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Staff CoTlfgt 
°i Washington 
Library 

The 

CHINOOK 

1918 

44 - 

Volume XVIII 

44 


Published by 

Junior Class, State College of Washington 


SEATTLE: 

THE DAVIS-PEEK PRINTING CO. 
1917 




















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DEDICATED TO 
President Ernest O. Holland, 
whom we have boundless faith 
for the future welfare of 
our college 










TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Dedication „_-_ 4-5 

Campus Views _ 7-18 

Administration _ _ 19-20 

Departments _— - _ 21-60 

Seniors _ _ —- - 61-81 

Juniors _ 83-93 

Student Government-- _ _ 95-105 

Publications _ 106-112 

Athletics— 

Football ... _ 113-129 

Baseball__ _ 131-139 

Track - -. __- _ _ 141-152 

Basket-ball ____ _ .153-161 

Wrestling _ _ 62-163 

Tennis _ __ 164 

Campus Athletics _ 165-168 

Women’s Athletics _ 169-174 

Debate _„_— —_ 175-180 


Judging Teams_181-183 

Campus Day . . . 184 

Music _ .... _ 185-196 

Dramatics_ 197-202 

Society _ - - _ __ 203-206 

Military „ . __. 207-215 

In Memorlam_ „_ ~ _ _ 216 

Religious Organizations_ 217-225 

Men’s Fraternities _ 226-259 

Women's Fraternities_ .-260-282 

Honorary Fraternities. _ 283-304 

Clubs and Literary Societies _ 305-360 

The Year’s Review _361-365 

Cartoon __— *_* 366 

Elementary Science Dept._ 367-371 

Cartoon _ 373 

Funny Bones - - ^375-390 

Advertisements--391-414 





































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P age 7 















OFFER OF THE STATE COLLEGE OF 
WASHINGTON 


The State College of Washington has much to offer to the 
men and women, particularly to the youth of the State. Founded, 
as it is, to promote the “liberal and practical education of the in¬ 
dustrial classes” the institution is far more, however, than a 
school of industrial labor, affording mere mechanical efficiency. 
In the field of higher learning, it stands as a broad-gauge college 
—distinctive in purpose and achievement. Modern, progressive, 
thorough,—steeped in the dual tradition of individual and of 
social betterment, it is increasing its usefulness and service to 
the state and to the nation with every passing year. 

While not an industrial school in the narrow sense, the pri¬ 
mary purpose of Washington State College is to give to the world 
industrially efficient people. The college appreciates the honor 
and the dignity of labor. Its students are trained to deliver their 
quota of work. That work means more, however, than service 
as mere tools. It means movement and initiative in affairs com¬ 
plex and ever changing. It means not only suitability to the 
exactitudes of industry but leadership in industrial development. 
A bequest of the college is the opening of greater fields of service 
—the finding of new and bigger things,—the training with which 
to execute them. 

But the aims of Washington State do not stop here. It is 
not content that its graduates be but doers of big things. It 
would have them lead big lives. With this end in view, its 
ministrations are not for technical efficiency alone but for cul¬ 
ture as well. The state college offers the culture that makes for 
clean living, broad tolerant thinking, honest capable citizenship. 
It provides the means and the setting for the cultivation of life’s 
finer, fuller ways. It affords a field alike for each son and daugh¬ 
ter of the commonwealth. The spirit of genuine democracy facili¬ 
tates its ends. 

This, then, is the offer of the State College of Washington. 
Opportunity to the spirit rather than to the caste; training for 
the work of life; education for efficiency, for leadership in indus¬ 
try, for solid enlightened citizenship. The world will always 
welcome the finished product of such an institution. 


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ADMINISTRATION 












MECHANIC ARTS 


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COLLEGE HALL 


Page II 














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AUDITORIUM 



















VAN DOREN HALL 



MUSIC CONSERVATORY 


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STEVENS HALL 


FERRY HALL 


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SCIENCE HALL 








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WILSON HALL 























Board of Regents 

EDWIN TRUMAN COMAN.Spokane 

WILLIAM A. RITZ.Walla Walla 

R. C. McCROSKEY.Garfield 

WILLIAM M. PEASE.Seattle 

ADAM DUNCAN DUNN.Wapato 


Executive Officers of the 
College 

ERNEST O. HOLLAND.President 

OSMAR L. WALLER.Vice-President 

F. T. BARNARD. * Registrar 

W. C. KRUEGEL.Accountant 

RHODA M. WHITE.Dean of Women 


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COLLEGE FARM 













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 


INCLUDING THE DIVISIONS OF 


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY, DAIRY HUSBANDRY, POULTRY HUSBAN¬ 
DRY, SOILS, CROPS, AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
AND FARM MANAGEMENT. 


GEORGE SEVERANCE, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT. 


During the past fifteen years the Department of Agriculture has grown from an 
enrollment of four Collegiate students to three hundred, from one of the* smallest Collegi¬ 
ate Departments to the largest. The salaried staff has increased from two to twenty-two 
members. 

The department is now divided into seven distinct divisions; namely, Animal Hus¬ 
bandry, Dairy Husbandry. Soils, Crops, Agricultural Engineering, Poultry Husbandry, 
and Farm Management. Students now have an option between a general course in Agri¬ 
culture or specialized courses in Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, Soils, Crops and 
Poultry Husbandry. At present it is possible for a student choosing any one of the op¬ 
tions offered to elect all the work offered in Farm Management or Agricultural Engi¬ 
neering, hence, specialized courses are not yet offered in these two divisions. 

The equipment of the Department offers many advantages to the student seeking 
practical instruction. The work in Dairy Husbandry iis strengthened by the operation 
of a commercial creamery doing from $25,000 to $30,000 worth of business annually and 
by the mainteance of a large purebred dairy herd comi>osed of typical specimens of 
Jersey, Guernseys, Holstelns and Ayrshires. The majority of the cows are in the ad¬ 
vanced registry, some very high records having been made. The work of caring for 
the herd Is done entirely by students at present. 

The livestock equipment of the Division ot Animal Husbandry has improved great¬ 
ly in quality, particularly the sheep and horses. A number of first prizes. Champion¬ 
ships and Grand Championships, have been won at the leading Northwest Livestock 
Shows during the last two years in strong competition. An offer of $1000 was received 
for the Shorthorn herd bull while on the fair circuit last fall, which is an indication 
of the quality of stock kept. With the completion of the new stock judging pavilion be¬ 
tween the wings of Wilson Hall, the Animal Husbandry Division will be well equipped 
for instructional work. 

The Division of Agricultural Enginering is better equipped than ever with various 
types of engines both statioary and tractor, and a variety of farm machinery loaned by 
various companies. The loaned equipment at present is valued at many thousands of 
dollars and offers splendid opportunity for study along this line. 

The inauguration of the Ail-North West Egg Laying Contest at the College, with the 
erection of a 1200 hen plant and the entrance of 186 contestants with 1116 of the best 
fowls from the flocks, aids materially in placing W. S. C. In the front rank of colleges 
in the opportunities offered for specializing in Poultry Husbandry. Practically all the 
work at both the regular poultry plant and the contest plant is done by students, 
this being part of the apprentice plan of instruction. This division aims to give thor¬ 
ough, practical training in all details of poultry rasing to students who desire to spe¬ 
cialize iu that line. 

The Divisions of Soils, Crops and Farm Management are using the College Farm 
and Experiment Station and outlying farms more and more as a basis of instruction. 
These Divisions will he well equipped in their new laboratories in Wilson Hall. 


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An increasing number of Intercolegiate contests are giving valuable stimulus to 
the work in several lines. The following Intercollegiate agricultural contests were par¬ 
ticipated in by W. S. C. during the past year: 

1. Stock judging contests at the Cascade Live Stock Show, North Yakima, Wash. 

2. Stock judging contest at the Northwest Live Stock Show, Lewiston, Idaho. 

3. Stock judging contest at the Pacific International Live Stock Show, Portland, 
Oregon. 

4. Butter judging contest at the Northwest Dairy Products Show—for long course 
men. 

5. Same for short course men. 

6. Chese scoring contest at the Northwest Dairy Products Show. 

7. Poultry Judging Contest at the Panhandle Poultry Association, at Moscow, Ida. 

Other institutions competing in one or more of these contests were the University 
of Idaho, the Oregon Agricultural College and the University of California, The teams 
in most cases have consisted of five men. During the past three years our stock judg¬ 
ing teams have won first place four times, second place twice and third place once. In 
1915 our Butter Judging team won first place and held the highest average in Butter 
Judging contests. In 1916 the one year Dairy course team won first place and the Colle¬ 
giate team took second place, in similar contests. Advanced students who have made 
good judging records have acted as judges at a number of the local fairs during the 
past year. The O. W. R. & N. paid the expenses of a corn judging team of three men 
for scoring all except the prize winning entries at their annual corn show at Walla 
Walla last fall. 

Interest in the work of the Department is further stimulated by two clubs, the 
Saddle and Sirloin Club, primarily fostered by the Animal Husbandry students but open 
to any Agricultural students who may be elected to membership by the Club, and the 
Dairy Club. These Clubs hold regular meetings open to anyone who desires to attend. 
Whenever oportimlty arises, practical men who have achieved success in some phase 
of Agriculture are secured on the programs. 

One hundred and thirty graduates have received the degree of B. S. in Agriculture 
to date, over 60 per cent of whom have graduated during the past three years, over 27 
per cent graduating in June, 1916. Over 95 per cent of these graduates are engaged in 
some phase of instructional, experimental or practical agriculture. Almost without ex¬ 
ception the graduates are making a recognized success in their work and several of the 
earlier graduates are becoming recognized authorities in their respective lines. About 
one-third of the graduates are engaged in practical Agriculture. Of the balance, the 
greater majority are engaged in teaching High School Agriculture, in Cow Testing As¬ 
sociation work or in County Agricultural work. Several, however, are engaged in U. S. 
Government service and in college teaching and experimental work. Our graduates are 
located as far east as New Jersey and as far south as New Mexico. We believe that 
no agricultural school graduates men of whom a larger percentage make good. 

The Six Weeks’ Winter School, the One Year Dairy Course and the Two Weeks’ 
Gas Engine course are important features of the educational work of the Department. 
Over 230 students have been enrolled in these courses during the present school year. 
A number of men have gained sufficient inspiration from these short courses to enroll 
as regular students. The Short Course Club, meeting weekly during the Winter School 
session, has been an important factor in making the school a success. Last, but not 
least, the democratic spirit pervading all grades and classes of Agricultural students 
has contributed mucb toward the success of the Winter School Session. 

