2,260.0 


+ 8 


- 5 




:5, 385.0 


5,820.0 


5,795.0 


5,570.0 


+ 4 


- 3 



Hemisphere is combined with that produced in the season beginning July 1 or 
October 1 of the same year in the Southern Hemisphere. Pulled wool is included 
for most countries at its greasy equivalent. 2/ Preliminary. 3/ Converted 
"pulled wool" to greasy basis at 1.7. 4/ Includes estimates for other producing 
countries. 5/ Includes Basutoland and South West Africa. 6/ Includes mainland 
China, jj Rounded to nearest five million. 



Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis of official 
statistics of foreign government, other foreign source material, reports of U.S. 
Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service Officers, results of office research 
and related information. 



- 28 - 



WORID BREATGRAIN CROP 
AT NEAR RECORD LEVEL 

Near -record world production of "breadgrains in 1965 is estimated 
at 278 million metric tons compared with the 1964 record harvest of 
285 million tons , according to the second estimate of Foreign Agricultural 
Service. Harvests of the Northern Hemisphere are completed- -over three- 
fourths of the world wheat and all except 5 percent of the world rye crops 
--and harvesting in southern countries is well underway. 

The world wheat crop of 1965, estimated at 9; 007 million bushels 
(245 million tons), is 3 percent "below the 1964 record of 9,294 million 
bushels (253 million tons) . Outturn exceeds the previous near -record 
production of 1962 by 4 percent . Bumper crops in the continents of the 
Northern Hemisphere were more than offset by sharp declines in two 
major producers --the USSR and Mainland China--and in several Southern 
Hemisphere countries, where dry weather generally continued to reduce 
crops as the season progressed. 

Record wheat crops were harvested in North America, Western Europe 
Eastern Europe and Asia. These countries account for over 70 percent 
of the world output . Although Canada 1 s harvest was reduced mainly by 
bad weather during harvest, above average yields per acre resulted in a 
crop 13 percent more than in 1964, and the third largest on record. U.S. 
production was the largest since i960, and also the third largest on 
record. 

Record production in both Western Europe and Eastern Europe resulted 
in increases of 4 and 13 percent, respectively over the big crops of 
1964. Three countries of the European Economic Community had larger crops 
than in 1964, France and the Netherlands had record crops, and Italy's 
near-record harvest was the largest in 7 years. However, prolonged cold, 
wet weather resulted in comparatively poor crops in West Germany and 
Belgium. 



A pronounced increase in the production of the United Kingdom 
made that country the largest West European producer outside the EEC. 
Acreage increased 16 percent and nearly as high average yields per 
acre as the 1964 record resulted in a production 14 percent more than 
the previous record crop of 1964. Finland had a record output, and 
Spain and Portugal had larger crops than in the dry year of 1964. 
However, production declined in Austria, Sweden, and Switzerland. 

Spectacular gains occurred in the yields per acre in a number of 
countries in East Europe. Although acreage increased only slightly 
in Rumania and Poland, and declined in Bulgaria, excellent yields harvese 
harvested resulted in crops 44, 7 and 43 percent, respectively over 1964. 



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- 31 - 



Czechoslovakia, East Germany and Hungary had moderately lower production, 
but substantially above the 1955-59 average. Acreage of Yugoslavia 
was reduced sharply by bad weather in the fall of 1964; although good 
yields were harvested, the crop was 7 percent below 1964. 

The production of a poor spring crop in the USSR resulted in a drop 
in the 19644wheat harvest of possibly 20 percent. The winter wheat 
crop—usually about 40 percent of the total- -was above average, but 
dry, hot weather seriously reduced growth of the spring crop. 

Despite a significant drop in the production of Mainland China-- 
the principal producer --Asia produced a record crop. Record harvests 
in India and Pakistan were 22 and 10 percent, respectively, larger than 
in 1964. Even though Japan reduced acreage, higher yields resulted 
in a 3 percent increase in production. 

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wheat to about 5 to 10 percent below the preceding year . Weather was 
not favorable for 1965 production, which declined 8 percent below the 
1964 crop. 



Countries of southwest Asia had a good season for wheat. Production 
reached about 470 million bushels (12.8 million tons), compared with 
436 million bushels (ll-9 million tons) in 1964, and the average of 
390 million bushels (10.6 million tons) annually in 1955-59- Bumper 
crops in Iran and Iraq Tjere the result of increased acreage and generally 
good weather. Turkey's harvest exceeded the poor crop of 1964, but was 
below 1963. 

The northern countries of Africa had good crops. Egypt planted 
about the same acreage, and production was almost up to the high 1964 
level. Algeria's crop was sharply higher than the poor crop of 1964, but 
below 1963. Morocco increased acreage by 8 percent and high yields per 
acre resulted in a 13 percent increase in production. Tunisia also had 
a good crop. 

Production in the principal wheat countries of the Southern 
Hemisphere will be considerably below the good crops of 1964. In 
Australia, persistent drought in the eastern states continued to 
reduce yields to the lowest level since the severe drought year of 1957° 
Production is estimated at 275 million bushels (7-5 million tons) 
compared with 368 million bushels (10 million) in 1964. 



