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CHINOOK 

1913 





































































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Ol)£ (Tl)iitooK 


1913 



NEWS BUREAU 
WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY 
PULLMAN, WASHINGTON 


Comprising Volume 'D^lrteen of l^e Annual 3\ecor6 

at tl)e 

State College of Washington 


EDITED BY 


Junior Class 


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PETER McGREGOR 
President of the Board of Regents 






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NEWS BUREALf 

Washington state yN|tygg; 

»U*Ma|, WA§ttlN6f8&' 



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X5o ^ou 

"peter 5ltc<&regor 


^l)at we may stjow ho all our apprecia¬ 
tion of the untying loyalty—of tlje 


faithful and patient service you are giving 
us—tl)ls Z5^lrteentl> Volume of tl)e 
Chinook Is "Dedicated. 





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(Greetings 


"<5o tt)05e persons wbo consider it tbelr 
duty to criticise t^e work of tl)ls publica¬ 
tion, we tender our— 

IKeartiest Salutation. 




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Contents 


Ipart One—X5h<* State College 

of Washington 

"part Cwc _ _ _ 

_ 13h^ Classes 

Ipart ^Ijree . __ _ _ __ 

... 

^partTFour_ _ __ _ . 

Organisations 

"Part Tlve __ 

..- Tif<t 

"Part Six_. __ 

__ "^Advertising 



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ENOCH A. BRYAN 
President of the College 
































Our "jpresident 




Our president holds a warm place in the heart of every student connected 
with the State College of Washington. We realize full well that the growth, the 
development of the State College has not been due to the natural outgrowth of 
the economic conditions of Washington, but rather that the magnificent buildings, 
the atmosphere of learning, the joys, the hopes, the memories, all, in fact, that 
make the institution dear to our hearts, have been brought about chiefly through 

the efforts of one man—Enoch Albert 
Bryan—that but for his untiring and 
persistent work the State College would 
stand today as it did fifteen or twenty 
years ago, an agricultural college in 
embryo, without organization, without 
equipment, and without support. Need¬ 
less to say, because of this great work, 
because he has spent a great share of his 
life in the upbuilding of this institution 
in order that we, as students, might reap 
the reward, President Bryan is fully de¬ 
serving of the fullest measure of gratitude 
and love that we can offer. 

But not in our minds alone does Presi 
dent Bryan hold an important place, for 
he is generally recognized throughout the 
Pres. Bryan at Twenty-five West as one of its leading educators. It 

would be profitable indeed to review the details of a life so devoted to our interests; 
a life, the influence of which has been so great; however, it is only necessary to glance 
at his work and his characteristics as a man to determine why he has attained this 
position of prominence and gained the admiration of all who know him. 

His work, prior to the time of his coming to Washington, can best be explained 
by quoting from an edition of the “Commercial Vincennes,” of Vincennes, Ind., 
dated some twenty years ago. It reads as follows: “President E. A. Bryan has 
long been recognized as one of the leading educators of the State of Indiana. He 
is a graduate of Indiana University at Bloomington and Harvard University at 
Cambridge. After leaving school he taught for a while in the schools of Grayville, 
III. From thence he was called to the Presidency of the Vincennes University. He 





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has served in that capacity for eleven years with perfect satisfaction to the trustees, 
patrons and people at large. He took charge at a time when the prestige of the 
institution was not high, and when it was greatly in need of reorganization. Pro¬ 
fessor Bryan has really re-created the University and made it one of the foremost 
educational institutions in the state. He has been a tireless worker and displayed 
great powers of organization. As an instructor he is not surpassed in the state. His 
intelligent energy and high scholarship easily give him a place among the leading edu¬ 
cators of this state. He has been president of the State Teachers* Association and 
of the College Association of Indiana.** 

President Bryan was called from Vincennes to take up his work at this College 
on September 13, 1893. The life of the institution was at ebb tide. Nothing in 
the way of courses or text books were provided. The institution was in a state of 
disorganization. And, too, it was the time of the financial panic. Added to this 
was the failure of wheat crops in Washington. Indeed, the prospect was enough to 
discourage the strongest heart. At such a time many a man would have failed. 
In fact. Professor Lilly and Professor Heston, the two preceding presidents, had 
failed miserably. But President Bryan 
met the situation with a dauntless spirit, 
and opened the college year in a little old 
red wooden building known as College 
Hall, with a faculty of ten and a stu¬ 
dent body of twenty-three. However, if 
the first year was discouraging the follow¬ 
ing years were doubly so. The crop fail¬ 
ures continued. A period of general de¬ 
pression ensued. Yet, President Bryan 
never once wavered from his course. These 
inevitable circumstances only caused him 
to work with greater zeal and determi¬ 
nation. 

Moreover, his task was made incon¬ 
ceivably harder because of political and 
social opposition. For it was necessary 
for him to lobby with narrow-minded Pres. Bryan at Thirty-five 

politicians and explain the needs of such an institution, to postpone improvements 
until appropriations could be secured, to explain to the ignorant and uneducated, who 
knew nothing concerning the College, and cared less, to overcome the attacks of the 



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enemies of the school, who desired only to see its downfall, and withstand the mud- 
shnging of their paid newspapers. It has been necessary for our president to pass 
through all such conditions as these to realize his aim. How it has been possible 
for him to master such circumstances, to cope with such odds, and emerge victorious, 
few of us can tell. He alone knows. 

We might surmise his success due to persistency, keen judgment, strong will 
power, and organizing ability. In any case, those who are acquainted with Presi¬ 
dent Bryan will say that he has all of these qualities. The results that he has 
accomplished show that he has worked with an untiring energy, that his judgment 



Old College Hall 

has seldom erred, that he has ruled with an iron hand, and that his plans of organi¬ 
zation have developed until the State College stands today as a record of his con¬ 
structive ability, as a monument to his great work. 

Such achievements, such qualities as these, no doubt, explain why President 
Bryan is recognized to be so great an administrative genius; they explain why he 
has attained so high a position of prominence in the minds of those who have known 
him or felt his influence. But there is still another quality in his life that means 
more than any other to us as students who come in contact with him daily, and 


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which is, in a measure, indicative of his success. It is his willingness to ever lend 
an attentive ear to those students who are in need of guidance. Never, no matter 
how heavy his own duties and cares, has he refused to listen to the troubles of the 
student. It has been he to whom we could look at all times for friendly advice 
and wise direction, who has been ever ready to point out the right course and suggest 
the best methods. It is because of this interest, this attention to the welfare of the 
students, that he has won such a warm place in all our hearts. And, as we see 
him day after day on the campus, as we associate with him in social and business 
life, this feeling of respect and of reverence passes into a love which knows no les¬ 
sening or weakening, but grows deeper and stronger as time advances. 

And so, in addition to the qualities that make of President Bryan an adminis¬ 
trative genius, which we admire, comes that which commands respect and love. 
The influence such a life has upon others, in how deep a sense such a personality 
is educative to every human soul with which it is associated, we cannot say, we can 
only feel. President Bryan offers to us a shining example of a character which 
long has stood square and firm before the world—a great man using great gifts in 
the service of state and of that state’s people. Anything we might say or do, in 
expression of our deep feeling of regard for our president, would be weak as com¬ 
pared with his great service. We can only voice this sentiment: President Bryan, 
every one of your students, from those to whom you handed diplomas in 1894 to 
those to whom you will hand diplomas in the future, look to you as a great leader 
of a great movement. We salute you as the ideal to which we may well aspire 
but hardly hope to reach. 







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O. L. WALLER 
Vice President of the College 

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THE STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON 


The State College was founded to promote the interests of liberal and practical 
education. To this end it offers two kinds of training: One fits men and women 
for service; it requires accuracy and precision, is quantitive in character, and is a 
study of equations and of formulae. It qualifies for earning a living and for render¬ 
ing service as a productive worker. The other educates for citizenship; it qualifies 
men and women to be useful to society; gives them an interest in the betterment of 
humanity, makes them public spirited; broadens their knowledge of government; 
protects them against the demagogue, and gives them a basis from which to get the 
most enjoyment out of life and to render the greatest uplift to their fellowmen. 

The State College, in its courses in science, supplies the exact, the quantitative 
knowledge that everyone needs to become a part in the industrial development of 
the State. By means of its courses in the humanities it develops interest in the 
welfare of the race and capacity for co-operation in general social activities, and 
at the same time it fits one to get the greatest enjoyment from life. 

O. L. WALLER. 



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^Browne Johnson McCroskey 

T roy McGregor 


^ftoar6 of Regents 

Governor Marion E. Hay, Ex-officio. 

Peter McGregor, President. Lee A. Johnson, Vice President 

*J. J. Browne D. S. Troy 

R. C. McCroskey E. A. Bryan, Ex-officio Secretary 

J. G. Lewis, Ex-officio Treasurer 

“Executive Officers of tl)* (Tollege 

Enoch A. Bryan, President Osmar L. Waller, Vice-President 

Elton Fulmer, Dean of College Frank T. Barnard, Registrar 

- Rhoda M. White, Dean of Women 

^Deceased William C. Kruegel, Accountant 



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Jinnett Cooil Doelle 

Folger Chambers McCroskey 

Williams Sorenson 


Jinnett Cooil Doelle 

Folger Chambers McCroskey 

Williams Sorenson 

TExccuttve Officers of Students’ "Assembly 

C. J. Cooil.President 

Edna Folger...First Vice President 

H. M. Chambers..Second Vice President 

E. R. Jinnett.Third Vice President 

S. O. Sorenson...,.Fourth Vice President 

Walter Williams...Fifth Vice President 

Henry Doelle..... Treasurer 

Gladys McCroskey.. Secretary 


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^Departments of instruction 


Department. 

Mathematics and Civil Engineering. 

Chemistry ... 

Agriculture.... 

Veterinary Science. 

Forestry... 

Mining Engineering. 

Geology. 

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. 

Economic Science and History. 

English. 

Education. 

Modern Languages. 

Latin. 

Home Economics. 

Botany... 

Zoology. 

Horticulture. 

Farm Extension. 

Pharmacy. 

Elementary Science. 

Music. 

Military. 


Head of Department. 

.Osmar L. Waller 

.Elton Fulmer 

.Roscoe W. Thatcher 

.Sofus B. Nelson 

.G. L. Clothier 

..Francis A. Thomson 

.Solon Shedd 

.Hubert V. Carpenter 

.A. W. Taylor 

.Bruce McCully 

.A. A. Cleveland 

.Frank C. ChaJfant 

.A. E. Evans 

_Josephine T. Berry 

.R. K. Beattie 

.A. L. Melander 

...O. M. Morris 

.R. C. Ashby 

.G. H. Watt 

.F. O. Kreager 

.W. B. Strong 

.H. Kimbrough 

.C. R. Bennett 


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Seventeen 














































Sewell Hurd Goff Bendixen Knight 
Casad Hurd Jones Humphrey Perry McCain 
Edwards Spurling Lewis Waller Sampson Brislawn Russell 
Millington Doolittle Gordon Kennedy Hecht Alway 

Civil TEnglnccrlitgi Society 

OFFICERS 
First Semester 




M. P. Brislawn.. 

E. H. Schunneman. 

B. O. Bendixen.. 

Second Semester 

W. E. Doolittle.......... 

C. M. Howard.. 

O. A. Lewis.. 

Roll. 


...President 

.Vice President 

Secretary-T reasurer 


.President 

.Vice President 

Secretary-T reasurer 


M. P. Brislawn 

B. O. Bendixen 
R. Meyer 

C. E. Knight 
L. Thuesen 

R. W. Kennedy 
R. M. Alway 
G. A. Spurling 
C. M. Howard 
W. H. Amos 
W. G. Atwell 


A. M. Goff 
E. H. Schunneman 
P. G. Wilson 
H. G. Perry 
W. E. Doolittle 
O. A. Lewis 

E. B. Parker 

F. G. Jones 

R. E. T. Merrifield 
H. A. Sewell 
C. A. Isaacs 


J. L. Winehart 
E. Fountain 
T. A. Allan 
L. V. Edwards 
C. J. Lindblad 
Frank Brownell 
Walter Penick 
Ralph Lowry 
H. G. Millington 




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ELTON FULMER, Dean of the College 


With one of the best equipped laboratories in the Northwest, with a staff of 
trained and skilled instructors in their particular line of work, the Department of 
Chemistry at the State College of Washington stands high among similar courses 
of learning in other colleges and universities of this country. The success of this 
department must be largely attributed to its head, Elton Fulmer, Dean of the College 
and Chemist for the State of Washington, a man who is today one of the recognized 
leaders in America among men of his profession. 

When Dean Fulmer came to Pullman in 1894 this department was merely 
an infant. But under his direct supervision, during nineteen years of ceaseless, earnest 
toil and effort, it has been built up to its present high standard of efficiency, and 
we owe much to him who has accomplished this work for us. 

It is the purpose of this department to fit men and women to become quick 

and accurate observers; to fit them to fill governmental positions an to become 

instructors of chemistry in other institutions of learning. It is the purpose of this 

department to give to all students a knowledge of the elementary principles of 
chemistry, thus enabling them to understand more clearly simple chemical reactions 
which are constantly taking place in everyday life; and it is for the fulfillment of 
these purposes that the departmental instructors are striving. 

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Twenty-two 


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Guy Stambaugh 
The Dairy Exhibit 
Four Valuable Boys 
“Skinny and Coltie” 


New Arrivals 
Prof. McDonald 

Sheep on College Farm 


Harry Raymond 
A Real Beauty 
Stock Judging Class 
Unbewust, the Cowboy 


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Twenty-three 














































































































Cornwall 

Sorenson 


Cooke 

Morgan 


Croonquist 

Harding 


Lynch 

German 


Rosecrans 

Schnebly 


Animal Tfusbaitir? <Tlub 


S. A. Sorenson .Secretary 


Officers, 1911-1912. 

it D^'c4 nC k .-.—President L. V. Cooke ...Treasurer 

F. B. Schnebly .;.Vice-President 

ROLL 

H. A. Croonquist 
S. A. Sorenson 
Thomas Allan 
C. Suver 
O. P. Thompson 


R. A. Lynch 
C. W. Morgan 
L. V. Cooke 
O. L. Cornwall 
W. L. Steward 
H. C. Rosen 


G. C. German 
W. V. Shimek 
J. A. Sorenson 
O. A. Rosecrans 

H. Grover 
F. B. Schnebly 

THE STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

The Department of Animal Husbandry sent a stock 
judging team to Spokane Fair last fall which won 
first place in an open intercollegiate stock judging 
contest, offered by that association. Virgil McWhorter, 
a member of that team, was awarded highest indivi¬ 
dual score of the day. 

This same team, with the addition of Otis Fletcher, 
went to the Fat Slock Show at Portland, Oregon, 
and again won first honors in an intercollegiate con¬ 
test in which there were five teams entered- 

In addition to the winnings of this team, Warren 
Lincoln entered and won an individual contest offered 
by the Slate Fair at North Yakima. 

The record of these men in the live stock arena 
shows only too plainly that our students in Animal 
Husbandry are learning the practical as well as the 
theoretical side of the live stock industry. The effi¬ 
ciency of this department must be attributed to its McWhorter, O. T. McWhorter, V. O 
head, Prof. McDonald, the coach of this team, who Reilly 

today a recognized authority on live stock in the Davis Lincoln 



Northwest. 


Spokane Stock Judging Team. 


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Twenty-four 


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Folsom Brown Galbraith Unbewust Wegner 

Hahner Clemans Ralston Cornwall Johnson Elliot 

Howard Kalkus McCoy Richardson 

Veterinary MteMcal Society 

Organized 1901 

OFFICERS 
First Semester 

M. T. Clemans. Presiddht 

A. R. Galbraith.....Vice-President 

O. S. Brown.Secretary-Treasurer 

J. P. Johnson... .Sergeant-at-Arms 

H. D. Richmond.Librarian 

Second Semester 

A. R. Hahner. President 

O. L. Cornwall. Vice-President 

G. A. Unbewust......Secretary-Treasurer 

J. P. Johnson.Sergeant-at-Arms 

Roll 

A. R. Galbraith A. R. Hahner 

M. T. Clemans H. S. Knapp 

O. S. Brown O. L. Cornwall 

L. E. Ellithorpe G. A. Unbewust 

T. A. Elliot J. P. Johnson 

H. D. Richmond J. H. McCoy 

G. P. Howard G. L. Folsom 

Faculty) 

Dr. W. E. Ralston Dr. J. J. Heldring 

Dr. E. E. Wegner Dr J. W. Kalkus 


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Twenty-six 


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‘Vet” Galbraith, Ex-Driver 


‘All Specimens’ 


In the Dissecting Room At Work on the Teeth Ready for a “Killing” 

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Twenty-seven 































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Twenty-eight 


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Carlson Tyrer Neuman Swanson Keffer Preissner 

Mason Rosenkranz Reeder Seaton Wilkinson 

Doelle Menaglia Taylor Thomson Sampson Puckett 

Shelledy Kinney Wharton Sands Stone 

5Ztltthtg ^Engineering Society 


OFFICERS 

First Semester 

J. I. Preissner....President 

R H. Rosenkranz....Vice President 

H. E. Doelle.Secretary-Treasurer 

R. Keffer......Press Correspondent 

B. R. Kinney. Sergeant-at-Arms 

Second Semester 

H. E. Doelle.President 

A. R. Neuman. . Vice-President 

B. R. Kinney.. Secretary-Treasurer 

J. I. Preissner. ...Press Correspondent 

Roll 

C. G. F. Carlson F. .H Miller R. B. Shelledy 

H. E. Doelle W. E. Mitchell V. V. Sproat 

H. Howse A. R. Neuman F. W. Stone 

R. Keffer J. I. Preissner S. A. Swanson 

B. R. Kinney G. K. Reeder T. D. Tyrer 

F.. B. Mason T. E. Puckett C. P. Wharton 

V. A. Menaglia T. H. Rosenkranz R. L. Wilkinson 

R. W. Merritt W. E. Sands C. A. Seaton 

Jno. F. Foran 




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With its large and comprehensive array of geological books and papers, its 
many hundreds of fossils, rock and mineral specimens from the entire world, with 
special emphasis being placed on collections from the United States and particularly 
the Northwest and the State of Washington, its well equipped laboratories for special 
as well as for regular geological work, and the opportunities for study under the 
direct supervision of the head of the department. Dr. Solon Shedd, a recognized 
Northwest authority on all things geological, the department of geology bears well its 
reputation of being the best of its kind in the entire Northwest. The best facilities 
obtainable have been provided for work in petrography, crystallography and paleon¬ 
tology, as well as structural and dynamical geology. 

It is the aim of the department to fit graduate students for work in teaching, 
where there is a broad field, for positions on the United States Geological Survey, 
State Surveys, for special research work, and for work in the economic branches of the 
subject. The student is taught to observe carefully, and to draw correct conclu¬ 
sions from his observations, and to this end, a considerable amount of field work 
is required of the student. 



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Galward 
. LaViolette 
C. DuVall 
B. McElroy 


H. V. Carpenter 
J. Ismay 
H. Yales 
J. Semple 


B. Dass 

C. Dunphy 
A. B. Jones 
L. E. Wright 
A. Redpath 


M. K. Akers 

N. Lake 
R. Jeffery 

J. A. Ramsey 


J. Beckman 
W. McKinney 
M. E. Baumeister 
E. S. Lockwood 


-American ^Institute TElectrlcal £n<jlneers 
Cocat Officers 

£ r ° f - H. V. Carpenter. .. Chairman 

Prof. M. K. Akers.Secretary 

STUDENT OFFICERS 

Firs/ Semester Second Semper 

J* ^ a,es .— Student Chairman . C 

W. A. Gatward. Student Secretary . 


A. Dunphy 
M. E. Baumeister 




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Thirty-four 


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Boddy Parkhurst Jackson Henning Ramerman Taylor 
Matsen Meyer McRae Kimm Gregory Gaines English 
Fletcher Shearer Willey 

Richardson Jinnett Neuman Maxwell Wallers Wiley Rake 


Isabel! McRae 


Social Science (Tlub 

Executive Committee 
A. W. Taylor 


H. M. Chambers 


The Social Science Club includes in its membership all students enrolled in 
the Department of Economic Science and History. The chief purpose of this club 
is to give greater solidarity to this branch of college work, and to provide a means 
of closer co-operation between students and faculty of this department. Meetings 
are held every two weeks, at which various topics of current interest are brought up 
for discussion. In addition to this, lectures are frequently delivered before the club 
by persons not connected with this institution. During the past year special effort 
has been made to extend this phase of the organization’s activity. 

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Thirty-six 


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The Department of English aims to do its part in accomplishing the proper 
purpose of a College, namely, such a development of character, personality and tech¬ 
nical skill as shall result in efficiency in service. To this end it affords opportunity 
for attaining mastery of our mother tongue in speech and writing, and for acquiring 
the culture that comes from contact with great minds and great lives through the pages 
of literature. For living in the best sense, for discharging with credit the various 
duties that come upon a person in our complex modern world, and at the same time 
receiving the maximum of personal pleasure and profit, such training as the depart¬ 
ment gives is indispensible. As a preparation for teaching, preaching, journalism, law 
or politics, for any occupation that involves public writing or speaking, the depart¬ 
ment offers distinct and special advantages. 



The Department of Education was established to meet the obligation of train¬ 
ing teachers imposed upon the College by both state and national law. This depart¬ 
ment, in close co-operation with other departments of the College, is preparing teachers 
of the various subjects taught in high schools, such as English, Latin, Modern Lan¬ 
guages, History, Mathematics and the sciences; and teachers and supervisors of such 
special subjects as Agriculture, Horticulture, Manual Training and Domestic Economy. 

The rapid development of the department during the few years since its estab¬ 
lishment necessitated, this year, the employment of an additional instructor, and this 
increase in the teaching force has made possible the addition of several new courses 
in Education, which have been announced for next year. 

One of the important features just added to the department is the library of 
high school text-books, containing the texts which are being used in the high school of 
the state or which are being urged for adoption. These texts form the beginning 
of a pedagogical museum which is intended to serve the needs not only of the students 
of the College but of superintendents, teachers and others interested in educational 
devices and equipment. 

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Thirty-seven 


















































Never before has the demand for modern language training been so imperative 
as today. Throughout the civilized world the effort is to bring together its inhab¬ 
itants. The world is daily growing smaller. The whole trend of invention is to 
make nations closer neighbors and keener competitors. Translation, at best inade¬ 
quate, cannot keep pace with the giant strides of inventive genius, scientific research 
and social progress. The nation that wins in the race for commercial, industrial or 
intellectual supremacy must read the languages and speak the tongues of other lands. 

The Modern Language Department is disproving the statement so often made, 
that college instruction in modern languages is neither practical nor thorough. It is 
not giving its students a few facts about the languages, but the languages themselves; 
not the ability to laboriously dig out the meaning of a few classics, but the power 
to read and enjoy the entire literature; not the faulty stammering of a few foreign 
phrases, but the idiomatic life of the languages. It is demonstrating that American 
students, through careful phonetic training, can attain absolute accuracy in pronun¬ 
ciation. In short, it stands for up-to-dateness, thoroughness and efficiency. 



“Latin and Greek dead? Why? They live forever in the spirit of modern 
civilization. They are the warp and woof of our intellectual interests and activities. 
They are the cultural air we breathe, component parts of it along with Hebrew and 
English literature. We are born into a life that comes from the mountains of Greece 
and the plains of Italy, as well as from the forests of Germany and the wilds of 
Judea. Latin and Greek will live in reviving youth ‘till the leaves of the judgment 
book unfold’.’’ 

The attention of the general student is directed toward the following courses 
offered by the Department of Latin: Classical Art, History of Greek Literature. 
History of Roman Literature, Roman Politics, Roman Law, and four courses in 
Law Latin. 

For students of literature the courses in Greek and Roman Literature are essen¬ 
tial to round out their literary appreciation and understanding. 

For students in Economic Science and History the courses in Roman Politics 
and Roman Law are recommended particularly. 

. W a 44 * i 


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BOTANY 






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ZOOLOGY 


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Grieves Wegert 

Schroeder 

Reilly Ritter 

Tulley 


Moeser 

Melville 

Peterson 

Westacott 


Ballaine Warrell Leavitt 

Williams Geue Mantz 

Watt Sims Mains 

Rinehart Wegner 


$\)avmacY 


STATE COLLEGE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
Officers, 191 1-1912 


Guy Tulley. 

Walter Williams. 
W. L. Rinehart. 
H. A. Wegner... 


....President 

.Vice President 

.Secretary 

.Treasurer 




That the Pharmacy Department is destined to marked success in the future, as 
in the past, is certain. A recent ruling of the State Board of Pharmacy requiring 
all applicants for registration to be graduates from a reputable school of pharmacy 
insures a larger attendance for this department than it has had in the past. 

Each year finds an increasing demand for our graduates—a demand much greater 
than the department can supply. The success of these men in the business world 
must be attributed to Professor Watt, the head of this department, under whose 
instruction they received their knowledge of pharmacy. 

a M* i 



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The purpose of any education should be the earning of the best possible living, 
the greatest enjoyment of life, and the most efficient and useful citizenship. 

Less than 5 per cent of our people belong to the professional class; more than 
95 per cent must earn their living by some form of manual labor: they should be 
happy and intelligent in that labor. 

Most high school fit for college, most colleges aim at the professions. The 
professions are overcrowded with men not fitted by nature for professional work; 
the industrial workers have received but little attention from the educational system. 

The main purpose of the Deparment of Elementary Science is not to lead from 
the industrial to the professional class, but to turn the boy to the shop or the farm, a 
skilled workman, happy in his calling, and an intelligent and useful citizen. 

One-half of our American laboring men receive less than $500.00 a year. The 
purpose of the Department of Elementary Science is to train young women to main¬ 
tain American homes on such an income. It aims at the greatest financial problem 
of the day—the proper spending of the workingman’s dollar. 

To the boy or girl without high school advantages, to the young man or woman 
past high school age, to the great mass of young people who must become industrial 
workers, the Department of Elementary Science offers help in finding the life work, 
in training for that work, in developing power to enjoy life to the fullest, and in 
training for intelligent citizenship and able leadership. 


First Semester 


Clemcntar? Science JDepartment 


Frank Carlson 


Frank Carlson.President 

S. A. Sorensen.Vice President 

Leola Carson.Secretary-Treasurer 


departmental 

Officers 


Second Semester 

Walter A. Ryder.... President 

P. W. Strupler.Vice-President 

Xema Hughes..Secretary-Treasurer 


f 

V 


Walter A. Ryder 


Forty-eight 





































, uii i n i k 


Forty-nine 








































Eagon Barnum Wright Brownell Munn Meyer Schroeder Atwell 
Moore Reilly Atwell Ferguson Wiese Stucky Holt Gatward 
Tuttle McCready Schoepf Armstead Klemgard Petterson Hunt 
Dupertuis Smith 

Strong Shimek Mains Bradrick Lewis Koch Freier 



Prof. W. B. Strong 


Mtllltar? 


W. B. Strong. 


Conductor 


OFFICERS: 

George P. Koch- ...Chief Musician 

A. H. Reilly --Principal Musician 

VV. G. Atwell....Chief Trumpeter 


PIECES: 


Clarinets 
G. P. Koch 
R. Meyer 
Walter Holt 
W. H. Amos 
P. C. Atwell 
R. Munn 
J. Stucky 


A. H. Reilly 
Sam Hunt 
W.G. Atwell 
J. G. Klemgard 
F. R. Armstead 
N.J. Wright 
A. F. Moore 
L.T. Eagon 


Cornets 

E L. Ferguson 
Win. H. Schrreder 


French Horns 
B. O. Bendixen 
L. K. Wiese 


Altos 

J. C. Petterson 
Norman Lake 
A. W. Bradrick 


Baritone 

G. P. Wilson 
W. V. Shimek 
F. B. Lewis 



Trombones F. Brownell 

VV. A. Gatward R. H. Barnum 

R. VV. French 


Bass R. E. Smith 

S. H. Dupertuis L. L. Schoepf 

A. B. McCready 


Drums 
Fred Eck 
R. R. Tuttle 


Drum Major 

H. |. Freier 




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Reilly Leiser Eck Wilson Gatward Ferguson Schroeder 
Devin Mclnnis Goetches Tuttle Peterson Wiese Bendixen Millington 

McCready Smith Windus 

Fitzsimmons Petterson Meyer Koch Du Vail Stephenson 

Maylott Aten DesVoignes 

Strong Cave Cornelius Bradrick 

Orchestra, W. Strong, Conductor 





Drew Taylor King Beyer 
Atwell Brian Sterne Samples 

Corps 

Walter G. Atwell, Chief Trumpeter 


Fifty-one 






































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T3I)C 4^°lrbr mnla Sextette 


Mrs. Kuria Strong, Director 
Gladys McCroskey, Pianist 



Shields (Baritone) Dunn (1st Tenor) Williams (2nd Tenor) 
Baumeister (Bass) 

Quartette 

Prof. W. B. Strong, Director 

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Wiese Lockwood Strong Curtis Eck 


Baumeister Fulmer Wiley Merritt Gregory Peasley 
Stookey Williams Shields Gaddis Dunn Fulton 

<&lee Club 

Prof. W. B. Strong.Director 

OFFICERS 

Roy W. Merritt...President 

H. Reed Fulton.Vice President 

Benton Stookey. Manager 


X3l>e 

“Heigh-ho—the troubadours are gone!" Not on their prancing horses with guitars strung over 
shoulders, but on the unromantic train, each with a heavy suitcase. Poor fellows, would that this 
case might be the only one with which they have to struggle on the trip. 

Nineteen strong the company was, if Professor Strong is to be counted, when, after a lingering 
journey the first night s «!op was reached. Palouse, the company’s town, brought out an audience to 
the neat little theatre which was a surprise. The first performance was—well, it was a good 
audience, an appreciative one, certainly an intellectual one. Everything went smoothly, Sunday 
brought most of the boys back to Pullman, although some went on to Spokane. 

Monday evening, the first day after the small-pox quarantine, the club dropped off at Deer 
Park. After a good supper had been stowed away, the gay troubadours put on the regular regalia 
and made their way to the opera house. During the course of the seventh encore the key was 
dropped and it was several minutes before Baumeister discovered it on the floor of the dressing 
room. There was a dance following the song fest. The floor was splendid and Des Voignes’ 
Football Rag was “awfully lovely to dance to." 

“Heigh-ho—the troubdours are gone!" Every biscuit-shooter sighed and daintily wiped away 
a sob as the train looted down the track towards Colville. COLVILLE! That’s the place. Our 
old dub-mate, Grover Graham, met us at the depot with real automobiles. Merritt met an old 
flame and was happy. Gaddis met a new one and was happy too. The evening’s program was 
good. The new men were getting down to business; the bursts of applause were numerous. “What 
a world of merriment their melody foretells!" After the show the high school boys gave a dance 
in honor of—and the best time of the trip was there on that excellent hardwood floor. 

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Fifty-three 


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It was a long ride from Colville to Davenport and the boys were tired when they got there, 
despite the diverting incident of meeting the Cheney Normal Dramatic Arts Club composed of 
several flippant dames. The Glee Club has always been popular in Davenport and the audience 
that evening was as good as ever. Fitzsimmons played the "Humoresque” by request. There was 
no reception in Davenport and the boys were tired enough to be glad of it. A night’s sleep looked 
so good to the boys they insisted on waiting for the afternoon freight out to Reardan. The sleep 
did them good, but alas, the afternoon freight was unaccommodating enough to get wrecked, and so 
at six o’clock in the afternoon the club slopped back and forth on the station platform and repeated 
the doxology, with Reardan sixteen miles away. Teams were procured and the drive through slop 
and rain was taken. Strange to tell, the ride did the boys a world of good, and when the curtain 
went up in Reardan at nine o’clock everybody was in the best of spirits. The audience was light—- 
almost enough so to render it unnecessary to turn on the gas. The performers had the best time 
of the evening. Things took a funny turn and many times the play came to a standstill on account 
of helpless laughter. The quartette started to sing the “Bible Tales,” Baumeister commenced the 
verse, "Samson was a strong man”—forgot the rest and kept bravely on, "Sam son was a strong 
man, deedle, diddle, do, deedle, diddle, do—.’’ And the audience never fell! Again, when the 
play quartette was serenading and the Irishman’s head appeared in the window above, Fulton, who 
was standing in the wings, leaned too heavily against a small table, his legs flew out from under him 
and down went the table with the crash. The quartette tenor saw the incident, sputtered feebly and 
stumbled off the stage. It was with difficulty that the play was continued. 

Spokane absorbed the club until eight o’clock Friday night. The concert was given in the 
High School auditorium before an excellent audience composed of fond parents, and friends of the 
college. This concert was undoubtedly the best of the tour. Everyone was feeling just right and 
the audience "broke” with the opening number. Joe Shields as the “Girl” was enthusiastically 
received, as in fact he was everywhere. The quartette was encored time after time. The people 
were more than pleased and urged that the club come each year. 

Saturday noon the troubadours were back in Pullman dangling their ways up the hill. One 
more performance and it would all be over—thank goodness. The home concert was a howling 
(rather good adjective) success. Once more Professor Strong had brought the Glee Club season 
to a successful close. 

Music, when soft voices die. 

Vibrates in the memory . . 



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McWhorter Stewart 

Bennett 

Leiser Meyer 

Officers 

Commandant.Claire R. Bennett, First Lieutenant 1 7th Infantry, U. S.A. 

Colonel...Ovid T. McWhorter 

Lieutenant Colonel.E. C. Stewart 




J. D. Meyer 

Majors 

O. E. Leiser 

L. D. Baker 

P. H. Neuman 
J. S. McNair 

Captains 

W. W. Merchant 
H. G. Cotton 

K. B. Peasley 

R. I. Stratton 

J. G. Maxfield 
A. W. Langdon 

First Lieutenants 

W. F. Bonnell 

R. L. Wilkinson 
Roy E. Will 

R. H. Davis 

J. M. Shields 

H. E. Malsten 

Second Lieutenants 

A. C. Miller 

M. P. Moeser 

W. L. Penick 


, « M i » W . , 


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H. G. Cotton 
M. P. Moeser 
R. W. Wilkinson 


H. W. Meyer 
A. W. Langdon 
J. G. Max field 


V. D. Cornelius 

W. L. Penick 
R. H. Davis 


warn 


Fifty-seven 





















































K. B. Peasley 
R. J. Stratton 
R. E. Will 


J. S. McNair 
C. E. Campbell 


L. D. Baker 
W. W. Merchant 
W. F. Bonnell 


a 44* ■ 


Fifty-eight 
















































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Melville Walker Sprowl Jensen Ash Casad 

Newman Malmsten Shields Matsen Friermood Christopher| 

Mon-(£ommlsslone6 Officers—Thirst and Second battalions 




Gregory Dietz Custer Hunt Pearson Fortier 
Evans Semple Humphrey Boyce Dempsey Rinehart Lybecker 

Walter Locklin Spaberg German Hoffeditz 
Davis Duffy Glasgow Miller 

1 i 4-W— 1 


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Salute of Private Shearer Officers’ Mess Private Merritt Meets a Friend 

In Line for a Meal Looking Them Over 

Cadets Marching to, and Boarding Train— Camp Sport 


* 




Camp m E. Hay 


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After much talk on the part of the cadets and the successful unwinding of red 
tape by Commandant Peter J. Hennessey, the faculty and Board of Regents finally 
allowed the cadets to get from under their authority for a few days* encampment on 
Northwest Boulevard in the city of Spokane. 