The Department of Agriculture is making a rapid growth and there are sufficient 
reasons why it should become one of the biggest Agricultural Departments in the coun¬ 
try. This result may be accomplished through the combined efforts of the students, the 
Alumni and the Faculty of the Department. 


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Page 26 






































ARCHITECTURE 


R. WEAVER, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT. 

The road to success by way of the Architectural courses is open primarily to three 
general types of students: To the individual who is artistic as well as practical and 
has an ambition to become an architectural designer. 2nd: To the man whose inclina¬ 
tion is for construction and structural engineering as related to buildings and whose aim 
is to become a structural designer. 3rd: To the student who is uncertain as to his 
greatest talent and inclination and who should work at both the structural and artistic 
studies until he "finds himself/* after which he may specialise along the lines of his 
choice. 

Following his college course the first type may work as a general architectural drafts¬ 
man, designer, perspective draftsman, superintendent or specification writer, and after 
a proper amount of practical experience this individual should be well qualified to prac¬ 
tice as an architect. 

The second type of student may find employment as a structural draftsman, in¬ 
spector, superintendent, specification writer and he may eventually establish himself 
as a structural designer and engineer, or as a contracting engineer. 

The third type may find himself strong in both the artistic and engineering divi¬ 
sions of the work in which case his accomplishments will be limited only by his ini¬ 
tiative and imagination. Should this third type find, however, this his greatest talents 
lie in a more limited field, he could then devote himself to specialization in the line of 
his choice. 

To students in other departments who desire Interesting electives either cultural 
or practical, the courses in Architecture offer valuable material. The interesting sub¬ 
ject of architectural history is offered, during three semesters and is taught with the 
aid of a stereopticon and over two thousand lantern slides of the masterpieces and sig¬ 
nificant examples of the world's architecture from early Egyptian down to the present 
day. A student may elect any semester’s work covering the periods in which he may 
be interested. 

There is a course In Architectural Composition In which the aim is to develop the 
appreciation of Architecture and of the related space arts. 

Historic ornament is another subject which is popular with those interested in 
decoration and those who desire a knowledge of the sources of historic ornament as 
well as instruction In the drawing and color work Involved. 

For either men or women, and regular or special students the course in Residence 
Design is most valuable. Every man or woman will some time build or remodel a 
home. The science of economical planning, the methods and materials of construction, 
exterior and interior design, efficiency and art in the home are all discussed and exer¬ 
cises are given in planning and decoration. 

Other courses which make suitable electives are Freehand Drawing from Archi¬ 
tectural casts, Water Color, Architectural perspective and modeling. 


Page 27 








Page 28 












DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 


I. D. CARDIFF, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

“Botany is urgently recommended as a harmless and interesting study for young 
ladies/' so states an introduction to an eighteenth century work on Botany, or rather, 
“A Study of Flowers.’' From early days down almost to the present time, such ideas 
as this have prevailed more or less with reference to the science of botany. Owing to 
the activity of the early systematic botanists and their methods of teaching, many people 
are apt to think of the science as a study of flowers. The science as we know' it today, 
however, is one of the most comprehensive and important fields of knowledge. It 
touches human life at many angles, and in an institution like the State College, becomes 
the fundamental science for the various lines of agricultural and horticultural work, as 
well as furnishing important contributions in the fields of pharmacy, home economics, 
and sanitary engineering. 

From a superficial study of flowers, this science has developed into an enormous, 
complex field of organized knowledge dealing with the application of the fundamental 
principles of physics and chemistry to living matter, and has become a science almost 
as exact in its details as the latter. The fundamental principles of sanitation and in¬ 
heritance have for the most part, been worked out in the botanical laboratory, as have 
many of the major problems dealing with the conservation and increase of the world’s 
food supply. 

The department at the State College is manned by a staff of ten botanists, and oc¬ 
cupies tw'enty-one rooms in Science Hall. Its laboratories are well equipped and its 
herbarium is the best in the West, There are offered thirty-three courses, including 
the fields of general Botany, Morphology, Physiology, Pathology, Bacteriology, Pharma¬ 
ceutical Botany, Food and Drug Testing, Seed Testing, Taxonomy and Ecology. In ad¬ 
dition to its teaching work, the department performs important services to the State by 
investigations in various lines and by the bacteriological testing of milk and other dairy 
products;: bacteriological testing of water; the examination of seeds, the identification 
of weds, etc., also the manufacture of cultures for legume inoculation. 


Page 29 













Department Of 




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CHEMISTRY 

C. C. TODD, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT. 

The Department of Chemistry offers instruction fundamental to the study of sev¬ 
eral other sciences and presents courses of study leading to the B. S. and M. S. degrees 
in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Many students elect chemistry for their re¬ 
quired science, realizing that it enables them to interpret many of the phenomena of 
life. Each semester of 1916-17 the department enrolled 550 students, fifty-two of whom 
are majoring in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. 

Thirty-seven degrees have been granted, three of which are masters. One graduate 
has taken his M. S. at Columbia and two have the Doctor’s degree, one from Harvard 
and one from the University of Chicago. 

Nearly all the graduates of the Department are at work in some branch of Chem¬ 
istry. Fifteen have found employment in some application of Chemistry to the indus¬ 
tries. Several are in government and State service, three are assayers. two are exper¬ 
iment station chemists, one is head chemist for a large condensed milk factory and sev¬ 
eral are in college work. Some of our graduates have gone to Alaska, India and Cuba. 
The demand for chemists in all lines is very good. The U, S. Government during the 
past year has given more than thirty examinations for chemists, at an average salary 
of $1,600 per year. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Certain lines of industry require the services of men trained in both engineering 
and chemistry. Graduates from the course in Chemical Engineering find employment as 
chemists and superintendents of sugar refineries, powder mills, milk condenseries, and 
other industries where chemical knowledge must be supplemented by familiarity with 
machinery and application of power. In the two years the course has been Ojfferd the 
enrollment has increased from twelve students to twenty-two. 


Page 31 







DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC SCIENCE AND 

HISTORY 

L. F. JACKSON, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

This department has first of all a service function for all students of the College, 
in whatever field they are majoring, in training them for life in twentieth century so¬ 
ciety. This service is becoming more important year by year as economic, political and 
social conditions become more complex. The man or woman who intends to be a leader 
in any field appreciates the need for an understanding of the basic laws of wealth¬ 
getting and wealth-using, of the principles of politics, of the development and organiza¬ 
tion of human society. This need the department aims to meet in its general courses 
in History, Economics, Government and Sociology. 

For its major students the department provides three lines of study. First , a gen¬ 
eral course in social training for students planning to enter one of the essentially so¬ 
cial professions—law, journalism, social service, politics, diplomacy, or the teaching 
of the social studies. Secondly, a special course for leaders in rural communities. A 
great deal of energy has been expended during the past few decades in the organization 
of our urban centers, and a study of their social problems. The next generation will 
call on the best effort and talent for the organization of the rural communities, and the 
betterment of their living conditions. A special training for this work, with basic 
courses in socialogy and economics and providing for wide election in agriculture, is 
offered to those who wish to enter this field. Thirdly, a course for men who wish a 
broad training for business. Many of the young men of the country are coming to 
realize that business is no longer a simple matter, or a local matter. If they are to 
succeed they must have organizing ability and a knowledge of economic laws and social 
forces. To give them this training the department offers a course of four years' study 
largely in general economics and applied business courses. 


Page 32 










THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

BRUCE McCULLY, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT. 

The main difference between a department of English and the other standard de¬ 
partments of a college consists in the very much greater stress laid upon the expression 
of ideas in language. In most other departments the controlling purpose of the work is 
attained when the student can think clearly and logically in the terms of the material 
with which the department is concerned. In the case of English there is the further 
end to be obtained that the student shall develop ability to express effectively in words 
the results of his thinking. This expression involves, if it be adequate, the expression 
of himself to others, a consideration that immensely affects the problem. The person 
who would excel in this field must know people, and he cannot know them too well. 
He should study them as history reveals them in the varied life of the past; he should 
know their visions and dreams, their experiences, their aspirations and their ideals as 
they have been preserved for us by the art of poets and dramatists. As for subject- 
matter of his study, he may truly say that nothing human is uninteresting to him. He 
is properly concerned with everything wherein men have given expression to their varied 
life. 

To study and understand the things that have been, or are now, valuable or sig¬ 
nificant or beautiful, to associate in this study with the greatest minds and spirits that 
the world has known, to strive for utterance by voice or pen of one's own thinking in 
the case under the stimulus and guidance of sympathetic instruction, this is the ideal of 
English training as the State College would have it realized. Some of this training is 
necessary if a man would live adequately at all. Much of it is desirable if one would 
be a leader among men. 

A person expects not only to live; he looks forward to making a living. As the 
world is organized today this means more and more a varied intercourse with other 
men. It becomes a matter of vital business significance that the youth in training shall 
acquire in his college days an ability to play his part in the game. For this no other 
kind of training can compare with the ideal of English training set forth above. English 
training is not mere confectionery; it is not merely a means for attaining a pleasant 
dilation of soul; it is quite as truly the efficient means for attaining the most substantial 
ends of the modern business man. 

On the side of literary enjoyment and appreciation there is much that might be 
said. There are words that will never grow old; the breath that uttered them has 
proved to thousands upon thousands of each successive generation to be in very truth 
the words of life. The unfolding of their mystery, the guidance of halting feet into the 
gateway of the treasure house of the world's great literature; this too is among the 
functions of an English department. 


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Page 34 













DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND CIVIL 

ENGINEERING 

0. L. WALLER, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

One of the first departments established at Washington State College was the De¬ 
partment of Mathematics and Civil Engineering, and from the very beginning it has 
been one of the foremost departments. The aim has always been to give that broad 
training that is essential to clear vision and, at the same time, to give the technical 
training that is necessary in the solution of present-day problems. 

The Great Teacher said, “By their fruits ye shall know them,” and measured by 
this standard, the Department has always ranked high. A look through the Northwest 
will show that graduates in Civil Enginering from Washington State College have been 
and are now foremost in practically every movement for the development of our re¬ 
sources, the extension of our irrigation systems, the building of our railways, the im¬ 
provement of our streets and highways, and the betterment of our cities. Not only have 
our graduates been promoters, urging on the Improvements, but they have also been 
doers of deeds, designing and superintending the actual works of improvement. 

It has been said, “He that would be greatest among you, let him be your servant," 
and truly the civil engineer has become the servant of all. As city engineers, as State 
highway engineers, as country engineers, as engineers with the United States Reclama¬ 
tion Service and the United States Geological Survey, and as engineers in private prac¬ 
tice, they have served the people of the great Northwest faithfully and well. They have 
given themselves heart and soul, might, mind, and strength, to the development of this 
great new country. 