- 32 - 



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- 33 - 



Argentina reduced acreage this year, and lack of rain after 
planting resulted in a production considerably "below the excellent 
crop of 196U. Recent rain, however, may have improved yields. In 
the Republic of South Africa, continuing drought caused a downward 
revision in production to 32 percent below the good crop of 196k 
and 3 percent less than the 1955-59 average. 

Total production of the five principal exporting countries -- 
the United States, Canada, Australia, Argentina, and France -- is 
estimated at 3>08l million bushels (83.9) million tons) compared 
with 3A53 million bushels (85.8 million tons) in 196k. Very 
good crops in the United States, Canada and France failed to 
offset reduced harvests in Australia and Argentina. Therefore, 
total production of the five countries is about 2 million tons 
below I96U. 

World rye production in I965, estimated at 1,29^- million 
bushels (32.9 million tons), exceeds the 196k harvest by 39 
million bushels (l million tons). However, output is 150 million 
bushels (3-8 million tons) below the average of 1955~59« World 
acreage approximated the I96U level, but good crops resulted in a 
3-percent increase in production. 

Production of North America was 8 percent more than in 196k 
and 36 percent above the 1955-59 average. The combined acreage 
of the United States and Canada -- the only producers of rye in 
North America -- was below the average. However, higher yields 
per acre in recent years, have more than offset the reduced acreage 
in both countries. The harvests of Asia and Africa increased 3 a^d 
13 percent, respectively, over the preceding year. 

The USSR had a good rye crop, with production of 570 million 
bushels (lU.5 million tons) compared with 50*+ million bushels 
(12.8 million tons) in 196^. Acreage was below the average, but 
yields were the highest in recent years. Eastern Europe had a 
bumper rye crop, with better yields than anticipated early in 
the season. Acreage increased over the preceding yeaij and per 
acre yields were among the highest on record. 

Western Europe, however, had a decrease of 15 percent in rye 
production. The crop was reduced sharply in West Germany, the 
principal producer. Acreage declined and the outturn was the 
lowest yielding in five years. Of the 17 countries of Western 
Europe that produce rye, only Finland, Norway, Portugal, and Sweden 
had larger crops than in 196^-. 



- 3^ - 



U.S. RICE EXPORTS 
DOWN IN I96U-65 



United States exports of rice totaled 1, 295*999 metric tons by 
the end of the 196^-65 fiscal year, or approximately 10 percent less 
than the l,k-kO,^kQ metric tons reported for the 1963-6U fiscal year. 
The tremendous drop in sales to the Eastern European countries , from 
83,000 metric tons in fiscal year 1963-6U to 11,000 metric tons in 
fiscal year 196U-65 was largely responsible for the overall decline. 

Shipments of rice to the other European markets were also down 
sharply. Those to the EEC were down from 100,000 metric tons in 
1963-6U to 66,000 metric tons; those to the other Western European 
countries dropped from 63,000 metric tons to 59*000 metric tons £4®?- 
during the same period. European demand for U.S. rice declined 
during the year primarily because of increased production. 

Rice exports to countries in the Western Hemisphere amounted to 
150,000 metric tons during this fiscal year, as compared with 179*000 
metric tons in 1963-6^. Most of this decrease was accounted for by 
smaller amounts of rice going to the Dominican Republic and Nicaragua. 
Those countries took less than half of the amount reported last year. 
Shipments to Haiti dropped from 2,000 tons in the previous fiscal 
year to only 120 tons in 196^-65. On the other hand, the United 
States exported substantially larger volumes of rice to Chile and 
Ecuador. 

Exports of rice to the Asiatic countries, however, reversed the 
trend of overall shipments by the United States. These exports 
increased from 7^-7*000 metric tons in the previous 12 months to 7^0,000 
metric tons between July I96U and June 1965* despite the drop of rice 
shipments to Indonesia from 91*000 metric tons to a mere 25 tons. 
The latter can be explained as due to Indonesia's restriction on 
rice import contracts which became effective on August 17* 1964. 
Exports to the Philippines, on the other hand, increased kl percent 
and those to Japan 90 percent. The Syrian Arab Republic and South 
Vietnam became markets for U.S. rice in the current fiscal year. 

Approximately 19 percent less rice was exported to the African 
countires this year. Individual decreases to many of these countries 
however, were partially offset by increased volumes to such countries 
as the United Arab Republic, Angola, Burundi and Rwanda, Cameroon, 
Republic of the Congo, and Ghana. Exports to countries of Africa 
totaled 218,000 metric tons as compared with 260,000 metric tons during 
1963-64. 



- 35 - 



RICE, HEXED !/■■ U.S. Exports by country of destination, July 1963-June 1964 and July 1964-June 1965 



Destination 



July 1963- 
June 1964 



July 1964- 
June 1965 



Destination 



July 1963- 
June 1964 



July 1964- 
June 1965 



Metric 
tons 



,035 
,957 
,589 

62 
,826 
188 

9 

,621 
296 
,864 
70 
282 
,347 
38 
,031 
,068 
56 
,668 
146 

62 
2 

b,518 
575 
5 

',571 



Western Hemisphere: : 

Canada '• 47, 

Mexico : 

British Honduras : 

Canal Zone : 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador : 1 . 