So it came about that the First Regiment of mimic soldiers of W. S. C. found 
themselves, early one morning during the last week of May, 1911, at the Armory, 
excited and waiting for orders to go to the 4 ‘front.” 

The cadets left over the O.-W. R. & N., by special train, arriving in Spokane 
about noon. They at once made ready to pitch tents. It was soon discovered, 
though, that the tent pins had been forgotten, and no sooner had some one been 
sent to hunt the missing pins than the heaviest hailstorm of the year put in an appear¬ 
ance and pounded home the opinion that, after 
all, military life was not altogether a joke. At 
last the tents were pitched and military life in 
miniature was at its height. 

On Decoration Day the cadets took part in 
the military parade, with the National Guard 
and the regulars from Fort Wright. The 
streets of Spokane never seemed so long or so 
hot as they did that day. Riverside, with all 
its wonderful sights to the boy from the farm, 
could not dispel the stuffy feeling the old gray 
uniform brought to the minds of its wearers. 

The mornings were devoted to drill and 
other duties that pertain to camp life; the after¬ 
noons were the cadets’ own until 5:30, when 
guard mount occurred. For each the afternoon 
had a meaning of its own. To some it meant 

home and mother and sisters; or perhaps SHE, d t lj 

too, lived in town. To others it meant seeing Lieut, r. J. Hennessey 

. i i W u 4 4* , 


ENCAMPMENT 


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Sixty-cne 























the sights of a city; while still others sat on the shady side of a pine, husking a cone 
and wishing that their money hadn’t burned a hole through their pockets the first 
night, and that board wouldn’t be due as soon as they returned to Pullman. 

To guard mount people came by the hundreds. They came afoot, by auto, 
horseback, delivery wagons, and every other way except by wheelbarrow, to see 
“their boys” do like “real soldiers,’’ and hear the martial strains of Prof. Strong’, 
band. After guard mount came supper, and many were the fair ladies who hunted 
up their uniformed friends to be asked to stay and have a bite of “pork and.** 

As is usual with the college student, it doesn’t take him but a moment after 
his studies or duties are finished till he is ready for sport. The same holds true with the 
cadet on encampment. One afternoon it was a track meet in miniature, the next it was 

eiving the ice cream vender a ride at 
breakneck speed over the rocky parade 
ground. Any transgressor of the rules 
made for these occasions was quickly 
punished by “running the gauntlet”, or 
held under the hydrant. 

The encampment also served as an 
occasion to even up some old scores. 
The awkward rookie, who had all 
semester stepped on another’s toes at 
drill, learned aerial navigation of the 
blanket variety. Here the private 
reigned supreme and the swell-headed 
“non-com” resembled a Fourth-of-July 
pinwheel in his antics to escape from the tossing blankets. 

Along with the fun came the walking of the posts. It wouldn’t have been 
realistic if the cadet hadn’t had the opportunity to get that lonesome “On Post” 
feeling. The first night the slumberings of the soldierettes were rudely disturbed by 
the rook, who, desirous of getting a ‘‘non-com’s’’ chevrons, tuned his voice like a fog 
horn and bellowed, “P-o-s-t number f-o-u-r, hand hall’s wa—hell!” Then straight 
therewith the night rained rocks, shoes and such other articles that could be reached 
from the bunk. Often, though, it was quite different: “Corporal of the Guard!” 

"Post Number four.” "Say, Old Scout, get me a relief: my feet are so sore 
that they give me the toothache. I’ll set ’em up to you when we get to town if 
you will give me a lift.” 

While in Spokane the cadets were entertained by the National Guard at a 
military ball. Many State College girls deserted their classes to be in Spokane for 
this event, and the evening will long be remembered by those who delight in tripping 
the light fantastic. 

Not for many years had an encampment been so pleasant and well managed 
as this one. This was due to the foresight of Lieut. Peter J. Hennessey and Sergt. 
W. N. Puckett, and much credit is due these men for the able way in which they 
conducted this “campaign.” 



I , tOii W a 44* , 

































































































Seniors 


CLASS OFFICERS 
First Semester 

Ovid T. McWhorter.President 


H. E. Doelle. 

.Vice-President 

Grace Mitchell. 

.Secretary 

A. R. Neuman.... 

.Treasurer 

Max Baumeister... 

.Sergeant-at-Arms 

m 


Second Semester 

Mathew P. Brislawn. 

.President 

Frank Jenne . 

_Vice-President 

Dorothea Gombert .. 

..Secretary 

H. S. Groat... 

.Treasurer 

Ovid T. McWhorter.. 

_Sergeant-at-Arms 

Roy W. Merritt... 

... Students’ Council 

m 


Colors: Old Gold and Green 

Yell: Wa-hoo, wa-hoo. 

one-nine, one-two. 

Wa-hoo, wa-hoo. 

one-nine, one-two. 

Wa-hoo, wa-hoo, 

one-nine, one-two. 


1912 Forever! 



Ovid T. McWhorter 



Mathew P. Brislawn 


W i . 4* « . 


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LAUli 



MAX ERNEST BAUMEISTER 

“Mox" 

Walla Walla 

Sigma Phi Epsiloii Crimson Circle 
Electrical 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Glee Club (2) (3) (4). Quartet (4). Secretary- 
Treasurer A. I. E. E. Secretary Junior Electricals. 
President “Mask and Dagger.” Stage (3) (4). 

"My boy % my boy , lead nol thyself astray" 


ERMA FRANCES CLYDE 
"Fannie" 

Pullman 

Modem Languages 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Columbian Literary Society. Y. W. C. A. 

“77// twelve o'clock she sits and blears her eyes by 
the study of books." 

CLARENCE J. COOIL 
“C. /.” 

Seattle 

Alpha Tau Omega Crimson Circle 
Education 

Thesis: “Physical Education in Secondary Schools.” 
Track “W” (1) (2) (3), Capt. (4). Northwest 
record in the half and mile. President of Class (2). 
President Students’Assembly (4). Stage (2) (3) (4). 
President Websterian Debating Society (3). Class De¬ 
bating Team (2). Chinook Staff. 

“ Athlete , Orator t Thespian , and Fusser." 

HELEN LEONA CORLISS 
"Leo" 

Seattle 

Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Columbian Literary Society. Country Life Club. 
Y. W. C. A. 

“She is a friend to every one" 


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JESSIE 


Chehalis 


GLOVER KOONTZ 

“ Jessie" 

Alpha Theta Sigma 
General 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3). 

“She gets a letter every day." 


Asotin 


Sigma Nu 


HORATIO REED FULTON 

"Romeo" 

English 

Thesis: '‘Advanced Course in Major Department/’ 

Glee Club (1) (2) (3) (4). Manager Glee Club 
(3). President Dramatic Arts Club (3). Tennis 
*'W” (2) (3). Captain (3). Evergreen Staff (1) 
(2) (3) (4). Stage (2) (3) (4). Charter Member 
“Mask and Dagger.” 

“Composer of ‘The College Moon , and fond of moon¬ 
light acting." 

GEORGE KINGSBURY REEDER 
"Muck" 

Spokane Alpha Tau Omega 

Mining Engineering 

Thesis: “Methods of Measuring Compressed Air 

Consumption for Various Rock Drills.” 

Mining Engineering Society. Junior Prom Committee. 

"Look what's here." 


ANNA E. SCHNEIDER 
"Kute" 

Plaza Sigma Beta Pi 

Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Chinook Staff (3). Y. W. C. A. Class Secretary 
(3). Junior Prom Committee. Secretary Columbian 
Literary Society ( I ). Class Basket Ball ( 1 ). 

"She knows her own mind" 


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Sixty-five 
































WILLIAM DENVER LOVE 
“Bill" 

Garfield Lantuama 

Agriculture (Candidate for M. S.) 

Thesis: “Concrete Construction on the Farm.’* 

Track “W“ (2) (3) (4). Vice President Athletic 
Association (4). Field Manager (3). Captain Quar¬ 
termaster W. S. C. C. C. Farmers’ Club. Washington 
Literary Society. 

“When he puls his shoulder to the wheel—the wheel 
goes round." 

AUGUST RHEINHOLD NEUMANN 
“Cus" 

Roslyn 

Mining 

Thesis: “Surface and Underground Equipment for 
a Coal Mine of 800 Tons Capacity.” 

Mining Engineering Society. Vice President Cla^s 
(4). Class Treasurer (3) (4). 

“The Muckers could nol spoil him—he was already 
spoiled " 

NORVAL FILLMORE WOODWARD 
“Sliver" 

Fairbanks 

Agriculture 

Thesis: “A Comparison of Standard Grades of 

Grains in Western Markets.” 

Rifle Team (I) (2). First Lieutenant W. S. C. 
C. C. Farmers’ Club. 

“Prepared to recite every day in every class " 


JOSEPH EARL YATES 
“Papa" 

Walla Walla Lantuama 

Electrical Engineering 
Thesis: “Tests of Transformer Oil.” 

President Junior Electricals (3). Secretary Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet (2) (3). Treasurer Class (3). Secre¬ 
tary Washington Literary Society (3). A. I. E. E. 
“He is true to his word" 


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Sixty-six 

























JOHN WALKER LaVIOLETTE 
“ Highpocket ’* 

Spokane Lantuama 

Electrical 

Thesis: “A 1200 D. C. Electrification of the O. W. 
R. N. from Colfax to Moscow.” 

Treasurer Y. M. C. A. (3). President Y. M. C. A. 
(4). Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2). Websterian De¬ 
bating Society. A. I. E. E. 

"Girls, I'm not indifferent — I'm engaged." 


LUCIA ANNE BISBEE 
"Lai" 

Spokane 

Home Economics 

Thesis: ‘‘Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
“She studied on Sunday night. She never got a D." 


WILLARD E. MITCHELL 
”Cum Shoe" 

Spokane 

Sigma Nu Omega 
Mining 

Thesis: ‘‘The Size of the Lead Button in the Fire 
Assay for Gold and Silver, as Affected by the Gain and 
Loss of Values.” 

Mining Engineering Society. Evergreen Staff (3) (4). 

"He worlds rvhile rve sleep." 

GRACE PEARL MITCHELL 

"Jimmie" 

Rockford 

Mathematics and Physics 

Thesis: ‘‘The Design, Test, and Application of a 
Means of Maintaining a High Electrostatic Potential.” 

President of the Mathematical Society (3). Secre¬ 
tary Class (4). Treasurer Columbian Literary So¬ 
ciety (4). 

"A mathematically inclined Co-ed." 


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CHESTER SCOTT 
“Moonie" 

Oakesdale 

Kappa Sigma Crimson Circle 
Mechanical Engineering 

Thesis: 4 ‘The Design of a Recording Gas Calori¬ 
meter.” 

Band (2) (3) (4) 

‘‘Keep cool , you cant fuss me.” 


EVA MARGUERITE GATELY 
44 Topsy ” 

Harrington 

Latin 

Thesis: ‘‘Stylistic Peculiarities of Gaius Salustius 

Crispus.” 

Columbian Literary Society. 

“Most girls talk too much—she doesn't." 

BISHAM DASS KOCHHAR 
“Bish" 

Noormohal, Punjab, India 
Electrical Engineering 

1 hesis: ‘‘Design of a Hydro-Electric Power Plant 
for Pullman.” 

Vice President Junior Electricals. A. I. E. E. Cos¬ 
mopolitan Club. 

44 A good student n>ho has many friends" 


JENNIE DAY 
44 Daylight ” 

Pullman 

Modern Languages 

Thesis: “Eine Behandlung Schiller’s Drama.” 

“You can say nothing mean about me. I've had my 
picture taken , and Jimmie gave me a Chinook receipt" 





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MATHEW PATRICK BRISLAWN 
“Mai" 


Sprague Alpha Tau Omega 

Civil Engineering 

Thesis: “Street Improvement in the City of Pullman.” 
President Class (4). Vice President Class (3). 
Civil Engineering Society. Cadet Lieutenant (2). Class 
Baseball (1). 

"Another of the Brislarvn Clan. Three more al home" 


KATHRYN ALMA GIFFORD 
“ Kiltie" 

San Jose, California 
Alpha Theta Sigma 
English 

Thesis: ‘‘Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Chinook Staff. Charter member of the Dramatic Arts 
Club. Stage (1). Junior Prom Committee. 

"My name isnl Kiltie , it's Kathryn" 


FREDERICK PRESTON HUNTER 
"Jumbo" 

Palouse 

Phi Upsilon Crimson Circle 
General 

Football “W” (I ) (2) (3). Captain (3). Wrest¬ 
ling “W” (2). Vice President Mining Engineering 
Society. 

"An orator, and master (?) of his art." 


RUTH ELIZABETH KENNEDY 
"Stub" 


Tacoma Alpha Theta Sigma 

Home Economics 


Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Secretary Class (2). Charter member Dramatic Arts 
Club. Stage (1) (2). Junior Prom Committee. 


"Sure!" 


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Sixty-nine 



























ANNA TAYLOR 
Pullman Sigma Beta Pi 

English 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Evergreen Staff (2). Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 

"The only one of Pullman's maids , who e'er was 
serenaded." 


JOHN ARTHUR RAMSEY 

“Texas Pete" 

Houston, Texas 
Electrical 

“The Development of a Hypothetical Hydro-Electric 
Plant for Pullman, Washington.” 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. Wrestling “W” (4). Class 
Football (2). Washington Literary Society. A. I. E. E. 

"Ever see him in a wrestling suit? He's got some 
form." 


HARRIET MINA BAKER 

"Harrie" 

Spokane Bridge Phi Alpha Epsilon 
Botany 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Chairman House Committee Stevens Hall. 

"Being good is an awful lonesome job." 


CHARLES EDWARD KNIGHT 
"K. P." 

Laingsburg, Michigan 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Civil Engineering. Baseball “W” (3) (4). Basket¬ 
ball “W“ (3). Captain Basketball (4). Football 
*W” (4). Civil Engineering Society. 

"He does all his worfc with his greatest energy" 


1 i~ i f W I i 


Seventy 






























ADA HUNT WEXLER 
“A/i* Wcx" 

Pullman Theta Kappa 

Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
“And she is a girl of the Sunn]) South .” 


SOPHIA KATHERINE MEYER 
“Sop/?];” 

Lind 

General 

Columbian Literary Society. 

“S/ie did this College in three years —//-e-/-p.” 


L. EARL WRIGHT 
“Doc” 

Castle Rock 
Electrical Engineering * 

Thesis: “Hydro-Electric Plant for the City of Castle 
Rock.” 

President of the Junior Electricals. A. I. E. E. 
Philomathian. 

‘Wo/ Large , hut always on the job .” 


MELVINA JENNINGS 
“Too/s” 

St. Johns 
Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Secretary of the Columbian Literary Society. Class 
Basketball (I). 

“S/?e is always ready to aid you .” 


1 -W— I 



Seventy- 




































I 



>. 44 * , 


MARIEL FULMER 

“Maree” 

Pullman Phi Alpha Epsilon 

English 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Chinook Staff. President Y. W. C. A. (4). Dele¬ 
gate to Y. W. C. A. Conference (3). 

“She is fitting herself for her life's work." 


BOYCE RAYMOND HEINTZELMAN 

“ Heintz ” 

Olympia Phi Upsilon 

Mechanical Engineering 

Thesis: “A Study of the Adaptability of Wash¬ 

ington Coal for Gas Producers.” 

Varsity Football (3) (4). Captain Class Football 
(2). Class Wrestling Team (2). 

"Get acquainted with him and you will find him a 
fine fellow .” 


ISABELLE McRAE 

“LaZ3e//e” 

Pomeroy Sigma Beta Pi 

Economic Science and History 
Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Chinook Staff (3). Evergreen Staff (2). 

44 A firm believer in the economic value of correspond¬ 
ence courses .” 


CARL GUSTAVE FRED CARLSON 

“ Alphabet ” 

Spokane 

Mining Engineering 

Thesis: “Methods of Measuring Compressed Air 

Consumption for the Various Types of Rock Drills.” 
Mining Engineering Society. 

"He leads the Senior Whisker Brigade .” 


i 


i 


i 


i 


Seventy-two 


I 




























I 


FRANCES IDA MANN 

“Fannie" 

Puyallup 

Chemistry Home Economics 

Theses: “Advanced Courses in Major Departments.” 
Columbian Literary Society. Y. W. C. A. Cabi¬ 
net. Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

"Another of our Two-Course Graduates." 


D. CHAUNCEY GEORGE 
“ chusy" 

Wenatchee 

Horticulture 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Philomathian Literary Society. 

“Hails from Wenatchee and is , therefore , logically a 
'grafter " 


DOROTHEA GOMBERT 
"Dora" 

Pullman Pi Delta Phi 

Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Secretary Class (4). 

"He may forget some , but he can never forget you" 


EDNA FOLGER 

"Dearie" 

Pullman Phi Alpha Epsilon 

General 

First Vice President of the Students’ Assembly (4). 
"She has dark hair , and so has he" 


, a 44* , 




I 


Seventy-three 

























LISSA ROCK 
“Lis” 

Diamond Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Vice President of the Columbian Literary Society (3). 
Secretary Columbian Literary Society (2) (3). Sec¬ 
retary Class (2). 

“We have heard of diamonds in rocks , but never 
before of a 4 Rock * *n Diamond" 


CHARLES M. BEARDSLEY 
“Millie" 

Marcus General 


“It can be said of him that he always aided , and never 
hindered his fellow students in their work" 


FLORENCE AMY DAVIS 
“Florence Fay" 

Harrison, Idaho Sigma Beta Pi 

General 

44 Fickle , fickle girl" 


OLE A SANDS 

“Pebbles" 

Puyallup Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
“From the Raspberry Belt but not of the Black- 
Cap Variety 


. W .< 4 *» 


r -four 


l 





























CHARLES HOWARD HARVEY 
"Harve” 

Peshastin 

Horticulture 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department/* 
Class Football (I) (2). President Philomathian 

Society (3). President Horticulture Club (4). 

“Steady there” 


DOROTHY COLLYER 
“Dodo** 

Quincy, Illinois Theta Kappa 

Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department/* 

Chinook Staff (3). Secretary Class (3). Washing¬ 
ton Agriculturist Staff (4). 

“Little girl , you will do .*’ 

HARRY ALDRICH RAYMOND 
"Bugs' 

Opportunity Crimson Circle 

Pharmacy 

Thesis: “A Study of Veratrum Californicum/’ 

Class President (3). Rooter King (3). Field Man¬ 
ager Athletic Association (3). Chinook Staff (3). 
President S. C. P. A. (2). Class Basketball (4). 

“Faint heart never won fair lady , so let'i have one 
more game of «o/o.** 


FRED BEN DUDLEY 
"Dud” 

Spokane 

Architecture 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.’* 
Chinook Artist (4). 

"He bids fair to be another Edison” 





Seventy-five 



















m 


IRVING BALLARD VESTAL 

“Washington Irving*' 

Snohomish Lantuama 

Agriculture 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.’* 
Websterian Debating Society. Farmers’ Club. 

“Another ‘Son of Whitman saw the light — hello, 
girlie." 


FRANK HARRISON JENNE 
"Coupe" 

Coupville Crimson Circle 

Agriculture 

Thesis: “Feeding Lambs for Washington Markets.*’ 
Wrestling “W” (2) (3) (4). Captain (3). Class 
Basketball (3) (4). President Farmers' Club (4). 
President Websterian Debating Society (4). Vice 
President Class (4). Evergreen Staff (2). Stage (3). 
"Boys, I have a half-nelson on a degree at last." 


EUNICE DORA COFFMAN 

"U-nice Dora" 

Pullman 

Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course .in Major Department.’’ 
Chinook Staff. Y. W. C. A. 

"She adores ahletes — half-milers preferred .*’ 


EARL CRANSTON HUNT 
"Early" 

Pullman Alpha Zeta 

Horticulture 

Thesis: “A Study of the Life-History of Pyronema 
Confluens.’’ 

Basketball “W“ (4). Class Basketball (1) (2) 
(3) (4). Horticultural Club. 

"If perseverance be the key to success, he will unlock 
the door" 


L= lW n 44 « , 

Seventy-six 



































i 


I 


I 



I 




MARY MANN 
"Marie" 

Goldendale 
Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Columbian Literary Society. Y. W. C. A. 

"She's a mighty fine girl" 





LEE NORMAN LAKE 
“King David" 

Wenatchee 

Electrical Engineering 

Thesis: “A Study of the Insulating Properties of 

Transformer Oils; Moisture and Time Curves.” 

Band (I) (2) (3) (4). Orchestra (2) (3). Class 
Football Team (2). Class Track Team (I) (2) (3). 
Class Wrestling Team (2) (3). Philomathian Liter¬ 
ary Society. A. I. E. E. 

“A Charier Member of the Phi Cams" 

BRIGGS RICHIE KINNEY 
"Wifee" 

Spokane 

Mining Engineering 

Thesis: “Plans for a Mining and Metallurgical 
Laboratory.” 

Secretary-Treasurer Mining Society (4). Philo¬ 
mathian Literary Society, Secretary (4). Class Track. 

"Why didn't he slid? to the Moustache Club? He 
couldn't" 

JOHN D. MEYER 
“ Heiney ” 

Lind Kappa Alpha 

Economic Science and History 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 

Debate “W” (3). Intersociety Debate (3). Presi¬ 
dent Washington Literary Society (4). Major W. S. 
C. C. C. (3). Secretary-Treasurer Twentieth Century 
Club (4). 

“A devilish good fellorv who is always ready to argue 
the question " 




I 


. 




Seventy-seven 



















GEORGE H. SHEARER 
“Pus” 

Spokane 

Sigma Nu Alpha Zeta Crimson Circle 
Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Business Manager Evergreen (4). First Lieutenant 

w. s. c. c. c. 

“It used to be Marguerite, but no tv its Cousin Jean." 


GLADYS McCROSKEY 

"Miss Mac ’ 

Garfield Phi Alpha Epsilon 

English Music 

Thesis in English: “Advanced Course in Major De¬ 
partment.” Thesis in Music: “Rosini and the Stabat 
Mater.” 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2). Evergreen Staff (3). 
Chinook Staff (3). Secretary Students’ Assembly (4). 
Pianist for Sextette (4). 

“To f?nor» her , is to be her friend." 

ROY WILLIS MERRITT 

"Du^e" 

Spokane 

Sigma Nu Crimson Circle 
Geology 

Thesis: “The Lime-Stones, and Closely Associated 
Rocks of Stevens County.” 

Editor Evergreen (4). Glee Club (I) (2) (3), 
President (4). Students’ Council (4). President 
Crimson Circle (4). Mining Society. 

“A firm believer in his ability to peddle publicity." 


SAMUEL A. KIMBROUGH 
“Sammy" 

Colfax Sigma Nu 

Economic Science and History 
Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Debate “W“ (4). Evergreen Staff (4). 

“Well, / got to go dorvn" 


i 


i 


i 


i 


- I W 


Seventy-eight 


1 


I 





















WALTER EPLER DOOLITTLE 
“Doolie" 

Colfax Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Civil Engineering 

Thesis: “Street Improvement in the City of Pull¬ 
man.” 

Civil Engineering Society. 

“His name tells it all" 


ADA ELIZABETH SPURLING 

“ Spatz" 

Ellensburg 

English 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
“Forwarded by Ellensburg Normal " 

ERNEST CHARLES STEWART 
"Slew" 

Daisy 

Chemistry 

Thesis: “Gravimetric vs. Volumetric Determination 
of Potassium Di-Oxide.” 

President Class (3). President Rifle Club (4). 
Treasurer Y. M. C. A. (I). Treasurer Class (2). 
Treasurer Websterian Debating Society (3). Lieuten¬ 
ant-Colonel W. S. C. C. C. (4). 

“The secret of Success is i vorfz" 

VICTOR BIGELOW BONNEY 
“Jigadier Brindle" 

T acoma 
Chemistry 

Thesis: “The Estimation of Starch, Official vs. 

Simple Methods; Chemical vs. Optical Methods.” 

Rifle Team (3) (4). Y. M. C. A. 

“Watch Tacoma Crow—also my whiskers" 





Seventy-nine 

















LESLIE A. WOOD 

“W oodie" 

Garfield Sigma Phi Epsilon 

General 

Horticultural Club. Entered W. S. C. in his Senior 
Year from Knox College. 

“A good k'ld, fcp Jove." 


BEULAH R. WELLMAN 

“ Boola ” 

Sprague Pi Delta Phi 

English 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department/’ 
"Availing a change of name" 


OLIVER E. LEISER 
"Lize" 

Spokane 
Architecture 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Rifle Team (2) (3). Major W. S. C. C. C. (4). 
Websterian Debating Society. Chinook Staff. 

"He is intent on minding his ovn business" 

RALPH A. GAINES 
"Silver-tongued Orator" 

St. John Kappa Alpha 

Economic Science and History 
Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Debate “W” (3) (4). Oratory “W” (3). Presi¬ 
dent Washington Literary Society (4). President Pro¬ 
hibition League (4). President Twentieth Century 
Club (4). Band (1) (2) (3). Winner Inter-class 
Oratorical Contest (3). 

“Popular opin.on is a mere gust of 7 vind" 

, ii4< i i 



Eighty 


























GROVER ALVIN SPURLING 
“C. A." 

Ellensburg 
Civil Engineering 

Thesis: “Calibration of Tanks in Washington State 
College Hydraulics Laboratory/’ 

Class Track Team. Civil Engineering Society. 

“Commenced fussing in his Junior year — there*s no 
hope now.** 


EUGENE S. HILL 
“Gene” 

St. John 
Forestry 

Thesis: “Strength and Stiffness of Rift and Tangent 
Sawn Timber.” 

“//e is hard on the telephone.** 


SARAH V. DUNCAN 
“ Nellie ” 

Tekoa 

Home Economics 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
“S/ie is a worker and never complains.** 


EDWARD BENTON STOOKEY 
“ Stook** 

Creston 

Agriculture 

Thesis: “The Effect of the Length of the Ripening 
Period Upon the Nitrogen Content of Wheat.” 

Vice President of Class (1). Evergreen Staff (1) 
(3). Chinook Staff (3). Track “W” (1) (2). 
Class Track (1) (2). Manager Glee Club (4). De¬ 
bate “W” (4). Class Basketball (4). 

“That which he does , he does with all his might.** ' 


, 4*ii W a 44 * , 


Eighty-one 

































CHESTER A. DUNPHY 
"Ches 
Spokane 

Electrical Engineering 

Thesis: “A Study of the Insulation Materials with 
Respect to Resistance and Puncture.” 

A. I. E. E. 

“A good student; no wonder , he's married." 


LAURA LILLIAN STRATTON 

1 nxie 
Pullman 

Home Economics 

Thesis: ‘‘Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Columbian Literary Society. Y. W. C. A. 

“The dark woman in the case" 


WILLIAM G. HUNTER 

“ Orang-outang ” 

Edmonds 

Agriculture 

Thesis: ‘‘A Study of the Difference in Character 

Between Winter and Spring Varieties of Wheat.” 

Agriculture Club. Washington Literary Society. 
Y. M. C. A. Rifle Team (3). Animal Husbandry 
Club. 

"Beware, young man — she's fooling thee" 

WILLIAM W. PARK 

"Parks" 

Pullman 

Economic Science and History 
Thesis: “Economics in the High School.” 

Y. M. C. A. 

"A firm believer in Higher Education " 





r 


it. 




















BERTHA ELSABE ENGELLAND 
"Bert” 

Tekoa Theta Kappa 

General 

President Columbian Literary Society (2). Presi¬ 
dent Cosmopolitan Club (2). Vice President German 
Society (3). Instructor in German (3). Treasurer 
Class (3). 

"A friend once , a friend forever” 

JOHN I. PREISSNER 

”Jip" 

Snohomish 

Phi Upsilon Crimson Circle Omega 
Mining Engineering 

Thesis: “A Concentration Plant for the Monarch 

Mine.” 

President Mining Engineering Society (3). Captain 

W. S. C. C. C. 

"He never had a crush 'till his Senior year; and then 
— oh, my!” k 

ovid tullius McWhorter 

r “Big Mac” 

North Yakima 

Alpha Tau Omega Alpha Zeta Crimson Circle 
Horticulture 

Thesis: “Modern Methods of Handling Fruit.” 
Business Manager 1912 Chinook. Colonel W. S. C. 
C. C. (4). President Class (4). A.-Y.-P., Portland 

and Spokane Stock Judging Teams (2) (3) (4). Vice 
President and Field Manager Athletic Association (3) 
(2). President Horticulture Club (2). Evergreen 
Staff (2). Assistant Instructor in Horticulture (1) (2). 
"Soldiers either fight or run—he will have to fight ” 

LEWIS L. NOLIN 
"Lew” 

Pullman Kappa Alpha 

Education 

Thesis: “The Development of the Elementary School 
Curriculum.” 

President Oratorical and Debating Society (4). De¬ 
bate “W” (1) (4). Vice President Washington Lit¬ 
erary Society (3). President Inter-Collegiate Prohibi¬ 
tion Association (3). 

"Recommends course in debating as a prerequisite 
for marriage ” 

n , 





Eighty-thre« 


















EVERETT THOMAS LOVE 
“£. 77* 

St. Clairsville, Ohio 
Delta Alpha Zeta Crimson Circle 
Agriculture 

Thesis: “The Direct Exchange of Agricultural 

Products Between the Farmers of the State of Wash¬ 
ington.” 

Business Manager of the Agriculturist (2). Man¬ 
ager 1911 Chinook. President Websterian Society 
(3). First Vice President Students’ Assembly (3). 
"He was a Successful Business Manager" 

ELIZABETH M. MEYER 
“Do-do” 

Lind 
General 

Winner of the 16th Annual Declamation Contest. 
Debate “W” (4). Pharmacy Graduate 1910. Co¬ 
lumbian Literary Society. 

"She things before she speaks—that is saying a good 
deal for a woman." 

HENRY E. DOELLE 
"Spitz" 

Fountain City, Wis. 

Delta Crimson Circle Omega 

Mining 

Thesis: “The Bromo-Cyanidation of Gold Ores.” 
Wrestling “W” (3) (4). Vice President Athletic 
Association (3). President Mining Society (4). Presi¬ 
dent Irish Club. 

"A leader among—the Muckers and Irish" 

WILLIAM MEIKLE 
"Bogus Bill" 

Alequa Alpha Zeta 

Horticulture 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
President Horticulture Club (3). Editor Agricul¬ 
turist (4). Evergreen Staff (3). Assistant Instructor 
in Horticulture. 

"Watch him , he will make good if he is not too busy" 

• >»*II W , 



Eighty-four 




















I 




; 


i 




VERNE LOCKWOOD 
“Verne" 

Pullman Sigma Beta Pi 

English 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
“A modest blush she 1 vears—not made fry art " 


JAMES E. ISMAY 
"Jim" 

Olympia 

Electrical Engineering 

Thesis: “A Study of the Adaptability of Wash¬ 

ington Coals for Gas-Producing Purposes.” 



A. I. E. E. 

“And the wind blew through his whiskers (before he 
had them trimmed) " 



VICTOR R. HYSLOP 
"Vic" 

Deep Creek 
Delta Alpha Zeta 

Thesis: “The Nitrogen and Humus Content of Soils 
as Affected by Dry Farming Practice.” 

Tennis “W” (2). President Class (2). Chinook 
Staff (3). Medal Winner in Grain Judging Contest (3). 

"He studies and fusses with equal vim" 

HARRISON SIDNEY GROAT 
"Doc" 

Renton Delta 

Pharmacy ^ 

Thesis: “A Formulary of Toilet Preparations.” 

President State College Pharmaceutical Association 
(3). Acting President Websterian Debating Society 
(3). Business Manager Websterian Play (3) (4). 
Treasurer Class (4). 

"A lad with a business head. He made his wa$ 
through College" 









t 


Eighty-five 























GRACE IRMA WILSON 
“Dot” 

Spokane Alpha Theta Sigma 

Home Economics 

Thesis: ‘Advanced Course in Major Department.” 

“She speaks, behaves and acts , just as she ought” 


J. J. L. HELDRING 
“Prof.” 

Pullman 

English 

Thesis: “Advanced Course in Major Department.” 
Professor in Veterinary Science. 

“Hold that pose boy, the camera is availing you ” 


JAMES ERNEST WILCOX 
“Pepless” 

Ashland, California 
Hydro-Electrical Engineering 
Thesis: “The Development of a Hydnro-Electric 

Plant for Pullman.” 

Electrical Engineering Society. 

“A person to whom this publication will be a surprise” 

VERNE R. JONES 
“Rube” 

Sprague Alpha Zeta 

Agriculture 

Thesis: “The Affect of Feeding Alfalfa Molasses 
Meal vs. Bran and Barley Upon the Quantity and 
Composition of Milk Produced.” 

Animal Husbandry Club. Band (1) (2) (3) (4). 
Tumbling Team (1) (2). Assistant Dairyman (3) 
(4). Class Team (3). 

“He missed his calling—he should have been a clown” 




Eighty-six 
































I 


I 


I 


I 


I 






HAROLD ARTHUR SEWELL 
“Art" 

Pullman Kappa Alpha 

Mathematics (Candidate for M. S.) 

Debate “W” (2) (3) (4). Rifle Team (3) (4). 
Evergreen Staff. 

“The logical conclusion is , therefore , that he is a de¬ 
bater" 


GEORGE W. GRAVES 
“Chicago" 

Oak Park, Illinois 
Phi Gamma Delta Alpha Zeta 
Agriculture (Candidate for M. S.) 

Thesis: “Relation of Soil Bacteria to Crop Rotation.” 
Track “W”. Agriculturist Staff. Farmers’ Club. 
“George did not knoll) that he Jvas coming in. 


Eighty-seven 



















School of 5Ttusic 

-- 


INEZ MILDRED BAKEMAN 

"Ina" 

Snohomish Pi Delta Phi 

Thesis: “Music Recital.*’ 

Polyhymnia Sextette. High Honors. 

"She smiles , and keeps on smiling." 