If we take out of this Northwest, its deevloped waterpower. Its irrigation systems, 
its bridges spanning its mighty rivers, and its railways, all that ia left loses its value. 
We have been in the habit; of calling our mines, our timber, and our agricultural prod¬ 
ucts the valuable things. But their value is due to the work of the engineers in making 
them available to the great mass of the people. Hence, the really valuable things are 
the works of the engineers, the men who “dream dreams and see visions” and with 
faith in their dreams and visions have set themselves to work and made them realities. 

The poet has rightly described the engineer in these lines: 

They say to the mountains, “be ye removed"! 

They say to the lesser floods, “Run dry"! 

Under their rods are the rocks reproved— 

They are not afraid of that which is high. 

Then do the hill tops shake to the summit, 

Then is the bed of the deep laid bare, 

That the sons of Mary may overcome it, 

Pleasantly sleeping and unaware. 


Page 35 




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Page 36 


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MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT 

H. V. CARPENTER, HEAD OP DEPARTMENT 

This Department offers courses in Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, 
Hydro-Electrical Engineering, and Physics. The aim throughout these courses is to 
give the student a working knowledge of the principles that make the foundation for 
the design, construction and operation of all sorts and types of machines and devices 
which go to make up the equipment of the industrial world. This seems to be quite 
an aim, but an examination of the work of the graduates of the Department will show 
that the diversity of their employment justifies some such a definition of our work. 

The man who gets his engineering training in the school of hard knocks finds that 
while experience is a thorough teacher of details in each lesson, she never stops to tell 
him why things happen as they do, nor what may be expected under somewhat different 
circumstances. It is the “reason why" that stumps the practical man, and the under¬ 
standing of it that gives the engineer his value. 

Everybody understands that Electrical Engineering is hardly out of its teens and 
that new things are coming out every day to puzzle the student and to make the pro¬ 
fessor revise his notes, but few people see how completely the other older lines of Phy¬ 
sics and Mechanical Engineering have developed in the past decade. Old machines have 
been displaced, larger, faster, cheaper, or more economical ones have come into use. 
Entirely new processes may upset an industry and cut costs in half, or a new demand 
may create a new industry over night. All these call for more trained men who know 
why they do things and the cheapest way to do them. 

Mechanical and Electrical graduates of the State College will be found mixed up 
in some way with most of the industrial and engineering enterprises of the Northwest, 
besides a good number scattered further. These men have a way of holding their jobs 
and making better ones out of them and are gradually finding their way into positions 
of trust and responsibility where the College is proud of them and where their own 
hopes and ambitions are more than realized. 


Page 37 



Page 38 

























DEPARTMENT OF MINING ENGINEERING 

F. A. THOMPSON, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The Freshman class in Mining this year is the largest in the history of the de¬ 
partment. This is In part due to the stimulation of the mining industry, and in part 
is the reflection of the excellent work being done by the graduates of the department, 
practically all of whom are successfully engaged in the practice of their profession. 

The distribution of the mining alumni of the State College is remarkable when one 
considers the youth of the institution itself. One man, for example, is a mine superin¬ 
tendent in central Peru, another is in charge of exploration work in the Belgian Congo, 
a third is manager of mines in Alaska, and a fourth is metallurgist for the United 
States Custom Service in New York City. Nearer at hand in our own State we have 
a number of alumni who are consulting mining engineers and mine superintendents, 
and the same is true in Idaho, Montana and British Columbia. 

Few of the schools of mines are as fortunate in their situation as that of the State 
College. Within a radius of 250 miles from Pullman are numerous and diverse mining 
and metallurgical industries. In fact, it is doubtful if any similar area in the world 
can show a greater production in so many different mineral resources. Within this 250- 
mile circle are the following great operations: Anaconda and Butte are the greatest 
copper mines and smelters in the world. Here numerous State College men are em¬ 
ployed. In the Coeur d'Alene District, the greatest silver-lead producing area in the 
world, we have great mines, large milling plants and under construction one of the 
most modern lead smelters, and State College men are in evidence. To the north¬ 
ward, in Southern British Columbia, are great copper mines and copper smelters, 
the largest, in fact, in the British Empire, many of the largest operations here are being 
directed by sons of the State College, and so on in other points of importance in this 
great mineral field. 

The State College, not only through the men of its mining department, but from its 
engineering departments, its chemistry department, and other lines, is taking its part, 
through the service which those trained within its halls are rendering, in making avail¬ 
able for use the mineral resources of the Inland Empire and beyond. 


Page 39 










Page 40 












STATE EXPERIMENT STATION 

I. D. CARDIFF, DIRECTOR 

The State College has two great functions to perform—one, investigation; the other, 
education. The Experiment Station is that division of the institution which has charge 
of most of the investigational work. It is a part of the institution with which the stu¬ 
dent comes little in contact. It has no athletic teams, chapel exercises, commence¬ 
ments, or other spectacular performances with which to establish its renown and moral 
worth. Neither has It holidays nor vacations. In other words, it is always on the job— 
including nights and Sundays. Its chief heritage is work—large quantities of work, 
having to do with the physical development of one of the greatest States in the Union. 

Once upon a time the Experiment Station represented a third of the institution, at 
least in name, the former title being “The. Agricultural College, Experiment Station, 
and School of Science/’ Notwithstanding its more or less eclipse by other portions of 
the institution at present, it is nevertheless performing a very large and useful function, 
for it is upon the investigations of the Station that the teaching and extension depart¬ 
ments of the College are obliged to rely for their information and principles with ref¬ 
erence to Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary Science, etc. In other words, it is the 
fountain from which the education of the youth and the development of the physical 
resources of the State must derive support. 

The Washington Station has made notable contributions to scientific thought and 
to the agricultural development of the Northwest. The investigations upon the princi¬ 
ples of heredity, the formation of gluten, the moisture requirements of plants, the de¬ 
velopment and formation of the wheat kernel, the processing of fruits, etc., have been 
of the greatest value. 

Its hybrid wheats have greatly increased the quality and output of Washington 
wheats. Triplet, a new Station hybrid, grades Fife, yet outyields the standard Fife, 
Forty Fold, or Red Russian ten or fifteen buschels per acre, yet will bring from three 
to five cents per bushel more than the latter ivheat. The potential increase in food 
supply and wealth in this hybrid is of enormous importance as is also the contribu¬ 
tions made upon diseases and pests, such as wheat smut, codling moth, San Jose scale, 
apple scab, Rhizictonia, etc. The control of these is saving the State many millions 
annually. 

The w r ork of the Station is fundamental in character, far-reaching and permanent 
in effect. Once the facts and principles of science have been discovered, they become 
a permanent heritage of the race. 


Page 41 




DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC AND FINE ARTS 


HERBERT KIMBROUGH, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 


MUSIC 

This is one of the popular departments of the College. The frequent public ap¬ 
pearances of its factulty, students, and organizations add much to the enjoyment of 
College life. 

Among the musical organizations are the Orchestra, thirty-five members; the Band, 
forty members; the Chorus, eighty members; the Glee Club, eighteen members; the 
String Quartet and several smaller choral organizations. 

Many musical attractions are brought to the College, and some of the greatest 
artists and organizations have been heard in its auditorium. The annual Music Festi¬ 
val, given in May, is a feature of the College year. 


EXPRESSION AND DRAMATIC ART 

This work is exceedingly popular with students and many are enrolled in its courses. 
A number of plays are staged each year and all students have the opportunity of try¬ 
ing out for the various parts assigned. 


FINE ARTS 

A large number of students are enrolled in the work in Fine Arts, which includes 
Drawing, Design, Painting, Arts and Crafts, and History of Art. Famous art collec¬ 
tions are frequently brought to the College for exhibition. 



MUSIC STUDENTS. 


Page 42 






DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

S. SHEDD, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The department of Geology offers courses covering general Geology, Physiography, 
Mineralogy, Crystallography, Economic Geology, Ore Deposits, Petrography, Paleon¬ 
tology, Topographic and Field Geology, Geology of Soils, and Agricultural Geology. 
On the completion of four years’ work the degree of Bachelor of Science is granted. 

The courses offered in Geology are intended to fit persons for teaching the sub¬ 
ject in its different phases, for research work along special lines, for positions in State 
and national geological survey, or for work along the economic phases of the subject 

Geologists in large numbers are employed on the U. S. geological survey, State 
Geological Surveys and the Bureau of Mines. The work of these men consists in map¬ 
ping the geology and topography, and in studying and describing the various features 
of economic and scientific interest The number of men trained in Geology that are 
being used in the search for deposits of the useful minerals, coal, oil, gas, clay, and 
the metals gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, etc., is rapidly increasing. All large mining 
companies employ continually a number of trained geologists to examine new pros¬ 
pects, to help direct the development work of the mine and to solve the many geo¬ 
logical problems that are constantly arising. Many are employed by exploration com¬ 
panies and by railroads, while an increasing number are practicing as consulting geolo¬ 
gists and geological engineers. 

There are several private scientific organizations as well as government bureaus 
that maintain numerous lines of research in various phases of Geology. These pro¬ 
vide fair salaries and opportunity for distinction in scientific work. There is a wide 
field open to those who desire to become teachers, either in high schools, colleges or 
universities. In this line the summer vacations offer splendid opportunity for field work 
and research. 

The College is well equipped for teaching the different phases of Geology. 

For the work in MineTology the College has large mineral collections containing 
all of the common and most of the rare minerals, the collection as a whole being an 
especially valuable one for teaching purposes. 


Page 43 



Page 44 























DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


F. C. CHALFANT. HEAD OF DEPARTMENT. 

“Of the students who take up the study of foreign languages in our schools and 
colleges, not one in a hundred attains even a fair reading knowledge, and not one in a 
thousand ever learns to carry on a conversation in the foreign language/’ declares a 
noted linguist and university professor in a recent work on the study of language. A 
severe indictment of the American college and university system of modern language 
instruction! And yet he might well have added: “Not one student in ten thousand 
ever attains a correct, idiomatic pronunciation of a foreign tongue.” 

The Foreign Language Department of Washington State College, however, offers a 
type of instruction which forms a notable exception to the prevailing inefficiency of 
modern language instruction in America. 

Impatient with a system that teaches facts about the languages, but not the living 
tongues themselves; weary of the eternal treadmill of translation, this department dis¬ 
carded the time-worn methods of the typical college and university and established a 
system, the motto of which is: “Methods That Give Mastery”—not only a fluent reading 
knowledge of the foreign literature, but also the ready command of the spoken idiom. 