Guatemala : 

Honduras : 

Nicaragua : 9, 

Panama Republic : 

Bahamas : 4, 

Barbados : 

Bermuda : 

Dominican Republic s 47, 

French West Indies : 

Haiti : 2; 

Jamaica : 

Leeward and Windward Islands : 

Netherlands Antilles : 4, 

Trinidad and Tobago * 

Bolivia : 

British Guiana 

French Guiana : 

Chile 6. 

Colombia : 

Ecuador : 

Peru : 37, 

Venezuela : 

Total : 178. 

Western Europe: : 
EEC: : 

Belgium and Luxembourg 14,352 

France : 3,724 

Germany, West : 42,776 

Italy : 8 

Netherlands : 38.832 

Total : 99.692 

Other Western Europe: : 

Austria : 307 

Cyprus : 73 

Denmark 1 ,310 

Finland : 508 

Gibraltar 4 

Greece 2,510 

Iceland : 328 

Ireland 903 

Malta 34 

Norway : 1 36 

Portugal : 3,310 

Sweden : 3,362 

Switzerland 8,841 

United Kingdom 41 .641 

Total : 63.267 

Eastern Europe: : 

Czechoslovakia : 

East Germany : 

Hungary : 

Poland 14,982 

Rumania : — 

U.S.S.R : 68,268 

Yugoslavia : — 

Total : 83.250 

Total Europe : 246.239 



Metric 
tons 

49,896 
4,001 
1,039 

136 
687 
177 
35 
4,219 
786 
4,232 
97 
259 
15,561 
809 
120 
13,189 
146 
5,808 
73 
4? 



7,048 
595 
5,766 
33,412 
1.986 



150.120 



10,050 
5,542 
39,156 
11 

11 .224 



6 5 ,98 3 



520 
130 
2,954 
917 
4 

3,009 
333 
1 ,392 
66 
134 
18 
5,036 
8,258 
36.683 



59,454 



945 
10,262 



11 .210 



136.647 



Asia: 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Arabia Peninsula States . 

Bahrein 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Saudi Arabia 

Syrian Arab Republic . . . . 

Vietnam 

Hong Kong 

Japan 

Korea 

Hansel and Nanpo Islands 

Taiwan 

Total 



Africa: 

Algeria 

Libya 

Sudan 

U.A.R. (Egypt) 

Angola 

Gambia 

Burundi and Rwanda 

Cameroon 

Canary Islands 

Central African Republic 
Congo (Leopoldville) .... 
Gabon 



Ghana 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Liberia 

Mauritania 

Nigeria 

Sierra Leone 

Senegal 

Spanish Africa n.e.c 

Togo 

Western Africa n.e.c 

Western Portuguese Africa . 

British East Africa 

Ethiopia 

French Somaliland 

Kenya 

Malagasy Republic 

Mauritius and Dependencies 

Mozambique 

Somali Republic 

Tanzania 

Uganda 

Republic of South Africa .. 

Zambia 

Total 



.(Oceania Total .... 
" World Total 



Metric 
tons 

5,946 
2 

128 
211 
364,145 
91 ,290 
665 
27,283 
9,40? 

185 
5,016 
576 
2,351 
45 

21 ,084 
43,939 



377 
102,714 

5 

72,041 



747.405 



413 

52 
70 

144 
413 

1 ,204 
7 

30,232 

26,081 
36,445 
18,005 
33,995 

1 ,187 
150 
32,311 
123 

59 

10,114 
7,659 
987 
56 
166 
76 

230 
246 
98 
647 
286 
57,469 
■ 252 



260.186 



8.178 



Metric 
tons 

7,460 
11 
241 
111 
324,508 
25 
118 
1 ,807 
11,525 
442 
15,655 
1,217 
155 
204 
86,111 
29,271 
18,909 
25,248 
180 
195,426 
21 

61,239 



779.884 



■: 1.440.548 



156 
49 
136 
541 
4 
206 
2,443 
3 
12 

32,277 
26 

38,666 
15,804 
20,794 
34,793 
68 
1 ,897 
5,581 



67 
1 ,051 
2,275 

74 
675 
459 
25 
312 
143 
165 
2,599 
1,375 
54,942 
549 



218.167 



11 .181 



1 .295.999 



y Includes small quality of rough rice milled equivalent. 



- 36 - 



U.S. EXPORTS OF WHEAT AND 
FLOUR SHOW 15 PERCENT GAIN 

United States wheat and wheat flour (grain equivalent) exported 
between July 1 and September 30, 19^5 , showed an over-all gain of 
15 percent as compared with the same three months of 1964. Exports 
during the current period totaled 206 million bushels, of which over 
63 million bushels or 31 percent was destined for India. India, 
still in short supply, is currently the largest single market for 
U.S. wheat and flour. 