JOSEPHINE LOUISE OLSEN 
"Ole" 

Spokane Theta Kappa 

Thesis: “Music Recital.’’ 

Polyhymnia Sextette. 

“ She's full of fun" 

ERNEST E. FITZSIMMONS 
“ Fitz ” 

Pullman Phi Upsilon 

Thesis: “Music Recital.’* 

President Dramatic Arts Club (3). Band (I) (2) 
(3) (4). Symphony Trio (3) (4). Concert Master 
College Orchestra (3) (4). Violinist with Glee Club 
(3) (4). Websterian Debating Society. Rifle Team 

(3). 

“With the violin , he enchants his audience" 

ELLA VERNA REED 

“ Vem" 

Pullman Sigma Beta Pi. 

Thesis: “Music Recital.’* 

“/*</ rather guess you are 4 worth rvhile\" 


t —, 



Eighty-eight 


















School of Veterinary Science 




J. CECIL THOMPSON 
"Cec" 

Spokane Sigma Nu 

Thesis: “A Study of the Milk Supply of Spo¬ 
kane.’’ 

Glee Club (1) (2). Executive Committee Students’ 
Assembly (2). Baseball coach (l) (2). Veterinary 
Medical Association. 

‘‘Come on /cl/on»a, lets have a little song.” 

RALPH EARNEST BAKER 
“Bake” 

Portland, Ore. 

Thesis: “The Application of Heat a3 a Remedial 
Agent in the Treatment of Congestion and Febril Con¬ 
ditions of the Domesticated Animal.’’ 

Veterinary Medical Association. 

"He is ambitious to become a progressive veterinarian.’ 

JOHN JOSEPH STRATTON 

"Brorvn Bear" 

Spokane 

Thesis: “A Study of the Causes, Symptoms, Path¬ 
ology and Therapeutics of the Diseases of the Foot of 
the Horse-’’ 

'He carries a bold front." 


ROBERT PRIOR 
"Bob" 

North Yakima 

Thesis: “A Study of the Technique of Pre- and 
Post-Operative Surgery.” 

Four semesters’ distinction. Secretary Twentieth Cen¬ 
tury Club. President Veterinary Medical Association 
(2) (4). Washington Literary Society. 

"He attends to hi* vivn business , and not to that of 
others." 




Eighty-nine 



















P. R. DIRSTINE 
“Dirf 
Lind 

Thesis: “A Sludy of the Pasture as Indicating Spe¬ 
cific Pathological Disease in Domestic Animals.*' 
Veterinary Medical Society. 

"Judge nol his knowledge by his conversation 


THOMAS BLYTHE HOUSCH1LD 
"Tom" 

Ritzville 

Thesis: “A Sludy of the Different Forms of Mange 
Occurring in Horses and Dogs; Their Causative Fac¬ 
to s and Treatments.” 

"Welly now , I don’t know about that." And he didn’t 


GEORGE WILLIAM CLARKE 
"Rough” 

Roslyn 

Thesis: "Horse Shoeing as a Preventive and a 
Curative Agent in Interfering.” 

Veterinary Medical Society. Track “W” (1) (2). 
"He peddles a—(perhaps he enjoys it)." 


ROBERT JOHN DONAHOE 
"Bob" 

Park City, Utah 

Thesis: “A Study to Determine the Relative Thera¬ 
peutic Values of Anti-Spasmodics in Equine Colics.” 

Wrestling ”W” (1) (2). Irish Club. Washington 
Literary Society. 

"Good pose, Bobbie.” 


THEODORE BELETSKI 
"Ski" 

Aroxino, Idaho 

Thesis: “Nervous Diseases of the Horse, Their 
Cause and Treatment.” 

Veterinary Medical Society. 

"Microscopically speaking, an open eye for the di¬ 
minutive forms of life." 




Ninety 


















Seniors in tarmac? 

(gy* ' ^ * -ns) 


JAMES H. WARRELL 
“Sunn;? /im” 

Garfield 

Class Track. State College Pharmaceutical Associ¬ 
ation. 

"He knows his course." 


ADOLPH HANS WEGNER 
"Hans" 

Kendrick, Idaho 

State College Pharmaceutical Association. 

"His name is deceiving , for he is not a Swede .’ 

WALTER LEONARD WILLIAMS 

"Speck” 

Bellingham Alpha Tau Omega 

Basketball “W” (2). Glee Club and Quartet 
(2). Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (1). Executive Com¬ 
mittee Students' Assembly (2). State College Phar¬ 
maceutical Association. 

"A prett i? little fellow—the pride of all the 
‘Pharmics " 

HARRY W. BALLAINE 
"Whang" 

St. John 

State College Pharmaceutical Association. 

"Just one of the Pharmic Bunch " 





Ninety-one 











































ROSCOE B. WESTACOTT 
"Westy" 

Garfield 

State College Pharmaceutical Association. 

"He's got the stuff in him 'cause Watt said so.’* 


WILLIAM LESTER RINEHART 
“ Riney" 

Fossil, Oregon Alpha Tau Omega 
Baseball “W” (I). State College Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

"If he says he will—he will; you can depend on 
that" 


WILLIAM HENRY SCHROEDER 
"Dutch" 

San Jose, California Phi Upsilon 

Band (I) (2). Orchestra (1) (2). President 

State College Pharmaceutical Association (2). 

"That's all right Dutch , it will grow out again." 


LEE ARNOLD MANTZ 
"Coke" 

Colville 

Class Track Team. State College Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

"Doesn't know the location of the Pharmic Labora¬ 
tory." 





i 


i 


i 


i 


i 


Ninety-two 


x 


i 






























~3 uniors 



CLASS OFFICERS 
Firsl Semester 

Eddie Kienholz.President 

G. P. Howard.Vice President 

Zoe Bean.Secretary 

William McKinney....Treasurer 

Joseph L. Philips.Sergeant-at-Arms 

Second Semester 

Eddie Kienholz 

Eddie Pape..—..President 

Clyde Petterson.Vice President 

Alice Wagnon.Secretary 

Guy Tulley. Treasurer 

Eddie Kienholz..Sergeant-at-Arms 

Walter Gatward.Student Council 

m 

Colors: Yale Blue and White. ^ 

Class Yell: 

Rip-rah, rip-zeen. 

Nineteen thirteen, 

Rip-rah, rip-zeen, Eddie Pape 

Nineteen thirteen. 


3 ^ 


Ninety-three 


I 



























I 



Dee Gaddis 
Helen Roudebush 
John Holland 
Rena Duthie 


Mary Williams 

L. I. Brislawn 
Rose Adams 

M. T. Clemans 


R. B. McElroy 
Josephine Olsen 
G. A. T. Powell 
Mary Waikle 


Marie Vestal 
E. H. Kienholz 
Grace Eccles 
Frank Brownell 


■- n i i 


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Ninety-four 


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H. M. Chambers 
G. P. Koch 
T. E. Harter 
P. H. Neuman 


A. B. Jones 
J. L. Philips 
R. I. Curtis 
Grace Coulter 


W. A. Gatward 
Dorothy Fortier 
W. L. Lincoln 
L. D. Baker 



R. Jeffery 
F. R. Smith 
J. J. Kimm 
C. M. Howard 



i 


Ninety- 





























































, W n 4 l< 


A. R. Hahner 
Edna Langlois 
E. S. Lockwood 
O. L. Cornwall 


G. P. Howard 
E. C. Pape 
C. C. Farr 
A. L. Strausz 


Zoe Bean 
F. C. Wright 
R. Keffer 
Harriet Taylor 


A. W. Langdon 
V. O. McWhorter 
F. A. Geue 
M. J. Forsell 


Ninety-six 
























































f 


. C. Fletcher 
A. Lewis 
M. Fulton 
. G. Hood 


V. K. Hancock 
G. A. Tulley 
T. G. Rake 
M. E. Jamison 


J. C. Petterson 
Henrietta Aten 
A. Redpath 
R. W. Kennedy 


H. Peckenpaugh 
O. S. Fletcher 
H. J. Perry 
H. W. Chase 


H i i 4 l< 


1 




i 


Ninety-seven 





























I 



H. D. Aten 
M. O. Monroe 
W. E. McKinney 


Mary Chandler 
Floy Bean 
Ruth Spinning 


C. C. Duvall 
Ada Pitner 
W. Holt 


Hazel Spinning 
Ethel Morgan 
Alice Waenon 


The Chinook regrets its inability to secure pictures of the following Juniors: 

Ralph Lowry R. G. Gardner T. H. Rosenkranz 

Stanley Armstrong J. C. Beckman Clara Minard 

J. O. Dalquist O. S. Brown H. P. Foster 

B. O. Bendixen W. H. Amos W. K. Burgess 

G. S. Canfield Crpha Henneck Edna Richardson 

I I 


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Ninety-eight 


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Sophomores 


CLASS OFFICERS 
F'.rsl Semester 


A. T. Peterson. 


.President 

Lester V. Cooke. 


.Vice President 

Irma Turner. 


.Secretary 

Arthur D. Stewart. 


.Treasurer 

J. E. Love. 

Second Semester 

. Sergeant-at-Arms 

Leonard Davis. 



Carl Dunn. 


.Vice President 

Laurel Henry. 



James McNair. 


.Treasurer 

L. H. Clinton. 


..Sergeant-at-Arms 

Arthur D. Stewart. 


..Students’ Council 

Colors: Orange and Black 

Yell: 

Zip-zoar, zip-zoar. 

Nineteen, one-four, 

Zip-zoar, zip-zoar. 

Nineteen, one-four. 



A. T. Peterson 



Leonard Davis 


, 4*i i W ii 4 < « i 


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Ninety-nine 































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3Fresl)meit 


CLASS OFFICERS 

First Semester 


H. E. Burdette... 

.President 

O. P. Thompson... 

.Vice President 

Hettie Cave. 

.Secretary 

John Sorenson. 

.Treasurer 

E. H. Schuneman. 

..Sergeant-at-Arms 


Second Semester 

Chester Boddy. 

...President 

P. R. Feddersohn. 

.Vice President 

Lillian MacLeod_ 

.Secretary 

Victor Menaglia. .. 

.Treasurer 

H. E. Burdette.... 

...Sergeant-at-Arms 

H. G. Holt. 

.Students’ Council 

Colors: 

Navy Blue and Gold 

Yell: 


Some class, some keen. 

Nineteen-fifteen, 

Some class, some keen. 

Nineteen-fifteen. 


A 




H. E. Burdette 




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Chester Boddy 


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One Hundred Two 


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M. O. Monroe 
Secretary 


Henry Doe!!e 
Vice President 


^Executive 
Officers of tl>e 
Athletic 
Association 



Ralph Lowry 
President 




Harry Chambers 
Treasurer 





Frank Jenne 
Field Manager 


. i- W i i44-. 


Cne Hundred Three 



































































I 


bearers of tl)e “W” 


FOOTBALL 


Fishback, ’08, *09, M 1 (Capt.) 

Laird, ’08, ’09, MO, M 1 

Pynn, * 1 1 

Tyrer, ’ll 

Harter, Joe, MO, ’ll (Capt. Elect) 

Suver, ’ 1 1 

Harter, Geo., MO, Ml 

Moeser, ’ 1 1 

Kienholz, M0, Ml 

Coulter, M0, Ml 

Clark, *1 1 

Gaddis, ’ 1 1 

Heintzelman, M0, Ml 

TRACK 


La Follette, ’09, M0, Ml (Capt.) 

Dalquist, '09, M0, M 1 (Capt. Elect) 

Cooke, M 1 

Graves, ' 1 1 

McWhorter, V. O., M 1 

Laird, ’ 1 1 

Lowry, '09, *10, M 1 

Welsch. ’07, ’09, M0, Ml 
Monroe, M0. Ml 

Powell, MO, M 1 

Williams, J.. *11 

Love, E., 'll 

BASEBALL 


Bradley, '09, *10, ’ll (Capt.) 

Graham, MO, Ml 

Rinehart, * 1 1 

Kienholz, ’ 1 1 

Tulley, M 1 

Knight, M0, M 1 

Sweitzer, *09, * 1 1 

Casad, * 1 1 

Cave, ’08, ’09, *10, *1 1 
McElroy, ’ 1 1 

Pape, M0, Ml (Capt. Elect) 
Patton, '09, '10, '1 1 


BASKETBALL 


Knight (Capt.), *11, M2 
Kienholz, * I 2 
Williams, W., *12 
Ritter (Capt. Elect), Ml, M2 


Sampson, * I 2 
Hunt, ’ 1 2 
Reilly, * 1 2 
Lowry, MO, Ml, M2 


WRESTLING 


Doelle (Capt.), Ml. M2 
Jenne, Ml, M2 


Cornwall, M2 (Capt. Elect) 
Ramsey, ’ I 2 


Fulton, MO, Ml (Capt.) 
Rucker, * I 1 


TENNIS 

Walsh, “Ted”, M 1 (Capt. Elect) 
Walsh, “Bob”, ’ll 

Folger, M I 


♦lit t H 


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One Hundred Four 


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J. F. Bohler 

Gymnasium 

Basketball 

Baseball 

Wrestling 



Andy Anderson J. E. Thornton 

Manager Ass’t. Football Coach 



One Hundred Five 

















ed Six 


Coulter Gaddis Clark Moeser Kienholz 
Heintzelman Laird Suver G. Harter J. Harter Fishback Tyrer 

football Bwrn 





































“Fellows, we played, we won, and we lost. We gave them all we had. So 
here’s to our Coach—‘May he be with us next season. We’ll be with him’.’’ 

THOMAS FISHBACK. 

VARSITY LINE-UP 

Ends—Pynn, Tyrer, Heintzelman. 

Tackles—Laird, Fishback (Captain). 

Guards—Harter, Joe (Captain Elect), Suver. 

Center—Harter, Geo. 

Quarterbacks—Moeser, Gaddis. 

Halfbacks—Coulter, Kienholz. 

Fullback—Clark. 


SCORES 


w. 

s. 

c. 

58. 

..-.Gonzaga 

0 

w. 

s. 

c. 

1 7. 

.U. of I 

0 

w. 

s. 

c. 

0. 

. U. of o. 

6 

w. 

s. 

c. 

0. 

. O. A. C. 

6 

w. 

s. 

c. 

II. 

.Whitman 

0 

w. 

s. 

c. 

6. 

.U. of w. 

30 





One Hundred Seven 













































Review of tfie Season 


The football season opened with the brightest of prospects for a winning team. 
Fishback, Laird, J. Harter, G. Harter, Coulter and Kienholz, all “W” men of last 
season’s team, returned to school and formed a strong nucleus around which the coach 
could build his team. We had just two weeks in which to prepare for the first game. 
But at the expiration of this time Osthoff sent a team upon Rogers Field which 
defeated the Irishmen from Gonzaga College by a 58-0 score. Although this was 

only a practice game it gave us confidence in our men. 

The first conference game came just thirteen days 
later with the University of Idaho. During this period 
our team strengthened its weak spots and developed 
machine work of smoothness and regularity. At 2:30 
on the afternoon of October 20th we slipped onto the 
field at Moscow and snatched victory from our old rivals 
by a score of 1 7-0. The Idaho boys put up a great 
fight, but could not stand against the onslaught of our 
men. The crowd of State College Rooters which jour¬ 
neyed to Moscow on that day to witness the annual 
battle were jubilant over their victory, and returned to 
Pullman unprepared for the defeat which met them the 
following week. 

When our team went on the local field to meet 
the University of Oregon on the 27th of October it was 
followed by a “hoodoo”. Notwithstanding the fact 
that two of our regular men were out of the game on 
account of injuries received at Moscow, our boys ad¬ 
vanced the ball over twice the number of white lines as 
did the visitors, and yet they could not score. The first 
quarter was scoreless. The second quarter was score¬ 
less. But in the third quarter Oregon’s Captain slipped 
around the State College defense and scored the only 
During the final period our team rallied and came danger¬ 
ously close to Oregon’s goal, but could not turn the trick. When the whistle blew, 
our team was defeated, but not by a better team. That evening the old chapel bell 
did not ring. 

Our next game was played in foreign territory. On the 1 1 th of November we 
played the Oregon Aggies at Corvallis. The rectangle was a sea of sawdust and 

, i t 4 4 + , 



Coach Osthoff 
touchdown of the game. 


One Hundred Eight 


I 
















water and it was impossible 
for the players to keep on 
their feet. Both teams fought 
stubbornly and fiercely, but 
during the first three periods 
of the game neither could 
score. Time and again our 
boys advanced the ball close 
to Oregon’s guarded line, but 
could not put it over. Thus 
did the game continue until 
the last half minute of play, 
when a costly fumble on the 
part of the Washington boys 


Kienholz Circling Idaho’s Defense 
Our team returned to Pullman more determined 



resulted in a touchdown for Oregon, 
than ever to win their next game. 

When we met Whitman College in Spokane on the following Saturday the 
‘Hoodoo” which had been following us was broken. Although the game was played 
on a slippery, muddy field, it was one of the most spectacular of the season. Whitman 

fought heroically to hold us 
scoreless, but their defense 
fell at the close of the first 
half when a well executed 
forward pass, an end run, and 
a line smash netted us our 
first touchdown. The second 
half started off with a rush. 
Coulter returned Whitman’s 
kick-off by a 65-yard run. In 
rapid succession there fol¬ 
lowed two end runs, a for- 

_ 0 . . _ _ ward pass and a line buck, the 

Pynn Receiving rorward Pass 

combination of which resulted in our second, and last touchdown. After this neither 
team could score, but both were fighting desperately when the last whistle blew. The 
Whitman boys surely deserve credit for the clean, hard fight they put up for their 
college. 


On Turkey day, just two 
weeks after this victory, we 
met the University of Wash¬ 
ington in Seattle. There, be 
fore the largest crowd thac 
ever witnessed a football game 
in the Northwest, and upon a 
field in tip-top condition, our 
team went down to defeat be¬ 
fore the University players. 
The decisive score or 
30-6 does not in anv 



G. Harter Goes Through Idaho’s Line 


r n l i t U* —, 




I 


On© Hundred Nine 






















































way compare the strength of the two teams. Three of the scores made by the Sound 
players resulted through costly fumbles on the part of our team. The other two touch¬ 
downs were earned by the University boys. But on the other hand Osthie’s men 
were the first in two years to score a touchdown on Gilmour Dobie’s machine. Dobie 
himself says we have the 
first team that ever hammered 
his men down the gridiron 90 
long yards for a touchdown. 

We do not say that we had a 
better team than the Univer¬ 
sity on that day, but we do 
say, and know, that our team 
put up a hard clean fight. 

They carried with them 
throughout the entire game 
that “ never give up and 
fight to the finish spirit” of 
every wearer of the Crimson 
and Gray. Although we lost 
the game, we do not feel 
badly about it, for the manly 
fight put up by our boys is 
really what counts. 

Next season will find 
Washington State with a 
heavier and stronger team. 




Our Touchdown Against the University 
of Washington 






At the Oregon Game 



I , W a 44* , 


One Hundred Ten 


































F _i4* i i_W a 44 * , 


FlSHBACK —“Fish” came from the woods. Accord¬ 
ing to the natives he left the farm a simple country youth 
with curly red locks and a “Bud Hicks” valise. But 
since this time Tom has changed. After coming to 
Washington, he turned out for football and made the 
team. He has been our varsity tackle for three years, 
and is an All-Northwest man. As captain of last sea¬ 
son’s team, he proved himself to be a good leader and 
a hard, consistent player. Tom will be with us next 
year. 


HARTER —Joe claims that he came from Colfax 
High. He says that he played football on the Colfax 
High team. He also backed up this statement by con¬ 
vincing the coach that he should play guard for the 
Varsity. When the boys elected him to lead next sea¬ 
son’s team, he told them that he was the man for the 
job. We believe you, Joe, for we have seen you play, 
and know that the All-Northwest squad claims you as 
one of its guards. “Big” would be a good steady fusser, 
had he not promised “Osthie” that he would never dance. 


KlENHOLZ —“Dutch” refuses to brief his football 
career because he is athletic editor of the Chinook. All 
right, Eddie, we will tell them you play left half and 
play it hard. W e will say that you are a good ground 
gainer and a good punter. But, of course, it wouldn’t 
be right for us to say that you always wrap “Her” pic¬ 
ture in your blanket before going to the football games. 
It might get you in had with the other girl. However, 
we can say that you are a Spokane boy, and are the 
proud possessor of three honor letters. 


Laird —“Tub” says the old slogan that “Nobody 
loves a fat man” isn’t true. Since his past season’s record 
as a football player placed him on the All-Northwest, he 
has succeeded in getting a few of the musical sex to call 
him “Tubby”. So there! The little Palouse town 
that claims him as its own, thinks Jesse to be the only 
real player on the Varsity team. But no one ever heard 
1 ub say such a thing. 


One Hundred Eleven 



















Harter —When “Slim’* lived in Wenatchee he 
always had a job. He played center on the Wenatchee 
football team, and, during his leisure hours, picked fruit 
for the ranchers. They were crazy about him because 
he got the fruit without a ladder. But after George 
came to Washington, “Osthie” used him for another 
purpose. He made him varsity center and told him to 
stop the forward passes. This he did with such cer¬ 
tainty that the All-Northwest squad needed him at center 
position. Slim is 6 feet 7 inches in height, wears a 
“W” sweater, and carries the mail. 


COULTER —“Colt” is a West-Sider, and comes from 
Olympia. Although the pride of the Capital City, he 
has been one of our most consistent trainers, and has 
rightfully earned his place in the backfield. He is five 
feet ten inches in heighth, and has a live weight of 1 65 
pounds. So you can see that he is no Freshman. He 
has a squirming disposition when carrying the ball, and 
for this reason is a very difficult man to tackle. Leo is 
quiet and unassuming. He never swears. 



HEINTZELMAN —“Shrimp” Heintzelman has won two 
coveted “W”s in football, and feels bad because he will 
not be with us next year. “Heintz”, as he is called by 
his friends, and he has a host of them, is a little chubby 
Dutchman. But, of course, you could never tell that 
by his name. For nerve and grit he has it on the Irish, 
and all who have seen him play will tell you so. He 
plays both quarter and end positions. The little fellow 
is exceptionally good at carrying the ball through a 
broken field. The boys all like “Heintz”. 


SuVER —“Babe” entered college last fall a big, 
green Freshman. Like all other good students he 
taking Agriculture, and says he wants to live the simple 
life. “Suve” made up one of the center trio, and for 
a first year man was exceptionally strong. “Osthie” 
says that two more years of hard work will make the big 
blond famous in this Western section. Go to it, “Suve”, 
we are all behind a good thing. 


W a 44 * 


One Hundred Twelve 


















MOESER—“Scut” Moeser, as he is known by all 
his team-mates, is our field general and drop-kicker. He 
never has been known to use profane language, although 
he was heard to say “My Goodness” when tackled by 
some rough player in the Whitman game. Milt is a 
cool, quiet sort of a fellow, and has never been “fussed”, 
so he says, but he will have to prove to some of us that 
such is the case. “Moe” is taking Pharmacy and has 
ambitions of becoming a doctor. 


CLARK—“Slew-foot” Clark, our plunging fullback, 
is one of the “old boys” of the College. He has been 
a member of every Freshman Football team for years. 
But this early training was a good thing for Washing¬ 
ton, as it made Ace a good player. Clark does not 
like to be called “Four Mile”. He is not proud of his 
home town and says that name interferes with his social 
standing here in College. Don’t you believe it, Ace, the 
Pi Delta Phis don’t care! 


PYNN—“Herr Pin” joined the squad last fall and 
made good from the start. He came from Spokane, and 
of course that helped. He was one of our speedy ends, 
and his ability to spear forward passes was of the stellar 
order. He is five feet, ten inches in height, and weighs 
155 pounds. You would never know him to be 
“Dutch”, if it were not for his name. He is really hand¬ 
some, and has a very pleasant disposition. He has wavy 
brown hair. 


TyRER —We have been told many times by the 
P.-I. that “Tommy” is a Seattle boy, but we do not 
always believe everything that we hear about him. How¬ 
ever, we do know that he is a hard conscientious worker, 
and that he yet may become famous in due course of 
time. After seeing him play at Seattle last fall, we can 
not doubt that he has the “stuff” in him. He is fast, 
plays the game well, and was given special mention by 
Dobie after the Thanksgiving game, so Tommy says. 


1 i- i— W i i i 


One Hundred Thirteen 























Caddis —When “Dee” was a Freshman it was 
thought by many that he did not have the “stuff” which 
goes to make up a football player. But “Dee” thought 
so. He just kept on plugging through his first two years 
of college, and when he became a Junior, made the team 
Although one of the lightest men on the varsity, he is 
fast and heady. At quarter he plays a good game, and 
at this position gave Dobie a great deal of worry last 
Thanksgiving. Gaddis says he will be with us next year. 


APPLEQUIST— “Hackenschmidt,” as his name im¬ 
plies, is one of the “Sylvest” brothers. He is a tower of 
strength, and the way ne tore up the line when given a 
chance at tackle last fall, almost assures him a place on 
the varsity this coming season. “Hack” is also known as 
Happy”, and always has a full smile for every one. 
He says that he likes the wrestling game, but that foot¬ 
ball is the game of real class. 


RlTTER— “Bertie” played his first collegiate football 
last season. Although he did not win the honor letter, 
he did some good work and deserves a great deal of 
credit for his consistent training. He plays the fullback 
position, and another year’s experience will make him a 
good man for the backfield. “Rit” is a Pharmic, and 
Watt is proud of him. He says Bert is a good “Pill 
Roller”. We don’t believe you. Prof., for we never 
saw him smoke. 


Walsh —“Teddy,” the boy from St. Paul, is a 
comer for the backfield. Although he was not a regular 
man for the halfback position this year, he has shown the 
Coach that he carries the goods with him and will un¬ 
doubtedly be given an opportunity to deliver them next 
fall. He is five feet ten inches tall, weighs I 65 pounds, 
and has dreamy black eyes which match with his newly 
cultivated pompadour. The co-eds are all crazy about 
him, but that does not bother “Teddy” one bit. 






One Hundred Fourteen 


















i i i 


PENICK —The season had only fairly begun, when 
this Ohio youth had the misfortune of breaking his ankle. 
By many he was considered the logical man for full¬ 
back position, but, of course, this accident put him out 
of the running. Walt’s greatest difficulty was in getting 
the signals to percolate his veneered top, but he has prom¬ 
ised Osthie to have that piece of ivory removed before 
next fall. 


McKlNNEY —Our chubby “Mack” played his first 
varsity football against Idaho. He had been working 
two long ve?.rs for this opportunity, and when it was 
offered him he proved himself to be a running mate for 
Applequist. There is no doubt that next season will 
find these two Siamese twins in action at tackle positions. 


McGregor —“Scotch” is a Palouse product. He 
knows it and admits it. He is also a big, husky Fresh¬ 
man, who plays the halfback position like a fiend when 
called upon to show his metal. He isn’t much of a 
fusser, but is a good student. Next year will find him 
on the varsity. Stick with it, “Mack”. 


Hewing closely to the 
line of his own strong 
convictions, standing out 
firmly upon his well 
chosen ground of honesty, 
reliability, and strength 
of purpose, and never 
failing to meet any circumstances except with careful 
consideration of those concerned, John H. Jones, the 
man, firm believer in the “square deal”, has endeared 
himself to every member of the institution and none 
there are who know him but can say, “There is my 
friend, and a friend of my college”. John Jones exem¬ 
plifies what this institution is endeavoring to teach—he 
lives by thinking right and doing right. After two years 
nf faithful service as graduate manager, John has left, 
but he is still with us, and we are still with him. We 
hcnor yo’i John Jones, even as you honor your Alma 
Mate-. Yom have made good—and we love you for it 


One Hundred Fifteen 






















One Hundred Sixteen 


Osthoff Powell Ritter McWhorter Love Tyrer Harter Graves Clarke Jones 

Beckman Lynch Cooke Williams La FoIIette Lowry Monroe Rockey Stone 

15rack Z3eam 


























' TRjkCK ' 

“Your Track Team was a success. It met and defeated Montana, Idaho, and 
Whitman in dual meets. May your next season's team meet all colleges in the North¬ 
west Conference.” 

TABOR LaFOLLETTE. 


THE VARSITY TEAM 


100 and 220 Yard Dashes 

The Quarter Mile.... 

The Half Mile. 

The Mile . 

Two Mile. 

The High Hurdles. 

The Low Hurdles. 

The High Jump.. 

Broad Jump. 

Pole Vault. 

Shot Put... 

Hammer. 

Discus. 

Relay. 


.Cooke, Lowry, Graves 

Cooke, Graves, Ritter, McWhorter 

....McWhorter 

....Welsch 

.Williams, Welsch 

...LaFollette, Powell 

.Lowry, LaFollette 

.Powell, Dalquist, Monroe 

.Monroe, Powell, Dalquist 

.Dalquist, Monroe, Powell 

.Love, Ed. 

.Laird, Love, Ed. 

.Love, Ed., Dalquist 

.Cooke, Lowry, Ritter, Graves 



SCORES 

W. S. C. 83 . 

W. S. C. 79 .. 

W. S. C. 99J/ 2 . 


U. of M. 39 

U. of I. 61 
.Whitman 40]/^ 




1 


One Hundred Seventeen 



















































Welsch 


Dalquist (Capt. Elect) 


Williams 


1C. of 5ttontana vs. S. <£. 

The first meet of the 1911 track season was held May 5ih on Rogers Field. 
Montana sent over nine men and on account of a previous agreement our team was 
limited to an equal number. The day was cold, rainy and windy. Under such con¬ 
ditions records were impossible. Cooke, a State College Freshman, was high point 
winner of the meet. 


Event 


SUMMARY 

2nd 


I' rconn 


100 Yard Dash 

Cooke 

Lowry 

Comrad 

10:1 

220 Yard Dash 

Cooke 

Lowry 

Comrad 

23: 

440 Yard Dash 

Cooke 

Cameron 

McWhorter 

54: 

880 Yard Run 

McDonald 

McWhorter 

Cameron 

2:11 

Mile Run 

McDonald 

Welsch 


4:51 

Two Mile Run 

Williams 

Welsch 

O’Rouke 

11:03 

220 Yard Hurdles 

LaFollette 

Powell 

Dinsmore 

17:2 

120 Yard Hurdles 

LaF ollette 

Lowry 

Theime 

29:3 

Shot Put 

Ryan 

Maclay 

Love 

37' 

Hammer Throw 

Ryan 

Mac lay 

Love 

105' 

Discus Throw 

Love 

Maclay 

Dalquist 

106' 4" 

High Jump 

Powell 

Dalquist 

Ryan 

5’ 

Broad Jump 

Pole Vault 

Relay 

Powell 

Conceded to W. S 
Conceded to W. S 

Dalquist 
. C. 

. C. 

Comrad 

20' 10" 


Final Score W. S. C. 83—Montana 39 




One Hundred Eighteen 

























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Monroe Powell E. Love 


lF6al)o vs. W. S. <£, 

On May 20th W. S. C. won the annual track meet with Idaho by a score of 
79-61. Idaho led all through the early part of the meet but our team came up won¬ 
derfully in the last four events. Dalquist of W. S. C. broke his own record in the 
pole vault and Buffington of Idaho broke the javelin record of the two institutions. 


SUMMARY 


Event. 

1st. 

2nd. 

3rd. 

Record 

Mile Run 

Welsch 

Downing 

Clark 

4:46 

Shot Put 

Ream 

Louix 

Love 

36’ 6" 

100 yard Dash 

Montgomery 

Cooke 

Watts 

10 flat 

High Jump 

Strohecker 

fowellf Ticd 


5' 10" 

Discus 

Love 

Buffington 

Stambaugh 

118’ 

440 yard Dash 

Montgomery 

Graves 

Beckman 

53: 

Pole Vault 

Dalquist 

Strohecker 

Monroe 

11' 1H 1 

Hammer Throw 

Laird 

Love 

Ream 

117' 

220 yard Hurdles 

Montgomery 

Lowry 

LaFollette 

25:2 

880 yard Run 

Denning 

McWhorter 

Lynch 

M’onroe 

2:04 

Javelin Throw 

Buffington 

Ream 

147' 3" 

220 yard Dash 

Cooke 

Montgomery 

Graves 

21:4 

2 mile Run 

Williams 

Welsch 

Redeker 

10:44 

Broad Jump 

Monroe 

Strohecker 

Powell 

20' 1U" 

120 yard Hurdles 

Powell 

LaFollette 

Davis 

17:2 

Relay 

Won by W. S. C. 

Lowry Graves 
Ritter Cooke 


3:30:1 


Final Score W. S. C. 79—U. of Idaho 61. 



, i H —, 

One Hundred Nineteen 



















Cooke Graves Ritter Lowry 

THE RELAY TEAM 


Whitman vs, X5P, S, <T. 

The track season of 1911 closed on May 26th when we met Whitman on 
Rogers Field. The day was ideal and a large enthusiastic crowd witnessed the 
closing meet from the hillside. The prettiest race of the day was the mile relay 
which was won by W. S. C. in the fast time of 3 minutes 29 and 2-5 seconds. 


SUMMARY 


Event 

1st. 

2nd 

3rd. 

Record 

Mile Run 

Clarke 

Woods 

Rockey 

4:46:4 

100 Yard Dash 

Cooke 

Lowry 

Bloomquist 

10:2 

440 Yard Dash 

Bloomquist 

Graves 

Ritter 

52:3 

Shot Put 

Neill 

Lewis 

Geue 

39’ 2" 

High Jump 

Dalquist 

Powell 

Monroe 


5’ 5" 

120 Yard Hurdles 

Lowry 

LaFollette 

Botts 

27:1 

880 Yard Run 

Beckman 

McWhorter 

Clarke 

2:05:1 

Pole Vault 

Dalquist 

Monroe 

Powell and Bowers 

10' 6" 

Discus 

Lewis 

Love 

McCoy 

121' 

220 Yard Dash 

Graves 

Cooke 

Bloomquist 

23:1 

2 Mile Run 

Williams 

Woods 

Barrett 

10:31 

Broad Jump 

Lewis 

Powell 

Monroe 

20' 10" 

Hammer Throw 

Laird 

Love 

Harter 

118 , 1" 

120 Hurdles 

LaFollette 

Powell 

Bowers 

17:3 

Javelin Throw 

McCoy 

Ritter 

Tyrer 

134'7" 

Relay 

Won by W. S. C. 

Lowry Ritter 
Graves Cooke 

3:29:2 


Final Score W. S. C. 924— Whitman 404. 


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One Hundred Twenty-one 


Montgomery W/ns tfye JOO 


Cooil and Williams in the Cross Country. Monroe Tries Hard. 

Denning wins the 880. Cooke Finishing Relay. 

Rowell wins the Hurdle Race. Graves gives Montgomery a Close Race in the Quarter. 