To attain this aim, instructors were secured who were not alone masters of the 
languages taught and imbued with the life and spirit of the foreign nations, but who 
w r ere also proficient in the padagogy of language teaching and could give their students 
power in the languages. 

Recognizing the deplorable lack of phonetic training in college and university lan¬ 
guage instruction, a language laboratory, equipped with the latest scientific appartus 
for the study of practical phonetics, was installed and opened to students and teach¬ 
ers of modern languages. In this laboratory the student masters the pronounciation 
of German, French and Spanish, even to their peculiar idiomatic accent and intonation. 
This system stands absolutely unique in university and college departments of foreiga 
languages in this country and affords a kind of training that cannot be secured else¬ 
where without the almost prohobitive cost and inconvenience of residence and study 
abroad. 

Finding few teachers in the Northwest proficient in the practical use of the mod¬ 
ern languages or trained in the technique of the direct method, the Department es¬ 
tablished a teachers’ training course in foreign languages, in order to equip young men 
and women to teach the language with an enthusiasm and efficiency that can come 
only from pedagogical training, intensive study and a practical command of the for¬ 
eign tongues. The marked success of the graduates of the Department and the rap¬ 
idly increasing demand for their services clearly demonstrates the efficiency of this 
training. 

Thus, the Department of Foreign Languages is offering a type or training widely 
different from that of the time-honored, but ineffective system still prevailing in the 
colleges and universities of this country. It is demonstrating beyond a doubt that Amer¬ 
ican students can attain a practical command of the foreign tongues and speak them 
with the accent of the native, without a costly trip to Europe or Latin America; it is 
bringing a new' life and enthusiasm into foreign language study; and it is equipping 
young men and women for efficient and lucrative service in one of the most attractive 
fields of liberal arts training. 


Page 45 





Page 46 














DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

F. G. MILLER, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The activities of the Department of Forestry comprise four main lines: 

1. Instructional work carried on at the College. Aside from the usual profes¬ 
sional courses, this phase of the work includes several courses designed for students 
in departments other than Forestry. Among such courses, General Forestry, our trees 
and how to know them, Wood Technology, Farm Forestry and Forest Grazing have 
proven the most popular. 

2. Extension work in forestry. In the past this work has consisted mainly in giv¬ 
ing addresses on forestry matters at various public gatherings; but now it is planned 
to offer through the extension department a series of correspondence courses. One such 
course, lumber and its uses, is already announced, and courses in our trees and how 
to know them, and farm forestry are in preparation. 

3. Experimental work. For many years the College has carried on experimental 
forest planting which has demanstrated conclusively that forest planting on the farms 
of Washington is both practicable and profitable. Plans are now under way which will 
considerably extend this experimental planting on the College farm, and two additional 
forest experiment stations have been established, one being located at Lind and the 
other at Waterville. These tw'o stations, with the one at Pullman, typify splendidly 
the various soil and climate conditions of Eastern Washington. The work planned at 
these stations includes trials of new species and silvicultural methods such as nursery 
practice, planting, spacing, mixtures, cultivation, thinning and pruning. 

Another project the Department of Forestry has under way is the preservative 
treatment of fence posts to prolong durability. This work is being carried on in co¬ 
operation with the experiment station and the Department of Agriculture. 

4. Cruise of the College timber lands. Of the original College land grant, com¬ 
prising 190,000 acres, 127,000 consists of timber lands, of which 100,000 acres, located 
mostly on the Pacific Slope, carry heavy stands of splendid virgin timber. In order 
to gain a better knowledge of the character and value of this timber, the president and 
board of regents authorized that it be recruised by the Department of Forestry. Al¬ 
though about half of this work has now been done, several sesasons will be required 
to finish it. Students of the department are employed in this work, and in this wav 
they not only earn a considerable part of their way through school, but acquire valu¬ 
able experience as well. It is the plan to put these lands under such management as 
will insure from them a continuous income. 


Page 47 









Economics 


Page 48 











HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 


AGNES H. CRAIG, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The department of Home Economics offers broad educational opportunity to the 
young women of the State who are interested in training themselves for practice in 
home making, for teaching home economics in the High Schools and higher institu¬ 
tions of the Northwest, and in many lines of professional or vocational work such as 
Institutional Management, Research, Specialists in Home Economics, Extension Work, 
Tea Room and Cafeteria Management, Dietitiens, Costume Designers, Craft Workers, 
etc. 

The graduates from this department, numbering over one hundred in ten years’ 
time, show an interesting record. About 98 per cent are following the profession for 
which they were trained; thirty-eight having married and the remainder being occupied 
as teachers chiefly in the larger accredited High Schools of Washington, and the 
Northwest. The popularity of the department can be best represented through its rec¬ 
ord of growth during the last four years which amounts to 125 per cent for major 
students and 248 per cent for the total enrollment in all College classes in Home Eco¬ 
nomics. One of the special advantages and attractions of the department is its Prac¬ 
tice House in which senior women have opportunity for actual practice under home 
conditions of the art of home management, the operation of the budget, household ac¬ 
counts, the planning and preparation of wholesome diet, ways and means of reducing 
the cost of living through right methods of buying and general control of expenditures. 

This year special attention has been given to regulating the cost of fuels in rela¬ 
tion to cooking. Tests have been made with coal ranges, electricity and oil. Some 
new features of the work for next year are courses in Experimental Cookery where 
new methods and standards in food preparation are developed, causes of our common 
failure in cookery, and comparative costs and quality of home-made and commercial 
food stuffs are studied. 

A course for Housekeepers is planned to consider ami practice problems of special 
interest to women already engaged in the management of homes. Special classes in 
the study of dietaries will be arranged for local housekeepers. In addition to the Col¬ 
legiate Courses, the department also offers winter school short courses for people with 
limited time for study; and in the Summer School, courses which offer many attrac¬ 
tions primarily for teachers. The young women of the department take an active and 
leading part in College activities. They are also identified with broader interests 
through the Ellen H. Richards Club, w r hieh is The Departmental Club, and which is 
federated with the Washington State Federation of Women’s Clubs and through the 
National Home Economics Honor Society of Omocron Nu of which Washington State 
College holds the only Chapter in the far West. 


Page 49 





Page 50 




































HORTICULTURE 

0. M. MORRIS, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The courses of study in this department are intended to give a thorough training 
in the science of Horticulture and prepare students for practical work. They are 
founded on the fundamental sciences, and for that reason the courses in Botany and 
Chemistry and the general courses required of all students for graduation are placed 
in the Freshman and Sophomore years. The work of the Junior and Senior years is 
devoted to advanced work in Horticulture and elective courses that will he of general 
educational value in the student’s selected future vocation. The schedule of the de¬ 
partment is arranged to give a well-rounded education, with special emphasis on one or 
more of the various branches of horticultural work. 

The completion of such a course prepares the student for practical work in horti¬ 
culture, teaching, or for research work. The demand for well trained men in any of 
these lines far exceeds the supply. 

The courses fall into four groups—Fruit Growing, Landscape Gardening, Floricul¬ 
ture, and Vegetable Gardening. The development of the fruit industry of the Northwest 
makes that branch of the work very popular. The rapid development of the country 
and the improvement of public and private property is calling for men trained in land¬ 
scape gardening and floriculture. The student has the opportunity to specialize in one 
division of work if desired, and is encouraged to select work, where electives are offered, 
from the departments of Agriculture, Botany, Chemistry, Entomology, Economics, Eng¬ 
lish and Education. 

The greenhouse, nursery, orchard, small fruit plots, and campus all afford oppor¬ 
tunities for instruction and research work. The students are required to do actual 
work in laying out orchards, planting trees, pruninng, spraying, picking fruit, grafting, 
propagation, making hot beds, caring for greenhouses, making designs for the improve¬ 
ment of public parka and private property, and in fact, everything that a successful 
horticulturist must know how to do. 


Page 51 




Page 52 











DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

ASA P. MAXWELL, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The department of Pharmacy of the State College of Washington offers opportuni¬ 
ties unexeeelled by any school of Pharmacy in the West. The faculties are of the very 
best. The expense of attendance is as low as can be found in any school of the kind 
in the United States—-indeed, much lower than in the majority of like schools. Tuition 
is free; only nominal laboratory fees are collected. 

To meet the demands of the profession three courses are offered. The first of these 
is a purely pharmaceutical course covering a period of two years. Every detail of mod¬ 
ern drug store management is treated in this course and upon graduation the student 
knows the business from prescription case to soda fountain. Realizing that in the own¬ 
ing and operating of successful pharmacies, knowledge of business methods, as well 
as of Pharmacy, is necessary additional business training, as bookkeeping, commercial 
law, and so on, is offered to those desiring it. At the close of the two-year course the 
degree of Graduate in Pharmacy, Ph.G., is conferred. 

A three-year course leading to the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist, Ph.C., is 
offered to meet the demand for persons trained for positions in anlytical laboratories 
and pharmaceutical manufacturing establishments. This course offers advanced work 
in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Pharmacognosy, Food and Drug Testing, etc. 

The third course of four years offers the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar¬ 
macy and affords an excellent opportunity to lay the best foundation for the practice 
of medicine. Graduates of this course are admitted to any medical college in the 
United States. 

The records of the graduates of the State College’s department of Pharmacy are 
convincing proof of its success. Three are members of the State Board of Pharmacy, 
one is the State Drug Inspector, sixteen are physicians, sixty are proprietors, w'hile 
others are engaged as managers and prescriptionists in the leading stores of the State. 
Several are holding positions on faculties of colleges and high schools and others are 
employed by large pharmaceutical concerns in commercial and scientific work. 


Page 5i 







MEN'S GYMNASIUM CLASS. 



WOMEN’S GYMNASIUM CLASS. 


Page 54 







PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

J. F. BOHLER, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The work offered in Physical Education is intended to stimulate the interest of the 
students in their personal health, to help the physically deficient overcome their de¬ 
fects, and to prevent an unhealthy condition resulting from exchanging an active, pos¬ 
sibly out-door occupation, for the sedentary life of a student. The aim is to develop 
organic vitality and moral vitality, for which physical activity offers the best remedy. 
The floor and appartus work given in the gymnasium, as well as indoor games, sup¬ 
plemented by all kinds of athletic exercises and games out of doors. To add interest, 
intramural leagues are formed and series of competitive games played. This serves 
a dual purpose. It not only supplies the necessary exercise for the time being, but 
teaches a large number of students a variety of games, so that in later years, no mat¬ 
ter what may be the popular sport of the community, they will be able to participate, 
thus affording the necessary recreation. With this in view, instruction is given in¬ 
doors in gymnastics, basketball, indoor baseball, handball, volley ball, boxing, wrest¬ 
ling, fencing, bag-punching, etc.; outdoors in football, hockey, baseball, track and field 
events, tennis, soccer, winter sports, etc. Gradually, more attention is being given to 
the intra-mural phase of athletic sports. It is very gratifying to note that as our facili¬ 
ties have been enlarged the interest in games has increased very much among the 
the student body in general. It is a conservative estimate to say that during the year 
eighty-five per cent of the students enrolled participated in some form of gymnastics, 
indoor or outdoor athletic sports. 