Shipments of wheat grain increased during the first quarter 
of the 1965-66 fiscal year as exports to all destination totaled 
187 million bushels compared with 157 million bushels for the same 
quarter the previous year. Approximately one-third of the 1965 
July-September quarter was destined for India. 

Shipments of U. S flour (grain equivalent) for July-September 
1965 were approximately 18 percent less than those for July- 
September 1964. Cut of 19 million bushels, 26 percent was destined 
for the United Arab Republic, 11 percent for Bolivia, and 5 percent 
for Korea. 

Inspections for export indicate the total shipments of U.S. 
wheat and flour should reach 275 million bushels by the end of 
October 1965. July-October 1964 exports of these commodities 
amounted to 2^1 million bushels. 

AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND 
FLOUR EXPORTS DECLINE 

Australian wheat and flour exports (grain equivalent) totaled 
236 million bushels in 196^-65, a decline of 18 percent compared with 
the 288 million bushels exported in 1 963-64. Lower exports to 
Europe accounted for most of the decline. 

Wheat and flour exports to Western Europeadeclined nearly 10 
million bushels in 196^-65, with most of the decline occuring in 
exports to the United Kingdom. Exports to Eastern Europe were off 
sharply due to smaller shipments to the Soviet Union. Exports to 
Asia continued at about the same level, with smaller shipments to 
Mainland China largely offset by higher exports to India. 



- 37 - 



WHEAT AND FLOUR 1/: U.S. Exports by Country of Destination, 
July-September 1°64 and July-September 1965 



Country of destination 



Julv-September 1 964 


Julv-Sebtember 1965 


Vfheat 


: Flour 2/ 


Total 


Wheat 


Flour 2/ 


Total 


1 ,000 


: 1 ,000 


1 ,000 


1 ,000 


1,000 


1 ,000 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


3/ 


: 49 


49 


u 


35 


35 


10 


: 42 


52 


— 


22 


22 




> 52 


52 




37 


37 


-- 


: 5 


5 


-- 








s 193 


193 




133 


133 


2U 


: 36 


250 


216 


6 


222 


534 


: 26 


560 


403 


10 


413 


179 


! 24 


203 


176 


35 


211 


173 


1 29 


202 


82 


40 


122 


121 


1 62 


183 


105 


36 


141 




: • 10 


10 


1 


2 


3 


9 


31 


40 




20 


20 


— 

361 


: 

: 46 
: 


— 

407 


— 

286 


— 

107 
2 


— 

393 
2 


— 


25 


— 

439 


— 
852 


20 


872 


— 


318 


318 


5 


247 


252 


— 


18 


18 


A/ 


13 


13 


— 


! 81 


81 


— 


87 


87 


— 


i 263 

! 


263 


3 
8 


244 


247 
8 


— 
— 


2,409 


— 

2,409 


1 


— ^ 

1 ,806 


1 ,807 


20,832 


224 


21 ,056 


4,288 


196 


4,484 


11 


271 


282 




243 


243 


1,721 


349 


2,070 


2,224 


495 


2,719 


1 ,863 


5 


1 ,868 


689 


172 


861 


267 


5 


272 


144 


19 


163 


— 


2 


2 


— 


12 


12 


909 


116 


1 ,025 


882 


181 


1 ,063 
80 


— 


93 


93 


— 


80 


— 


10 


10 


— 


8 


8 


2,21 2 


71 


2,283 


3.334 


67 


3.401 




4,865 


34,695 


13.699 


4,375 


18.074 


124 


2 


126 


2,526 


3 


2,529 


524 


1 


525 


2,363 


3 


2,366 


724 


2 


726 


2,882 


2 


2,884 


1 ,807 


476 


2,283 


1,114 


391 


1 ,505 


1 ,964 


200 


2.164 


6,987 


1 20 


7»1°7 


5.143 


681 


5.824 


1 5 .872 


519 


16.391 


232 


— 


232 


— 


— 


! 


— 
— 


— 
— 


— 
— 


— 

— 


12 
1 


12 
1 


— 


3 


3 


— 


6 


t fe 


— 


122 


122 


301 


100 


401 


2 


116 


118 


1 


94 


95 


23 


— 


28 


226 


— 


I 226 




9 


9 




4 


4 


2,230 


436 


2,666 


1 ,237 




51 


1 ,288 


579 




579 




135 


135 




4 


4 


93 




t 93 


86 




00 


1 ,269 


— 


1 , 269 


39 


~ 


60 


™ 

3,570 


7 

- 201 


t 7 
3,771 


807 


67 


874 


A. 969 


63 


5.032 


4,003 


778 


4.781 


1 1 ,666 


674 


12,340 


913 


15 


928 




188 


t 

; 188 


41 




41 








1 ,677 


1 


1,678 








9,742 


31 


9,773 


8.946 


167 


9.113 


12.373 


47 


12.420 


8.946 


355 


9.301 


21.519 


1 .506 


23.025 


36.484 


: 1 .548 


: 38.032 



f 



Western Hemisphere: 

Canada 

Mexico 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama Republic 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Dominican Republic 

French West Indies 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward and Windward Islands 

Netherlands Antilles 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador , 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Total 

Western Europe: 
EEC: 

Belgium-Luxembourg 

France 

Germany, West 

Italy 

Netherlands 

• Total 

Other Western Europe: 

Austria 

Azores 

Cyprus 

Denmark 

Finland 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland ., .... 