VARSITY 


TRACK 











































































































B9H 


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cSo 


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3 CL, 

H 


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t> 

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One Hundred Twenty-two 


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^>l)£ baseball Oeam 
































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BASF3ALL 



“The boys worked hard to give you a championship team. We had a good 
coach, and the best of feeling existed between each and every player. We played to 
win and that is the most any team can do.” 

HENRY BRADLEY. 


Obc Varstt? Z3eam 


Catchers—Graham, Pape (Capt. El 

ect) Short Stop—Bradley (Capt.) 

Pitchers—Sweitzer, Patton, 

1 st Base—Casad 

2nd Base—Cave 

Rinehart Right Field—Tulley 

Center Field—Knight 

Left Field—Kienholz 

3rd Base—McElroy 

SCORES 

April 5, W. S. C__ 

.. 3. 

.Pullman . 

Gonzaga . 

April 10, W. S. C. 

. 1. 

.Pullman .. 

.Indians ... 

April 15, W. S. C. 

.10. 

.Pullman ... 

Idaho ... 

April 19, W. S. C. 

.. 9. 

Pullman .. 

Oregon U... 

April 20. W. S. C. 

.. 9 . 

Pullman .. 

.Oregon U.. 

April 26. W. S. C. 

.. 0 . 

Pullman . 

O. A. C. 

April 29. W. S. C. 

2 

Pullman . 

O. A. C. 

May 1, W. S. C . 

.. 0 .... 

Walla Walla. .. 

Whitman ... 

May 2. W. S. C. 

..12 . 

Walla Walla. 

Whitman . 

May 3, W. S. C. 

.. 0 .... 

Eugene . 

Oregon U. 

May 4, W. S. C. 

.. 5 .... 

Eugene . 

.^regcn U. 

May 5, W. S. C. 

.. 9 ... 

.Corvallis . 

O. A. C. 

May 6, W. S. C. 

.. 2 ... 

Corvallis . 

.O. A. C. 

May 15, W. S. C. 

... 1. 

Pullman . 

,U. of W. 

May 27. W. S. C. 

... 5 ... 

.Scokane ... .... 

.C-onzaga ... 

June 2, W. S. C. 

.10 .... 

Pullman . 

U. of I. 

June 3, W. S. C. 

.12 .... 

Moscow . 

.U. of I. 

June 6, W. S. C_ 

... 3 .. 

Mcsccw .. 

.U. of I. 


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One Hundred Twenty-three 































































































Bradley (Capt.) Graham Sweitzer Kienholz Casad 


Patton 





Review of t(>e Season 

Much credit must be given our last season’s team for their faithful training and 
hard work on the baseball diamond. This team, under the supervision of Coach 
Bohler, made an excellent showing in the Northwest Conference. Bohler is well liked 

by all the boys, and it was through his ability as a Coach, 
and Bradley’s ingenuity as Captain that we were able 
to win a majority of the games played. 

The season opened on April 5 th when we met and 
defeated the Gonzaga boys on our home grounds. Five 
days later the Spokane Indians, a professional league 
team, was held to a tie score. Long will be remem¬ 
bered the hit of “Home Run” Tulley which made that 
little boy famous and the tie score possible. 

We next met Idaho at Moscow. The final score 
was 10-0 for Washington. Directly following this game 
we took two straight from the University of Oregon, and 
it looked like we had a championship team. Then the 
inevitable happened. On the 28th of April we were 
defeated by O. A. C. on our home grounds. Our boys 
simply could not score that day. The following six 
games were played in foreign territory. 

The trip to Whitman, the University of Oregon 
and O. A. C. is one which will long be remembered by 
every member of the team. At each institution our boys 
were treated with the utmost courtesy, and right here we 
wish to express our appreciation for the royal entertain¬ 
ment they received from our rival colleges. Out of the 
six games played on this trip, we won three and lost 
three. With Whitman we broke even, and with 
O. A. C. we won both games. But the University of 



Coach Bohler 


I ,■ < W a 44* . 




One Hundred Twenty-four 


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Knight Tulley Rinehart Cave Pape (Capt. Elect) McElroy 

Oregon took two straight from us, and thus squared up the two successive defeats we 
gave them earlier in the season. 

The University of Washington was our next opponent, and we met them on our 
home grounds the 15th of May. We knew the University had a strong team, but 
we had hoped to win. Early in the game both teams got a score, and then the 
Dlayers tightened up and allowed no more runs until the last inning. It looked like 
a tie game, when two costly infield errors lost us the game with a 3-1 score. On 
account of rain, we could not play Washington a return game. 

The last three games of the season were scheduled with Idaho, and our boys 
ended up in championship style, by taking them straight. Idaho did not have a chance. 
So, at the close of the base¬ 
ball season, Washington State 
found herself second in the 
Northwest Conference. The 
U. of W. had won he 
Championship. 

We may well feel proud of 
our 1911 team. It was one 
of the best teams, if not the 
best that ever wore the colors 
of Crimson and Gray. Th« 
fact that they could not 
always pile up enough scores 
to win, does not detract from 
their ability to play baseball. 

We had a good team. Tulley at Bat 





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“Lack of experienced material proved the undoing of Washington State in 
Basketball, but next season our men will be experienced and you will have a winning 
team.” 

CHARLEY KNIGHT. 

Varsity TLlue-up 


Center ...Reilly, Ritter (Capt. Elect) 

Forwards.Lowry, Hunt, Williams, Sampson 

Guards.Knight (Capt.), Ritter, Kienholz, Sampson 


SCORES 


Jan. 1 3, W. S. 

C. 

.31 

...Moscow . 

.Idaho . 

. 5 

Jan. 20, W. S. 

C. 

.35 ... 

...Pullman _ 

.Idaho ... 

.15 

Feb. 1,W. S. 

C. 

.19 ... 

...Moscow . 

...Idaho . 

.26 

Feb. 2, W. S. 

C. 

.19.... 

...Pullman . 

.Idaho . 

.13 

Feb. 7, W. S. 

C. 

. 7. .. 

....Pullman . 

.U. of W. 

.38 

Feb. 9, W. S. 

c . 

. 8. .. 

...Pullman . 

.U. of W... 

.27 

Feb. 15, W. S. 

C. 

.13 ... 

...Pullman . 

.U. of O. 

.18 

Feb. 1 7, W. S. 

c. 

. 1 ... 

...Pullman . 

.U. of O.. 

. 0 

Feb. 23. W. S. 

c . 

.14 ... 

...Pullman . 

.O. A. C. 

.19 

Feb. 24. W. S. 

c . 

_ 4 ... 

...Pullman . 

.0. A. C. 

.12 

Mar. 2, W. S. 

c . 

.12 ... 

.. .Corvallis . 

.O. A. C. 

.29 

Mar. 4. W. S 

c . 

.11.... 

... Eugene . 

.U. of O. 

.26 

Mar. 5, W. S. 

c . 

. 7 ... 

... Eugene .. 

.U. of O. 

.19 

Mar. 6, W. S 

c . 


....Corvallis ..... 

.O A. C. 

.13 

Mar. 7, W. S. 

c . 

.26... 

....Salem.. 

.Willamette U. 

. 6 




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Cne Hundred Twenty-seven 



































































































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Williams 


Lowry 


Reilly 


Hunt 


3\*vUw of tfye Season 

When Coach Bohler issued the first call for basketball practice, he found the 
situation to be anything but favorable. Although many candidates responded to the 
call, with but few exceptions, all were men of inexperience. It wa s 
under these conditions that Bohler started to work on our team, and 
we are all proud of the boys who worked with him, even if we did 
have a losing team. Under such conditions no coach could put out 
a winning aggregation, or Bohler would have done it. 

Out of the four games played with Idaho, we won three. 
Willamette was also defeated in the single game which we played 
there. But the rest of our games, those with the University of Wash¬ 
ington, and with the Oregon teams, were hopelessly lost. In every 
game, however, that old spirit of “fight” was shown by our men. 
Time after time they went upon the floor against a team they knew 
to be their superior and fought like men. They met teams confident 
of their ability to win, and sure of their power, with stem set faces 
and fought them to a finish. This spirit of losing, is the one we 
commend, and for this reason, if for no other, our fellows should not 

Ritter (Capt. Elect) feel lheir work to be lost - 


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WRESTLING 



Although wrestling is a recently recognized sport at the State College, it 
is fast growing in favor with the students. Under the direction of Coach 
Bohler our last seasons team made a creditable showing against teams from 
other Northwest Colleges. They met the University of Washington at Seattle 
and wrestled them to a draw, but later lost to Oregon Agricultural College in 
a single match held with them at Pullman. Capt. Doelle 

Of our team, Cornwall and Doelle hold Northwest titles in their weights, while 
Jenne and Ramsey have earned their honor letters by winning a match. We lose 
Doelle, Jenne, and Ramsey by graduation but Captain-elect Cornwall will be with 
us next year. 



WRESTLING TEAM 


Bohler Cornwall Dempsey King Anderson 
Ramsey Jenne Jones Doelle 


± 


One Hundred Twenty-nine 





















REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

An unusually large number of tennis enthusiasts worked faithfully to make a 
place on the Varsity last season, and as a result of this keen competition we had a 
championship team. In the preliminary tryouts for the purpose of selecting the 
team, Fulton, Folger, Rucker and the two Walsh Brothers proved themselves to be 
the best players. These men were matched against Idaho’s quintet on June I Oth and 
easily won all games, both singles and doubles. The State College boys surely 
played in championship form last season and it is to be regretted that they did not 
have the opportunity of meeting other conference colleges in the net game. 



“Bob'* Walsh “Ted" Walsh Folger Rucker 


m wt 

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One Hundred Thirty 


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One Hundred Thirty-one 



















Thornton Tulley Ritter Penick Humphrey Peterson McGregor 
Love Casad Jenne Russell Goff Cornwall Langdon 


"Scrubs’’ 

The varsity football player is rewarded for his services on the gridiron. He is 
given that which money cannot buy; that which is sought by all, but obtained by few; 
he is presented with the college emblem, a gift to be held in honor during life. 


For the services of the “scrub” player, no compensation is tendered. We are 
referring to the man, who, knowing that he can never make his letter, turns out day 
after day, and offers his aid that the building of the varsity may be made possible. 
It is only fitting that these fellows should, in some way, be rewarded for their faithful 
efforts to help their college, and it is for this purpose that a page of the Chinook is 
given. 

That we had a good “scrub” team last season was proved by the boys them¬ 
selves when they met and defeated Idaho’s “second best” on Rogers Field. In this 
game they played in real varsity style and came out with a I 5-0 score. 

That every evening of next season’s practice will find the old hillside covered 
with rooters to cheer the “scrub” in his daily battle against the varsity is our earnest 
desire. Such an attitude would show these boys that we appreciate their work and 
that we are behind them in spirit, if not in body. In such an action, an excellent 
opportunity affords itself to those students who do not play football, to assist the 
coach in putting out a winning team, and all should make the most of it. Next fall, 
we promise the “scrubs” more attention than they have had in the past. 


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Laird (Coach) Fortier Steward Love Williams Engelland King Scott 
Clinton Dempsey Miller Mantz Cooke 
Ritter R. Walsh E. Walsh Peterson Humphrey Boyd 

Sop l>omore 13earn 

TFVfcsbman-Sopbomore "IFoatball (Bame 

Score 0-0 



Standing—Kienholz (Coach), James, Menaglia, Boddy, Russell, Clinton, Fed 
dersohn, Davis, Christenson, McCready, Goff, Sorenson, Gordon, Applequist, J. 
Harter (Asst. Coach), Miles, Clough. 

Kneeling—Meyers, McGregor, Wexler, Casad. 

Olje TFres^matt Z3eant 

i tMiiW 



One Hundred Thirty-three 






























Crow Crow Dietz McLean 

Reard Sprowl Brian Loeb Jones 
Christensen Dunham Pearson Glasgow 

151)* TEUmeittar? football Z5earn 


TEUmentar? X5rack 

June 10, 1911 


SUMMARY 


III 


Events— 

First 

Second 

Third 

Record 

Mile Run 

McLennon 

Jensen 

Sutton 

5:2 3-5 

220-yard Hurdles 

Tyrer 

Holgerson 

Garborg 

29:2 

220-yard Dash 

Tyrer 

Holgerson 

Dietz 

23:4 

100-yard Dash 

Casad 

Dietz 

Holgerson 

10:3 

880-yard Run 

Breiding 

McLennon 

Sutton 

2:20 2-5 

Broad Jump 

Tyrer 

McLean 

Garborg 

l8'9!/ 2 " 

440-yard Dash 

Casad 

Dietz 

Sorenson 

54:1 

Pole Vault 

Dermody 

McLean 

Casad 

9' 

120-yard Hurdles 

Tyrer 

Garborg 

Holgerson 

18:1 

Shot Put 

Rosenoff 

Dietz 

Tyrer 

37' 

Discus 

McLean 

Rosenoff 

Dietz 

96' 

Javelin Throw 

Tyrer 

Rosenoff 

James 

133' 

High Jump 

Tyrer 

Holgerson 

McLean 

57" 

Hammer Throw 

Rosenoff 

McLean 

Dietz 

120'6" 

Relay—Won by Senior Elementary 

Team. 



Final Score—Seniors 83 2-3. Junior 28 I -3. Middle 5. 


One Hundred Thirty-four 









































Lynch Cooke Ritter Love Galbraith Williams 
Locklin Gibb McCutcheon Stone Rockey 

~3FVfcsl)mait ^rack Oeam 


T3 l)e ^Junior X3rack 

The annual Junior track meet held April 21, 1911, under the auspices of the 
1912 class, was a decided success. The day was ideal and the attendance was a 
record-breaker. As usual the Freshmen class won by a good margin, but neverthe¬ 
less the meet was fast and exciting. Lester Cook was the highest individual point- 
winner. Exceptionally good records were made in all events. 

SUMMARY 


Event— 

First 

Second 

Third 

Record 

220-yard Hurdles 

Tyrer 

Lake 

Holgerson 

29 

Mile Run 

Williams 

Rockey 

Koch 

4:54 

Discus Throw 

Love 

Harter 

Galbraith 

111' 4" 

Broad Jump 

LaFoIletle 

Lake 

Dempsey 

19'11" 

100-yard Dash 

Cooke 

Graves 

Quigley 

10:2 

Shot Put 

Galbraith 

Geue 

Love 

35' 1" 

Pole Vault 

Ellis 

McCutcheon 

Jenne 

9' 1" 

440-yard Dash 

Ritter 

Graves 

Beckman 

54: 

120-yard Hurdles 

LaFollette 

Lake 


17:4 

Hammer Throw 

Harter 

Stambaugh 

Love 

101'4" 

High Jump 

Tyrer 

Knight 

Dempsey 

5' 4" 

880-yard Run 

McWhorter 

Brownell 

Lynch 

2:05; 4 

220-yard Dash 

Cooke 

Graves 

Quigley 

23:2 

2-mile Run 

Williams 

Locklin 

Lake 

10:46 

Relay 

Won by Freshman 

Cooke Lynch 
Ritter Tvrer 





Final Scores 




Freshman . 

.67 

Juniors . 

.21 


Sophomores . 

.36 

Seniors .. 

. 3 




' 


One Hundred Thirty-five 


































I3l)e. TFVeslj-SopI) Z3rack 

April 28 , 1911 . 


SUMMARY. 


Event. 

1st. 

2nd. 

3rd. 

Record. 

High Jump 

Powell 

Monroe 

LaFollette 

5' 

Mile Run 

Rockey 

Gibb 

Curtis 

5:33: 2-5 

Broad Jump 

Monroe 

Powell 

LaFollette 

20* 6" 

100 Yard Dash 

Cooke 

Stone 

Monroe 

10: 1-5 

440 Yard Dash 

Ritter 

Beckman 

Lynch 

52: 4-5 

Pole Vault 

Monroe 

Powell 

McCuteheon 

10' 

880 Yard Run 

McWhorter 

Brownell 

Freier 

2:04: 3-5 

High Hurdles 

Powell 

LaFollette 

Henning 

17: 3-5 

Hammer Throw 

Love 

Harter 

Ash 

115' 8" 

220 Yard Dash 

Cooke 

Lynch 

Stone 

23: 

Discus Throw 

Love 

Galbraith 

Harter 

103' 8" 

Shot Put 

Galbraith 

Love 

Geue 

35' 6" 

Two Mile Run 

Williams 

Locklin 

LaFollette 

10:33: U 

Low Hurdles 

Kienholz 

Powell 

Monroe 

26: 2-5 


Relay Won by Freshman. 3:36:2-5 


Final Scores. 

Freshman_69 Sophomores_65 


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THE SOPHOMORE CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 



Stratton Willis King Williams Rockey 


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One Hundred Thirty-six 


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Hitterclass Cross Country 
5tteet 

November 4, 1911 

SUMMARY 


McDougall 

Evans 


Cooil 

Williams 

Evans 

Willis 

Parker 

Melcher 

Stratton 

Rockey 

Carlson 

Drew 

Kinney 

Spurting 

McDougall 

Kennedy 

King 

Yates 


Sophomores 
Freshman . 


FRESHMAN 

CROSS 

COUNTRY 

TEAM 


Points 

20 

19 

18 

17 

16 

15 

14 

13 

12 

11 

10 

9 

8 

7 

6 

5 

Final Scores 


Record 

27:35:1 

27:49:1 

29:02: 

29:03:4 

29.54: 

29 : 55:4 

29:56: 

30:30: 

30:31: 

30:32: 

31:49: 

32:20:4 

32:38: 

33:29: 

33:32: 

34:30: 


69 

68 


Seniors 

Juniors 


57 

6 


Drew 

Melcher 




Senior-Faculty baseball (frame 

In early June the Seniors and Faculty clashed in their annual baseball game. 
College days were over for the Seniors and their only ambition was to “drub” the 
Profs.—and they did, but only by a close score. Bohler and Osthoff deserve hon¬ 
orable mention for their great work with the “stick”. 

Senlor-^Alumnl (frame 

June 21, 1911 

When the Senior baseball team met the Alumni on Rogers Field last spring a 
great deal of amusement was afforded for the visitors on the hillside. The game was 
close and exciting and the Seniors barely won out with a 6-5 score. 

3 r resl)man-5opl)omore (frame 

The annual Fresh-Soph baseball game which occurs during the early part of 
May is one which is always watched by an enthusiastic “bunch” of students. Last 
spring they played a fast and spectacular game notwithstanding the fact that the 
Sophomores won by a good score. This game is a means of bringing to light men 
who might be likely candidates for the varsity. 

, H ,, 44* 






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One Hundred Thirty-seven 











































I 



Cooil 


Hyslop Knight Raymond 

Stookey Hunt Jenne Bonney 

Settlor basket !Sall Oeam 


Lewis McWhorter Holt 

Powell Tulley Brownell 

^Junior basket ^ftall Oeam 


Gardner 




One Hundred Thirty-eight 


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Sophomore 
^asKat ^all 
Oeam 


Sophomores 36, Seniors 23. 
Juniors 21, Seniors 5. 
Sophomores 21, Juniors 31. 




Henning Love Locklin 
Dunn Sampson Cotton 


4=^4 


♦freshman 

Oeam 

CHAMPIONS 

Freshmen 23, Seniors I 3. 

Freshmen 34, Sophomores 24. 

Freshmen 34, Juniors 29. 

Hunt Schneider Holgerson 
Anderson Reilly 
Unbewust Schultz Schneider 



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One Hundred Thirty-nine 











































Posing for Turk 
Posing Again 


On the Parallel Bars 
’‘Two Big Kids” 


Bohler 

Osthoff 



si 


^pbvstcal education 

The physical training of male students at the State College is in no way neg¬ 
lected. Under the supervision of Coaches Bohler and Osthoff, classes in gymnasium 
work are given semi-weekly to Juniors and Seniors. Aside from the regular routine 
of the “gym class”, instruction in wrestling, fencing, and boxing is offered to all. Many 
there are who take advantage of this excellent opportunity to learn the art of self- 
defense. 

Once each year, generally during the month of March, there is held in the boys’ 
gymnasium an athletic exhibition in which both the girls and boys take part. Perhaps 
more than ever before, the show this year was a success. Even as the work of the 
classes showed exceptional training, the special feats of Bohler, Osthoff and Monroe 
were worthy of comparison to those of the best gymnasts in the country. 

, j n —i 


i 




i 


i 


i 


i 


One Hundred Forty 


I 






























Girl Athletes, as Caught by the Chinook Photographer 



(Birls (Bynmasium 


; 


Under the able instruction of Miss Hazel Elaine Raber the girls of this school 
receive their physical education. For those entering the Elementary Department, three 
years, and for those entering the Collegiate Department, two years of physical train 
ing are required. Twice each week the co-eds report to a regular class in gymnasium 
work. 

Aside from this regular work, the different collegiate classes hold, during the 
winter months, very interesting tournaments in such sports as basketball, indoor tennis 
and baseball. Very much enthusiasm is shown in these sports and the competition for 
places on these teams is very keen. 


. ■ W -4 



One Hundred Forty-one 
































I 



mm 



X5l)e Sophomore basket !&all Oeam 

Won by Sophomores 


Morgan 


Shields Colley 


Ol)e Tresbman 
basket 3iall Z3eam 






I 


I 


I 


I 


One Hundred Forty-two 


I 
























Mann Koontz Mann 

Mitchell Stratton Gately Kennedy 


Senior baseball ^eam 




One Hundred Forty-three 

































































One Hundred Forty-four 


I 































I 


























































One Hundred Forty-five 





















































INDEX 


FRATERNITIES 

National 


Kappa Sigma 
Sigma Nu 
Alpha Tau Omega 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 


Local 


Phi Upsilon 

Delta 

Lantuama 


SORORITIES 

Local 

Pi Delta Phi 
Phi Alpha Epsilon 
Sigma Beta Pi 
Alpha Theta Sigma 
Theta Kappa 

PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES 

Agriculture 

National 


Alpha Zeta 


Mining Engineering 
Local 

Omega 


HONORARY FRATERNITIES 


Debate and Oratory 


Local 

Kappa Alpha 


t 



One Hundred Torty-six 












Oic^nWL 

rrvrna, JlfLu, ^Ua^Cc^ 



♦llrt H ii l l* , 


One Hundred Forty-seven 














I 


i 

V 

e* 

e 

€ 

e 

€ 

V 

€' 

V 

© 


i 

¥ 

p 

y 

f 


£1 



V 

e- 


f 

V 

* 

t 

k 



f 

V 

t 

V 

$ 



V 




4^ 



Libby 

Spear 

Osthoff 

Bellingham 

Almen 

Penick 

McElroy 

Dalquist 

Hoxey 

White 

Irish 

Evans 

Monroe 

Frost 

Lesh 

Windus 

Urquhart 

C. 0 Scott 

Semple 

Armstead 

Kuehl 

Clark 

Rusch 

Humphrey 

J. C. Scott 




I 


I 


I 


One Hundred Forty-eight 


l 




















































I 


I 


I 


I 


I 



I 


Iftappa Sigma 


Gamma Mu Chapter 
Chartered March 6, 1909 

Fratres in Facultate 
Oscar P. Osthoff 

Fratres in Universitate 
Class of 1912 
Chester O. Scott 

Class of 1913 


John A. Dalquist 

Ross B. McElroy 
Merle 0. Monroe 

H. Victor Almen 

Maurice Y. Hoxey 
Edgar H. Frost 

J. Clarence Scott 

Norman C. Evans 
Allan J. Urquhart 

Class of 1914 

John C. Semple 

Walter L. Penick 

Asa V. Clark 

Harold Bellingham 

Class of 1915 

Albion C. Libby 
William C. Rusch 
Frank R. Armstead 

William B. Irish 
Marlowe A. Lesh 

D. Donald Spear 

Pledges 

Ralph I. Curtis 

Harold Windus 
Thomas Z. Humphrey 
David G. Kuehl 

Harold McLeod 
Harold Davis 

Fred M. Moss 
Mayberry Davis 
Nelson Sweetzer 

Alumni 

^Edward Quinn 

Frank Richardson 
Cecil D. Martin 
Daryl White 

Walter Dalquist 

Oscar P. Osthoff 

Patrons 

Harold Davis 


^Deceased. 




One Hundred Forty-nine 
















'Kappa Sigma 31oU of Chapters 

Founded 1867 


University of Maine 
Bowdoin College 
New Hampshire College 
Dartmouth College 
Swarthmore College 
University of Pennsylvania 
Bucknell University 
Dickinson College 
Syracuse University 
Randolph Macon College 
William and Mary College 
University of Maryland 
Davidson College 
University of North Carolina 
University of Alabama 
Georgia School of Technology 
University of Georgia 
Vanderbilt University 
Washington and Jefferson College 
University of the South 
University of Kentucky 
Purdue University 
University of Michigan 
Lake Forest University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Nebraska 
University of Iowa 
University of Arkansas 
University of Missouri 
Baker University 
University of Oklahoma 
Louisiana State University 
Tulane University 
Millsaps College 
Colorado College 
Leland Stanford University 
University of Washington 
University of Idaho 
Dennison University 


University of Vermont 

Brown University 

Massachusetts State College 

Harvard University 

Pennsylvania State College 

Cornell University 

Lehigh University 

New York University 

University of Virginia 

Washington and Lee University 

Hampden Sidney College 

George Washington University 

Trinity College 

North Carolina College 

Mercer University 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Cumberland University 

University of Tennessee 

Southwestern Presbyterian University 

Ohio State University 

Case School of Applied Science 

University of Illinois 

Wabash College 

University of Chicago 

University of Indiana 

University of Minnesota 

Iowa State College 

William Jewell College 

Washington Universitv 

Missouri School of Mines 

Washburn College 

Southwestern University 

University of Texas 

University of Denver 

Colorado School of Mines 

University of California 

University of Oregon 

Washington State College 


t 



■ 1 


One Hundred Fifty 





















» **n W . 


One Hundred Fifty-one 
















Coe 

Mitchell 

Clemans 

Hoffeditz 

Holt 

Stewart 

Lowry 

Shearer 

Foran 

Folger 

Fearn 

McWhorter 

Merritt 

Armstrong 

McDougall 

Ritter 

Jinnett 

Fulton 

Moeser 

Gatward 


W it44* 


One Hundred Fifty-two 


i 

















































I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


Sigma Mu 

Delta Iota Chapter 
Chartered March 12, 1910 
Fratres in Facilitate 
Earl C. Galbraith 
Fratres in Universitale 


Roy W. Merritt 

1912 

George H. Shearer 

Willard E. Mitchell 


H. Reed Fulton 

Samuel A. Kimbrough 

J. Cecil Thompson 

1913 

Walter A. Gatward 

Stanley Armstrong 


Virgil O. McWhorter 

Ralph Lowry 


Mark Twain Clemans 

Benjamin A. Hoffeditz 

Walter A. Holt 

1914 

Arthur D. Stewart 

Herbert L. Ritter 


Everett R. Jinnett 

John F. Foran 


J. Clifford Folger 

Harvey Fearn 

1915 

Grover E. McDougall 

Guy R. Coe 


Milton P. Moeser 

George Pynn 

Pledges 

Maurice McGregor 

Edgar N. Becker 


Norman Moss 

John Mineah 


Donald G. Mead 

Frank T. Barnard 

Alumni 

Walter L. Maloney 

Robert McCroskey 


Alva A. Hammer 

Harry E. Goldsworthy 


James L. Thayer 

John M. Harbert 


J. Houston McCroskey 

Clinton B. Stuht 


Edward A. Holcomb 

Joseph W. Brislawn 


Arthur Hooker 

Joseph B. Halm 


Ernest A. MacKay 

Jeff H. Fulton 


Joseph L. Ashlock 

Patrick E. Crane 


Raymond N. Slate 

Earl C. Galbraith 


J. Cecil Cave 

O. Virgil Patton 


V. Guy Stambaugh 

Roscoe R. Fullerton 


Jno. N. Lilligren 

Frank H. Brown 


Edward Cheney 

Patron 

W. B. Strong 

._ A 11 11 Ai a 

1-j ■ r—^ ■ a 




One Hundred Fifty-three 


















Sigma ^tu 3\oll of <n>aptors 


Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1869 


Virginia Military Institute 
Georgia School of Technology 
Bethany College 
Mercer University 
University of Alabama 
Howard College 

North Georgia Agricultural Colleg< 

Washington and Lee University 

University of Georgia 

University of Kansas 

Emory College 

Lehigh University 

University of Missouri 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Texas 

Louisiana State University 

University of North Carolina 

Depauw University 

Purdue University 

University of Indiana 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Ml. Union College 

University of Iowa 

William Jewell College 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Vermont 

North Carolina University 

Rose Polytechnic Institute 

Tulane University 

Lei and Stanford University 

University of California 

Delaware State College 


University of Virginia 
Northwestern University 
Albion College 

Stevens Institute of Technology 
LaFayette College 
Colorado School of Mines 
University of Oregon 
Cornell University 
University of Kentucky 
University of Colorado 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Illinois 
University of Michigan 
Missouri School of Mines 
Washington University, St. Louis 
University of West Virginia 
University of Chicago 
Iowa Slate College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Arkansas 
University of Montana 
University of Washington 
Case School of Applied Science 
Dartmouth College 
Columbia University 
Lombard University 
Pennsylvania State College 
Western Reserve University 
University of Oklahoma 
University of Nebraska 
Washington State College 
Brown College 



, J Lt44*» 


! 




One Hundred Fifty-four 



















<X OCUC Owe^ft 

*^i<xmmcL ‘i&ii 



One Hundred Fifty-five 










































Fortier 

Ash 

Rinehart 

Shields 

Applequist 

Smith 

Kienholz 

McWhorter 

Laird 

Schuneman 

Wiese 

Shelledy 

M. P. Brislawn 

Cooil 

Thompson 

Williams 

Knight 

Reeder 

Peterson 

Dunn 

Anderson 

Cooke 

L. Brislawn 

Chambers 

Dumas 







One Hundred Fifty-six 


l 

























































I 


I 


I 


I 


I 



.Alpija ^>au Omega 



Gamma Chi Chapter 
Chartered May 20, 1911 
Fratres in Facilitate 


M. K. Snyder 


M. K. Akers 


Fratres in Universitale 

1912 

M. P. Brislawn 


C. E. Knight 

C. J. Cooil 

G. K. Reeder 

1913 

O. T. McWhorter 

L. I. Brislawn 


H. M. Chambers 

L. W. Rinehart 


W. L. Williams 

E. H. Kienholz 

1914 

F. R. Smith 

J. M. Shields 


A. T. Peterson 

R. B. Shelledy 


L. V. Cooke 

C. S. Dunn 


M. V. Fortier 

L. F. Dumas 

1915 

C. E. Ash 

E. H. Schuneman 


O. P. Thompson 

L. K. Wiese 

F. V. Anderson 

Pledges 

H. A. Applequist 

Boyd Schlaefer 


Ward James 

Loren Baptie 


Lawrence Worley 

Lusker McCroskey 

George Gannon 

Alumni Members 

Harry Armstrong 

F. E. Moberly 


T. J. Barnes 

L. M. Buck 


C. F. Anderson 

J. P. Laird 


W. R. Marston 

H. A. Betaque 


I. J. Putman 

B. E. Smead 


V. G. Shelman 

J. T. Percival 


W. W. Wilson 

J. O. Blair 


P. T. Prentice 

E. A. Kincaid 


C. W. Talbot 




i 


One Hundred Fifty-seven 














Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1865 


Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
University of Alabama 
University of Georgia 
Georgia School of Technology 
University of Texas 
University of Chicago 
Purdue University 
Hillsdale College 
Albion College 
University of Colorado 
Iowa State College 
University of Nebraska 
University cf Minnesota 
Colby College 
Tufts College 
Brown University 
St. Lawrence University 
Muhlenburg College 
Lehigh University 
University of Pennsylvania 
Trinity College 

Washington and Lee University 
Mt. Union College 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Ohio State University 
State University of Kentucky 
Vanderbilt University 
University of the South 
Leland Stanford University 
University of Oregon 
Washington State College 



One Hundred Fifty-eight 


Southern University 

University of Florida 

Mercer University 

Tulane University 

University of Illinois 

Rose Polytechnic Institute 

Adrian College 

University of Michigan 

University of Wisconsin 

Simpson College 

University of Kansas 

University of Missouri 

University of Maine 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

University of Vermont 

Cornell University 

Washington and Jefferson College 

Pennsylvania College 

University of North Carolina 

College of Charleston 

University of Virginia 

Wittenberg College 

Worchester University 

Western Reserve University 

Southwestern Presbyterian University 

Union University 

University of Tennessee 

University of California 

University of Washington 


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£Phi &L*-item 

stlpiici ^UZ^sCtl- 



♦4Aj - i F T i i 4 i* , 

























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English 

Chase 

McCain 

Bloom 

Goff 

A. R. Walsh 


Scott 

Bendixen 

Gardner 

Elliott 

Spi'oat 

Dietz 


Weaver Hill Hix 

Ness Rowland Hoppe 

Baumeister Howe Johnston 

Brownell E. S. Walsh Alway 

Wilkinson Garrett Wood 

Doolittle Engelland Holgerson 




One Hundred Sixty 

























































Sigma flty TEpsiloit 


Washington Alpha 
Chartered March 2, 1912 
Fratres in Facilitate 

Donald English Rudolph Weaver 

Clarence L. Hix 

Fratres in Universitate 
1912 


Max E. Baumeister 

Leslie Wood 

Walter E. Doolittle 


1913 


Howard W. Chase 
Frank L. Brownell 


Verne V. Sproat 

Rex D. Gardner 


Birger 0. Bendixen 


1914 


Edward S. Walsh 
George E. Scott 

C. Elston Hill 

1915 

A. Robert Walsh 
Herman Engelland 
William A. Ness 

Vernon E. McCain 
Ralph M. Alway 
William H. Hoppe 
Forrest Garrett 

Arthur Goff 

Pledges 

Irving W. Howe 
Ralph S. Holgerson 
S. Joy Rowland 
Thomas A. Elliott 
Adolph Bloom 

Ralph W. Wilkinson 
Frank Goff 

Alumni 

Carl F. Dietz 

Frank Johnston 

Edward C. Burlingame 


Arthur J. Powell 


George T. McMahon 

■ *44 n W 


0»q Hundred Sixty-one 
















Signta TEpslloit 







Roll of Chapters 

Richmond College 

West Virginia University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Medical Department, University of Illinois 

University of Colorado 

William and Mary College 

Ohio Northern University 

North Carolina College 

Purdue University 

Syracuse University 

Washington and Lee University 

Randolph Macon College 

Georgia School of Technology 

Delaware State College 

University of Virginia 

University of Arkansas 

Lehigh University 

Ohio State University 

Norwich University 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Trinity College 

Dartmouth College 

George Washington University 

Baker University 

University of California 

University of Nebraska 

State College of Washington 



One Hundred Sixty-Two 





























l£<ycaJL 

yzatcvrutU*' 



One Hundred Sixty-three 















Tyrer Preissner Burdette Powell Ratcliffe Strausz Fitzsimmons 

C. Howard Wilson Heintzelman Pape Tulley Peckenpaugh Hunter 

Casad Swanson Harter Healy McKinney Reilly P. Howard 

Coulter Schroeder Rock Holt 


One Hundred Sixty-four 


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£1)1 l6psilon 

Organized December 15, 1908 



Fralres in Facilitate 
Rudolph Meyer 


Fraires in Univcrsitate 
1912 


F. Preston Hunter 


J. I. Preissner 

B. R. Heintzelman 

1913 

E. E. Fitzsimmons 

E. C. Pape 


J. E. Harter 

C. M. Howard 


W. E. McKinney, Jr. 

W. E. Schroeder 


G. P. Howard 

G. A. T. Powell 

1914 

L. L. Coulter 

1915 

G. A. Tulley 

S. A. Swanson 


R. G. Ratcliffe 

H. G. Holt 


D. P. Reilly 

C. C. Casad 

Pledges 

T. D. Tyrer 

J. A. Healy 

G. G. Rock 

Alumni 

E. W. Wilson 

Virgil R. Smith 


C. E. Torpey 

H. T. Graves 


F. H. Skeels 

L. E. Des Voignes 


N. D. Lindsley 

W. S. Jackson 


W. E. Harrison 

J. W. Nelson 

Homer Humphrey 

Honorary Members 

H. A. Bradley 

Prof. H. C. Taylor 


A. L. Strausz 

Prof. R. P. Cope 


Larry Long 


Patron 

Prof. F. A. Thomson 


■ W a Mi , 


One Hundred Sixty-five 

















I 




Keffer 

Smith 

Ashby 

Donahue 

McCready 

Milner 

Hyslop 

Kennedy 

Lewis 

McNair 

Beckman 

Bartlett 

Love 

Williams 

Miles 

Mel ch er 

Willis 

Groat 

Lockwood 

Bibbins 

Gordon 

Rammerman 

Doelle 

Bradrick 

Schultz 


i 


One Hundred Sixty-six 


i 


i 


i 


l 


i 




















































I 


JMta 

Organized February II, 1911 



Fratres in Universitate 


E. T. Love 

1912 

H. E. Doelle 

V. R. Hyslop 


H. S. Groat 

M. C. Bartlett 

H. Donahue 

1913 

J. C. Beckman 

O. A. Lewis 


R. E. Smith 

R. Keffer 


S. E. Lockwood 

A. W. Bradrick 

R. W. Kennedy 

1914 

J. S. McNair 

J. A. Williams 


E. A. Willis 

M. B. Milner 

J. J. Rammerman 

1915 

A. B. McCready 

J. Miles 


L. G. Schultz 

W. Gordon 


W. S. Melcher 

M. J. Newhouse 

Pledge 

A. L. Bibbins 

Alumni 

J. T. LaFollette 


Patron 

R. C. Ashby 



• Mu H uM* , 


One Hundred Sixty-seven 



















One Hundred Sixty-eight 


l 


























I 


I 


I 


I 


I 




Cantuama 



Organized January 17, 1912 
Fratrcs in Facultaie 
Howard G. Millington 
Fralres in Universitate 

1912 


William D. Love 

J. Earle Yates 

1913 

J. Walker LaViolette 
Irving B. Vestal 

Chester C. Farr 

Will T. Hood 

1914 

Francis W. Thwaites 
Alvinus W. Langdon 

Howard E. Gregory 

J. Edward Love 

Homer Gregory 

Roy E. Will 

Harris C. Christopher 


1915 


George A. Unbewust 
E. Manchester Boddy 

M. Dodsworh 

George F. Richardson 
Alva F. Moore 



, m i i , 

One Hundred Sixty-nine 
















One Hundred Seventy 


l 






































, i i . 