All first and second year men and women are required to take physical culture 
unless excused or deferred. All students are required to take a physical examination 
upon entrance. Corrective exercises are prescribed for those physically deficient or 
abnormally developed. W’e aim to arouse an appreciation for a symmetrically devel¬ 
oped body, strong and healthy, and to awaken and keep alive a desire for play, when 
it has been dormant. A realization of the necessity for leaders In the play life of boys 
and girls is ever increasing the demand for men and women, clean and strong morally, 
having a knowledge of the physical needs of school children and the resourcefulness 
to meet those needs. 


Page 55 







Page 56 






























































VETERINARY SCIENCE 


S. B. NELSON, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

Instruction in the Department of Veterinary Science consists of four years of train¬ 
ing leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Veterinary Science and Doctor of 
Veterinary Medicine. The course is designed for the purpose of fitting young men to 
be efficient practitioners of veterinary medicine, Municipal, State and Federal, meat, milk 
and dairy inspectors; instructors in subjects pertaining to Veterinary Science, both fun¬ 
damental and applied; investigators of animal diseases; inspectors, and quarantine offi¬ 
cers dealing with the control of contagious diseases; and army veterinarians as officers 
in the general army, and veterinarians in the quartermaster's department. Additional 
positions are constantly being created by legislative action on account of the economic 
importance for the prevention, control and eradication, of contagious and infectious 
diseases among domestic animals and these are being filled by graduates of this de¬ 
partment. 

This department, among a few others of its kind in the United States, is given the 
highest posible standing by the United States Department of Agriculture and is ranked 
in class A. 

Instruction is given by a staff of seven veterinarians, all specialists in their respec¬ 
tive fields, supplemented by teachers in the department of Chemistry, Zoology, Botany, 
Animal Husbandry, etc. 

The department is fortunate in having two buildings excellently equipped with the 
most up-to-date appliances for modern methods of study and demonstration. One build¬ 
ing, designated as the Veterinary Building, is located on the College Campus. It is 
a three-story brick structure having well-lighted and spacious laboratories and class 
rooms and a well-appointed hospital for the reception of sick animals. The first three 
years of work which consists chiefly of the teaching of the fundamentals is given in 
the Veterinary Building. The abundance of clinical material composed of sick animals 
which are commonly seen in a country practice afford the student ample opportunity 
to apply the theoretical knowledge which he has acquired in the class room and lab¬ 
oratory. 

Hospital No. 2, located in Spokane, is fitted particularly for the teaching of the 
applied art. Instruction is here given to the senior students, particular attention be¬ 
ing directed to clinical methods of detection, prevention, control and eradication of 
both sporadic and infective diseases. Ample opportunity is afforded the student for 
familiarizing himself with such conditions as are commonly seen in a city practise. 
The packing houses and dairies offer excellent means for the student to become fa¬ 
miliar with the practical aspect of meat, milk and dairy inspection. 

Besides the teaching of veterinary students the departments offers courses which 
are of value to students in other departments and of particular value to students tak¬ 
ing premedical work. 

In addition to doing instructional work members of the veterinary faculty are as¬ 
sociated with the Extension Department and Experiment Station. This affords the 
student added opportunity by close association with his instructors of observing meth¬ 
ods of research and dissemination of information relative to veterinary topics. 


Page 57 












Page 58 
























DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 


A. L. MELANDER, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

Back countless eons ago there came into existence a spark of life. This struggled, 
flourished and multiplied producing with the lapse of ages, a diverse progeny to people 
the world with living things. The study of the earth’s animals, their lives, actions, 
intrigues and behaviors; their structures, mechanisms, functions and adaptations; their 
past history, present spread and future possibilities; the methods by which the spark 
of life has been perpetuated and expanded,— that study is Zoology. History takes men 
back a few thousand years. Where history stops and pre-history begins, back through 
the immeasurable period to the dawn of life, it is Zoology’s part to lead us. 

However, as presented at the State College of Washington, the study of animal 
life emphasizes the practical rather than the padagogic or theoretical side. Zoology 
is one of the foundation sciences fgr agriculture. Domesticated animals are still ani¬ 
mals and rules of feeding and breeding are fundametally zoology. The relationship 
between crop and pest is purely biological. Hence the importance of Zoology in serv¬ 
ing those divisions of applied biology known as Animal Husbandry, Veterinary Science, 
Poultry Husbandry, Dairying, Agronomy and Horticulture. To this end practical courses 
in fruit pests, crop pests, heredity, anatomy, physiology and embryology are given at 
the State College. 

As a service department to round out the education of a botanist, a student of 
literature or a musician, for example; as a major department for students taking a pre- 
medical course before engaging in the university study of medicine; as a vital prepa¬ 
ration for the teacher of general science, the fruit inspector, the county agricultural 
agent, the forester, or the modern farmer; as affording a broader angle of view to 
those interested in the problems of mankind, such as Psychology, Education, Social 
Science and History; or as the main training for Experiment Station investigators, ex¬ 
perts in the Federal Bureaus of Biological Survey or Entomology, or for other special¬ 
ists in Zoology, this department enters and serves a broad field. 

During the year members of the department have completed the following lines of 
investigation which will be published in the series of “Contributions from the Zoology 
Laboratory of the State College of Washington.” 

A taxonomic monograph of the Dipterous families Sepsidae and Piophilidae, by A. 
L. Melander and Anthony Spuler. 

Biology of the Coulee Cricket, by A. L. Melander and M. A. Yothers. 

Viability of Spermatozoa as Affected by Artificial Media, by A. W. Henry. 

The Rootweevil of the Strawberry, by A. L. Melander and M. A. Yothers. 

The Columbia Ground Squirrel, by W. T. Shaw\ 

A study of the Toxins of the San Jose Scale, by Anthony Spuler. 

The Psilidae of the United States, by A. L. Melander. 


Page 59 







DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

A. A. CLEVELAND, HEAD OF DEPARTMENT. 

The Department of Education was organized as a department in 1907, and has 
had a steady growth. During the year 1916-17 sixty major students enrolled in the de¬ 
partment and the total registration in all classes exceeded five hundred. 

Several new courses in Education will be offered next year and an additional in¬ 
structor will be employed. In addition to the courses conducted by the four regular 
members of the departmental faculty, courses in special methods will be given by in¬ 
structors in other departments. 

Under the new State law the duty of the colleges to prepare high school teachers, 
principals, supervisors, and superintendents is re-affirmed. The Federal law places 
upon the college the special duty of preparing teachers of science, agriculture, and the 
mechanic arts. 

The Department of Education was created to carry out these obligations and aims 
to meet the needs of four groups of students. 

First, those majoring in other departments who desire to take courses in Educa¬ 
tion for their general educational value, without regard to the work of teaching. 

Second, those majoring in other departments who are preparing to teach and who 
wish to qualify for a State College Normal or Life Diploma. 

Third, those who wish to make more thorough professional preparation for high 
school teaching. 

Fourth, those who wish to become principals, supervisors, or superintendents. 


Page 60 








Page 61 














ANDERSON ANDRESEN BABCOCK 


GUY CHARLES ANDERSON. La Center, Wash. Agriculture. Y. M. C. A. Rifle Team (2) 

(3) . Dairy Club. 

HALDOUA S. ANDRESEN. Port Angeles, Wash. Economic Science and History College of 
Puget Sound. Social Science Club. Olympic Club. 

EDNA ELAINE BABCOCK. Pullman, Wash. Foreign Languages. Pi Beta Phi, Twentieth 
Century Club. Mask and Dagger Club, Sec. (3), Pres. (4). Dramatics (1) (2) t3) (4). 
Class Basketball (1) (2). Women’s Athletic Council (2) (3) (4). French Club, V.-P. 

(4) . Chinook Staff (3). Evergreen Staff (4). Manager of May Fete Dances (2). 
Sealth Club, Sec. (2). Senior Play Committee (4). Women’s Athletic Association. 





BABCOCK BAKKE BALL 


FRANC. E. BABCOCK. Cheney, Wash. English. Cheney State Normal. Phi Beta Phi. 
Y. W. C. A. Dramatics (3). 

H. NOEL BAKKE. Seattle, Wash. Horticulture. Lambda Chi Alpha. Twentieth Century 
Club. Dramatics (1). Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2) (3), Secretary (4). Chinook Staff (3). 
Debate "W” (4). Alpha Zeta. Delta Beta. Student Social Committee (4). Websterian 
Literary Society. Horticultural Club. 

DORIC TRISTAN JEMISON-BALL. Port Angeles, Wash. Chemical Engineering. Uni¬ 
versity of Washington. Sphinx Club. Moissan Chemical Society. Pres. ( 4 ). 


Page 62 










n 



BANGS BOYER BRECOUNT 


BENTON M. BANGS. Albion, Idaho. Animal Husbandry. Albion State Normal. Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. Crimson Circle. Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. Football (2) <3) (4), Capt. (4). 
Class Pres. (4). Athletic Council (4). Gray “W” Club, V.-P. (3). Class Football and 
Baseball (2). Saddle and Sirloin Club. Dairy Club. Butter Judging Team (3). Y. 
M. C. A. Deputation Team (3). Freshman-Sophomore Buies Committee (4). Chairman 
Inaugural Committee (3). 

STANLEY DeWITT BOYER. Porter, Wash. Agriculture. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Dairy 
Club. Alpha Zeta. Sphinx Club. Websterian Debating Society, Pres. (14). Class 
Treas. (4). Olympic Club. 

GLADYS JOSEPHINE BRECOUNT. Spokane, Wash. English. Simga Beta Pi. CSioral 
Club. Twentieth Century Club. Spokane Club. Women’s Athletic Association. Gamma 
Tan. Class Sec. (3). Dramatics (3). Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). Student Social Com¬ 
mittee (3) ( 4 ). Women’s League Council (3) (4). 