Ireland 

Malta 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Trieste 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Total 

Eastern Europe: 

Czechoslovakia 

East Germany t 

Hungary < 

Poland 

Rumania 

U.S.S.R. „ 

Yugoslavia 

Total 

Total Europe 



WHEAT AND FLOUR ^• 3 » Exports by Country of Destination, 

July-September 1964. and July-September 1965 (Continued) 







.Till y-Sopt.omhpr 1 96A 




July-September 1965 


Country of destination 


: Wheat ' 


Flour 2/ : 


Total i 


Wheat : 


Flour 2/ : 


Total 




: 1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 I 


1 ,000 




: bushels : 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


Asia: 
















_ 


U i 


14 




:: \ 








28 ■ 
88 


40 
28 
88 


515 ! 


54 i 
137 


515 
54 
137 






; 

— 






— 


" 




! 
















— 






555 i 
90 


555 
54,861 


— 

63,268 : 


294 ! 
59 


794 
63,327 






2 


2 


16 


8 

266 


24 






94 


2,748 


2,489 


2,755 






— 

48 


— 

1,911 
893 


— 
2,389 


U 
22 


U 
2,411 






893 : 


— 


658 


658 






198 i 


220 


— 


53 


53 






8 

318 s 


8 

318 


— 

2,084 


— 

177 


— 
2,261 






24 


24 




19 


19 






34 
50 


34 
11,985 


199 
17,405 


3 


208 
17,408 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 






181 


1 ,119 


4,761 


100 


4,861 




: 60 


941 


1,001 


188 


970 


1 ,158 
78 
10 




: 


— 


— 


— 


78 






14 


14 


1 


9 




: 80 


886 


966 




924 


924 




: 27 


118 


145 


98 


49 


147 




: 11,847 


167 


12,014 


20,491 


1 

1 ,282 


20,492 




2,538 


7,414 


7,357 


8,639 






172 


172 


464 


130 


594 






124 


2.430 


2.350 


136 


2.486 




91.41° 


7.585 


9° .004 


124.075 


5.438 


129.513 


Africa: 












3 
(J 
652 




: 1,110 


7 
— 

757 


1 ,117 
— 
831 


— 
— 

2 


3 

V 

650 






735 


1,110 


— 


854 


854 






99 


102 


924 


81 


1 ,005 






5,870 


16,005 


10,319 


4,693 


15,017 






13 


484 


— 


50 


50 






— 


— 


— 


2 


2 






3 


3 




— 


— 






25 


25 


— 


13 


: 13 




: 884 


— 


884 


404 


— 


, 404 




' 1 


488 


489 


: 


j 759 


. 759 






2 


2 


. 


: 








33 


33 


: 


3 


. 3 






— 


— 


— 








: 1 


32 


33 


1 


: 30 


': 31 






12 


287 


: 


. 8 


: 8 






3 


3 










, ! 817 


9 


826 


1,166 


1 13 


'■ 1,179 






36 


36 


: 


67 


: 67 






15 


15 


: 


'. 12 


: 12 






— 


— 


: 


; 2 


'. 2 






— 


— 


: 


'. -1 


! 1° 

'. 1 






— 


— 


: 


: 17 


: I 7 






11 


11 


— 






— 


— 


'. 


: 


'. 




— 


1 


1 
20 


: 19 


• 10 


'. 29 






20 


: 


i 2 


, 2 






3 


3 




, ^ 






: 8 








! 6 


























. 10 


. 10 


























! 2 


! 2 








23 












8.174 


23.351 


: 12.335 


: 7.306 


20.141 






36 


36 




: 24 


24 






: 22.166 


■ 179.111 


• 187.093 


18.691 


: 205.784 



IT Data includes shipments for relief. 2/ Grain equivalent. TrnnaM prints t.hVnngh T^n'nfldn' hnv-P h^ari in'riiifteH In dntn fhy ronntr^ Ips Of 5 t lae^ edeBtinatlop . 

lj Less than 500 bushels. 



- 39 - 



Wheat and Flour: Australia's exports by country of destination, July-June 1963-64. and 1964-65 







July 1963-June 1964 


: 


July 


1964-June 1965 




Country of destination 


: Wheat : 


Flour 1/ : 


Total s 


: 

Wheat : 


Flour 1/ : 


Total 




: 1 ,000 


1 ,000 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 : 


1 ,000 




: bushels : 


bushels : 


bushels : 


bushels : 


bushels : 


bushels 


Western Hemisphere: 
















; . 


118 i 


118 i 


i 


116 1 


116 






30 : 


30 : 


, 


81 : 


81 




: 


3 : 


3 i 


, 


6 : 


6 




. , ' 11 : 


65 : 


76 : 


: 


4 : 


4 




. . * — : 


13 : 


13 ! 