One Hundred Seventy-one 
































It- 

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9 

9 

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?' 

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8 


9 


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9 

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Strong V. Vestal Brown Egge King 

Gray Gombert Coulter M. La Follette Roziskey 

C. La Follette Fortier Wellman G. Waller Baker 

A. Waller Bakeman Ashby Morgan Mulder 

Miller M. Vestal 




■? 


One Hundred Seventy-two 






























































fii iPelta flfyi 

Organized November 5, 

1906 


Sorores in Facultate 


Olga Todd 


S or ores in Universilaie 

Beulah Wellman 

1912 

Dorothea Gombert 

Inez Bakeman 

Marie Vestal 

1913 

Grace Coulter 

Dorothy Fortier 

Melcena La Follette 
Viola Vestal 

Gladys Waller 

1914 

Fern Ashby 

Clara La Follette 

Jean King 

Laila Egge 

Eva Mulder 

1915 

Grace Baker 

Enid Brown 

Martha Miller 
Mildred Morgan 
Marion Gray 

Pledges 

Opal Green 

Anna Waller 

Hazel Elaine Raber 

Juanita Strong 

Beryl Flood 

Maude Putman 
Nelle Jones 

Florence Grice 

Bess Fishback 
^Sophia Armsbee 
Florence Waller 
Marian McCroskey 

Alumnae 

Mabel B. Hooker 

Elmina White 

Verne Gaddis 

Lora Green 

Edna Kelley 

Elizabeth Prior 

Orpha Huxtable 

Eula Hart 

Honorary Members 
Miss Augusta Roziskey 

Miss M. Kohn 

Mrs. O. L. Waller 

^Deceased. 

Patronesses 

Mrs. E. A. Bryan 

Mrs. W. C. Kruegel 




I 


One Hundred Seventy-three 














Quarels Langlois Post Fulmer Mcfnnis 

Guile McCroskey Folger Davis Mecklem 

Shoudy Mecklem Roudebush MacLeod Turner 

Baker McKay Lewis 

—» i i i t i 

One Hundred Seventy-four 


l 
























-Pbi 'Alpfa TS^psiloit 

Organized October 3, 1908 



Sorores in Universitate 


1912 


Gladys McCroskey 
Edna Folger 


Edna Langlois 


Quevenne Mecklem 
Mildred Guile 
Lucile McKay 


Ruth Mclnnis 
Helen Quarels 


Edna Davis 

1913 

1914 

1915 

Lilian MacLeod 


Mariel Fulmer 
Harriet Baker 


Helen Roudebush 


Zelva Mecklem 
Grace Post 
Ruth Turner 


Ruth Shoudy 
Alice Lewis 




One Hundred Seventy- 


















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Waring Roberts Allen Taylor Schuele 

Turner McRae Lockwood Davis Reid 

Bean Morgan Strickler McRae Schneider 

White Willey Tramill 


I 1 ^ ■ 

One Hundred Seventy-six 















































Slgnta ^eta pi 

Organized October 5, 1908 


Sorores in (Jniversitate 

1912 


Verne Lockwood 
Verna Reid 
Florence Davis 

1913 

Anna Schneider 

Anna Taylor 

Isabelle McRae 

Ethel Morgan 

Blanche Willey 

Floy Bean 


1914 


Irma Turner 
Gertrude Strickler 
Leona Tramill 

1915 

Grace White 

Lulu McRae 

Agnes Enewoldson 

Elizabeth Roberts 

Pledges 

Madeline Allen 

Cecil Bethel 

Mamie Hummon 
Florence Taylor 

Alumnae 

Marion Brew 

Jose Eliot 

Hallie Brennesholtz 

Pluma Tompkins 
Edna Heater 

Edna Michaelsen 


Edith Largent La Follette 
Gladys Lockwood 

Stella Wilson 


Honorary Members 

Emily Wood 


Bernice Waring 


Mrs. Charles H. Schuele 
Patronesses 

Mrs. F. A. Thomson Mrs. Bruce McCully 

Mrs. M. K. Akers Miss Alice Paterson 


One Hundred Seventy-seven 











I 



, ♦♦*11 I 


Devin 

Gifford 

McBeath 

Douglass 

Wagnon 

Martin 

Anderson 

Kennedy 

Perry 

Windus 

Bean 

Shields 

Cave 

Wilson 

Koontz 


3 


I 


I 


I 


One Hundred Seventy-eight 


l 











































^Alpl) a Si^ma 

Organized October 12, 1908 



Sorores in Universitate 



1912 


Kathryn A. Gifford 
Ruth E. Kennedy 

1913 

Grace I. Wilson 
Jessie G. Koontz 

Alice Wagnon 

1914 

Zoe C. Bean 

Mary B. Anderson 
Florence Hindus 

Marjorie Martin 

Inez M. Douglass 
Alice L. Devin 


1915 


Hettie Cave 

Winnie Shields 


Lydia Champlin 
Byrdie McBeath 

Lily E. Wagnon 
Margaret Anderson 

Pledges 

Lida Windus 

Mary L. Tanke 
*Ruth Batcheldor 

Alumnae 

Lottie Jellum 

Hilda Lafrenz 

Ada W. Thomle 

Florence M. Montgomery 

Frances R. Devin 

Florence Fleener 
Mabel L. Filion 
Bertha M. Kimmel 
Jane D. Johnson 
Mary G. Bird 


Honorary Members 

Louise M. Barnard Mrs. M. E. Jenne 

Patronesses 

Mrs. Solon Shedd Mrs. A. E. Egge 

Mrs. Asa Don Dickinson Mrs. Frank Barnard 

Mrs. J. W. Mathews 

^Deceased. 


One Hundred Seventy-nine 

















ft 

f 

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Burch am H. Spinning Collyer Adams Windus 

Wexler Taylor Jacobsen Bressler R. Spinning 

Engelland Olsen Kimmel Davis Carr 

I, W Il4«> 



One Hundred Eighty 


l 














































T3 beta IKappa 

Organized October 9, 1909 
Sorores in Universilate 


1912 


Bertha Engelland 
Dorothy Collyer 

1913 

Josephine Olsen 
Ada Wexler 

Rose Adams 

Ruth Spinning 
Charlotte Davis 

1914 

Hazel Spinning 
Harriet Taylor 
Beulah Carr 

Elizabeth Jacobsen 

1915 

Belva Burcham 

Winifred Windus 

Caroline Bressler 

Kathryn Kimmel 


Pledges 


Anna Jacobsen 


Beatrice Bean 


Alumnae Members 

Lura Grimm 

Lorena Hay ford 

Jess Rogers 


Patronesses 


Mrs. Sanger 

Mrs. Ashlock 


Mrs. Jackson 
Mrs. Windus 


s£±H=n=i444£=L 


I 


One Hundred Eighty-one 


















One Hundred Eighty-two 


l 

















































1 Alpha Zeta 


Z&tuyt£ ‘(phafotci' 



11 Omega 


3k&7U>'MVU^ &X-Ci£c%Vlitcc& 


1 Kappa Alpha 


. »**it W 1144* , 


One Hundred Eighty-Wire* 
























I 


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One Hundred Eighty-four 


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^Alpl)a Zcta 



Elliott Chapter 
Chartered June 19, 1907 
Fratres in Facilitate 

R. W. Thatcher W. T. McDonald 

R. C. Ashby 

Fraties in in Universitate 



1912 


E. T. Love 


E. C. Hunt 

Geo. Graves 


V. R. Hyslop 

V. R. Jones 

O. T. McWhorter 

1913 

Wm. Meikle 

R. E. Smith 


T. L. Fishback 

F. R. Smith 


W. A. Holt 

V. O. McWhorter 

Warren Lincoln 

Pledge 

Leonard Davis 

Alumni 

A. L. Strausz 

J. P. Hunt 


C. A. Crasvford 

C. N. Eaton 


Geo. Lawrence 

G. E. Farrand 


M. J. Newhouse 

H. C. Wilcox 


E. C. Durdle 

J. T. LaFollette 


H. W. Reaugh 

R. E. Bryant 


E. E. Wilkinson 

T. O. Morrison 

G. E. Waters 

Honorary Members 

L. R. Scott 

G. L. Watt 

E. E. Elliott 


H. B. Berry 

W. G. Brierly 


A. B. Nystrom 

Geo. Severance 

O. M. Morris 

W. A. Linklater 


, i i 44 *—, 

One Hundred Eighty-five 














I 


,Alpl)a ZoXa 

Founded at Ohio State University, October 27, 1897 


Townshend... 

Morrill. 

Morrow... 

Cornell. 

Kedzie.., 

Granite. 

Nebraska.. 

Massey. 

La Grange.... 

Green Mountain 

Wilson. 

Babcock. 

Centennial. 

Maine. 

Missouri. 

Llliott. 

California. 

Purdue.. 

Kansas. 

Dakota. 



Roll of Chapters 


....Ohio State University 

.Pennsylvania State College 

...University of Illinois 

. Cornell University 

.Michigan Agricultural College 

New Hampshire Agricultural College 

.University of Nebraska 

North Carolina Agricultural College 

.University of Minnesota 

...University of Vermont 

.Iowa State College 

.University of Wisconsin 

.Colorado Agricultural College 

. University of Maine 

..University of Missouri 

.Washington State College 

....University of California 

.. Purdue University 

....Kansas State Agricultural College 
..North Dakota Agricultural College 



» ^ —> i 

One Hundred Eighty-six 


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Preissner Mitchell Doelle Keffer 

Shelledy Miller Foran 



Omega 

Organized March, 1911 
Fratres in Universitate 

1912 

W. E. Mitchell H. E. Doelle 

J. I. Preissner 

1913 

Robert Keffer F. H. Miller 

T. H. Rosenkranz 

Pledges 

John F. Foran R. B. Shelledy 

Omega is an honorary mining fraternity, founded to bind the miners of this 
College in a closer professional relationship, and to lend an influence for the develop 
ment of a greater W. S. C. School of Mines. 




One Hundred Eighty-seven 





































Stewart Philips Nolin 

Sewell Brislawn Jinnett Boddy 

Gaines Meyer Chambers 


IKappa ,-ALplja 

Organized April, 1912 
Fralres in Universitate 


L. L. Nolin 
H. A. Sewell 
H. M. Chambers 
L. I. Brislawn 
J. L. Philips 


R. A. Gaines 
E. R. Jinnett 
A. D. Stewart 
J. D. Meyer 
E. M. Boddy 


Kappa Alpha was organized as an honor fraternity. It has for its object the 
maintenance of high standards in oratory and debate, as well as the creation of a 
spirit of good fellowship among prominent participants in these college activities. Only 
those persons who have represented the college in at least two intercollegiate forensic 
contests are considered eligible candidates for membership. 

One Hundred Eighty-eight 





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One Hundred Eighty-nine 








































I 





Christopher Gregory Roseerans Dick Fulton 

Williams Woodin Henkp Beckman Ramsey 

Dodsworth Thwaites McNair LaViolette George 

Moore 


i. -r 


One Hundred Ninety 


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^oung Alton’s Christian Association 

Organized November 3, 1894 

Fred C. Henke.General Secretary 

CABINET OFFICERS 

Jos. C. Beckman.President 

J. W. LaVioIette.Vice President 

Duke Dodsworth . Secretary 

James McNair. Treasurer 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Howard E. Gregory.Bible Study 

Harry Christopher.Mission Study 

J. Arthur Ramsey. Meetings 

Chester C. Farr.Finance 

Walter Williams.Music 

Frank W. Thwaites.Employment 

Robert Fulton . Extension 

J. W. La Violelle.Social 

O. A. Rosecrans. Advertising 

Raymond J. Dick. Membership 

Chauncey George .Aid 

Alva Moore .Intercollegiate 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Dean Elton Fulmer.Chairman 

Prof. W. T. Shaw.Treasurer 

Prof. M. K. Snyder.Alumni Member 


lr 

pt {S' w 


Walter Williams Homer Gregory Howard Gregory F. C. Henke 
Y. M. C. A. Quartette 


One Hundred Ninety-one 
































■■■■ 


I 



Charlotte Davis 
Florence Davis 
Mary Anderson 


Blanche Willey Isabelle McRae 

Grace Coulter Lucile McKay 

Elizabeth Jacobsen Mariel Fulmer 
Edith Sage 


young Women’s Christian “^Association 

Organized 1894 

General Secretary. Miss Edith Sage 

Cabinet Officers 

Marie! Fulmer.President 

Charlotte Davis..Vice President 

Mary Anderson.Secretary 

Elizabeth Jacobsen.....Treasurer 

Advisory Board 

Mrs. A. S. Van Dyke M's. W. C. Kruegel 

Mrs. Bruce McCully Mrs. Ellon Fulmer 

Mrs. Enoch A. Bryan Mrs. Solon Shedd 

Miss Rhoda White Mrs. O. L. Waller 

Mrs. A. E. Egge Mrs. F. A. Thomson 


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One Hundred Ninety-two 


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One Hundred Ninety-three 
























































I 






Williams lmus Meyer Davis Mitcnell Lynch Brennesholtz 

Colley Maxwell Sorenson Keyes Carmichael Aten Mann 

Eccles Aten Bull Williams Winn Hood Robins 

Stein Davis Henry Jennings Fulmer Williams Richardson 

Spurling Corliss Rock 

Klemgard 

Columbian "Xitetar? Society 

OFFICERS, 1911-12 


Bertha Sorenson. 

Pauline Davis.. 

Margaret Williams 

Kathryn Stein . 

Henrietta Aten . 

Eva Maxwell . 


.President 

_Vice President 

.Secretary 

.Treasurer 

...Sergeanl-at-Arms 
.Attorney 




One Hundred Ninety-Four 




































One Hundred Ninety-Five 







































— ■ W Ii44« , 


One Hundred Ninety-six 


X^ebsteriart iDebatin^ Society 


































Smith 
F riermood 
Woodin 
G-uitteau 
Rockey 


Lynch Harding Morgan Freier 

Henning Wright Clinton Jones 

Jones Feddersohn McNair Jinnett 

Matsen Carlson Cotton Clinton 

Malotte Menaglia Sorenson Foster 


First Semester 

E. R. Jinnett. 

P. Woodin . 

B. R. Kinney. 

H. M. Chambers 

W. L. Davis. 

L. E. Wright. 


Z5I)0 "pl)llomatl)lan Abating Society 


OFFICERS 

.President. 

..Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

.Treasurer. .. 

.Reporter and Historian 
.Sergeant-at-Arms. 


Second Semester 

. .,.F. R. Smith 

.H. L. Freiet 

..R. A. Lynch 

.J. Matsen 

.E. R. Jinnett 

.E. R. JinneH 


■ k W —. 


One Hundred Ninety-i 




































































I 




Council 

Organized January, 1912 
OFFICERS 

M. O. Monroe.President 

Harriet Taylor .Secretary 


M. O. Monroe 

Fraternity Roll 


Kappa Sigma 
Sigma Nu 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Phi Upsilon 
Delta 


Pi Delta Phi 
Phi Alpha Epsilon 
Sigma Beta Pi 
Alpha Theta Sigma 
Theta Kappa 


An Inter-Fraternity society, organized for the 
purpose of regulating and controlling matters jointly 
concerning the fraternal organizations. 



Harriet Taylor 


Country TCife (Tlub 


Organized 1911 


OFFICERS, 1911-12 

E. T. Love.....President 

J. L. Philips..Vice President 

Dorothy Collyer .Secretary-Treasurer 

J. A. Guitteau. Sergeant-at-Arms 

The membership of the Country Life Club includes all students in the depart¬ 
ments of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry, Veterinary Science and Home Economics. 
The purpose of this organization is to foster social relations between these depart¬ 
ments and to aid in supporting, both editorially and financially, the Washington 
Agriculturist. 

■ W it 44 * i 


I 


One Hundred Ninety-Nine 























I 



Lewis 

Jenne 

Dalquist 

Gardner 

Chase 

Lowry 


Bendixen 

Preissner 

Me Elroy Merritt 

Kimm 

Pane 


Baumeister 

V. O. McWhorter Hunter 
Rake Doelle 

Chambers Monroe 

Harter 


O. T. McWhorter Raymond Shearer 


Love 

Cooil 

Bartlett 

Scott 

Philins 

Kienholz 


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Two Hundred 


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drimson. Circle 


Organized March 6, 1911 
OFFICERS 


Roy W. Merritt. 


.President 

Harry Chambers... 


...Vice President 

J. G. Rake. 

Active Members 

.Secretary-T reasurer 

M. E. Baumeister 


E. T. Love 

M. C. Bartlett 


O. A. Lewis 

B. O. Bendixen 


Ralph Lowry 

C. J. Cooil 


O. T. McWhorter 

H. W. Chase 


V. O. McWhorter 

H. M. Chambers 


R. W. Merritt 

J. A. Dalquist 


R. B. McElroy 

H. E. Doelle 


M. O. Monroe 

Rex Gardner 


J. L. Philips 

F. Preston Hunter 


E. C. Pape 

J. E. Harter 


J. I. Preissner 

F. H. Jenne 


J. G. Rake 

J. J. Kimm 


H. A. Raymond 

E. H. Kienholz 

C. O. Scott 

G. H. Shearer 


The necessity of a more unified action on the part of the student body in the 
disposition of student affairs has long been in evidence. The Crimson Circle, select¬ 
ing its members from among the leaders of our student activities, regardless of position 
or fraternal membership, is striving to accomplish this need. It is the purpose of this 
organization to bind together our student body in such a way that the individual efforts 
of all its members will be linked together as one in accomplishing a great act—in 
building up a greater State College of Washington. 



, 4ln i 

Two Hundred One 























tkroa&way Club 

OFFICERS 


First Semeser Second Semester 

J. A. Healy... President .J. A. Healy 

Osman Thompson. Vice President .G. E. McDougall 

J. A. Davis. Secretary-Treasurer .J. A. Davis 

Roll 


Harold Peckenpaugh 
Tom Tyrer 

A. W. Wiegert 

R. I. Curtis 
Robert Ratcliffe 
Percival Jones 

S. S. Loeb 
Harry Read 
Robert Barnum 

B. A. Hoffeditz 


W. F. Bonnell 
A. B. Davis 
J. A. Davis 

G. E. McDougall 
J. A. Healy 
Osman P. Thompson 

H. R. Eglin 
E. A. Stewart 
G. G. Rock 
Max Lockman 


The enrollment of the Broadway Club is limited to ex-students of the Broadway 
High School at Seattle. An organization of this nature tends to bind together with 
ties of friendship, students from the same high school or city, and through such a 
relation, to aid its new members in becoming acquainted with the ways and customs 
of the College. 


Tfrlsl) Club 

OFFICERS 

H. E. Doelle... 

A. V. Clark. 

J. P. Johnson.;. 


..President 

Vice President 
..Chief Adviser 


Roll 


G. H. Gannon 

L. I. Brislawn 

M. P. Brislawn 
Stanley Armstrong 


J. A. Healy 
A. H. Reilly 
Clifford Folger 
J. A. Ramsey 


The exact purpose of the Irish Club is known only to the members of that 
organization. Once each year, on St. Patrick’s Day, the student body has the oppor¬ 
tunity of being entertained by these “Sons of Ireland”. Aside from this single appear¬ 
ance their activities are confined entirely to their numbers. That they are merry-makers 
is known by all. 


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Two Hundred Two 













































































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5ttask and iPa^er Club 

Organized 1911 
OFFICERS 

Max Baumeister .—...—.-.President 

Zelva Mecklem.,........Vice President 

By rdie McBeath.....Secretary-T reasurer 

Mildred Morgan.....Corresponding Secretary 

Twain Clemans.“His Hamlets” 


Mildred Morgan 
Reed Fulton 
Zoe Bean 


Charter Members 


Byrdie McBeath 
Melcena LaFollette 
Clyde Petterson 


Initialed Members 


Zelva Mecklem 
Twain Clemans 
Max Baumeister 


Winifred Windus 
Grover McDougall 
Benj. A. Hoffeditz 


The object of the Mask and Dagger is to control the number and to raise the standard of 
the amateur dramatic productions presented at the Stale College. Membership of the club is 
limited to fifteen people, and only those persons who have received dramatic training are considered 
as candidates- Thus, the very nature of choosing members for this organization should make it 
the most efficient for its purpose of any organization in our Student Body. 

. 4*u W a44* , 


Morgan 


Baumeister 


Clemans 


Mecklem Fulton 


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Two Hundred Four 


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TKls Iftousc lit Order 

A Four-Act Drama presented by the Websterian Debating Society, 
April 18, 191 I 

Directed by Miss Augusta Roziskey 


Hilary Jesson.. 

Filmer Jesson.. 

Derek Jesson. 

Nina. 

Sir Daniel Ridgeley.. 

Fryce Ridgeley. 

Lady Ridgeley. 

Geraldine Ridgeley... 
Mademoiselle Thomi 
Major Moureworde.. 

Dr. Dillnott. 

Harding. 

Forshaw. 


Cast of Characters 


.Clarence J. Cooil 

.Joseph L. Philips 

.Miss Jessie Perry 

.Miss Hazel Taylor 

...Harold H. Damman 

_Howard L. Melvin 

..Miss Dorothy Turner 

.Miss Bess Cook 

Miss Bess P. Harlow 

.Ernest C. Stewart 

_Frank H. Jenne 

... J, Harry McCready 
..Howard E. Gregory 


Successfully managed by H. S. Groat 




Two Hundred Five 

















































■■ 


S rlend from Ifadla" 

Annual play presented by the Senior Class of the Elementary Science Department, 

April 29, 1911 

Directed by Miss Augusta Roziskey 


Cast of Characters 

Mr. Eraster Underholt..A. B. McCready 

Charles Underholt.Adolph Bloom 

Marian Hastings....Susie Smith 

Bernice .I la Thompson 

Gertrude ...Grace Morgan 

A Keen Sharer.....Victor Menaglia 

Mrs. Beekman Streete.Eva French 

Jennings . Glen Mitchell 

Tom Valentine.Lawrence Clinton 

Rev. James Tweedles...G. R. Lawson 

Tilly ..Mildred Morgan 

Bill Finnerty. T. E. Allen 

Managed by John Sorenson 

A very amusing comedy, displaying the talent of the Elementary Students. 


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Two Hundred Six 


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Ifolaittl)* 



The Sixth Annual Music Festival, held under the auspices 
of the State College of Washington 
Prof. W. B. Strong, Director 


Cast of Characters 


The Lord Chancellor.Mr. Mox Baumeister 

Earl of Mountararat...Mr. B. A. Hoffeditz 

Earl Tolloller. Mr. Benton Stookey 

Private Willis (of the Grenadier Guards). Mr. H. R. Glaisyer 

Strephon (an Arcadian Shepherd).Mr. Frank Brownell 

Queen of the Fairies....Miss Leona Tramill 

lolanthe (a Fairy, Strephon’s Mother).Miss Mary Dempsey 

Celia. Miss Phoebe Russell 

Leila.Miss Irma Turner 

Fleta.Miss Frances Carroll 

Phyllis.... ..Miss Josephine Olsen 


lolanthe was a real treat for music lovers, and will be long remembered by all 
who were present. 


, W . .44* 



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Two Hundred seven 

















































I 



X5l)£ Z5eett) of tl)o (Sift Iftorsc 

Presented during Summer School by the Class in Dramatic Arts 
Directed by Miss Augusta Roziskey 


Cast of Characters 




Miss Williams (the Aunt) 

Mrs. Butler. 

Anne Fisher. 

Kate (the Maid). 

Dick Butler. 

Devlin Blake. 


.Miss Hayta Wilson 

Miss Melcena La Follette 

....Miss Grace Prescott 

.Miss Gladys Moore 

.Dr. Lewis Mark 

.LeRoy LaFollette 


A play of one act, dealing with the newly married Butlers, and a pair 
of hideously painted vases, given as a wedding present by the aunt. Miss Williams. 

, n —t 


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Two Hundred Eight 


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~for 016 TEll 

Presented by the Senior Class, Monday Evening, June 19, 1911 
Directed by Pauline Dunslan Belden 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Charley Walker, Captain Yale Track Team.Clarke E. Torpey 

DICK CARSON, Walker’s Roommate.“Tabe” LaFollette 

“Artie” Armstrong, Athlete.George Watt 

Beef” Campbell, Athlete...—J. P. Laird 

' Bill” Bailey, Announcer..Frank Skeels 

Assistant Professor Allbright...Harold Damman 

Jack Ludlow, a Freshman..Richard Ageton 

Alice Fairfield, Ludlow’s Cousin.Miss Blanche Thayer 

Edith Van Norton, a Coed.Miss Stella Wilson 

Gwen Hardy, a Coed.. Miss Mildred Waters 

Mrs. Fairfield, Alice s Mother.Miss Mary G. Bird 

HELEN BECKWITH, Alice’s Friend.Miss Marion A. Flood 

"Bud” Turner, Athlete.Orville Kneen 

“Spud” Foster, Athlete.Edward Burlingame 

“Andy” Anderson, Athlete...Henry Holtz 

Jim Dwight, Athlete.Edward F. Gaines 

Tom McCoy, Athlete.Ray Marston 

Ted Jones, Athlete..Norman Lindsley 

' Ollie” Ollcott, Athlete.Howard Melvin 

Mike McCarty, Yale Trainer.Patrick Elmo Crane 

“Sport” Hendricks...Frank Moberly 

Mascot” .lppei Kiyohara 

Successfully managed by Garnett E. Waters. 

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Two Hundred Nine 



























































^American (TltUen 

Presented by the Dramatic Arts Club, Friday evening, 

December 8, 1911 
Directed by Miss Augusta Roziskey 
Cast of Characters 

Beresford Cruger._H. Reed Fulton 

Peter Barbury...Grover McDougall 

Egerton Brown._..Malcolm Fortier 

Sir Humphrey Bunn.C. M. Beardsley 

Willie Bunn.Ben Hoffeditz 

Otto Stroble...Mox E. Baumeister 

Lucus... ) t t-) 

c- c ..Loren oaptie 

Carola Chapin.Mildred Morgan 

Lady Bunn.Byrdie McBeatli 

Georgia Chapin.Adele Hill 

Annette .Dora Price 

Mercury . Ben Hoffeditz 

Beatrice Carew.. Zelva Mecklem 

Managed by Mox E. Baumeister 

A very successful play which pleased the audience. Each character was coached 
to fill his part with ease and certainty. 

i W—j- i ^4+ i 


Two Hundred Ten 












































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~A, O' "Plymouth Z3owit 

Seventh annual play presented by the Websterian Debating 


Society, January 20, 1912 
Under the Direction of Miss Augusta Roziskey 


Cast of Characters 


Miles Standish. 

Garret Foster. 

John Margeson. 

Philippi de la Noye. 
Miriam Chillingsley. 

Barbara Standish. 

Resolute Story. 

Rose de la Noye. 


.Clarence E. Ash 

.J. Clyde Petterson 

.Joseph L. Philips 

.Clarence J. Cooil 

.Miss Jessie Perry 

.Miss Marie Vestal 

.Miss Winifred Windus 
Miss Melcena LaFollette 


Successfully managed by H. S. Groat 

This colonial play was well received by Pullman and Colfax audiences. The 
cast of characters was proclaimed by a professional player to rank righ in the ama¬ 
teur class. 






I 


Two Hundred Eleven 











































yCt ? Cor6 In Clver? 

Presented by the Y. W. C. A. in connection with the May Fete Program, 

May 27, 191 1 


Cast of Characters 

Lord Thirlmere (H. M. S. Phlegethon)....Clarence J. Cooil 

Spiggott (an Old Family Butler).Frank Jenne 

Hopkins (a Footman)...Clyde Petterson 

Robert (the Smallest Page Procurable).._____Tom Lavin 

Sybil Amberley (Daughter of Sir George Amberley).Zelva Mecklem 

Laura (Her Friend).Jessie Perry 

Rose (Her Friend)....Edna Browning 

“Skim milk will often pass as cream, and things are not always what they 
seem.” 


because of 3Mlt*eit 


Presented during Summer School by the Class in Dramatic Arts 
Under the Direction of Miss Augusta Roziskey 


Cast of Characters 

Miss Gladys Terrill.Miss Zoe C. Bean 

Dolly Wakelee...Miss Hazel Taylor 

Joseph Terrill.Guy Dunning 

Ted Owen.......Charles Talbot 

“No pet dogs in my love affairs,” so Dolly says. 


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Two Hundred Twelve 


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, Li n ulii —, 


Two Hundred Thirteen 






























I 


Stewart Jinnett Bull Nolin Gaines 

^Debating an6 Oratorical ^Association 

OFFICERS, 1911-1912 

L. L. Nolin. ...President 

R. A. Gaines._.Vice President 

E. R. Jinnett......Corresponding Secretary 

Miss Esther Bull. Secretary 

A. D. Stewart.. Treasurer 

Wearers of the Varsity “W* in Debate and Oratory 

(To April 1, 1912) 

Debate 

Harold A. Sewell (2) (3) (4) Clyde Petterson (2) 

Harry Chambers (2) (3) Louis Brislawn (1) (3) 

Everett R. Jinnett (I) Lewis L. Nolin (2) 

Arthur D. Stewart (1) (2) Chester E. Boddy (1) 

Ralph A. Gaines (3) (4) Miss Ester Bull (1) 

Joseph L. Philips (2) Miss Cora White (1) 

John D. Meyer (3) Miss Nellie Belfre (1) 

Oratory 

Ralph A. Gaines (3) 



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Two Hundred Fourteen 


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White 


Belfry 


Whitman vs, Washington State (Toltega 


At Pullman 


April 11, 1911 


Question 

Resolved: “That men and women should receive the 
same wages for the same work performed. 


Affirmative, Whitman—• 

Miss Helen Walters, Leader 
Miss Alice McMillan 
Miss Alice Lillequist 


Negative, Washington State College— 
Miss Nellie Belfre. Leader 
Miss Cora White 
Miss Esther Bull 

Decision: Two to one for Whitman 


ICnlvarslt? of Mtontana vs, Washington 
State (Eolteg* 

At Missoula 
April 12, 1911 
Question 

Resolved: “That the control of National Resources 
should rest in the Federal Government, rather than in the 
State." 

Affirmative, U. of M.— 

W. S. Bullerdick, Leader 
D. C. Warren 
Negative, W. S. C.— 

Harold A. Sewell, Leader 
Harry Chambers 

Decision: Two to one for Montana. 

Sewell 

Chambers 

W —i 


Two Hundred Fifieen 































r jjii'T nrwui iln 



Meyer 


PhiHps 


Petterson 

Ifolnt TPebate 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE VS. WASHINGTON 
STATE COLLEGE 
May 12, 1911 
Question 

Resolved: “That a gradual abandonment of the Protective Tariff would be 

to the Best Interests of the United States.” 

At Pullman 

Affirmative, O. A. C. Negative, W. S. C. 