BROWDER BRYAN BUELL 


PAUL McCROSKEY BROWDER. Colfax, Wash. Economic Science and History. Alpha 
Tau Omega. Pres. Associated Students (4). Class Pres. (3). Varsity Debate (2) (3) 
(4). Delta Beta. Crimson Beta. Crimson Circle. Band (1) (2) (3), Chief Musician 
(3). Orchestra (1) (2) (3). Intersociety Debate (2). Junior Prom. Comittee (3). 
Whitman County Club. Social Science Club. Websterian Debating Society. Twentieth 
Century Club. Point System Committee (3). Chairman Frosh-Soph Glee (2). 

LILA M. BRYAN. Pullman, Wash. General. Indiana University. Kappa Alpha Theta. 

Polyhymnia Sextette (1). 

BUELL, WM. C. 


Page 63 








BURKHAUDT CALVERT CHAPMAN 


E. WALTER BURKHARDT. North Yakima, Wash. Architecture. Architectural Society. 
Yakima Valley Club. Sphinx Club. 

SIDNEY EVERETT CALVERT. Pullman, Wash. Education. Kirksville Normal. Univer¬ 
sity of Washington. Education Club. 

MERYL GREY CHAPMAN. Pullman, Wash. General. Winner of Y. M. C. A. College Song 
Contest «1). Columbia Literary Society, Sec. (3), V.-P. (3). Lohese Club, Pres. (3). 
Women's Executive Council (3). Art Editor Chinook (3). Gamma Tau. Sec. t4). Y. 
W. C. A., Treas. (4). Twentieth Century Club. German Club. French Club. 



CHRISTIAN OONMEY CLARK 


LORRAINE C. CHRISTIAN. Prosser, Wash. Agriculture. Y. M. C. A. Websterian De¬ 
bating Society. Dairy Club. College Band. Yakima Valley Club. 

KATHRYN CONMEY. Sedro-Woolley, Wash. English. College of Puget Sound. Univer¬ 
sity of Washington. Columbian Literary Society. 

MABEL FLORENCE CLARK. Pullman, Wash. Home Economics. Lohesa Club, Pres. (2). 
Girls Living at Home Club, Pres. (4). Columbian Literary Society. Ellen H. Rich¬ 
ards Club. Women's Council. Choral Club. Y. W. C. A. 


Page 64 












COWAN CBOONgCIST CUNDY 


ROBERT COWAN. Selah, Wash. Agriculture. Lambda Chi Alpha. College of Puget Sound. 
Alpha Zeta. Saddle and Sirloin Club, V.-P. (4). Washington Literary Society, Treas. 
(3). Yakima Club, Pres. (4). Intersociety Debate (2). Stock Judging Team (4). 
ARV1D PAUL CROONQUIST. Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Animal Husbandry. Sigma Phi Ep¬ 
silon. Alpha Zeta. Scabbard and Blade. Manager 1917 Chinook. Saddle and Sir¬ 
loin Club. Twentieth Century Club. Spanish Club. Captain W. S. C. C. C. Winner 
of Medal for Best Drilled Corporal (1). Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. Junior Prom. Committee. 
Military Ball Committee. Washington Agriculturist Staff. Class Yell Leader (2). 
Idaho Club. 

HAROLD JESSE CUNDY. Spokane, Wash. Agriculture. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Saddle and 
Sirloin Club. Evergreen Staff. Chinook Staff (3). Captain W. S. C. C. C. Spokane 
Club, Pres. (2). Websterian Debating Society. 



EDITH DARK EIDEMILLBR ENOLEBART 


SARAH EDITH DARK. Spokane, Wash. Education. Columbian Literary Society. Choral 
Club. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). German Club. Women’s Athletic Association. Class 
Baseball (2). Class Basketball (4). Spokane Club. 

GEORGE BAYER EIDEMILLER. Tacoma, Wash. General. University of Washington. 

Theta Delta Chi. Glee Club (3) (4). Tahoma Club, Pres. (4). 

ENGLEBART, CARL II. 


P age 65 

















/ 



EVANS FARRIER FLOTH 


D. CHESTER EVANS. Hartline, Wash. Veterinary. Gamma Delta. Alpha Psi. Track 
Squad (1). Class Track (1). Class Cross Country (1), Capt. (2). Basketball Squad 
(4). Class Basketball (2) (3) (4). Websterian Debating Society. Veterinary Medi¬ 
cal Society, Pres. (4). Dramatics (3). 

FARRIER, RALPH A. 

RAYMOND CHESTER FLOCH. Pullman, Wash. Electrical Engineering. Student Branch 
A. I. E. E. Whitman County Club. 



FRANCE A. FREELS G. FREELS 


MILDRED LAKE FRANCE. Spokane, Wash. Economic Science and History, Whitworth 
College. Pi Beta Phi. Evergreen Staff (3). Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). Spokane Club. 
ANETTA SADIE FREELS. Garfield, Wash. English Sigma Beta Pi. Y. W. C. A. 
Women's Athletic Association. Columbian Literary Society. Class Baseball (2). Class 
Basketball (3) (4). Class Sec. (4). Whitman County Club, V.-P. (4). 

GOLDA MAE FREELS. Garfield, Wash. Foreign Languages. Sigma Beta Pi. Class 
Baseball (2). Class Basketball (4). Drarntics (3). Y. W. C. A. German Club. 
Women’s Athletic Association. Spanish Club. Whitman County Club. 


Page 66 







GEUB - • GLASGOW GXAOV 


JOHN E. GEUE. Snohomish, Wash. Hydro-Electrical Engineering. Sigma Tau. Student 
Branch A. I. E, E. Electro-Mechanical Engineering Society. Sphinx Club. Rifle 
Team (1) (2) (3) (4). Class Wrestling (3) (4). 

CECIL RAY GLASGOW. Gerome, Wash. Civil Engineering. Chairman Civil Engineer¬ 
ing Society (5). Class Basketball (1) (2) (4) (4). Class Treasurer (1). Class Yell 
Leader (1). 

MURIEL JASPER GNAGY. Colville, Wash. Chemistry. Sphinx Club. Prohibition League. 
Spanish Club. Kanlsku Club. Mining Society. Moissan Chemical Soicety, Sec.-Treas. 
(2), Reporter (3), Pres. (4). Y. M. C. A. Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry (3). 



GOFF GOLDSWORTHY H. GOWDY 


ARTHUR M. GOFF. Colfax, Wash. General. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Sigma Tau. Kwana. 
Websterian Debating Society. V.-P. (3). Civil Engineering Society, V.-P. (3). So¬ 
cial Science Club. German Club. Y. M. C. A. Whitman County Club. Varsity Foot¬ 
ball *W\ Class Football (1) (2) (4 i. Alumni Football 1916. Civil Football (3) (4). 
Class Track (1). Grey “W" Club. Athletic Council (3). Junior Prom. Committee 
(3). Freshman-Sophomore Rules Committee (2). Straw Boss Campus Day (3) (4). 
2nd Lieut. W. S. C. C. C. 

WILLIAM PERCY GOLDSWORTHY. Spokane. Wash, Animal Husbandry. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. Alpha Zeta. Twentieth Century Club. Spokane Club. Saddle and Sirloin 
Club. Orpheus Club. Dramatics <3). Glee Club (1). Websterian Debating Society 
Sec.-Treas. (2). Class V.-P. (2), Pres. (3). Student Social Committee (3) (4). Y. M. 
C. A.. Sec. (3). 

GOWDY. HAZLE IRENE 


Page 67 



















F. GOWDY GUNDERSON HANKE 


FLORENCE MAE GOWDY. Pullman, Wash, Home Economics. Ellen H. Ricnards Club. 
Y. W. C. A. Columbian Literary Society. 

LEROY ALEXANDER GUNDERSON. Malden, Washington. Civil Engineering. Civil En¬ 
gineering Society. Class Basketball (3) (4). 

ALICE ELEANOR HANKE. Spokane, Wash. Foreign Languages. German Club. Choral 
Club. German Declamation Contest, Second Prize (1). Student Volunteers, Sec. (3), 
Pres. (4). Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). Dramatics (3). 



HANSEN HARTMAN HOLMES 


IDA M. IIANSEN. Davenport, WaBh. Foreign Languages. Sigma Beta Pi. Gamma Tau. 
Twentieth Century Club. Y. W. C. A. Editor Student Handbook (2). Talamian Lit¬ 
erary Society, Pres. (2). Scandinavian Club, Pres. (1) (2). German Club, V.-P. (3). 
Dramatics (2) (3). Treble Clef Club. 

HENRY HARTMAN. Wenatchee, Wash. Horticulture. Gamma Delta. Alpha Zeta. Del¬ 
ta Beta, Pres. (4). Crimson Circle. V. P. (4). Twentieth Century Club, Pres. <4). 
Associate Editor Chinook (3). Winner of Freshman-Sophomore Contest (2). Inter- 
class Debate (l). Intersociety Debate (1). Varsity Debate (3). Evergreen Staff (2) 
(3). Orchestra (1). Apple Judging Team (3). Dramatics (2). Oratory and Debate 
Committee (4). Horticultural Club, V.-P. (2). Washington Literary Society, V.-P. 
(2). Chelan County Club, Pres. (2). Freshman-8ophomore Rules Committee (4). 
Junior Prom Committee (3). 

SHIRLEY EVELYN HOLMES. Kennewick, Wash. Chemistry. Sigma Beta Pi. Gamma 
Tau. Twentieth Century Club. Pan-Hellenic Council (3) (4). Y. W, C. A., Sec. (2). 
Moissan Chemical Society, Sec. (3). Women’s League Council (4). Talamian Lit¬ 
erary Society, Treas. (3), Pres. (4). Chairman of Point System Committee (4). 


Page 68 


















HORAN HOUR ALL HOWARD 

S 

ESTHER MARY HORAN. Wenatchee, Wash. Home Economics. -iiBet3--Ptfi. Gamma 
Tau. Ellen H. Richards Club, Pres. (4). Y. W. C. A. Women's XChletic Association 
Athletic Council (4). Women’s League Council (4). Chelan County Club, Sec. (1) 
Evergreen Staff (3). Hesperides Club (4). 

CLEMENCE BROOKS HORRALL. Spokane, Wash. Animal Husbandry. Lambda Chi Al¬ 
pha. Alpha Zeta. Saddle and Sirloin Club, Pres. (4). Stock Judging Team (3) (4). 
Spokane Club. Class Track (1) (2). Poultry Judging Team (4). 

R. C. HOWARD. Colfax, W T ash. General. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Class Pres. <2). Twen¬ 
tieth Century Club. Chinook Editor (3). Freshman-Sophomore Rules Committee, 
Chairman (4). Alpha Zeta. Crimson Circle. Chairman Student Social Committee (4). 