— : 


7 : 


7 




.. : — : 


29 ■ 


29 i 


— 1 


9 : 


9 






19 : 


19 i 


— 1 


. 







. ■ : — i 


165 i 


165 : 


— s 


264 : 


264 






7 


8 


: 


37 ; 


37 




..i 12 


449 


461 


___ . 


524 : 


524 


Western Europe: 














EEC: 
















. 


— : 


— 


36 1 


2 : 


38 




8,304 


2/ 


8,304 


— 





— 




— 


2 


2 


— 





— 




8.304 


2 


8.306 


36 


2 


38 


Other Western Europe: 
















_ 


5 


5 





5 '. 


5 




1 ,798 




1 ,805 


388 




388 









679 


851 


5 ! 


856 









4,169 


3,596 





3,596 




.., 1,236 





1 ,236 












2,234 


28,568 


19,691 


2,305 


21 ,996 






12 


12 


— 


26 


26 






2.253 


36 .474 


24 r 526 


2.341 


26 . 867 


Eastern Europe: 





















1 ,417 





j 









6.149 


55.955 


19.040 





19.040 






6.149 


57.372 


19.040 





19.040 




..: 93,743 


8.409 


102.152 


43.602 


2.343 


45.945 


Asia: 














Slno Bloc: 
















..= 89,964 





89,964 


80,048 





80,048 




: 







1 .663 





1.663 




.. : 89.964 


— 


89.964 


81 .711 





81 .711 


Other Asia: 
















..= 14 


174 


188 


1 8 


140 


143 




: 


108 


108 


t 


— 






: 


28 


28 


I 


8 


8 




324 


21 


345 


! 










.. : 14 


5,772 


5,786 


1 18 


8,783 


8,801 




: 2,051 


164 


2,215 


i 2,249 


1 122 


2,371 




.. : 7,572 


1 


7,573 


: 16,176 


4 


16,180 




: 


225 


225 


1 146 


' 437 


583 




.. : 1,163 


15 


1,178 


: 8,983 


' 1 


8,984 




4,876 





4,876 


' 2,450 


: — 


2,450 




.. : 244 





: 244 




: 






18,800 


2/ 


18,800 


: 16,276 


I 


• 16,276 




..; 3,143 


2/ 


i 3,143 


: — 











724 


1 724 


' 373 


; 633 


1 ,006 




.. ! 5,274 


1 


' 5,275 


' 1 ,959 




1 ,959 




. . : 187 


3,979 


: 4,166 


1 3,669 


! 4,476 


1 8,145 




..= 2/ 


99 


: 99 




! 






2,043 


1 15 


: 2,058 


1 2,173 


1 6 


2,179 




.. : 829 


2,323 


I 3,152 




' 1,215 


1 1,215 




: 


! 122 


1 122 


: 


> 137 


137 




: 2J 


' 230 


1 230 


: 









: 746 


577 


1 1,323 


« 710 


■ 689 


1 1 ,399 




1 ,588 


2,180 


! 3,768 


1 








1,213 


1 ,858 


! 3,071 


! 1 ,802 


' 2,075 


: 3,877 




.. : 3,566 


' 2/ 


s 3,566 


! 5,191 


I 


: 5,191 




..= 565 


: 676 


' 1,241 


! 450 


' 390 


: 840 




— 


60 


I 60 


I 


! 34 


1 34 




84 


: 712 


; 796 


49 


: 718 


'■ 767 




54.296 


2: . 64 


■ 74.360 


: 62.682 


' 19.868 


: 82,550 




.. : 144,260 


20,064 


164,324 


: 144.393 


1 19.868 


=164.261 


Oceania: 






5 












! 9 


' 12 


! 3 


' 14 


! 17 






933 


! 967 


6 


1 930 


! 936 






; 8 


: 1 ,932 


18 


8 


; 26 






414 


425 


1 9 


639 


; 648 






2 


7,797 


5,919 


1 


i 5,920 






163 


' 187 


; 26 


! 163 


! 189 






1 .529 


11 ,320 


5.981 


1 .755 


' 7.736 


Africa: 










. 








I 69 


I 354 


', 729 


, 588 


• 1,317 






i 11 






. 24 


: 24 




. . : 343 


: 3 


; 346 


! 67 




: 67 






: 1 


1 





1 27 


: 27 






! 977 


! 978 


, 1 


: 796 


: 797 






I 14 


I 959 


, 777 


! 12 


: 789 






: 266 


4,142 


, 1 ,498 


: 436 


: 1,934 






: 50 


, 377 


s — 


1 56 


: 56 






: 10 


1 10 




: 8 


: 8 






: 210 


1 223 


! U 


: 160 


: 174 






: £ 


: 4 


T 3 


: 11 


. 14 






: 1.615 


7.405 


; 3.089 


: 2.118 


: 5.207 




..: 2,717 


: 1 


: J,71» 


t 

! 12,611 




: 12,611 






: 32,067 


: 288.380 


: 209.676 


: 26.608 


S36.284 



1/ Grain equivalent. 2/ Less than 500 bushels. 



Compiled from Official records, Foreign Agricultural Service. 