C. L. Jamieson (Leader) J. L. Philips (Leader) 

H. J. Gelkey J. D. Meyer 

H. C. Hetzel Clyde Petterson 

Decision: Two to one for O. A. C. 



HI 


Jinnett 


Gaines 
At Corvallis 


Stewart 


Affirmative, W. S. C. Negative, O. A. C. 

E. R. Jinnett (Leader) A. A. Asbaker (Leader) 

A. D. Stewart A. P. Gibson 

R. A. Gaines A. F. Eschricht 

Decision: Two to one for O. A. C. 


Two Hundred Sixteen 


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ICnlverslt? of Washington vs. Wash¬ 
ington State (Tollege 

At Seattle 
February 16, 1912 
Question 

Resolved: “That all State, County, and 

Municipal Judges of the Courts of the State of 
Washington should be subject to Popular Recall.’’ 

Affirmative, U. of W. 

A. R. Hilen (Leader) 

John Bovington 

Negative, W. S. C. 

Harry Chambers (Leader) 

Louis Brislawn 

Decision for the University of Washington. 


Chambers 

Brislawn 


Washington State College vs. 
Whitman College 

At Pullman 
February 16, 1912 
Question 

Resolved: “That all State, County, and 
Municipal Judges of the Courts of the State of 
Washington Should be Subject to Popular Recall” 
Affirmative, W. S. C. 

Lewis Nolin (Leader) 

Ches ter Boddy 

Negative, Whitman. 

Roland Bainton (Leader) 

George Cole 

Decision: Two to one for W. S. C. 



Nolin 

Boddy 


, I I44* , 


Two Hundred Seventeen 
































I 



Tre$I)man-Sopl)omore iDebate 


Held on the evening of December 16, 191 I, at the College Auditorium 

Question 

Resolved: “That all the Municipal, County, Superior and Supreme Judges of 
the State of Washington should be subject to Popular Recall.*’ 


Affirmative, Freshmen. 

Chester Boddy (Leader) 
G. A. Unbewust 
Harvey Fearn 


Negative, Sophomores. 

E. R. Jinnett (Leader) 
W. L. Davis 
H. C. Christopher 


Decision: Two to one for Sophomores. 


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—*4Ai Jff-j Jilt. 


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Two Hundred Eighteen 


I 








































Ralph A. Gaines 


If titer collegiate Oratorical 
(Lontest 

Held at Pullman, May 26, 191 1 
PROGRAM 

Social Science and Reform.Ralph A. Gaines, W. S. C. 

The Fourth Estate.Fred W. Clemans, Whitman 

The American Republic.Waller Morris, Ore. Agr. College 

Won by Fred W. Clemans. 

Washington Stale College has been the winner of eight out 
of the twelve Intercollegiate Oratorical Contests held between 
the above named institutions. While it is true that Whitman 
won this year, it should be remembered that the oration given 
by our orator was ranked first in thought and composition. Mr. 
Gaines is deserving of much credit for the able way in which 
he represented our College in this contest. 



Steam’s 5Uc6al "debate 

June 8, 1911 
PROGRAM 

General Question: Resolved, "That the United Slates should 
hold Colonies.” 

1. Resolved: "That the control of a subject people has a bad 

moral effect on the governing people." 

Affirmative, E. J. Jacobs Negative, Benton Stookey 

2. Resolved: “That for military reasons the United Slates 

should hold Colonies." 

Affirmative, Roncisco Davis Negative, Mildred Morgan 

3. Resolved: "That it would be to the best interest o, the 

United States to own outright the Panama Canal Zone.” 

Affirmative Edna Richardson Negative, Chester Farr Harry Chambers 

4. Resolved: “That the holding of Colonies is a menace to our Republican Institutions." 

Affirmative, Harry M. Chambers Negative, J. C. Petterson 

3. Resolved: "That for commercial reasons the United States should hold Colonies." 

Affirmative, J. O. Sorenson Negative, Louis Brislawn 

6. Resolved: “That the United States should hold permanently the Philippines." 

Affirmative, Joe Matsen Negative, L. L. Nolin 

7. Resolved: “That the acquisition of Cuba as a Colony would be advantageous to the United 

Stales.” 

Affirmative, G. R. Lawson Negative, J. J. Kimm 

By Drs. Gaw, Vogt and Cleveland, Harry M. Chambers was judged the winner of this 
contest. Mr. Chambers was presented with a Fifty-dollar Gold Medal given annually by the 
late J. W. Stearns to the winner of this debate. 

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Two Hundred Nineieen 























"Annual "3nter-<Tlass Oratorical 


Contest 


March 15, 1912 


PROGRAM 


To ihe winner of this contest, Mr. Joseph Matsen, a $25 Gold Watch was presented. The 
winning oration is an excellent piece of work, and Matsen is deserving of the prize he received. 
In this man Washington State will have a strong contender for first honors in the annual Inter¬ 
collegiate Oratorical Contest held at Walla Walla next May. 


Joseph Matsen 


The Education of the Saloon.F. R. Newman 

My Claim..Roncisco H. Davis 

Personal Liberty.Lloyd H. Walters 

Our Duty to the Theater.Anker L. Christenson 

The Right of Suffrage.George A. Unbewust 

The Progress of the World Peace.Joseph Matsen 


Modern Society and the Socialistic Utopia.— 

.Ralph A. Gaines 

Judges on Thought and Composition— 

Prof A. E. Egge 
Prof. A. A. Cleveland 
Prof. A. W. Taylor 
Judges on Delivery— 

Mr. Wm. Goodyear 
Mr. H. A. Ellis 
Mr. A. B. Clark 


Manual Oratorical (Tontcst of tl)c 
TElcmcittarY Science department 

April 17, 1911 
PROGRAM 

“Victory Through Virtue”.Frank Stubbs 

“Life”.P. R. Feddersohn 

“A Strenuous Life”.Alfred Jensen 

“Blaine, The Plumed Knight”.G. R. Lawson 

"Roosevelt s Speech in Spokane”.F. W. Carlson 

“A Picture of War”.H. A. Spaulding 

“Cuba Must Be Free’.Joseph Matsen 

“Abraham Lincoln”.W. A. Ryder 

The man who is a willing worker, who makes the 
best of every opportunity offered him, is the man who is 
going to “make good.” Some of our Elementary students 
are going to “make good.” A few of these particular 
boys are found on the program of this contest. These 
fellows are fitting themselves for their collegiate work, and 
we need only to look to them to find the near-future 
leaders of our student body. It will be well to remember all who were entered in this contest, 
as well as Mr. Walter Ryder, the winner. 


Walter A. Ryder 


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Cooil 


Hoffeditz 


Philips 

Rake 


McCready 


Armstrong 


Merritt 

Mitchell 


Gregory 


Fulton 


Folger 


Shearer 
Kim in 


Nolin 


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Roy W. Merritt ... 
Joseph L. Philips... 

H. Reed Fulton. 

J. G. Rake. 

Howard E. Gregory 
Benj. A. Hoffeditz... 

Jesse Kimm . 

J. Clifford Folger. 

Clarence J. Cooil. 

L. L. Nolin.. 

A. B. McCready_ 


Cvergreen 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

.....Editor (First Semester) 

.....Editor (Second Semester) 

..Associate Editor 

.Associate Editor 

....Exchange 

.Society 

....-...Locals 

. Athletics 

.Education 

.Oratory-Debate 

.Special Assignments 


BUSINESS STAFF 


George H. Shearer 
Willard E. Mitchell.... 
Stanley Armstrong . 


.Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 
..Assistant Business Manager 


The Evergreen is the official weekly publication of the State College of Wash¬ 
ington. It is the students’ paper, and is edited and published by a staff chosen from 
the student body. 


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Philips 

Baker 

Harrison 

Koch 

Howard 

Coulter 

Langlois 

McWhorter 

Bean 

Chandler 

Keffer 

Monroe 

Strausz 

Rake 

Chambers 

Kienholz 


Curtis 


Brislawn 


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C?!)e (Tfyinook 


EDITORIAL STAFF 

Virgil O. McWhorter.Editor 

Robert Keffer.Associate Editor 

Lyman D. Baker.Art 

Harry M. Chambers.... Departments 

Joseph L. Philips.Classes 

J. G. Rake. Calendar 

Mary K. Chandler..*.Calendar 

Louis Brislawn .............Humor 

Philip Howard . Humor 

Zoe C. Bean. ...Stage 

Edgar H. Kienholz... .Athletics 

Grace Coulter . Society 

M. O. Monroe. Kodak 

Edna Langlois .Kodak 

Irma Harrison .#.Literature 

Ralph I. Curtis. Organizations 


BUSINESS STAFF 

Alva L. Strausz.Business Manager V 

Geo. P. Koch....Assistant 

The Junior class is indebted to the following persons who have aided in com¬ 
piling and illustrating this publication: 


Fred Dudley 
C. Q. North 
Roy W. Merritt 
Harry Raymond 
Ovid T. McWhorter 
Walter Ryder 


Herbert Hodge 
Reed Fulton 
George Reeder 
Rena Duthie 
Jessie Aten 
Oscar Jacobson 


Boyd Schlaefer 
R. H. Sterne 
Frank Tews 
D. H. Stevens 
F. H. Jenne 


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Walsh 

Smith 

Elliott 


Koch 

McDougall 

Howard 


Collyer 

Meikle 

Graves 


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Ol)e XiPasljlngton .Agriculturist 




* 




William Meikle - 
George W. Graves 

Koy E. Smith. 

Dorothy Collyer. 

Philip Howard. 


EDITORIAL STAFF 


.Editor 

.Agriculture 

.Horticulture 

..Home Economics 
Veterinary Science 


BUSINESS STAFF 


T. A. Elliott ... 

A. R. Walsh. 

Grover McDougall. 
Geo. P. Koch. 


.Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

.Circulation Manager 

.Mailing Clerk 


Since the Washington Agriculturist is edited jointly by the students of the 
Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary Science, and Home Economics Departments, it 
serves as an excellent medium through which the farmers of this state may learn of 
the work being accomplished by these respective departments. 

Such a relationship is very desirable in that it not only offers much of real prac¬ 
tical value to the farmer, but brings him in closer touch with the work of the students 
of this College, and thus shows to him the relation of a College Education to his 
profession. 



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Frank T. Barnard 


1 1^ i I 


43ow ^Pow 


EDITORIAL STAFF 


Ivan Putman.Editor 

Lora Green...Assistant Editor 

Mrs. M. K. Akers.Assistant Editor 


BUSINESS STAFF 


Frank T. Barnard......Manager 

Elizabeth Vermilye.Assistant Manager 


A publication of this nature accomplishes 
many purposes; paramount is the promotion of closer friendship among alumni scat¬ 
tered throughout the country. It serves as a medium through which the old graduates 
may learn of the success of their fellow alumni. The paper specializes in printing 
articles and pictures explaining and illustrating this particular phase of alumni work. 
Letters have been received from Paris, 

Cuba, the Philippines, and Japan, telling 
of alumni progress. All such letters are 
published in the Pow Wow and they furnish 
much of interest to graduates closer to the 
institution. 


This publication has been instrumental 
in causing the organization of alumni clubs 
in many cities. Through such organizations 
graduates are brought together and many 
pleasant hours are spent in recalling past 
friendships and pleasures at the Old State 
College. 


Every alumnus should be a subscriber to 
the Pow Wow. 


Ivan Putman 


The Pow Wow is a quarterly publica¬ 
tion edited by the State College Alumni. 
This paper was first published in 1910 by 
alumni members of the faculty. Although 
its life has been short, it has the promise of 
a very bright future. About fifty per cent 
of the alumni are now on the Pow Wow 
subscription list, and this percentage is greater 
than that of subscriptions to alumni papers of 
other colleges and universities. 


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ytta y 


Queen .Marion Flood 

Lady in Waiting. .Edith Largent 

Master of Ceremonies.Milton Newhouse 

Maids of Honor 

Orpha Huxtable 

Mildred Waters 

Blanche Thayer 

Stella Wilson 

One of the prettiest events of the year is the May Day Fete, and particularly was 
this true of the Fete last May. The Campus was well covered with groups of spec¬ 
tators, and the sun was fast disappearing below the hill when Milton Newhouse, master 
of ceremonies, followed by a procession of white-gowned maidens and Seniors in cap 

and gown, came down the Campus from Stevens Hall. They took their places in 

a semi-circle before the May-pole, and the girls, to the accompaniment of the band, 
danced about the pole, gaily wreathing it with ribbons of pink and blue. Then came 
the eagerly looked for Queen o’ the May, Marion Flood, with her maids of honor, 
preceded by her tiny, dainty flower girls, and followed by her little pages bearing her 
long court train. She made a charming picture, indeed, as she came to be crowned 
with a coronet of flowers, the insignia of her sweet rule as Queen of the day’s festivities. 

After the pretty ceremony of the coronation, the May-Pole dance was resumed. 
Later the crowd adjourned to the Auditorium to see the annual play, which is always 
presented by the Young Women’s Christian Association in connection with the May 
Fete program. 



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Commencement 

ORDER OF EXERCISE 


The Commencement Procession 

Processional March..Meyerbeer 

The President of the College and the Commencement Orator 
The Vice President and the Dean of the College 


The Regents of the College 

The Honored Guests of the College 

The College Faculty 

The Alumni of the College 

The Candidates for Degrees 

The Invocation...Rev. Jame3 Mailley 

Cujus Auimain, from Slabat Mater.Rossini 

Mrs. Kuria Strong 

Announcement of Degrees to be conferred. 

Sixth Pastoral Symphony...Beethoven 


The College Orchestra 

The Commencement Address 

Dr. William Jasper Kerr, President of the Oregon Agricultural College 

Air Varied .. 

Prof. E. A. Evans, Organist 

The Conferring of the Degrees 

President of the College 
The Award of Medals and Honors 

President of the College 

The Benediction 

Rev. C. H. Harrison 

The Recessional March, (“Tannhauser”).Wagner 

Pi of. E. A. Evans, Organist 



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3uiuor $rom 

April 19, 191 1 
Patronesses 

Mrs. Thomson 

Mrs. Egge 

Mrs. Akers 

M rs. Gaw 

Executive Committee 

Chairman....E. C. Stewart 

Decoration......C. J. Cooil 

Refreshments........O. E. Leiser 

Program...O. T. McWhorter 

Invitation ....George Shearer 

In the hearts of the students, the Junior Prom holds preference over all our Col¬ 
lege formals. This dance is given each year by the members of the Junior Class, and 
the Class of 1912 spared no efforts in making the Armory a place of beauty and 
attractiveness for last year’s Prom. 

As the couples entered the Armory, they were welcomed by the President of the 
College, the President of the Junior Class and the patronesses of the dance. The cozy 
corners, which were artistically decorated with Indian blankets, were naturally the first 
seats to be filled. The dancers vied with each other for these preferred seats through¬ 
out the entire evening. 

But the cozy corners were not all of attractiveness at the Armory. The walls 
were completely covered with evergreens, among which were intermingled pennants of 
all colors and sizes. These, with the Class colors artistically arranged overhead, made 
the entire Armory a sight of beauty. 

The novel and attractive programs called forth no little praise on the part of 
the visitors, and the 1912 Class will be long remembered for their ability to choose a 
favor which will readily recall the pleasant and enjoyable hours spent at their Prom. 

When the orchestra began playing “Home, Sweet Home”, a happily spent- 
evening was over, but the memories of that event will linger long with all those who 
were present. 





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Z3l)e Varsity !ftall 


December 9, 1911 
Patronesses 

Mrs. F. E. Sanger 

Mrs. M. K. Akers 

Mrs. F. O. Kreager 
Committee in Charge 

Ralph Lowry F. H. Jenne 

M. Orien Monroe Henry E. Doelle 

Harry M. Chambers 

One of the most popular annual events at the State College of Washington is the 
Varsity Ball. It is held at the close of the football season in the Armory, and usually 
proves one of the most pleasant and enjoyable of all the College dances. With good 
music, a splendid floor, and a crowd of college people all intent upon a good time, 
the few hours of pleasure pass all too soon. 

The Athletic Association, under whose management this ball was given, spared 
neither time nor effort in planning and decorating for this affair. The committee in 
charge amply demonstrated their ability to entertain by giving all who were in attend¬ 
ance such a good time that it was an evening long to be remembered. 

“Our” football team was a very general topic of conversation, interspersed with 
no little comment upon the games of the past season. Many a stirring incident and 
thrilling moment of past games were recounted again and again, all to the credit of 
our gridiron warriors. Beyond this, many of the merrymakers who have thoughts for 
the future, passed many remarks as to the possibilities of next year’s team. 

Scarcely e’er we realized it, the strains of “Good Night, Dear” reminded us 
that the evening of pleasure, so long anticipated, had ended. Another “Varsity” 
had come and gone and now we have left only the memory of a happy and joyous 
evening. 


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I3l)e Mltlltar? 

February 22, 1912 
Committees in Charge 

General Chairman, Lt. C. R. Bennett, U. S. A. 


Executive 

Col. O. T. McWhorter 
Lt. Col. E. C. Stewart 
Major J. D. Meyer 

Programs and Music 

Col. O. T. McWhorter 
Lt. C. E. Stewart 


Illumination 
Lt. W. F. Bonnell 

Floor 

Capt. H. W. Meyer 
Lt. V. B. Cornelius 
Lt. R. J. Stratton 
Lt. R. L. Wilkinson 

Door 

Capt. W. W. Merchant 


Invitation 

Capt. O. E. Leiser 
Lt. G. H. Shearer 


Decorations 

Major J. D. Meyer 
Capt. J. S. McNair 
Capt. K. B. Peasley 
Lt. P. H. Neuman 
Lt. C. Campbell 

Refreshments 

Lt. J. G. B. Maxfield 
Capt. H. G. Cotton 

Cloak Room 

Capt. L. D. Baker 
Lt. T. E. Allen 


Officer of the Day 
Lt. R. L. Wilkinson 


Sergeant of the Guard 
Sgt. T. G. Jones 

The Military Ball is given every Washington’s Birthday by the Regiment of 
Washington State College Cadets. The immense United States flag, the regimental 
colors, flags of various nations from the Union Jack of Old England to the variegated 
standard of a Tahitian Chief, the sabers of ancient and venerated warriors long since 
passed to their glorious reward, the white tents of our own cadets, which have covered 
their sleepy heads after weary and toilsome marches, and the rusty rifles with which 
they are wont to drill, formed indeed decorations to please the hearts of the most 
valiant. 

‘‘The lights shone o’er fair women and brave men,” yea e’en to the midnight hour. 


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^res^man-Sop^omore <Blee 

May 6. 191 I 

Patronesses 

Mrs. M. K. Akers 

Mrs. Lionel Gittelson 

Miss Olga Todd 

Miss Augusta Roziskey 
Chairmen of Cimmittees in Charge 
J. L. Philips 
A. T. Peterson 

The Glee, given jointly by the members of the Freshman and Sophomore Classes, 
is one of the annual social events of the College. On this evening the under classmen 
bury forever their trivial differences and devote themselves to a general good time. 

The early part of the evening is spent in the College Auditorium where the four 
classes vie with one another in the presentation of a new -ong. These songs are always 
well rendered and offer much enjoyment to those present. Later, all adjourn to the 
Gymnasium, where the festivities are continued with songs and dancing. 

This event is the most impressive of any of our social functions. 

<Tl)inooK Oilllcum 

March 16, 1912 
Patronesses 

Mrs. W. B. Strong 

Miss Lora Green 

Miss Hazel Elaine Raber 
Chairman of Committee in Charge 
Walter A. Holt 

The second annual Chinook Tillicum given by the Junior Class was one of the 
most pleasant and enjoyable informals of the College Year. 

The music was especially good and every one entered into the spirit of the evening. 
The Tillicum has, without doubt, won its place among the College informals and will 
always bring back memories of a “Jolly good time.” 

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Social Cvents of tl)e (Lollege ^car 


APRIL, 1911 

1 5—Annual Panthegatric. 

21—Junior Prom. 

24—“Breakers” Stunt Party. 

MAY, 1911 

1—Delta Smoker. 

5— May Romp. 

6— Freshman-Sophomore Glee. 

12—Alpha Zeta Banquet. 

20— Alpha Tau Omega Banquet. 

30—Annual picnic of the Columbian Lit¬ 
erary Society. 

JUNE, 1911 

7— Senior Girls’ Spread. 

8— Alpha Theta Sigma Easter Break¬ 

fast. 

9— Columbian Literary Society Ban¬ 

quet 

12—President’s Reception. 

15—Alpha Theta Sigma Informal Re¬ 
ception. 

I 6—Pharmacy Banquet. 

1 7—Washington Literary Society Ban¬ 
quet. 

I 8—Sigma Beta Pi Senior Shower. 

21— Annua! Alumni Ball. 

22— Commencement Day. 

SEPTEMBER, 1911 

28— Theta Kappa Welcome Party. 

29— All College Reception to Students. 

OCTOBER, 1911 

5— Frolic for All College Women 

given by the Y. W. C. A. 

6— Freshman Dance. 

7— Sophomore Dance. 

14—Junior-Senior Dance. 

21—Broadway Dance. 

26— Second Annual Y. M. C. A. Mem¬ 

bership Banquet. 

27— Senior Dance. 

28— Columbian Literary Society Hal¬ 

lowe’en Frolic. 


NOVEMBER, 1911 

4— Freshman - Sophomore Hallowe’en 

Dance. 

—Pi Delta Phi Reception. 

18—Sigma Beta Pi Informal Dance. 

22—Alpha Theta Sigma Reception. 

24— Theta Kappa Reception. 

DECEMBER, 1911 

7— Broadway Club Smoker. 

9—Varsity Ball. 

—Y. W. C. A. Party for Elementary 
Girls. 

1 5—Glee Club Soiree. 

I 6—Foundation Day of Kappa Sigma. 

21— Pi Delta Phi Annual Christmas 

Party. 

—Phi Alpha Epsilon Annual Christ¬ 
mas Party. 

22— Christmas Party for the “Left¬ 

overs” in Stevens Hall. 
JANUARY, 1912 

5- 12—Holiday Club Dance. 

1 3—County Fair. 

25— Broadway Club Smoker. 

26— Theta Kappa Formal. 

FEBRUARY, 1912 
9 —Sigma Beta Pi Shakespearean 

Formal. 

1 0—Broadway Club Dance. 

I 6—Kappa Sigma Formal. 

22— Military Ball. 

MARCH, 1912 
1—Pi Delta Phi Formal. 

8— Sigma Nu Formal. 

—Columbian Literary Society enter¬ 
tains the Websterians. 

9— Glee Club Formal. 

—Delta Formal. 

I 5—Phi Alpha Epsilon Formal. 

—Freshman Party. 

1 6—Chinook Tillicum. 

—Phi Alpha Epsilon Reception. 

23— Y. W. C. A. St. Patrick’s Party. 

30—Washington Literary Society enter¬ 
tains Columbian Literary Society. 

—Reception at Ferry Hall. 




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H*fastene6 ^Justice 

By H. Reed Fulton. 

Slap, went the harness over the back of the pinto, and, as Jim Malone busied himself with 
the buckles, a cheery morning tune b:oke from his lips. 

He was just the sort of a man that one expected to see striding between two colls, quite 
careless of their backward glances. His clean-shaven face was the mirror of wholesome open-air 
living, coupled with the faith that one could be a farmer and still not a slave. Two years before 
he had graduated from an Agricultural College, and since then had prospered. His farm was 
clear of debt and a model for the entire county. He had saved enough to marry the girl he had 
met in his college days. They were supremely happy. 

With a final slap on the rump of the last ho.se, Jim turned and stepped to the door, unbut- 
toning, as he went, the old canvas jacket which covered a clean shirt. Someone was coming across 
the field towards him. A slight shrug came from the broad shoulders as he recognized his dis¬ 
reputable Canadian neighbor, who lived on a small adjoining farm at the edge of the limber. 

“What you think, Jim Malone? Cattle what you claim break my fence and ruin—ruin my 

wheal what is bundled. Sacre! What you think?*’ Andre came up to the barn with excited 

step and gesture, followed by his flea-bitten cur. “All year have I worked. Slaved. Morning I 
go to house for fork and when I get back to field—cattle—one, three dozen—eat my bundles! 
Cattle what belong to you! All my work gone. What you think?” The last words rose to 
a shriek, while Andre pranced up and down, his face twitching with the frenzy he had worked 
himself into. 

Jim gave a short laugh and then spoke, as he kicked the heel of his boot against the door- 
sill. "Sorry that the milking herd got into your field, Andre, but according to what the boy 

says it must have been on account of your carelessness in pulling the bundles close enough to 

the fence for the cows to reach them. You might have known better than that.” 

“Know better! I put my bundles where I damn please. I have leased the land—is it not 
mine?” 

“Of course that land is yours and you can do as you please with your bundles, but don’t 
come to me with your loss. It was your own carelessness." 

“So? Is it not my land? I don’t know—maybe you can find in the law what tells me 

where to put my bundles! I am a poor man. Der is the wife and children. Somebody will 
pay for it, I tell you!" 

“Listen here, Andre," broke in Jim, advancing towards him. "No use of your flying off the 
handle—no use threatening me. I could have jailed you two years ago when you cut down 

the government corner tree, or a year ago when you used that north pasture of mine, thinking 

that I wouldn’t find out about it. Now you come here roaring about something that is no fault 
of mine. I’m tired of it. You worthless cross between a Canadian and a Spaniard, I don’t want 
you on my ranch any longer. Get!" 

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Jim stepped foiward, turned Andre around and started him toward the fence with a none 
too gentle kick. 

Fairly sputtering with rage, and hissing many a "sacre , “damn , and caramba between his 
teeth, Andre picked his way across to the fence. As he swung his leg down on the other side, 
he brandished his fist in the air and shouted, "Somebody will pay for! Somebody will pay!" 

Jim turned with a laugh and walked briskly to the house. His wife met him in the doorway 
and said, as she finished tying her sun-bonnet under her chin, "There, now I m all ready, Jim. 

"Just a moment Bessie, while I change my coat, replied Jim. 

A few minutes later they were bound for town seated in the buckboard behind the pintos. 

“Do you know, Jim," said Bessie, "I saw Andre going across the field and I*ve been won¬ 
dering if what they say about him and his wife is true. They say that he whips her and cuffs her 
around more like an animal than a human being. I can hardly comprehend how a man can treat 
a woman that way. She paused and looked up at her companion as though expecting an answer. 

"I guess that it is true," replied Jim. “It seems a shame loo, but he is little better than a 
brute. I imagine that he has beat every bit of her love for him out of her. It looks to me as 
though the only reason she stays with him is on account of the children.’ 

"But that is the very reason why she shouldn’t stay." 

“She thinks that she couldn't support them alone and she won’t leave them to him, re¬ 
turned Jim. 

“I don't see why she couldn’t find work in town if she tried," said Bessie. 

"She could, I have no doubt," replied Jim. 

Then the conversation veered to matters about the farm work. Amongst other duties Jim 
must ride to the breaks to look for some mavericks the following morning. 

Dusk had fallen, and the moon, a great red ball, was just peering over the fringe of mountains 
across the river, when the buckboard rattled out of town and down the deserted road on its home¬ 
ward way. Between the scrub pines of the timber’s edge, now and again across little openings 
where the moonlight threw strange, hurrying shadows, trotted the horses eager for the coming feed. 

It would have taken keener eyes than those of the happy couple reviewing the gossip of the 
town, to have seen the dark shadow that followed them up the long rise, flitting in and out amongst 
the pines, avoiding the moonlight patches for fear of a tell-tale gleam. The horses were taking 
their time for the hill. An owl flopped silently across the road low to the ground and then 
swerved suddenly upward, alighted on a dead limb in a tamarack, and sounded its dolorous cry. 
The shadow stopped beside a tree and jerked up the rifle. A laugh from Bessie rippled out on 
the night air. The rifle came slowly down. A Spanish oath slid between set teeth and the shadow 
and darkness became one. 

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Two Hundred Forty-one 















At the top of the hill the road swerved sharply to the left and the pintos struck out over the 
level with a long swinging trot for home. 

Early the next morning Jim was saddling his horse and giving Pete, the hired boy, directions 
for the day’s work. 

“I was talking with Cal Higsbee last evening,” said Pete, “he said as how he had heard that 
cross-bred Andre say he was going to get you for kicking him off the ranch. Maybe you had 
better look out for him. No telling what a fellow like that will do.” 

“Oh, I guess that he won’t carry his bluff too far,” replied Jim. “I’ll be ready for him, 
nevertheless.’’ Swinging himself into the saddle he waved goodby to the little woman standing on 
the porch, and rode off into the woods towards the breaks. 

An hour’s riding brought him to where the country “broke” and fell away in long ridges in 
the direction of the river. Here the trail led down over fallen logs, now keeping along the sides 
of the canyon and across patches of alkali where the dust lay half a foot deep, now following the 
creek bottom amongst the boulders. The horse picked its way without hesitation or direction, and 
Jim, with both hands on the pommel of the saddle, breathed deep of the pine-laden morning air, 
and laughed aloud at the antics of the squirrels and chipmunks along the way. The horse splashed 
noisily across the shallow expanse of water in the bottom of the canyon and scrambled up the 
sharp incline, sending down a shower of clods and pebbles. 

Not ten minutes later another horse slopped at the shallow and pushed its eager nose into 
the water. The rider leaned out and searched the opposite bank with his eyes. Evidently satisfied 
with what he saw, he tumed his horse’s head down the stream and urged him forward. A canvas 
bag was tied behind the saddle and a revolver butt was visible above the bolster where it hung 
on the pommel. 

The sun was well down in the sky before Jim Malone turned his horse’s head towards home. 
He had ridden in and out among the ridges in the hot sun for hour after hour, locating a little 
bunch of cattle here and there. It had taken him longer than he had expected. 

Though tired, both the horse and the rider seemed rested as soon as they came to the cool 
shade in the ravine where the creek tumbled boisterously between the boulders along the bottom 
for some distance and then drifted languidly across some flat stretch only to leap forward again 
with a whisper of laughter. 

The sun lingered on the horizon and with wistful hand painted the few scattered clouds in 
gorgeous colors. Enchanted by the beauty of the scene, Jim began to sing softly that old hymn, 

“Day is dying in the West . . .’’ 



Two Hundred Forty-two 













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He wondered idly who had preceded him up the ravine. There were Iracks in the mud 
where the trail crossed the creek, and the splashings were not yet dry on the other side. Once he 
thought that he heard a shot, far up the canyon, but the wind was fickle and the trees often twist 
the sounds awry. 

“Heaven is touching earth with rest . . ." 

Some minutes later Jim halted his horse beside a spring which bubbled forth from between 
the roots of an old wind-blown spruce to lure all passersby with its coolness. He flung himself 
at full length on the ground to drink. He bent his head, but before his lips could touch the water, 
the sharp crack of a revolver broke the silence- 

Jim leaped to his feet and behind the tree in one bound. The warning that Pete had given 

him that moining had come to his mind. Perhaps that Half-breed would try to pot him from 

behind. The report had come from close at hand up the ravine, but it was queer that he had not 
shot close enough for him to hear the bullet. The horse had not been alarmed by the noise and 

was standing with nose thrust deep in the spring water drinking in steady draughts. 

Jim remembered that someone had preceded him up the trail. It was an unusually lonely 
way, never traveled for mere pleasure. If Andre had fired the shot just heard, he would be very 
likely waiting for another opportunity to make up for the miss. At all events, it was worth looking 
into, and so, revolver in hand, Jim dropped back to the shelter of some bushes and began to work 
his way up the creek on his hands and knees. A noise over his shoulder startled him and he 
turned. The horse was lying down; probably the pommel would be broken in the rolling. But 
instead of rolling, the animal only kicked out spasmodically several limes, and then lay still, except 
for an occasional shiver that seemed to sweep over the entire body. Finally the head came back 
with a je;k. \^hat could be the trouble? It came to him of a sudden. God! The spring had 
been poisoned! 

Jim Malone crouched there amongst the bushes for a moment in a daze, the perspiration 

standing out on his forehead in great beads. Then his jaws set with a snap and he began once 

more his forward crawl. 

Yard after yard passed,—-each moment he expected to be greeted with a flash of flame. The 
odds were much against him, for beyond a doubt he was already located by whoever had fired 
the shot. As he peered cautiously through a bush and out over an open space, something caught 
his eye. It looked like—like an old glove thrown in a mud hole. No, it was a—! Jim pushed 
aside the foliage and glided across the opening. 

There in the slimy center of the stink-hole lay a dirty brown hand still gripping a revolver. 

A forehead almost sunken from sight showed a small red-circled hole. A dark crimson film floated 

fantastically out on the scum. 

A green bottle fly droned back and forth in short irregular flights around the fast disappearing 
head, alighting now and then to be disturbed by the scum as it arose little by little. Once it was 
almost caught in the ooze, but it struggled up into the hair leaving a trail of mud. 

Five minutes later the fly buzzed disappointedly away down the ravine. 



■ i n —, 


Two Hundred Forty-three 

















Ol)e Romance of a ~JJalouse.r 


The balmy rays of evening were a-slantin’ thru the trees; 

Above our heads, the leaflets were a-lispin’ in the breeze; 

The fishes were a-sportin’ in the softly flowin’ juice. 

As, hand in hand, we wandered down the banks o’ the Palouse. 

The sun, with sort o knowin* wink, slid down into the West, 

And somewhere near, a drowsy songster (wittered in its nest. 

IVIy heart was madly bealm , and I longed for an excuse 
To tell her how I loved her—, on the banks o’ the Palouse. 

Her breast was all a-flutter, like a butterfly in May. 

I took her gently in my arms—she seemed content to slay! 

My tongue pulled at its halter, gave a jerk, and busted loose— 

And then I popped the question—, on the banks o’ the Palouse! 
******** 

When verdant shades of Summertime have ripened into brown. 

The skies are filled with murky clouds, the snow comes swoopin' down; 

But while the storms are ragin , we re as happy as the deuce. 

Within our little cottage, on the banks o’ the Palouse. 

—D. H. S. 

Ol)£ ~3)awmtt$ 

As I strolled a golden sunbeam. 

Creeping outward o’er the lea. 

Gently kissed a little daisy 

Near the path in front of me. 

Then a vision bright seemed dawning, 
Glowing with the light of day. 

And the gloomy world of passion 
Changed into a golden way. 

In the brave, tho' simple daisy, 

I could trace love s peace serene. 

Scorning not its lowly mission 
There among the grasses green. 

Ever looking upward, trusting 
In its gentle, modest way, 

And I claimed it for my emblem 

Through life s rough and changeful way. 