HUNTINGTON JAMIESON JEFFREY 


JEAN ELLSWORTH HUNTINGTON. Kelso, Wash. Agriculture. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
Alpha Zeta. Crimson Circle. Pres, of Board of Directors of Student’s Store (4). 
Class V.-P. (3), Treas. (4). Saddle and Sirloin Club. 

LYDIA MAE JAMIESON. Tacoma, W'ash. Economic Science and History. University of 
Washington. Y. W\ C. A. 

BLANCHE O. JEFFREY. Pullman, Wash. Education. Dramatics (2). Talamian Lit¬ 
erary Society, Pres. (3). Women’s League, V.-P. (4). Y. W. C. A. Gamma Tau. 


Page 69 














JENSEN JOHNSON JONES 


CLAUDE H. JENSEN. Sprague, Wash. Hydro-Electrical Engineering. Sigma Tau. Stu¬ 
dent Branch A. I. E. E. Electro-Mechanical Society. Junior Prom. Committee. 
ETHEL M. JOHNSON. Centralia, Wash. Home Economics. Sigma Beta PI. Twentieth 
Century Club. Ellen H. Richards Club. V.-P. (3). Scandinavian Club, Sec.-Treas. 
(3). Talamlan Literary Society, Treas. (3). Y. W. C. A. 

LUCIEN NORTON JONES. Seattle. Wash. Agriculture. University of Washington. Gam¬ 
ma Delta. Class Treas. (2). Selath Club. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Chinook Staff (3). 



K1LI10W KING KLOSSNER 


GEORGE OLIVER KILDOW. Colville, Wash. Chemistry. College BaJid and Orchestra 
<1> (2) (3) (4). Moissan Chemical Society, Pres. (3). Stevens-Pend Orielle Club, 
Pres. (3). Sphinx Club. Spanish Club. 

ERVIN EDWIN KING. Davenport, Wash. Agriculture. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Alpha Zeta. 
Crimson Circle. Twentieth Century Club. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Business Mgr. 
Washington Agriculturist (3). Circulation Mgr. Evergreen (3). Chinook Staff (3). 
Class V.-P. (3), Treas. (3). Manager Junior Prom. (3). Websterlan Debating So¬ 
ciety, Pres. (4). Straw Boss Campus Day (3). Sphinx Club, V.-P. (2). Class Football 
(1) (2). Business Mgr. Evergreen (4). Y. M. C. A., V.-P. (4). Instructor in Agri¬ 
cultural Engineering (3) (4). 

MILDRED MARION KLOSSNER. Pullman, Wash. Foreign Languages. Lohese Club, Pres. 
(4). Girls’ Living at Home Club, Pres. <4». German Club. Women’s Council. Whit¬ 
man County Club. Newman Club. _ 


Page 70 













fcUNATH ’ LARSEN LAUDERDALE 


CLARA IRENE KUNATH. Skykomlsh, Wash. Home Economics. University of Wash¬ 
ington. Ellen H. Richards Club. Women's Athletic Association. Hockey Team (3). 
Class Basketball (4). Y. W. C. A. German Club. Women's Council (4). Columbian 
Literary Society. 

ROY LARSEN. Wenatchee, Wash. Horticulture. Alpha Tau Omega. Alpha Zeta, Pres. 
(4). Crimson Circle. Washington Literary Society, Pres. (4). Horticultural Club, 
Pres. (3). Apple Judging Team (4). Apple Show, Asst. Manager (3), Manager (4). 
Director of Student Store (3) (4). Winner State Bankers Rural Credit Contest (2). 
ROBERT LAWRENCE LAUDERDALE. Sandpoint, Idaho. Dairy Husbandry. Class Cross 
Country (1) (2). Class Traclc (1) (2) (3) (4). Dramatics (2). Varsity Track Squad 
(1) (3). Websterian Debating Society. 


«A 



LEONARD LEONARD LEWELLEN 


PEARL LEONARD. Coulee City, Wash. Education. Cheney State Normal. Y. W. C. A. 

Women’s League. Choral Club. Education Club. Spanish Club. Rifle Club. 
ELMER O. LEONARD. Castle Rock, Washington. Agriculture. Alpha Zeta. Saddle and 

Sirloin Club. Dairy Club. Class Basketball (1). 

AMY LEWELLEN. Columbus, Indiana. Education. Minneapolis School of Music and Dra¬ 
matic Art. Graduate in Music 1916. Orchestra. Piano Club. Evergreen Staff. Y. W. 
C. A. 


Page 71 







LODGE MAXWELL McASSEY 


ALICE MARY LODGE. Wenatchee, Wash. Home Economics. Pi Beta Phi. Chelan County 
Club, Sec. (2). Y. W. C. A. Ellen H. Richards. Class Basketball (1) (2) (3) (4). 
Class Baseball (2). Chinook Staff <3). Evergreen Staff (3). Class Secretary (2). 
Women's Athletic Association. Rifle Club, Sec. (4). Point System Committee (4). 
Hesperides Club, Sec. ( 4 ). 

LORA ELLEN MAXWELL. Johnson, Wash. Economic Science and History. Zeta Phi. 
Gamma Tau, V.-P. (4). Delta Phi, Sec. (3), Pres. (4). Varsity Debate (2) (3). Ora¬ 
tory and Debate Committee (3). Women’s League, Pres. (3). Class Sec. (3). Colum¬ 
bian Literary Society, Pres. (3). Social Science Club. Y. W. C. A. Twentieth Cen¬ 
tury Club. Whitman County Club. Secretary A. S. S. C. W. (4). ■ 

ETHEL S. McASSEY. Clarkston, Wash. Home Economics. Lewiston State Normal. El¬ 
len H. Richards Club. Y. W. C. A. Talamian Literary Society. Asotin County Club. 



McCUNE McCflOSKEY McCORMICK 


EVA ADAMS McCUNE. Pullman, Wash. Education. Cheney State Normal. University 
of Idaho. Education Club. Y. W. C. A. Whitman County Club. Choral Club. 
EDNA LOUISE McCROSKEY. Walla Walla, Wash. English. Pi Beta Phi. Women’s 
League, Pres. (4). Gamma Tau. Women's Athletic Association, Sec. (4), Council 
(3) (4). Chinook Staff (3). Pan-Hellenic Council (3) (4). Twentieth Century Club. Y. 
W. C. A. 

JENNIE MAE McCORMACK. Spokane, Wash. Home Economics. Cheney State Normal. 
University of Washington. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2), V.-P. (3), Sec. (4). Ellen H. 
Richards Club, Sec. (3). Class Basketball (2) (4), Capt. (4). Women's League Coun¬ 
cil (4). Twentieth Century Club. Gamma Tau. Columbia Literary Society. Wom¬ 
en’s Athletic Association. Alpha Chi Omega. 


Page 72 












MELROSE MELVIN MILLER 


CHARLES JAMES MELROSE. Spokane, Wash. Electrical Engineering. Sigma Phi Ep¬ 
silon. Sigma Tau. Gray "W" Club. Tennis <1) (2) (3) (4), Capt. (2). Class Cross 
Country (2) <3). Chinook Staff (3). Student Branch A. I. E. E. Evergreen Staff (2). 

MAREA CLARA MELVIN. Pullman, Wash. Education. Sigma Beta Pi. Y. W. C. A., Sec. 
(1). German Club. Whitman County Club, Reporter. Class Sec. (4). 

AUBREY CLIFFORD MILLER. Victoria, B. C. Mining Engineering. ^Sigma Phi Epsi¬ 
lon. Mining Engineering and Geological Society, Pres. (4). Omega. Twentieth Century 
Club. Junior Prom. Committee. Class Yell Leader (1) (3) «4). Whitman County 
Club. Captain W. S. C. C. C. Spanish Club. 



MORGAN NASH NAVE 


VICTOR MORGAN. Davenport, Wash. Agriculture. Crimson Circle. Saddle and Sirloin 
Club. Chinook Staff (3). Evergreen Staff (3). Point System Committee (4). Stock 
Judging Team ( 4 ). 

MARY ELLEN NASH. Spokane, Wash. EconomLc Science and History. Cheney State 
Normal School. Pi Beta Phi. Spokane Club. French Club, Sec. (4). Junior Prom. 
Committee. 

SAMUEL A. NAVE Elizabethton, Tenn. Education. Carson-Newman College. Cheney 
State Normal School. Education Club. Choral Club. 


Page 73 













NEWHALL PALMER FARM ALEE 

OLIVE MABEL NEWHALL. Friday Harbor, Wash. Home Economics. Ellen H. Rich¬ 
ards Club. Y. W. C. A. Columbian Literary Society. 

IRENE CLEORA PALMER. Bellingham, Wash. Home Economics. Alpha Chi Omega. 

Gamma Tau. Tal&mlan Literary Society. Class Basketball (2) (3) (4). Chinook 
Staff (3). Junior Prom. Committee (3). Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). Women’s League 
Council (4). President of Pan-Hellenic Council (4). Athletic Board of Control (4). 
Women’s Athletic Association, Sec. (4). Dramatics (2). Whasanka Club. Ellen H. 
Richards Club. Twentieth Century Club. 

JAMES G. PARMALEE. Buffalo, N. Y. Mining- Engineering. Michigan College of Mines. 
Mining Engineering and Geological Society, Pres. (4). Philomathian Literary Society, 
V.-P. (2). Websterian Debating Society, Pres. (4). Omega. Twentieth Century 

Club. Whitman County Club. Straw Boss Campus Day (2). 



PASSOXNEAU PRIOR RANEY 

JOSEPH PASSOXNEAU. Malone, New York. Economics and History. Websterian Debat¬ 
ing Society. Delta Beta. Chairman Debate Council. Twentieth Century Club. So¬ 
cial Science Club. Varsity Debate. 

CLEMENTINE J. PRIOR. North Yakima, Wash. Chemistry. Kappa Alpha Theta. Gamma 
Tau. Y. W. C. A., Treas. Women’s League. Treas. Moissan Chemical Society. Tala- 
mian Literary Society. W. A. A. Board. Class Basketball (1) (2) (3). Class Base¬ 
ball (1) (2). Student Social Committee. 

CARL DELANO RANEY. Spokane, Wash. Electrical Engineering. Sigma Tau, Pres. (3). 
Scabbard and Blade, V.-P. <4). Crimson Circle. Evergreen Staff (3). Electro- 

Mechanical Engineering Society, Pres. (3). Twentieth Century Club. Major W. S. 
C. C. C. Student Branch A. I. E. E. Websterian Debating Society. Student Social 
Committee. Laboratory Assistant in Physics. Y. M. C. A. Editor Engineering Sup¬ 
plement of the Evergreen (3). 