- 40 



WORLD RAPESEED PRODUCTION 
AT ALLTIME HIGH 



Estimated at nearly 5.0 million short tons, world rape seed production 
in 1965 established a record. The 1965 outturn is one-fourth greater 
than that of 1964 and 30 percent above the 1955-59 average. 

The major fa e c~Cdr-s pertinent to the 1965 crop include: (l) A substan- 
tial increase in India's crop despite reduced acreage; (2) a phenomenal 
rise in Canadian production resulting from acreage expansion; (3) 
record production in Europe, largely because of increased acreages in 
Poland, France and Sweden; and (4) an estimated increase in production 
in Mainland China, largely reflecting more favorable growing conditions. 

North America : Production in Canada, the world's leading exporter, 
rose by 240,000 tons from last year's record. The official estimate, 
somewhat above trade estimates, indicates an output four times the average 
annual production during the 1955-59 period. The sharp rise from 1964 
resulted from an estimated 8l percent expansion in acreage. 

This sharp expansion in Canadian seedings was stimulated by increas- 
ing producer prices in recent years which have resulted in a further 
shift from seedings of wheat. Yields, although below those of 1963 and 
1964, were one-eighth above the average of the 1955-59 period. Prices 
through mid-December have continued to rise because forward sales for 
export have exceeded farmers' marketings. A sizable portion of this 
year's crop will, therefore, not move into export channels until sometime 
later in 1966. 

South America : Chilean output also rose to a new high, despite re- 
duced yields. The rise, of reflecting increased seedings- -four-fifths 
above those of a year earlier--took place as a result of increased do- 
mestic prices for rapeseed in that country. 

Western Europe : Rapeseed production in France, at a, record volume, 
was one -fifth above that in 1964 and more than double the average annual 
production during the 1955-59 period. The increase from 1964 reflected 
expanded acreage, yields being lower because of unfavorable weather. The 
gain has caused some marketing problems since the French edible oil indus- 
try must either blend this oil with other oils or attempt to export it. 
French rapeseed exports, largely seed as such, increased sharply in 1965. 
Major destinations were Algeria, Italy and West Germany. 

Swedish production (largely winter rape) increased by about 11 per- 
cent from the high tonnage of 1964 because of increased acreage. Rape- 
seed production has grown in popularity because of its lower labor 
requirements as well as the fact that prices have gained substantially 
and a large volume traditionally is exported, largely to West Germany, 
Italy and Poland. 

West German rapeseed acreage, which is geared to the German govern- 
ment's price support system, increased slightly in 1965. However, pro- 
duction declined slightly because of less favorable growing conditions. 

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- 42 - 



In Denmark the 1965 rape seed crop, especially that sown in the spring, was 
adversely affected by unfavorable weather conditions. Despite increased acre- 
age, production declined significantly. Virtually all of the Danish crop is for 
export because of the margarine manufacturers' preference for other veg. oils. 

Eastern Europe; Poland, reportedly harvesting a record crop, ranked 
fourth in 1965 in world production of rapeseed. The outturn, indicated at 
127^500 tons above that in 196L, rose chiefly because of expanded acreage — 
up nearly 30 percent from a year ago. Comparably, yields increased by 11 
percent. Production in East Germany is believed to have increased somewhat 
as a result of higher yields and slightly larger seedings. Acreage is esti- 
mated fractionally below the average during the 19^-^9 period. Czechoslo- 
vakia's 1965 rapeseed crop was one-third above last year's revised estimate. 

Asia: In India, the world's largest rapeseed producer, output increased 
by about 520,000 tons. This increase accounts for more than one-half of 
the net rise in 1965 world production, _,but none of the Indian increase is 
likely to be exported. The increase was due to yields markedly above 
those of the previous year; acreage declined by 7 percent. 

The World's second major producer of rapeseed, Mainland China, is 
estimated to have harvested a somewhat larger crop, reflecting slightly im- 
proved yields. Competition for tillable land, however, for use in the 
production of food crops, continues to restrict the area sown to rapeseed 
substantially below that prior to 196l. 

In Japan, despite a continued strong demand among oilseed crushers, 
domestic rapeseed production, at less than one-half the tonnage produced 
in the 19$^-^9 period, declined in 1965. Yields were significantly above 
those in 196h 5 but seedings declined by more than one-fourth to the smallest 
acreage in recent years. Since some crushers are anxious to maintain 
stable supplies., import requirements have in recent ??ears risen sharply. 
Practically all of these imports are supplied by Canada. 

Pakistan's rapeseed output equaled 196U production due to a slightly 
larger yield. Acreage declined because of heavy rains at seeding time and 
also increased cultivation of rice. 



WORLD PEPPER TRADE 

World exports of black and white pepper (Piper nigrum L. ) during 196I| 
were substantially under the large 1963 shipments of 173.2 million pounds, 
reflecting lower Indonesian and Indian exports. However, the sharp fall in 
exports from these countries was partly offset by increased shipments from 
Brazil, Sarawak, and the Malagasy Republic. Preliminary statistics indicate 
that world pepper trade for 1965 will be larger, as rather sharp increases 
have been recorded in exports from India, Sarawak, and Brazil. 