-J- A. 



i—tiii t-W d- iJfa—i 


When the hand of the Great Painter 
Tints bright the eastern skies— 

And the waning light retreating 
In the meadow softly dies; 

Then it is that Morn advancing, 

Thru’ the golden gate of dawn 
Casts around her ruddy glimmer 
Over all the mighty lawn. 

Wrapped in gloomy thought I wandered. 
Heeding not the glorious view 
O’er the Summer’s verdant meadow 
Burdened low with crystal dew, 
Longing for more show of glory, 

III content and ill at ease. 

(Naught to soothe a restless spirit 
In the morning’s gentle breeze.) 


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Two Hundred Forty-four 


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Unusual §taKT8 


All Steadies 




Two Hundred Forty-five 





























































































Not smokin’ ’is pipe in the mountains. 

But a-sniffin' the mornin’ breeze, 
Wrapped up in ’is old gray blanket, 

In is yard where there ’aint no trees. 
With one little Kreager on top im. 

And never a prep’ll forget— 

That not e’en the pride of the College, 

Can beat ’im to ’is little pet. 


THE TWO TRIBUTES 

I. 

The Loafer 

I am a loafer; I fear my work, 

And the threatened failures that ’round me lurk; 

I dread the clang of the morning bell 
That summons me to a day of hell. 

Vet I sl.uggle on ’neath my wretched load. 

Cringing in shame from the teachers’ goad. 

With the hope some day to g aduate, 

And leave behind the life I hate. 

Then forever I’ll turn my back 
On this pile of bricks and its ugly stack! 

II. 

The Worker 

I am a worker: In dauntless youth, 

I am building a castle with stones of truth. 

My step is quick and my eye is bright; 

My pulse is leaping to the fight. 

I love my work and I bear no ill 
To the Old State College on the Hill; 

But my heart is thrilled by its majesty 
When I see it at the close of day. 

Just as the sun is sinking down. 

For it stands transfo med to a g’eam.ng crown! _D. H. S. 


Two Hundred Forty-six 



















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Two Hundred Forty-seven 












































(Breeding 


The following resolutions were drafted by the Associated Students of the State 
College of Washington and sent to the University of Washington on the event of her 
Semi-Centennial Celebration: 

TO THE FACULTY, ALUMNI AND ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF THE UNI¬ 
VERSITY OF WASHINGTON, GREETING: 

Whereas, Our great sister institution is about to celebrate her semi-centennial jubilee; therefore. 

Be It Resolved, That the Associated Students of the State College of Washington extend 
to the Faculty, Alumni and Students of the University our most hearty felicitations on the occa¬ 
sion of her fiftieth birthday, and that we hope she may maintain the same devotion to the highest 
ideals of education that has characterized her work in the past; and be it 

Resolved, That we hope for a continuation of the harmony which has heretofore existed 
between the Stale University on the West and the Slate College on the East, since only through 
co-operation can the best interests of the stale be conserved; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the Faculty, Alumni and Stu¬ 
dents of the University of Washington, a copy published in the Evergreen, and a copy recorded in 
the annals of our institution. 


(Signed) 


ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF THE STATE COLLEGE 
OF WASHINGTON. 


MEMORY 

Oh memory, .forsake me not; 

With thee I spend an idle hour, 

But let me gain from thee the power 
To live, to live, I know not what. 

Ah yes! I have it; just a lot 
Of those old days, that used to flower 
And shield me ’neath the college tower, 
With friends I long fox evermore. 

Alas, Old College of the West, 

In this short life, oh what a part 
Doth thou contribute to the best 
Of youth, and all his early start, 

To grow' gigantic like thou art. 

Oh memory, ’tis thee I bless. 

—J. T. L. 


He dreams there by the campfire; 

Dreams of the days to come, 

Thinks of the ball games coming, 

And of the hit and run. 

For he cleans the pot and the kettle. 
And sees the days gone by, 

Back at the old State College, 

Chasing an elusive fly. 

He dreams all year of baseball; 

Game of the padded mit, 

He loves to hear the bat crack, 

And see the three-base hit. 

Football is a passing fancy, 

For he is a baseball fan, 

And he plays the national pastime, 
For he is a BASEBALL MAN. 


Two Hundred Forty-eight 



































Gladys and the girls prepare the feed 
while Ted, etc., await with hunger. 
“Mack” takes a ride in a “steamboat/’ 


«*T» T * 

1 m coming, 1 om. 
At the sea-shore. 

Out for sport. 






Two Hnndred Forty-nine 




























































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Miss Tyler’s favorite expression: 
“I am here to stay.” 

Did Donald Spear his birthday 
cake? 

“No”, we answer, with tears in 
our eyes, “it was merely a frosted 
dish pan.” 


At the Y. M. C. A. Reception. 

Prof. Waller: “How do you 
do, may 1 call you Cally?” 

Miss Callingham: “Yes, if I 
may call you Dad Waller.” 


The Real Cake 

Reed Fulton (in Education Class) : “I not only believe in Darwin’s Theory of 
Evolution, but going farther, I would like to state that some of our specimens are on 
the return trip.” 

Prof.: “I quite agree with you, Mr. Fulton.” 


Mrs. Strong: ‘‘Prof.’s shoes are so long that he has to back up to the door to 
knock.” 

Overheard at the Pi Delta Phi House: 

‘‘It’s too bad Boyce Heintzelman’s father 
isn’t a brewer. His name would sound 
so good on a bottle.” 

When told that there are burglars in 

the house, Neta M- sits up, snaches 

off her night-cap and says: “Girls, do 
I look alright?” 

Andy came back during vacation to 
(Reid) a little. pw-m.pha-ep5u.on sorority 



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Two Hundred Fifty-one 


























Heard over the telephone: 

“Hello—this is 68.“ 

“No, I haven’t much of anything on tonight.” 

“Yes, sure; I’ll be right over.” 

Miss White: “Now girls, you should treat the 
faculty with respect according to their rank.” 

Girl: “Which one is the rankest?” 

Tommy forgets his glasses Christmas and writes 
back “home” for them. They are sent to Miss 
Schneider with the accompanying note: “Love is 
blind.” 



"EC. 31" 


Said Prof, in Economics one day, 

"You see it is just in this way; 

This is not as it may seem, 

But you know what 1 mean— 

Say! You needn’t be getting so gay! 

“I’ve got this worked out in my head. 

You want it explained, nuff said. 

If you want to know. 

You know where to go— 

Say! Do you think that seal’s a bed?" 


Ramsay at the Y. M. C. A. 
Bible Class: “Yes, friends, we 
must try to follow the divine in¬ 
junction to cast out the sick, to 
heal the dead, and raise the 
Devil.” 

Student in Sociology: “The 
more I study the less I know.” 

Prof.: “Well, Mr. Rake, 

you must be studying very hard 
this semester.” 

What’s the matter with the 
Prohibition Club? 


"Now you just listen real hard. 

While I read some things from a card. 

I shall everything embody 
In what you must study— 

Say! My Statements need a little regard!' 

"Let me remark in conclusion. 

That, from a D there is no exclusion 
Unless you can recall 
Details of it all— 

Say! Who caused that Confusion?" 

—You’re excused! 



It’s too dry. 






Two Hundred Fifty-two 














































I 



HE KNOWS HOW 

Sap. Powell (in Hort.) : “To pick an apple, 
grasp the fruit firmly and then turn it toward 
the atmosphere.” 

Prof. Taylor (in Ec. 12): “Mr. Rake, 
how many penal institutions are there in the 
State of Washington and where are they lo¬ 
cated?** 

Rake: “The State Prison at Walla Walla, 
the Reformatory at Chehalis, and the State 
Normal at Cheney.** 


“MARY, MARY, 

QUITE COKIRARr 



Mary-Mary 



Miss Baker (at Senior Party) : “There is a 
spoon for everyone, is there not Mr. McWhorter?*’ 

Big Mac: “Y-e-s. I think there is. At least there is a chance for everyone.” 

Fraulein Callingham: “I under¬ 
stand German perfectly, but often get 
mixed up with my ENGLISH.” 

“What is space,” the teacher asked. 
The bearded Senior said: 

“I can’t think of it right now. 

But I have it in my head. 


“For two long hours he waited” 

Viola: “I just love baby Irish.” 

Tom Tyrer is called up and told to come to 
the library. He goes and finds Ace sitting 
with E. L. 

Ted Lowry (speaking to Mrs. Tabor La- 
Follette) : “How do you do. Miss Largent?” 
Exit Lowry. 





i 


Two Hundred Fifty-three 





































































Wrestler 1ftas (Hose Sl)ave 


G,ET5TKIMME0. 


Ramsey Principal Figure in Near-Tragedy at N. P. Depot 

It happened on the first Thursday after the first Sunday after the first sunshiny day in March. 
Every Thursday is somebody's Jonah Day. This lime the pleasure was all Ramsey s- 

For weeks—aye, even months he had nourished what he chose to te:m a moustache. And it 
had waxed long—even unto a length at which it might be seen. Not only in its beauty did he 
glory, but, like Samson in days of old, he also found in it the seat of his great strength. Care¬ 
fully had he guarded it unto the day when it was his to go forth and do battle unto the Philis¬ 
tines in the place which is called Seattle. Safely too had it come through many a fierce conflict 

until the very eve of the battle. Then it was that his Delilah in the shape of three members of the 

“Anti-Alfalfa Society" bore down upon him and with scissors uplifted demanded of him the 
p.ide of his heart—his little precious. 

It was at this same 
identical moment that 
the spirits of our he:o 
began to yearn for the 
peace and seclusion 
which is not to be found 

upon a crowded depoi 

platform, but alas, it 
could not be, for the 
villians still pufsued 
him. 

To his credit it may 
be said that he did not 
submit to the operation 
with all the ease and 
grace of a man who 
habitually adorns a 
barber-chair, but in¬ 
stead made known in a 
fitting manner the deep 
regard and intense 
pride with which he 
held said hirsute adorn¬ 
ment. 

Little did his brief 
show of strength avail 
him, however, for, as 
the chaff falls before 
the flail, so fell the 
“down” before the 

awful onslaught of the self-appointed tonsorial artists. 

When an end had come to the battle, lo and behold, the tresses that had adorned his upper 
lip lay even a fathom deep. And many did preserve souveni rs of the occasion. And it is said 
that he who had been shorn of his strength arose, and look up his staff and walked. And from 
that day forth he was an humbled man. 





Two Hundred Fifty-four 



























I 









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Two Hundred Fifty-five 


























































CLASS DAY 

“I want to see that fight," said Acting President Waller, “but I want to see a fair fight, ‘fit’, 
in daylight, according to rule. If the Freshmen and Sophomores are bound to mix, I think we 
ought to mix them in proper proportions and watch the reaction. The affairs of these youngsters 

ought to be managed, refereed and judged by their older brothers." Accordingly a committee of 

“High-brows”, with authority from the Assembled Students, set to wo-k to accomplish this end. 
Through diplomacy and a liberal use of the choicest brand of “Senior Salve" they got results. 
The belligerent parties were induced to abandon their lime-honored custom of secret night attacks, 
and to nurse their wrongs and cherish their hatred for one grand day of conflict on the open field. 

On the day set, October 6th, the entire college community, faculty, students, janitors, and 
farm hands, turned out to view the battle royal on Rogers Field and the highest expectations of 
all were realized. Every Fresh and Soph on the grounds, and they were all there, had an oppor¬ 
tunity to lest his nerve and display his speed, agility and general physical prowess. In the obstacle 

race, the pennant fight, the push-ball game, the sack fight and the tug of war. only a small amount 

of blood was spilled and no bones were broken, but every “budding colleger" got his nose pushed 
into the ground and had a chance to show his enthusiasm and class loyalty, while the rest of “us 
folks" saw the fun. 

Class Day is an established and permanent event at the State College. 

- W ii 44 * 


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Two Hundred Fifty-six 


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Start of Sack Fight 
“Joe** the Strong Man 
The Pennant Fight 
Freshmen Secure Pennant First 


“Dad” and “The Boys’ 
The Obstacle Race 
The Underclassmen. 






FjcU 


Two Hundred Fifty-seven 




















































































































































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Two Hundred Fifty-nine 
































































APRIL 



1. Morris, pencil photographer of the Spokesman-Review, 
lectures to the general public on the “Cartoonist and 
His Work/' 


S0NHET3 M 


2. Miss Anderson at Vespers. One string of her violin 
gets embarrassed and “busts”. She gives Des Voignes 
a signal of distress and they depart. 


6. Spring vacation officially begins. W. S. C. trims Gonzaga on the diamond. 

8. Spring fever epidemic raging. Pest-house established in Tanglewood, 

9. Easter bonnets begin to bud. 

10. Work again. We “class-cutters” hear T. R. at Moscow. 

I I. Whitman defeats W. S. C. in first intercollegiate co-ed debate. “This is a 


country for the ladies, by the ladies, and of the ladies.”—A. Lincoln, 


up-to-date. 

12. Prof. Daggy, formerly of the U. of W., talks on Riley and his poetry at Chapel. 
1 3. Prexy off for a vacation. Prof. Waller outlines his Chapel policy. 

14. Whitman songsters appear with an excellent program. 


15. Six scrubs develop into ”W” debators in O. A. C. tryout. 

1 6. Easter bonnets bloom out. Several young fellows are obliging enough to escort 


a few of the displays to church. 


18. Websterian play, “His House in Order”. Joe Philips, the erring husband. 

Cooil and Miss Taylor make love. 

19. We sting the U. of O. 9 to 2. Two Oregon pitchers overcome by an avalanche 

of hits. 

20. U. of O. again. 9 to 2 again. All W. S. C. again. Tulley hooks a flying 

fly as it flew over the bank toward Lake D’Puddle. 

21. Junior Track Meet. Freshmen win. Keffer strong with the discus. Junioi 

Prom in the evening. 

22. Judge Lindsay and the “Misfortunes of Mickey.” “Don’t snitch or you’ll 


get your face smashed.” 

24. Waller warns steadies to be careful about evening fussing in the library and 
thus avoid exciting the envy of the unfortunate ones. 



25. Tub, recovering from the spring fever, suffers a relapse. 


26. Deac. Ryan starts a strong campaign for the fussers. 


29. Not hotcakes, but WAFFLES. Y. W. C. A. First 
aid to the hungry. Preps stage a successful play— 
“My Friend from India.” 


t 



Two Hundred Sixty 


1 


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MAY 


Evergreen publishes parly affiliations of many students. 
“Fussers,” “Anti-fussers," “Independents." 

Pastor of Christian church makes a chapel talk and gets 
some heavy ones off on that innocent animal, the goat. 

Mr. Cline, one of the prominent men of the state, speaks 
in chapel. 

Rumbles of the approaching interscholastic field meet. Tim 
sits up nights thinking up original expressions. 

"Hennessey’s best" groom themselves for the approaching in¬ 
spection. Capt. Lauback, the inspector, arrives- 
Timmie sells interscholastic tickets in bunches of twenty-five 
and two. Skeels offers to buy twenty-five for Alpha Theta 
Sigma(?) Inspection completed. 

High school students begin to arrive. Pat Crane comes 
through with the meal tickets. Spokane wins the oratorical 
contest. 

Timmie is king. Tries to rain on him and can’t. Spokane 
carries off the honors of the Interscholastic Track Meet. 
Foster, president of Reed College, Portland, speaks in chapel. 

18- May Festival begins with a violin and organ concert by Evans and Gitlelion. 

19. Russian Symphony Orchestra pleases. W. S. C. musicians give the opera “Iolanthe." Glaisyer 
bites his lip and stares in a sober reception of love. Cooil and Merritt elected to head 
Student’s Assembly and Evergreen. 

20. A birth. And its name 
was Alpha Tau Omega. 

21. Sunday track meet with 
U. of I. Y. M. C. A. 
on the O.-W. R. & N. 

23. Dramatic Arts Club re¬ 
cital. 

24. Seniors sneak off to hold 
the annual “Klatawa." 

Juniors appear in cap and 
gown and get official rec¬ 
ognition from Prof. Wal¬ 
ler. 

26. W. S. C. wins track 
meet with Whitman. 

Whitman wins triangular 
oratorical contest. 

27. We’re off for encamp¬ 
ment. Girls dine at Ferry 

Hall with the peaceful 

citizens who remain at 
home. 

29. Chamber of Commerce of 
Spokane entertains the 
cadet officers at luncheon. 

National Guard gives bali 
for cadets. 

30. Big parade on streets of 

Spokane. Cadets give 
exhibition drill at camp 
in evening. 

31. Band boys champion roughnecks of the camp. Rough-house the ice cream men. Hunt for 
bedbugs. The gauntlet for fleet runners. Up in the blanket. Off for home. 







Two Hundred Sixty-one 































of the ponies 


JUNE 

1. All in, down and out. Once fine-appearing cadets yawn and 
sleep in classes. Profs decide that there shall be no more 
encampments. 

2. Thwaites and Miss Glover out for a stroll. 

3. Ag. Club puts on Hindoo show. Guha performs. Bill 
Meikle master of ceremonies. Davis gets the prize pig. 

5. Round up ponies for final exams. 

6. Alumni and oldtimers come back to visit their old haunts. 

7. Fitzsimmons plays his graduation recital. 

Music at chapel. LaFoIlette No. 4 performs on the violin, 
to the delight of the audience. Chambers wins Stearns 
Medal. 

Y. M. C. A. Shortcake feed. 


8 


9. 


10. W. S. C. leaves Idaho in a cloud of dust in the tennis tournament. Hot, but glorious for 
a picnic. 

11. The sweet girl graduate takes a stroll. Was she alone? She was-not. 


TubTai-rd qrra 
:e>usy In the: 

LiBTi/mY. 

SttN OCHIND A LAT«it 

T*w\ 


12. Profs wear a wise look and say that it would pain them to hand out so many flunks, but-. 

13. How many recitations have you left? One—two—three—four-. 

We match wits with the faculty in the first finals. “No, nobody used a pony.“ “Giddap.” 

The “college life” student spends the evening at home, a towel around his head, a big text 
book in one hand and a lemon in the other. 

“Tub" gets busy in Library. 

Some of the lucky ones pass through the ordeal 
of final exams, and make their get-away to home 
and mother. 

Rev. West of Everett delivers baccalaureate ad¬ 
dress. Mayor Hindley of Spokane addresses 
Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 

Senior class play, “For Old Eli.” Seniors do 
themselves proud. 

Band and orchestra give a big concert in the 
evening. 

Alumni day. Alumni banquet. Alumni ball, 
alumni everything. 

22. Commencement. President Kerr of O. A. C. delivers the address. Several Seniors see stars 
and are relegated to the class of 1911J^. 

23. Skiddoo. All gone but the summer school. 


14. 

13 . 

16. 

17. 


18. 


19. 


20 . 


21 





Two Hundred Sixly-two 














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, 4ln H ik 4 4* , 


wM KhJ 








SUMMER SCHOOL 
JUNE 

19. Summer School overlaps commencement. 
Students arrive. “O, you school - 
ma'ams!”— Profs. ”O t you college pro¬ 
fessors !"— Schoolma'ms. 

23. Reception in Stevens Hall for Summer 
School students. Timblin declares his 
ignorance and innocence regarding Tan- 
glewood. Miss Callingham preceptress 
of Stevens Hall. 

24. Botany and Zoology classes off to the 
Snake River. A strictly scientific jour¬ 
ney. 

27. A chance to talk. Prof. Beattie gives 
an illustrated lecture in chapel. 

29. Evans delights with organ recital. 

30. A program in the gym. Dance follows. 

JULY 

I. Prof. R. Kent Beattie chaperones a 
party to the mountains on a picnic to 
last over the Fourth. 

2. Hennessey returns to town from his 
honeymoon journey. 

5. The ’W ] /4 class entertained by Skeels 
at the Phi Upsilon House. 

6. Ovid T- breaks into private domain. 
Mill calls him out by phone. 

7. “Because of Blilzen,” a dramatic suc¬ 
cess. A hop in the gym. 

8. Timblin goes with Miss J. to the moun¬ 
tains. HU team departs for the happy 

feeding grounds and they (Prof, and Miss J.) a e trailed home behind Prof. Isaacs. 
II. Kreager’s chance to talk. Illustrated lecture on “Industrial Education. 

13. Miss Roziskey gives a recital at chapel. Picture of Summer School students is took. 
Picnic in Reanie's park. 

14. Program in Stevens Hall. Mr. Hadley sings in chapel. A little informal affair at the gym. 
13. Sigma Beta hop in Stevens Hall. 

18- Dewey didn't come. Evergreen appears. Prexy gives his 
annual address to the Summer School. 

19. Skeels goes to class for a change. 

21. Final hop in the gym. “Swellest time ever.*’ 

22. Stevens Hall waiters get a porcupine hair cut. 

23. Talbot takes seven girls for a buggy ride. “Where was 
Talbot?” 

24. Cooil wants it kept quiet that he is engaged. 

27. The flunkies begin to blow out. 

28. “The Teeth of a Gift Horse”—final dramatic treat. 

Yet one more dance. 

29. I wonder why Timblin is in such a hurry to get away? Hadley 'S/nos in CAone} 

1911 Summer School enters history. ^ 


l 


Two Hundred Sixty-three 

































SEPTEMBER 


Profs come back lo their old haunts. Some of the fresh 
ones wander around gazing at the skyscrapers. Football 
practice begins. 

First large consignment of students—mostly new—arrives. 
Registration begins. Y. M. and Y. W. on the job. 
Profs, do a rushing business, signing up the innocents 
who are thirsting for knowledge. Sophs initiate a few 
Freshies and Preps. The old “apple gag" is worked 
again. 

Freshies out for revenge. Wait patiently all night for 
the arrival of the Sophs. Sophs in a haystack > 

First chapel. Freshies issue a poetical poster asking 
where the Sophs were keeping themselves. Freshies tie 
up Sophs in evening mix, after cornering them by the 
n building. 

22. Y. M. C. A. holds a stag party. Masculine games and speeches. 

23. Freshies paint the stack. Almost duplicate of the Sophs’ colors. 

24. New students take in the sights. Cld-timers make their first remarks concerning the beauty 

of the Freshman girls. 

25. Froshes get into the spirit of recitation. “That’s what we learned in H. S." 

26. Shrewd ones, who have been here before, begin to consider 

the advisability of going lo class. “Let me see that fight,” 

says Waller. “Have the classes fight it out on Rogers Field.” 

27. “Rooks” get a few of the rough edges polished off and begin 

to learn that sweet refrain, “Rah, Rah, Ree." 

28. We go to the five socials held at the churches of the town 

just in lime lo get in on the refreshments. Upper class 

society organized lo regulate Fresh-Soph fight. 

29. Everyone gels acquainted at the Y. M. and Y. W. recep¬ 

tion. Several contracts for steady Sunday afternoon positions 
assigned. 

30. Washington Literary Society holds a cider and peanut drunk. 

“Nobody loves a fat man."— W. Fletcher. 



I i i i i 




Fresh-Soph Fight 


Two Hundred Sixty-four 
















OCTOBER 



Vice President Waller addresses students on 
the value of the Bible at Sunday meeting. 

President Bryan gives his farewell address at 
chapel. Urges students to get a broad view 
of things. 

First Evergreen. Merritt serves up the news 
in dashing style. President Bryan off for 
Europe. 

Rev. Dr. W. B. Hinson of Portland delivers 
a strong address at Chapel. 

Froshes and Sophs fight to a draw in the Class 
Day bouts. 

W. S. C. triumphs over the fighting Irishmen 
from Gonzaga in football. President Taft has 
honor of seeing us. 

W. H. Hubbard, Vice President of the Ameri¬ 
can Peace Society, talks on world peace. 
Rev. Marvin addresses a Chapel audience on 
the “Debt That Men Owe Each Other.” 


II. Prof. Waller gives his impressions of the Class Day stunts. 

14. Every one in the Palouse crowds into the auditorium to hear Gypsy Smith. 

16. Froshies paste their procs over everything on the campus. Night shirt parade. 

18. A pink Evergreen gives color to the Idaho game. 

19. The big rally occurs. Gym is guarded by courageous ones. 



20. Pullman is transferred to Moscow. W. S. C. 17, Idaho 0. 
We were happy. 

23. Prof. Waller compliments our Rooter King on his nerve in 
calling off a riot at Moscow. 

26. Miss Olsen sings a lullaby at Chapel. Rally for the U. of 
O. game. 

27. Oregon luck—6 to 0. 

28. Preps have a dance of their own. 

29. Miss White addresses the Young People s Union at the Chris¬ 
tian Church. 

31. Hallowe’en. Small boys—of all sizes—have their annual 
frolic. 





I 


Two Hundred Sixty-five 


I 





















NOVEMBER 


“Slim” Harter interviews his girl in the Library at 

12:59. 

Students send resolutions to the U. of W. congratu¬ 
lating them on the celebration of their Fiftieth anni¬ 
versary. 

W. S. C. takes another from Idaho. Second team 
grabs a 15 to 0 victory. 

A student, plus an athlete, plus a “fusser,” plus E. 
Kienholz equals a good halfback on our football 
team. 

Froshes announce the coming of Spring by uncover¬ 
ing some pale green skypieces. 

Art exhibit and reception by the Twentieth Century 
Club. Jacobson talks on “Art.” 

II. Bad news from O. A. C. Webfooters swim to victory. Edmund Vance Cooke and his poetry. 

13. Jack Frost goes to class. 

14. Waller tails of his visit to the University and their celebration. 

15. Dr. Babcock, a member of the United Slates Bureau of Education, addresses the students 
at Chapel. 

17. Band and others leave for Spokane to take part in the Night Shirt parade in that city in 
the evening. Juniors defeat Sophs at basketball. 

18. Senator Gore, the blind senator from Oklahoma, impresses a large audience with his eloquence. 
W. S. C. victorious over Whitman in football in 
Spokane, II to 0. 

21. Midsemeslers! Wow! 

22. Midsemesters continue. Juniors swamp seniors in a 
basketball game. 

23. Miss Taylor plays the pipe organ. Mr. Hadley de¬ 
lights the Chapel audience with two solos. The Vets 
refuse to play the Pharmics a game of football. 

24. Band boys ha-e a public rehearsal. Freshmen de¬ 
clare themselves basketball champs by conquering the 
Sophs. 

26. Off for the Apple Show. 

27. Football team, accompanied by Merritt as press 
agent, departs for Seattle. 

28. Mountain Ash Choir thrills a big audience. Welsh¬ 
men are superb singers. 


29. Kimbrough plays the new grand piano to the delight of the students. 

30. Hunger, turkey and indigestion. Bad news from Seattle—30 to 6. 



Two Hundred Sixty-six 



«»I p*.' 



&irT HaTUCR IN THU LIBRARY. 




















DECEMBER 


1. Washingtonians drain a keg of cider- Y. M. C. A. holds a 
“songfest.” 

2. Going! Going! Gone! Thanksgiving vacation. 

4. “Big Joe” elected captain of the 1912 football team. Prepara¬ 
tions made for athletic ball. 

5. Jumbo Hunter strongly suspected of having joined the ranks 
of the fussers. 

7. Jumbo is looking for the fellow who started the report that 
he was seen fussing. 

8. Dramatic Arts Club presents “An American Citizen.” Fulton 
and Miss Mecklem provide the sentimental part. 

9. Freshies and Sophs are both victorious in a football battle. 

Score—0 to 0. Athletes have their annual hop. 

II. Skill of Skovgard, great Danish violinist, delights and aston¬ 
ishes a large audience. 

12. Prof. Waller tells us to call upon our advisers once in a while. Also takes the part 

of the student as against the profs who delight in assigning too much work. 

14. breshmen and Sophomore debating teams become suspicious of each other and guard their 

arguments very carefully. 

15. Commissioner Coates of Spokane defends socialism from the attacks of our wise profs. 

Prof. Hulme of Idaho addresses the students of Economics and History. 

16. Sophs defeat the Freshies in a wordy battle over Judicial Recall. 

21. "Rook” Barnum, official representa¬ 
tive of President Eliot of the N 
P., announces that the philanthropy 
of Mr. Eliot will allow the wesi- 
siders to get another whiff of the 
clam-diggers’ ozone. 

22. Depopulation. Off for a jollifica¬ 
tion. 

25. Two red ties, some variegated sox, 
one pair of suspenders and a box 
of cough drops. Who said there 
was no Santa Claus? 

27. Y. M. and Y. M. C. A. entertain a 
jolly gathering of “leftovers” at Stev¬ 
ens Hall. 

28. Several term papers are slowly but 
surely nearing completion. 

29. W. S. C. attends a party. Where? 

All over the state. 

31. The Sunday evening caller is allowed 
to slay until midnight. 

Closing Scene of “American Citizen." 

Two Hundred Sixty-seven 




f 
































MoxT^>Aune»3TETk 

fNTe^viewa 

TV? or Wallets 

JuaT-fctrone. 
Chatc-l 
( h < ivme ) 


JANUARY 

I. “Now, I wonder, will she propose?” 

4. Baumeister inlerviews Waller just be¬ 
fore Chapel. 

5. W. S. C. defeats Genesee at basket' 
ball. 

8. Vacation ends. Back to work again. 

9. Rev. Dunn of Spokane delivers an in¬ 
spiring address at Chapel. 

10. “Osthie” says he is engaged. “Now isn’t 
that just too provoking?”— W. S. C. 
Cirls . 

11. Two live Seniors represent the Senior 
class in cap and gown at Chapel. 
(They are loudly applauded by other 
Seniors in the Junior seats.) 

12. N. W. Durham of Spokane appears before the Twentieth Century Club with an address 
on “Progressiveness.’* 

13. All “Rubes” attend the County Fair, and are properly sold. 

14. Barbers threaten to charge the Senior boys for a haircut when they once decide to shave. 

15. Prof. Fulmer meets the “Ag.” Club at Van Doren Hall. 

17. Six speeches at Chapel. Members of the State Board of Education tell some “heavy ones*’ 
on each other. 

18 . 

19. 



Rumor has it that “Dutch” Schroeder was seen purchasing a curling iron. 

Mr. W. D. Vincent, cashier of the Old National Bank of Spokane gives an illustrated 
talk on Laborador. W. S. C. defeats Idaho, basketball. 


20 . 


22 . 


23. 


26. 


27. 


28. 

29. 

30. 


Webs present their annual play, 
it over between acts. 


Merritt’s typewriter 
an editorial ode to 


Elaborate scenery, clever acting and a long time to think 

SL 



Duke 
writes 
mud- 

Student life is deadened by 
the nearness of the final 
effort of the semester. 

Prof. Humphrey gives illus¬ 
trated lecture on “Some 
Western Pioneers.” 

Prof. Jacobson also enters 
the illustrated lecture field 
with a lecture before two 
Pullman clubs on “Art." 

Mr. Knowliltle stays home 
and prays for brains. 

Profs, get decision for aggressiveness in the first round of final exams. 

“Something novel—something new.” It’s the Mask and Dagger club. 


T>he Quattei appear* in Ch«pe) 




Two Hundred Sixty-eight 





















6 . 

8 . 

9. 

10 . 

12 . 

14. 

15 . 

16. 


17 . 


18. 


19. 


21 . 

22 . 

23. 

26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 


"Just Before They Quit" 

FEBRUARY 

The spring moving epidemic reaches Ferry Hall in advance of the season. Lantuama Club 
formed. 

Basketball team barely escapes being defeated by Idaho. 

Just a little breathing spell between semesters. 

We drink to the honor of the Class of 1911. New fountain gives aid to the thirsty. 

A few Seniors in the moustache race give up hope. They were just stragglers. 

The dress suit and the Shakespearean Annual get together. 

Prof. Beach addresses a large audience on "Social Fatalism.” Glee Club off for a cruise 
in the sea of harmony. 

Jesse J., the mail carrier, is a welcome guest at Stevens Hall. 

Colonel Eck decides to get married. 

Our basket ball boys make the U. of O. stars 
hustle for victroy. 

Nolin and Boddy out-talk Whitman in the home 
bout of the triangular debate. Chambers and 
Brislawn lose at Seattle. 

Eddie Pape becomes "Cap" of the baseball team. 

Glee Club performs at Pullman. Baumeister and 
Joe Shields make a hit. 

Chas. D. Hurrey, national Student Secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A., visits W. S. C. 

Faculty get out after Duke*s goat. Duke ap¬ 
peases them by consenting to break away from 
his Evergreen. 

Military ball. Tailor has pressing engagement 
with many rook suits. 

Washingtonians lead the students in celebration 
of Georges birthday. Warriors have their big 
dance. 

C. A. C. wins a basketball game after hard fight for victory. 

Joe Philips elected to edit the Evergreen for remainder of year. 

Nolin begins the Chapel debate of "Judicial Recall." 

Marriages, elopements, near-elopements and just plain fussing. Brislawn upholds the judiciary 
in Chapel. 

Boddy swings the Chapel audience back to believing in judicial recall. 


Pit the Qfi.C. Wr&st/iny Match . 
Fjah* J e ts the, 'Fait 


Two Hundred Sixty-nine 



























MARCH 

1. Prcxy again takes the reins at Chapel. Daggy talks on 
oratory. 

2. Beta Alphas get promoted to national standing. Chartered 
to Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

4. It’s all up with judicial recall. Chambers has had his say. 

5. A real booster club, the Crimson Circle, comes into exist¬ 
ence. 

6. An oak swatter is ordered. Freshmen refusing to wear the 
official green will be given a warm entertainment. 

8. Paullo Gruppe, the noted cellist, entertains a large crowd. 

9. Glee Club holds a big banquet in Van Doren Hall. All 
the musicians eat and make merry. 

10. Mark Twain C. bids fair to become a fusser. 

12. President Bryan talks of European war in Chapel. 

13. Vice President Waller gives his "Keep Off the Grass" lecture. 

14. Students’ Assembly meeting. We decide to give a Campus Day. 

15. Matsen wins all the prizes in the oratorical contest. The Freshmen have a party. 

16. Stock judging team leaves for Portland. Juniors entertain College students at the annual 

1 illicum. 

18. The Irish and the Freshies celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. 

20. Bohler and Oslhoff get their star performers ready for the "Gym*’ show. 

21. Montaville Flowers, the Lyceum actor, interprets Hamlet. 

22. Pretty girls, daring acrobats, muscular physical culture specimens—all at the Physical Cul¬ 

ture show. 

23. "Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary," pleases 
a large audience. 

25. Baseball and track men get out for 
regular work on the field. 

26. Profs begin to buy tennis racquets and 
white trousers. A sure sign of spring. 

27. Prof. Waller announces that his term 
as acting President will be over with 
the last of the month. 

28. Several Freshies appear without the 
green and are dusted. 

29. Typewriting expert performs in Chapel 
31. Enter 1914 Chinook. 






Two Hundred Seventy 


































































Sherman, K^ay & Go. 



T i 


In the purchase of a piano, sever¬ 
al factors together determine the 
question of future satisfaction. 


The standing and reputation of 
the piano selected and the standing 
and reputation of the firm from whom 
you purchase are of vital importance. 


Sherman Clay & Co. have been the leading piano house of 
the Pacific States for nearly half a century during which time they 


have offered only such makes of pianos as had been proved of de¬ 
pendable quality—and always at the lowest price consistent with 


quality. In every case, the purchaser’s permanent satisfaction has 
been the aim, and the success of such a plan is proved by the 
magnitude of our present business. Correspondence and investi¬ 
gation solicited. 

Steinway, A. B. Chase, Mehlin, Estey, Ludwig, Emerson, 
Kurtzmann, Kingsbury, Wellington and other Pianos. Player 
Pianos and Victor Talking Machines. 


^ ^ ^ 


Sherman, lay& Go. 



810 SPRAGUE AFE. 


SPOKANE , WASH 


f 



Two Hundred Seventy-two 



















ACTIVITIES 


EDUCATIONAL: 

Trade Courses 
Commercial Courses 
College Preparatory 
Courses 
RELIGIOUS: 

Bible Study 
Shop Meetings 
Sunday P. M. Meetings 
PHYSICAL: 

Swimming 

Gymnasium 


Tennis 
Basket Ball 
Base Ball 

BOYS’: 

Clubs, Hikes, Gymnasium, 
Camps 

EMPLOYMENT: 

Situations secured 
Help investigated 


SOCIAL: 

Entertainments 
Y. M. C. A. Senate 
Student Literary Societies 

LITTLE INN: (Cafeteria) 
Appetizing 

DORMITORIES: 

Good Beds 


W u 4* t , 


I 


Two Hundred Seventy-lhree 



































-COMPLEMENTS OF THE- 


STAR CLOTHING CO. 

200-202 Yakima Ave. 

NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 


DO NOT KNOCK 


All the world knocks a knocker. This increases the din of the 
anvil chorus. Don’t even knock a knocker; don’t listen to him. 
Where there is no ear, there no sound is. The knocker will not 
knock long where no appreciation is shown. 

Knock not, lest ye be knocked. We can find something to knock 
in everyone, and everyone can find something to knock in us. Be 
charitable to others and you will show the truest character towards 
yourself. Knocking is the sign of envy. The knocker envies his 
stronger brother, so he takes out his little hammer and futilely, but 
none the less irritatingly, taps him. 

Knocking is a bad habit. Break it. Don’t lose your friends be¬ 
cause you have the knocking habit. Don’t lose your individuality 
by joining the hopeless, dyspeptic ranks of self-confessed failures, 
the chronic knockers. —Adopted 





„ ____ 




Two Huudred Seventy-four 


























It’s a Pleasure to Feel, 


when you meet people that there’s nothing the matter 
with the way your clothes fit; that the STYLE IS 
RIGHT; and you have the latest patterns. We make 
a specialty in Young Men’s and Men who care for 
their dress. 

Our stock is always filled with the BEST and 
NEWEST. 

n u ' *^-n n 

V. W. CLARKSON 

PULLMAN, WASH. 

> W ■ , 4 4 * 


t 


Two Hundred Seventy-five 

























••••••• 

V 


Maxwell 1 100 North End Division Street Bridge No. 0702 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

. W a 44* , 


Cemetery Work 

Barre, Quincy, Scotch, Montello and all the Best Grades of 
American and Foreign Granite, Also Vermont, 
Georgia and Italian Marbles 


WRITE FOR SOUVENIR CATALOGUE 


Sammis Monumental Company 


DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS OF 


Monuments, Mausoleums and Qeneral 


Two Hundred Seventy-six 


































You Can Rely 



on a 



BUGGY 


At some time or other the 
strength of nearly every 
pleasure vehicle is put to 
the test. 


At such a time even the life of yourself or one of your 


family may depend on the quality and strength of the material 
in your vehicle. 


If it’s a Studebaker you can depend on it 

No weak spots in a Studcbaker. It’s an honest vehicle 


clear through 


Hardware, Farm Implements. Stoddard Dayton 
Maxwell Line of Autos. 

I handle a complete line of Farm Implements, 
Tools, Cutting Machinery, Threshing Machinery, 
Gasoline Engines, Lighting Plants, the Pittsburg Elec¬ 
tric Weld Hog Fencing, De Laval Cream Separators. 

—Harvester Repairs of All Kinds.— 

When in Pullman Give Us a Call 


T. C. MARTIN, Prop. 


933 Grand St 


Telephone 11 



i 


Two Hundred Seventy-seven 

























Estimates Furnished on all Kinds The Oldest and Largest House 

of Electrical Work in Eastern Washington 


Tfie Doerr-Mitchell Electric <o. 

JOBBERS 

Electrical and Gas Supplies 

MAKERS 

Telephones, (Randeliers, Jtfotors, Batteries, Etc. 


118-120 Lincoln Street Telephone Main 1088 

Opposite New Post Office SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 


Pullman Stationery and Drug Co. 



« • • 


WE CARRY... 


A Complete Line of Drugs, College 
Goods, Pennants, Pins and Eastman 
Kodak Supplies. :: :: :: :: 


...WE SOLICIT... 

Your Patronage When You Want 
Anything in Our Line. :: :: 



...WE ARE.. 



THE COLLEGE STORE 


I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


Two Hundred Seveniy-eight 


I 































-L. M. VARNEY- 

MAKES SHIRTS AND LADIES’ 
SHIRT WAISTS 


Baseball Uniforms and College Pennants 

S. 208 HOWARD STREET 


PHONE MAIN 1710 SPOKANE WASHINGTON 



Coulter Cooke Williams Ritter Love Harter 

Sophomore "W yttzn 

■ ■ i 4*+ . 


Two Huncred Seveniy-nine 






























q)ULLMAN3 

U/opular, 

JHOTOGRAPHER 

r\ 

THE AMMO (STUDIO 


0 

ROBERT BURNS 

Pullman’s Leading Photographer 

College Post Cards a Specialty 

? - 

1 

n 

.i44» , 


Two Hundred Eighty 




















w. s. c. 

Souvenirs, Pennants, Posters and College 

Jewelery. 

WATT’S 


PHARMACY 

- < 4M9 9 


College Text Books and Supplies. 
Alumni Pins. 


Prompt Attention to Mail Orders From 

Old Students. 

, W 1 1 44 * , 

Two Hundred Eifihiy-one 

















Dutton’s Ice Cream Parlors 


-HOME-MADE PRODUCTS- 


ConfectionerieSy Ices , Cold and Hot Drinks 

The Place Where You Always 
Get the Best. Bring Your Friends 


ALWAYS OPEN > 




C. R. DUTTON 

PULLMAN, WASH. 


Hotel St. Nicholas 

An Elegant, Strictly Modern 
High-Class Hotel in 
the Heart of the City 


The Finest Turkish Bath 
West of Chicago 

Including a 30x35-foot Plunge 

Also 

LADIES DEPARTMENT 
recently enlarged, in connection 

Ladies can now be received any time 

Corner First Avenue and Stevens Street 
SPOKANE, WASH. 

A. G. BENSON, Manager 


HOTEL 

VICTORIA 


When in Spokane, Stop 
at the Victoria. 
You Will Be Pleased. 


MODERN THROUGHOUT 
CENTRALLY LOCATED 




Two Hundred Eighty-Two 


































GEO. DONALD, Pres. L. L. THORP. Vice-Pres. 


YAKIMA NATIONAL BANK 

NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 



STUDENTS 

C/There is a warm welcome and 
a pleasant reception awaiting 
you at our Bank. : : : : : 

CWe are always ready to ex¬ 
tend every personal and friend¬ 
ly service within our power. 

«U f you are not do.ng your 
BANKING with us : : : : 


CAPITAL AND SURPLUS *250.000 
THE YOUNG BUSINESS MAN 


Who successfully demonstrates ability to success¬ 
fully conduct a small business, receives special 
attention at THE YAKIMA NATIONAL BANK 


F. BARTHOLET. Cashier G. E. STACY, Asst. Cash. 


RESOLVE NOW TO DO SO. 

The First National Bank 

Pullman, Wash. 

Home of the Palouse Dollar 




Two Hundred Eighty-Three 



































U/firrb j>at?- Pat's WATT! 


PullmanElectricSupplyCo* 

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 

New Westinghouse Drawn Wire 
Globes 

113 Main Street. - PULLMAN, WASH. 

W. F. M. Ricketts 6 Son 


WATCHMAKERS 
AND JEWELERS 


Pullman Steam Laundry 


J. N. SCOTT, Prop. 


Phone 145-R 


1013 Grand St. 


Pullman. Wash. 


DON’T LOOK 

for a Barber Shop 

But go to the ACME for first- 
class work. 

C. L. JAIN, Prop. 

Club Barber Shop 

HARRY AUSTIN, Proprietor 


The Largest and Best Equipped 
Shop in the City. 


Pullman. 


Washington 


PALACE MARKET 

P. S. 6 C., Proprietors 

Dealers in 

Fresh and Cured Meats 

Retail and Wholesale 


SHIP LIVE STOCK 

Pullman, Wash. 


124 Main Street, 


Pullman, Wash. 



/ hr Zmh C/vA cr»l*rU«n« 5nyJ».. 


. W ., 44* , 


Two Hundred Eighty-four 
































TheTribune 

We do 


..Printing.. 



All kinds of 

...JOB WORK... 

PULLMAN, WASH. 



Builders of 

SERVICABLE 

TRUNKS 

Store: Cor. Sprague & Washington 



POOL AND BILLIARDS AT THE 

Brunswick Parlors 

Celebrated K. P. and Derby Cigars 

Large Assortment of Other Brands 
PIPES REPAIRED 

ICE CREAM wholesale and 

______ RETAIL 

CANDIES AND SOFT DRINKS 
A. J. Hochradel, Prop. Phone 57 


Phone No. 5 

Star Livery 

B. C. BAIRD, Prop. 


Best of Turn-Outs and Saddle Horses. 


•Mu W u 4 *i . 




Two Hundred Eighty-five 



























D. & M. 

Sporting 

Goods 


...Always Give Satisfaction- 

Special Prices to All Clubs and 
Schools 

Write for Catalogue 

McGowan Bros. 
Hardware Company 

Howard and Railroad 
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 



//jrA AtTfei f' 


Chemicals, Assay and 
Laboratory Supplies 


The C. M. FASSETT CO., Inc. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

r- n a 444 , 


Two Hundred Eighty-Six 


I 
































Macey 
Sectional 
Book Cases 




Davenports 


Tull & Gibbs, inc. 

First Ave. and Wall St. 

Sjokane^s Greatest Housefurnishmg Store 


Let us help you to furnish your 
home economically and attractively 

Complete Office Liberal Dignified 

Furnishers Credit 


, . W — 1 4 ^4+ i 


Two Hundred Eighty-seven 

























































































































1 


JONES &, DILLINGHAM 

-MANUFACTURERS OF- 

If, n PAINTS, STAINS 
J YJ AND ENAMELS 

ASK TO SEE SAMPLE TINTS OF 


J&,D DULLTONE 



THE IDEAL FLAT WALL FINISH 

ECONOMICAL 

DURABLE 

PLEASING EFFECTS 

WRITE US FOR FULL INFORMATION 

WASHABLE 

SPOKANE 


LEWISTON 


You can always find 

GEO. EWING 

LEE ALLEN 

The Transfer Man 

Careful Work Satisfied Customers 

PULLMAN, WASH. 

Office Phone 30 Residence Phone 1594 


I. H. WALLER 

TRANSFER 

Hardware, Crockery, Oils, 

“The Best of Service.” 

Students, Let Me Handle Your Baggage. 

Paints and Glass 

PULLMAN, WASH. 

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON 


, n —, 

Two Hundred Eighty-eighi 


I 


I 


I 























- Rp.ftp.r Fruit = 

The handsomest fruit growers’ paper published 
in the world, and the best. No fruit grower 
can afford to be without it. Each month is 
devoted to some principal feature of fruit grow¬ 
ing. Send for sample copy. *r nr < 

Subscription Price $1.00 per Year 


E. H. SHEPARD, Editor and Publisher 

HOOD RIVER, OREGON 


V. T. McCROSKEY 

PROPRIETOR 
OK THE 


VICTOR TALKING MACHINES 
Magazines. Phone 51 

COLFAX, WASH. 

i W 1 




Two Hundred Eighty-nine 





































WHY NOT EARN MORE? 


If you are not satisfied with 
your earning power, let 


3Mair 

business (College 


Train you to earn more. A course in Bookkeeping, 
Shorthand, Penmanship, Etc., will quickly pay for 
itself in increased earning power. 

Why not investigate now? 


• Call at School Office and talk it over, or 
send for our free illustrated catalog. 

H. C. BLAIR, “Principal 

FIRST AVENUE AND MADISON STREET 

SPOKANE 

Telephone: Bell, Main 405; Home, A9405 




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Two Hundred Nimty 


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SUPERIOR QUALITY 
UNIFORMS 





Are Better Than the 
Government Standard 


They excel in materials and the 
workmanship is perfect. 


Our military equipments are of 
highest quality. 


We are makers of College Pen¬ 
nants, Class Pins, Caps and Gowns. 


Send for the Catalog you wish. 


The Henderson-Ames 
Company 

KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN 
North Pacific Branch, 

409 Marion Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 
George R. Merrifield, Manager 


♦***-*- W 11 44* 




Two Hundred Nineiy-one 



























Theatrical Costumers 

WIG MAKERS 

FRENCH HAIRDRESSERS 

Masquerade and Theatre Costumes 
Shipped Out on Rental Anywhere 

Goods Made to Order 
Sold or Rented 



MILLER-DERVANT 

124 N Post Street 

Between Riverside and Main Avenue 

CATALOGUE FREE ON APPLICATION 


COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, New York 

MAKERS OK 

Caps and Gowns 

To the American Colleges from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific. 
Cla^s Contracts a Specialty. 

Bulletin, samples, etc., will 
be forwarded by mail, or may 
be seen at 

THE STUDENTS’ STORE 
...SEE... 

Love Love 

For a complete course in 
Art of “Love Making”. 
Practical lessons given to 
ladies. :::::: 
-Office at the— 

LANTUAMA HOUSE 





Mitchem Bros. 
Packing Co. 


We buy fat hogs raised 
in the Inland Empire 
from which we manu¬ 
facture the well known 

Apex Brand 

Ham, Bacon and Lard 

PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 


“Be£t Cup of Coffee on Earth” 

OAKES 

CAFE 



512-514 Sprague Ave. 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

MAIN 1H74 —TELEPHONES- A i«55 




Two Hundred Ninety-two 



































POPULAR FAVORITE 





Two Hundred Ninely-lhree 



























LIPPITT BROS. 

Department Store 

COLFAX, WASH. 


Largest Assortment of 
Ladies’ and Misses’ 

Suits, Coats and Dresses 


SEND US YOUR ORDERS 


THE 


Uf>! 


Gid daps” 

Organized Feb. 6, 1912. 

Charter Members 


Lilian MacLeod 

Mildred Guile 

Ruth Mclnnis 

Ruth Turner 

Pledges 

Grace Coulter Viola Vestal 

Patroness 
Lora Green 


, »tUn W 


RINGS 

DIAMONDS-EMERALDS - RUBIES 

=WE FURNISH^- 

Special Designs 

—FOR— 

Class & Fraternity Pins 

» ' ■ ~ €i 

E. J. Hyde Jewelry Co. 

609 Sprague Ave. Spokane 


Two Hundred Ninety ft ur 
































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UNDERTAKING 

High Class Furniture 

Rugs, Linoleum 

Picture Framing a Specialty 

The Midway House 

JOHN LYON, PROP. 

Save time by eating at “The Mid¬ 
way'’. A full line of Groceries, 
Cigars and Confectionery. 

501 MAIDEN LANE. PULLMAN, WASH. 




(\ _ * 0 _E _£^k 

fl P <5».Vfx W« </«,y«r« St-A 

Palace Hotel 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Rates $2.50 and 83.00 

A. H. Dawson, Proprietor 

A Brick Building, with all Modern 
Improvements 

Corner Olsen and Grand Streets 

PULLMAN —WASH. 

^OME and see me, Boys! Maybe I 
can do you some good. I am in 
the Insurance, Investment and Bill 
Posting business. 

M. J. Chapman 

Room 15, First Nat’l Bank Bldg. 




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Two Hundred Ninely-five 



































The Standard Railway of the Northwest 
has frequent trains from and through its 
chief cities to Minneapolis, St. Paul, 
Milwaukee, Chicago, Kansas City, 
St. Louis. Immediate connections to 
Duluth, Superior, Winnipeg and all 
points East and South. 


Service that Sets the Pace. 
Let us ticket YOU. 


WM. LAIRD, Agent, Pullman, Wash. 

W. J. JORDAN, General Agent, Lewiston, Idaho 



Q 


Annual Rose Festival. Portland. June 10-15, 1912 
Montamara Festo. Tacoma. June 30-July 4. 1912 
Grand Lodge, Order of Elks, Portland. July 9-13. 1912 
Golden Potlatch Carnival. Seattle. July 15-20, 1912 
Yellowstone National Park, Season June 15-Sept. 15, 1912 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco, 1915 


a 


Northern Pacific 


Original, Direct and Only Line to Gardiner Gateway, Official Yellowstone Park Entrance 


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Two Hundied Ninety-six 


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THE STAR ★ THEATRE 

MILLER & EMMICK, Prop rietors 


Moving Pictures and Illustrated 

...Songs... 

Complete Change of Program , Monday , 

IVednesday , Friday and Saturday . 

Doors Open at 7:00 P. M. One Complete Show After 9:15 P. M. 
Continuous Performance—Saturday Matinee Ladies and Children fc 


...COMPLIMENTS OF... 


CRANE CO. 


SPOKANE WASH. 


Two Hundred Ninely-seven 



















[satisfaction guaranteed 


City Transfer and Storage Co. 

E. C. TURN BOW, Proprietor 



Day and Night Service. Quick Delivery 


Business Telephone 52 

PULLMAN, WASH. 

A Large Stock of 

Pianos 

City Shoe Store 

Late£f Styles, La£fs and Leath¬ 
ers. €f| Red Cross Shoes for 
Women. Barry Shoes for 
Men. ^ Quick Repair Shop. 

fVindus and Ellsworth 

Carried in Connection 
with our 

Furniture Stock 

J. W. WEST 

New and Second Hand Goods 
Bought and Sold 

Waters 

The Queen Restaurant 

Good Meals and Quick Service 

PULLMAN, WASH. 

Furniture and Piano Store 





Two Hundred Ninety-eight 
























The Most Practical Institution of Learning 
in the Pacific Northwest 

The State College 

of Washington 

PULLMAN, WASH. 

m 


ENOCH A. BRYAN, LL.D. 

President 



Full four-year courses, leading to the bachelor’s degree, given in the following 
departments of study: 

Mathematics, Civil Engineering, Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Agriculture, Hor¬ 
ticulture, English Language and Literature, Economic Science and History, Mechan¬ 
ical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mining Engineering, Modern Languages, 
Geology, Home Economics, Pharmacy, Veterinary Science, Education, Music, For¬ 
estry, General, and Architecture. 

The following short-course schools are also maintained: 

Department of Elementary Science (3 years), teaching Domestic Economy, 
Agriculture, Manual Training and High School Work; Pharmacy (2 years); Veter¬ 
inary Science (three years); Assaying (10 weeks); Artisans (one year); Forestry 
(one year); Dairying (one year); Winter School for Farmers (six weeks), teaching 
Fruit Growing, Soil Management, Crop Production, Dairying, Stock Judging, For¬ 
estry and Household Management. 

Faculty of I 30 Officers and Instructors 
Well Equipped Laboratories, Library and Museums. 

Splendid Gymnasium 

Tuition free. Expenses very moderate. Healthful surroundings. 

A postal card addressed to the Registrar will bring you full information by 
return mail. 

, H —, I 


Two Hundred-Ninely-nine 




















Pullman Hospital 


D. R. Campbell, M. D. 


RESIDENCE 

Corner Star Route and Montgomery 

OFFICE 

Flat Iron Building 
Pullman, - Washington 


Strictly Modern 
Fully Equipped 

Graduate Nurses Only Employed 
No Contageous Cases 


Eliphalet T. Patee, M. D. 


PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 



SUCCESSOR TO C. H. RUSSELL, M. D. 

Pullman Washington 


OFFICE AT RESIDENCE 

White’s Drug Store 1200 Maiden Lane 


Dr. L. G. Kimzey 

PULLMAN', WASH. 


Residence Phone 133L Office Phone 126 


E. W. McCann 

The Grocery Mai 
(Successor to Dredge’s Grocery ) 

Phone us your order* and see how 
speedily your goods will come. 


Fresh Vegetables, Fruit and 
Highest Quality Gro¬ 
ceries Obtainable 


Quick Delivery, Courteous Treatment 
Best Groceries. Phones 15-16 


Women’s Tailored Suits 

Street and Evening Costumes 


QUEEN QUALITY SHOES 
FOR WOMEN 

CROSSETTE SHOES 
FOR MEN 

MEN S SWELL HABERDASHERY 

Star Hats. Headquarters for 
W. S. C Robes 

WOODIN’S 

Prices Everla&ingly the Lowest 
Always Something Doing 

PULLMAN WASHINGTON 


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Three Hundred 





























Pullman Mill Co. 

Pullman, Wash. 

xManufacturers and Jobbers of 

Flour - Mill Feed - Cereals - and - Chop 




Our W. S. C. Brand is a Specially 
High Grade Flour 


62- 


-Telephone- 


-62 



- Denap sy takes S'irsn^h ~Tes t 
ro ng est /^<xn m C.c\]e^. 


Pullman Shoeing Shop 

J. H. MOORE, Prop. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 


Opposite Palace Livery Barn 


F. J. BORTELL 

PracticaFHorseshoer 

1011 Grand St. Pullman, Wash. 




Three Hundred One 





























Everybody 
Loves a 


JVinner 


Year after year, as steadily 
as clockwork, the 


UNDERWOOD 


Typewriter 


demonstrates its superiority in speed and reliability by winning every typewriting contest in 
every class at the Annual Business Show, Madison Square Garden, New York City. 


1911 RECORDS 


WORLD S PROFESSIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP (One Hour) 

1st —UNDERWOOD H. 0. Blaisdell 112 words per minute 

2nd—UNDERWOOD Florence E Wilson 111 

3rd—UNDERWOOD Rose L. Fritz 107 

4th—UNDERWOOD E. A. Trefzger 107 

5th—UNDERWOOD ./. L. Hoyt 106 

WORLD S AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP (Thirty Minutes) 

1st —UNDERWOOD Ous F. Trefzger 98 words per minute 

2nd—UNDERWOOD Margaret B. Ckcen 98 

3rd—UNDERWOOD Bessie Friedman 90 “ “ “ 

4th—UNDERWOOD Lottie E. Betts 83 

WORLD S SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIP (Fifteen Minutes) 

1st—UNDERWOOD William F. Oswald 77 words per minute 

WORLD’S EDISON TRANSCRIBING CONTEST (Ten Minutes) 

1st—UNDERWOOD Lottie E. Betts 63 words per minute 


NOTE—Above records are net. Five words were deducted for each and every error. 


Tile Official Record of the UNDERWOOD for one hour’s work is26 words per minute greater than the best 
official record of any other competing machine. 

Eve r y UNDERWOOD u ed in above Championship Contests is a STOCK machine, an exact duplicate of 
which can be purchased in every large city in the world. 


“The Machine You Wilt Eventually Buy" 


Underwood Typewriter Company, Inc. 


3 . 


Three Hundred Two 















April 2, 1912. 

We the undersigned do hereby wor- 
shipfully petition the Board of Regents 
and the T)ean of Women to eut down 
the number of lights on the campus. 
This in behalf of the enraptured souls, 
who responsive to that “quickening 
impulse” which comes ever with the 
breath of spring, are wont to inhabit 
the campus in pairs. Tt is no more 
than right that we should be shielded 
by night’s dark curtain from the rude 
gaze of the unsympathetic rabble. 

Signed—Fussers’ Club. 

Jumbo Hunter, Pres. 

J. L. Philips, Sec. 

Joseph E. Harter, Ass’t Sec. 


April 9, 1912. 

We, the undersigned, with grave 
anxiety and deep conviction in the jus¬ 
tice of our stand, do hereby beg you, 
George Grimes and President Brvan, 
to graciously hear our petition. 

We want more lights on the campus, 
in order that those innocent, tho mis¬ 
guided souls, who blindly traverse its 
walks in a consuming atmosphere of 
love, may be delivered out of the dark¬ 
ness. 

Signed—Anti-Cupid Club. 

E. T. Love, Pres. 

Bill Mitchell, Sec. 

Geo. E. Harter, Ass’t Sec. 



No Matter How Often You Come, You’ll Always 
Find Something New Here 

and remember, that under no circumstances do we sacrifice quality 
in order to quote a lower price. 


Hills Bros’. Coffee and Tea 
Heinz Pickles 
Burrett’s Extracts 
Educator Crackers 


Preferred Stock Can Goods 
Cresca Dainties 
U. S. Inspected Meats 
Premium Ham and Bacon 


Sanders Grocery & Market 

PHONE 39 

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON 

W ii 4*» 


Three Hundred Three 





































Seasonable Up-to-date 

Goods 

Always at Your Own Prices 


Dry Goods 

Notions, Fancy Silks, Up-to-Date Neckwear, Hosiery, Linens, Knit 
and Muslin Underwear. 

Notions 

Ladies Tailored Suits 

Consisting of the Very Best Material and Styles in Season 
Skirts in the Latest Weaves and Fashion 

Ladies Dress Shoes 

The Famous Utz & Dunn Shoes and Slippers. Our specialty is U Fit 

the Foot Correctly 

Mens Furnishings 

Suits, Hats, Caps, Gloves, Ties, Sox, Valises, 

Trunks, Belts, Underwear 
M. Barn & Co., Tailors, Chicago 
Made to Order Clothes Artistically Fitted. Have a Fit 

Grocers 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 
Prompt Delivery Service 
Phone 13 


Whitman Wagner Dept. Store 

Pullman, Wash. 


Three Hundied Four 


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THE HERALD PRINTERY 



ANYTHING THAT’S PRINTED 

COLLEGE AND SOCIETY WORK A SPECIALTY 


Programs, Pamphlets, Posters, Menu Cards, Dance Programs, Calling 

Cards, Society Stationery. 

Phone us and Our Representative will Call on You. 

PHONE 53 NEXT DOOR TO P. O. PULLMAN, WASH 



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Three Hundred Five 

























The... 




Burgan Emerson Co. 

PULLMAN'S BIG DEPARTMENT STORE 


Only Reliable Merchandise has a showing 
here. Every Department Complete with 
the best of its kind. 


THE MEN’S STORE 

Clothcraft Suits and Overcoats 
Iron-clad and Lasher Sox in Cotton, 
Wool and Silk 

Munsing and Cooper Underwear 

Silver Collars and Cuffs 

Noxall, Silver, Fairmont, and Lakeside 

Dress and Negligee Shirts 

Paris and Boston Garters 

Cohen & Goldman Fine Dress Pantaloons 

D. & P. Dress Gloves 

Sweaters, Umbrellas, Trunks, Bags, Suit 

Cases, Hats, Caps, Neckwear, Belts, 

Gowns, etc. 

Walkover Shoes 
Thompson Bros/ Shoes 


THE WOMEN’S STORE 

Redfern Tailor Suits 

Skirts, Coats and Dresses 

Royal Worcester Corsets 

Gossard Corsets 

Zion City Laces 

Colonial Draperies 

Puritan Undermuslins 

Derby Kid Gloves 

Iron-clad Hosiery 

Wayne Knit Hosiery 

Munsing Underwear 

Complete Millinery Department 

Carpets, Rugs, Linoleums 

Blankets, Pillows, Sheets and Pillow 

Cases, etc. 


THE QUALITY STORE 

i—tiii i-ffj iMi—i 


Three.Hundrcd Six 


















. W a 44 t . 






Three Hundred Seven 









































L. S. FERGUSON 
Plumber and Tinner 



COPYRIGHT 


General Shop Work. Repairing of All 
Kinds. Estimates Given. 


Office and Shop: 
Corner Paradise and Pine 


Phone No. 73 


Frank Forman, the Tailor 


Cleaning, Pressing, Repair¬ 
ing. First Class IVork 
Guaranteed 


500 MAIDEN LANE 
272 -PHONE-272 


P. C. I. Co. 

All Kinds Building Material 

COAL, WOOD PAINTS 


Pullman, 


Wash. 





3 . 


Three Hundred Eight 



































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*V/. ^'voJktxrn, V 

707 - 709-71 I Sprague Avenue, 708 - 710-712 First Avenue 



This 3A Folding Pocket Kodak 
$20.00 

Other Kodaks 
$5.00 to $100.00. 

Cameras $1.00 to $34.00. 


MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE 
PROMPT ATTENTION 


Send to Us for Everything You 
Need. 


The 

Principal 
Kodak 
Store in 
Spokane 


LI ERE every Eastman 
* Kodak and Premo 
Camera in the newest and 
most popular sizes is avail¬ 
able. 

This is the complete Kod¬ 
ak store for the amateur and 
the professional photograph¬ 
er. 

Developing and 
Printing Our 
Specialty 

We guarantee perfect work 
and prompt service at a 
moderate charge. 

Enlargements from your 
negatives; black or brown; 
prices, 5 x 7 inches at 25 c to 
16 x 20 inches for $2.00. 
Send us your Negatives. 


, 44 W 




Three Hundred Nine 























































MRS. H. DOUGLAS 


F. E. STOKES 


MILLINERY 

Art Needlework Materials 
Human Hair Goods 


B. & L. Cafe 

A. LLOYD, Prop. 

Everything that’s Good 
to Eat 


Transferring 

PULLMAN, WASH. 


White’s Drug Store 

Phone 126 


1 


OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 


Victor and Edison Phonographs 

THE BALDWIN WARRANTY 
With each Baldwin Piano—L'pright or Grand 
—is issued an absolute, unconditional warranty, 
covering both workmanship and material. Nor 
does time erase this warranty. Thus does the 
Baldwin protect posterity 

A. D. BAUM, Pullman, Wash. 


Hamilton’s 
Hardware 

Prompt Delivery in City 

PULLMAN ; WASH. 


J. C. RUTH E. W. McCANN 

Pullman Land Company 

Real Estate, Loans, and 
Insurance 

-*+K- 

NOTARY PUBLIC PULLMAN, WASH. 


W. M. CHAMBERS 

Wholesale Dealer in 
ALL KINDS OF GRAIN. HAY 
AND PRODUCE 


, H 11 44* . 


Three Hundred Ten 























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MGDRES 


NDN-LEAKABLE 


FOUNTAIN PEN n 


There are two things that you have 
a right to demand of a fountain pen — 

perfect work while in use and good behavior while not in use. 

Moore’s covers both of these to perfection. Not only does it write the 
instant you want it to but it keeps on writing freely and evenly as long as 
there is a drop of ink in the reservoir. 

When you are done with the pen a simple operation pulls the pen-point 
back into the barrel, the cap is screwed on and the ink reservoir becomes 
an air-tight chamber from which it is impossible for ink to escape. 

Moore’s is the original non-leakable fountain pen. Naturally che 
success of this pen has brought forth many imitations, and it Is this 
which prompts us to advise you to look carefully for the Moore imprint. 

For Sale at 

THE STUDENTS’ STORE 

H. S. GROAT, Ph. G., Pullman, Wash. 


The inscription 


Oregon City Woolen Mills 

on Indian Blankets is a 
guarantee of 

QUALITY 


“A Student’s Necessity.” Unsur¬ 
passed for room decoration. Just the 
thing for athletic events. Indispen¬ 
sable to “Fussers.” Elaborate lounging 
and bath robes made to order from Nav¬ 
ajo blankets of your selection. 


The Students’ Store 

PULLMAN, WASH. 



, 4lii *« i 


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Three Hundred Eleven 





































M. S. JAMAR 


Members 


International Order 
Spanish Athletes 


Attorney at Law 


Duke Merritt, Jumbo Hunter, Harry 
Raymond, Joe Philips. 

Throwers of the Bull 


Flat Iron Building, - Pullman. Wash. 


w.s.c. 



HEADQUARTERS 

Colfax, Wash. 


WHITEHOUSE 
CLOTHING CO. 

MATT JOHNSON, 

-PROP.- 


J. B SANBORN 

Harness 
and Saddlery 

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON 


B. F. CAMVFELL 

W. S. C. Student 1893—1897 
Dealer in Farm Implements and Vehicles 
ever since. 

1 carry a full line of the most modern and 
up-to-date Farm Implements and it is always 
a pleasure to give W. S. C. Students inform¬ 
ation in regard to these implements. W. S. 
C. Students always welcome at my place of 
business. 

817 East Main St. Pullman, Wash. 


Dr. A. A. Rounds 

DENTAL SURGEON 


Dr. E. A. Archer 

OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN 
First Nat. Bank Bldg. Pullman, Washington 



L. D. Baker 






Three Hundred Twelve 



































Phone 28 


128 Main St. 


Gen. Arthur 

Van Dyck 

Owls 


The three greatest sellers in the Pacific 
Northwest. They must have 
quality to be that. 

Distributed by M. A. Gunst & Co. 

--- =SoJd by - == 

Thorpe’s Smoke House 

Incorporated 


The place where everybody goes. Meet your old 
friends and get acquainted with new friends at 

THORPE’S 

i_H_i i4ii _ 


Three Hundred Thirteen 




















Mmkbn-MmiB Co. 


ENGRAVERS 



349-355 MINNESOTA ST. 

ffaul. fflimi. 


1 i-n ^ 4 # - 


Three Hundred Fourteen 


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When You Need Furnishings 


FOR THE HOME 
OFFICE, HOTEL 

CLUB OR CAFE 

You’ll Profit by Visiting One of the Great 

Stores of 

The Grote-Rankin Co. 

IN SPOKANE AND SEATTLE 

Where you will always find the largest varieties of 
dependable and thoroughly proved lines, at the 
lowest prices consistent with honest merchandising 
and on terms to suit your every requirement. 


SPOKANE AGENTS FOR 

The Great Majestic Ranges The Free Sewing Machines 

Gastav Stickley Craftsman Furniture The Daveno Davenport Beds 
The Howard Overdraft Heaters The Ostermoor Mattress 

The Hoosier Kitchen Cabinets Rixdorfer Inlaid Linoleum 

AND MANY OTHER EQUALLY WELL KNOWN LINES 


Three Hundred Fifteen 






















QuicK 

Print 

Producers of Quality 
Printing 

So. 110-12 Lincoln Spokane 


i nto* . 


Three Hundred Sixteen 


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