The export check-price levels implemented last year by India and 
Indonesia — which account for over two-thirds of world production — have 
continued to help support pepper prices in 1965 at an average level of 
approximately 10 cents per pound ^ve the 196U annual average of 38.8 
cents per pound. . 



Exrorts from India durin^ 1964 totaled 36.2 million rounds, down 
13 percent from, the previous year as a result of sharply curtailed 
shipments to the United States. However, the resumption of lar n e scale 
buying by the U.S. this year, of 9.5 million pounds, has helped to boost 
exports for the first 6-m.onths of 1965 to 35.5 million pounds — a 32 
percent increase over the corresponding period a year earlier, and 
approximatinr total 1964 shipments. 

India's exports to the Soviet Bloc during January-June 1965 
continued at high levels--15.5 million pounds, against 14.5 million 
during the 6-month 1964 period. The Soviet Union is now India's largest 
customer. The Soviets, together with other Bloc nations, have received 
about one-half of the Indian exports since 1963. 

The Indian Government is corsiderint 7 a plan to commission the 
State Tradin" Corporation to purchase pepper for stabilization purposes. 
However, neither ouantities nor prices to be involved in this scheme 
have yet been announced. Also, the government has plans for an export 
quota arrangement, the implementation date of which, has now been 
postponed indefinitely. Under this proposed Man, export quotas would 
have been allotted to established shippers, based on their highest 
export level during the 1960-64 period. Accord inc to the government, 
this plan would help to stabilize prices and develone export markets by 
eliminating competition amon rr exporters. 

The Indonesian Government has established a new state trading 
organization known as "LAPr'UO" to be the sole exporter of pepper. This 
organization will also be responsible for trade nromotion, market 
research, and. improvement of quality and production net hods. Offices 
are to be established in both New York and Rotterdam to implement sales 
and marketing programs. 

On the basis of more complete data from. Indonesia, 1963 exports 
have been revised upward to an exceptionally large 96.1 million pounds, 
more than double the previous year's level. Fxports during the first 
8-m,onths of 1964 (the latest data available) amounted to 31.2 million 
pounds, well under the corresponding period a year earlier. 

Malaysia's (Sarawak only) exports during 1964 reached 27.1 million 
pounds, 6-percent over the previous year. The release of stocks and 
larger production have boosted shipments for the first 7-months of 
1965 to 24 million pounds, almost double the exports of the correspondin 
period a year earlier. Despite continued efforts to export direct, 
nearly four-fifths of the crop is still channeled through Singapore. 



- kk - 



BLACK AND WHITE PEPPER: Exports from specified producing countries, 

1964 with comparisons 



Continent and country 


' Average 


: 1962 


1963 


: 1964 1/ 




: 1,000 
: pounds 


" 1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


Asia: 


.: 1,978 

53,863 
.: 30,426 


: 1,803 
: 101 
. 55,142 
: 38,850 
- 25,935 


: 1,915 
: 208 
: 41,736 
. 96,127 
- 25,627 


: 1,814 
: 1,236 
36,217 
3^31,184 
: 27,136 






121,831 


165,613 


: 97,587 


Africa: 


.: 76 


: 75 
: 2,357 ' 
132 


; 6/ 

1,989 

7/ 393 


I 6/ 

4,215 
jj 226 


Total 


': 1,480 


2,564 


2,382 


4,441 






6,094 


: 5,240 


: 8,920 






130,489 


• 173,235 


. 110,948 



l/ Preliminary. 2/ Includes estimated unregistered exports to 
Singapore, jj January- August only. 4/ Sarawak only. jj/ Prior 
to 1962 included with Nigeria. 6/ Not available, jj Includes 
pimento. 8/ Brazil only. 

Foreign Agricultural Service. Prepared or estimated on the basis 
of official statistics of foreign governments, other foreign source 
material, reports of Agricultural Attaches and Foreign Service 
Officers, results of office research and related information. 



- 45 - 



Reexports of pepper from Singapore during 1964 totaled 32. 7 million 
pounds, down sharply from the 1963 level of 68.5 million because of the 
trade embargo with Indonesia. However , some Indonesian pepper is still 
reaching the Singapore entrepot through smuggling. Reexports during the 
first half of 1965--at 16.3 million pounds--are running 24-percent ahead 
of the similar period last year because of increasing supplies being made 
available from Sarawak. 

Pepper exports from Brazil through October 1965 have approximated 
11 . 5 million pounds , exceeding the annual totals of any preceding year . 
More pepper is being made available for export as new plantings come into 
bearing. A new area is being opened to pepper cultivation in the coastal 
regions north of Santos in the State of Sao Paulo. In 1964, Brazil was 
the second largest supplied of pepper to the United States . 

Exports from the Malagasy Republic during 1964 were a record 4.2 
million pounds. Shipments during the first 8 months of 1965 totaled 1.5 
million, compared with 1.8 million founds for the January-August 1964 
period . 



- 46 - 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20250 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

U. f. DEPARTMENT OF AORICULTURE 



Official Business 



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and return the whole sheet to: 

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