Page 14 
















RUSSELL SAUPE SCHULLER 


FRED L. RUSSELL. Pullman, Wash. Animal Husbandry. Sphinx Club. Washington 
Literary Society. Band (1) (2). Orpheus Club. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Alpha 
Zeta. Stock Judging Team (4). 

WILLIAM E. SAUPE. Snohomish, W'ash. Hydro-Electrical Engineering. Sigma Tau. Stu¬ 
dent Branch A. I. E. E. Electro-Mechanical Engineering Society. Sphinx Club. 
Rifle Team <1) (2) <3) (4). Class Wrestling (2) (3) <4). Class Football (1) 2). 
SCHULLER, H. J. 



SHANNON SCHULZ SKIDMORE 


FRANK LEE SHANNON. Walla Walla, Wash. Animal Husbandry. Whitman College. 
Kappa Sigma. Scabbard and Blade. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Jnterclass Basketball 
(2) (3) (4). 

ROSETTA A. SCHULZ, Los Angeles, Cal. Foreign Languages. Charles City College, 
Charles City, Iowa. Cheney State Normal. Choral Club. German Club, Pres. (4). 

H. MARVIN SKIDMORE. Oakesdale, Wash. Education. Cheney State Normal. Orpheus 
Club. Junior Prom. Committee (3). Education Club, Pres. (4). Choral Club, Pres. 
(4). Dramatics (3) (4). Class V.-P. (4). Twentieth Century Club. Whitman Coun¬ 
ty Club. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Discipline Committee A. S. S. C. W. (4). 


Page 75 













SORENSON STENBERG TALLEY 


S. ALBERT SORENSON. Ellensburg, Wash. Agriculture. Delta. Alpha Zeta. Crimson 
Circle. Basketball (2) <3) (4). Class Basketball (1) (2). Vlce.-Pres. Associated 

Students (4). Executive Council (4). Saddle and Sirloin Club. Class Baseball (2) 
(3). Class V.-P. (4). 

LYMAN HAROLD STENBERG. Puyallup, Wash. Agriculture. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Base¬ 
ball (1) (2). Varsity (3) (4). Saddle and Sirloin Club. 

WILFRED H. TALLEY. Oakesdale, Wash. Agriculture. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Y. M. C. A., 
Treas. (1). Class Football (1) (2). Football Squad (1) (2) (4). Class Track (1). 
Glee Club (2) (4). Dramatics (2) (3). Websterlan Debating Society. Pres. (4). 

Whitman County Club, Pres. (4). Lieut. W. S. C. C. C. Saddle and Sirloin Club. 
Orpheus Club. 



TAYLOR TODI) TROY 


ROBERT LYMAN TAYLOR. Montesano, Wash. Agriculture. Lambda Chi Alpha. Gray 
“W" Club. Websterlan Debating Society. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Dairy Club. Sub¬ 
scription Mgr. Washington Agriculturist (2). Wrestling (3) (4), Capt. (4). Olympic 
Club, V. -P. (4). 

PAUL EDWARD TODD. Keisling, Wash. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Cheney 
State Normal. Lambda Chi Alpha. Sigma Tau, Pres. (4). Scabbard and Blade, 
Treas. (4). Cadet Col. W. S. C. C. C. Student Branch A. I. E. E. Pres. (3). 

Websterlan Debating Society. Class Track (1) (2). “Big Five*’ Campus Day (4). 
IRAS VIVIAN TROY. Pullman, Wash. Home Economics. Kappa Alpha Theta. Ellen H. 
Richards Club. Y. W. C. A. Mask and Dagger. Twentieth Century Club. Women’s 
Athletic Association. Women’s Athletic Council (2) (3). Women’s League Coun¬ 
cil (4). Class Sec. (2), Pres. (4). Class Tennis (1) (2) (3). Dramatics (2) (3) 4). 
Whitman County Club, Sec. (4). Olympic Club. Chinook Staff (3). 


Page 76 



















TTSON TYHER WALKER 


NORMA LEONE TUSON. Davenport, Wash. Education. Sigma Beta Pi. Editor Student 
Handbook (1). Dramatics (2). Class Baseball (2). Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3). Man¬ 
ager of Y. W. C. A. Bazaar (3). Talamian Literary Society, V.-P, (2), Pres. (3). 
Junior Prom. Committee. Executive Council Women’s League (3) (4). Twentieth 
Century Club, Sec.-Treas. ( 4 ). Gamma Tau, Pres. (4). 

TOM D. TYHER. Seattle, Wash. General. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Football (1) (2) (3) 
(4). Track (3) (4). Athletic Council (4). Crimson Circle. Kwana Society. Broad¬ 
way Club. Varsity Committee. 

GLEN STANLEY WALKER. Pullman, Wash. Economic Science and History. Dramatics 
(1). German Club. Evergreen Staff (4). Economics Club. 



WALLIS WAPPENSTEIN WEBSTER 


FLOY ESTHER WALLIS. Moberly, Mo. Home Economics. Kirsksville State Normal 
School. Ellen H. Richards Club. Dayton Club. Education Club. 

WILLIAM A. WAPPENSTEIN. Seattle, Wash. General. Sealth Club. Saddle and Sirloin 
Club. Y. M. C. A. Saddle and Sirloin Football Team. 

HARRY W. WEBSTER. North Yakima, Wash. Animal Husbandry. University of Wash¬ 
ington. Saddle and Sirloin Club. Yakima Valley Club. 











WELDIN WHETSEL WILLIAMS 


MARIK WELDIN. Pullman, Wash. Mathematics. Newtonian Society, Sec. (1). Colum¬ 
bian Literary Society, Sec. (4). Inter-Society Delate (3). Y. W. C. A. Rifle Club. 

JOT JUDSON WHETSEL. Spokane, Wash. General. Alpha Tau Omega. Mask and Dag¬ 
ger, Pres. (3). Dramatics (1) (2) (3) (4). Chinook Staff (3) (4). Evergreen Staff 
(3). Accompanist Polyhymnia Sextet (3). Co-author Senior Play. 

EDWARD HART WILLIAMS. Pullman, Wash. Electrical Engineering. Student Branch 
of A. I. E. E. 



G. W. WILSON A. WOLF WOOD 


GEORGE W. WILSON. Seattle, Wash. Agriculture. University of Washington. Sphinx 
Club. Rifle Club. Dairy Club. Y. M. C. A. 

AUGUST L. WOLF. Latah, Wash. Agriculture. Saddle and Sirloin Club. 

CHRISTINE M. WOOD. Bigfork, Mont. Home Economics. Montana State College. Ellen 
H. Richards Club, V.-P. (4). Columbian Literary Society, Pres. (4). Gamma Tau. 
Women’s Council. Dramatics. Y. W. C. A. 


Page 78 

















WORTHEN WORTHEN ZINK 


CHESTER H. WORTHEN. Lynden, Wash. Hydro-Electrical Engineering. Lambda Chi 
Alpha. Sigma Tau. Websterian Literary Society. Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. Twentieth 
Century Club. Student Branch A. I. E. E., V.-P. (3), Pres. (4). Dramatics (2) (3). 
MINNIE M. WORTHEN. Lynden, Wash. English. Women’s League. Y. W. C. A. As¬ 
sistant Editor Y. W.-Y. M. Handbook (2). Women’s Athletic Association. Cross- 
Country (1). Baseball (2). Gamma Tau. Evergreen Staff (3), Assistant Editor (4), 
Editor (4). Columbian Literary Society, Treas. (2), Intersociety Debate (2). Prohi¬ 
bition League Pres. (3), Reporter (4), State Secretary (4). Scandinavian Club, V.-P. 
(2), Sec. Treas. (2). Wasanska Club, Sec. (2), Pres. (4). Chairman Senior Play Commit¬ 
tee. 

FRANK WILLIAM ZINK. Pittsfield, Mass. Foreign Languages. Springfield Training 
School. Lake Chautauqua School of Physical Education. Delta. Scabbard and Blade. 
German Club. Assistant Physical and Athletic Director (1) (2) (3) (4). Coach of 
Elementary Science Teams (1). Major W. S. C. C. C. Reserve Officers’ Training 
Corps. 

FORBES E. BAILEY. Spokane, Wash. Agriculture. Alpha Zeta. Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 

(2) . Horticultural Club, Sec. (3), Pres. (4). Evergreen Staff (4). Chinook Staff 

(3) . Washington Literary Society. 



VEROGNA G. HULL, 
Pullman, Music. 


Page 79 







PAUL H. SIEFNER. PeEll, Wash. Pharmacy. Kappa Pal. Delta Sigma. Class Pres. 
(2). Pharmaceutical Association. 

ROY EUGENE JENSEN. Farmington, Wash. Pharmacy. Kappa Psi. Sphinx Club. 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

CARL WALDO PERSON. St. John, Wash. S. C. P. A., V.-P. (2). Sphinx Club. Web- 
sterian Debating Society. Prohibition League. Y. M. C. A. 

MILES F. POTTER. Winona, Wash. Pharmacy. Kappa Pal. Delta Sigma. S. C. P. A. 
Sphinx Club. 



LOREN R. BABCOCK 

ALBERT PIRO. Cle Elum, Wash. Pharmacy. 
P. H. E. MASKENTHINE. Davenport. Wash. 
FRANK C. HOFFMAN 
DAVID G. SHANAHAN 


S. C. P. A. Spanish Club. 
Pharmacy Member of S. C. P. A. 


Page 80 












L. E. COX. Koaskia, Idaho. Pharmacy. Sphinx Club. S. C. P. A., Pres. (2). 

JAY CHESTER SHOUDY. St. John, Wash. Pharmacy. Kappa Psl. S. C. P. A. 

NORTON K. BO' OK. Sedro-Woolley. Wash. Pharmacy. Class Sec. (2). 

A. IRVIN BAKER. Pullman. Wash. Pharmacy. Kappa Psi. Mgr. Kaiblgan Club. Pharmic 
Football and Basketball. S. C. P. A. College Orchestra. Lieut. W. S. C. C. C. 



H. C. LUCE. Boston, Mass. Veterinary. Alpha Psi. Medical Vlce-Pres. (3). Campus 
Photographer. Student Instructor History (2) Path. Sphinx Club. 

C. H. DILLS. Outlook, Wash. Veterinary. Alpha Psi. Captain Cadet Corps. Scabbard 
and Blade. Vlce-Pres. Sophomore Class. Vet. Medical Pres. (2). Vlce-Pres. (1). 
Sphinx Club. Vet. Football. Vet. Basketball. 

LESTER, JOE E. Spokane, Wash. Veterinary. Sigma Nu. Alpha Psi. Crimson Circle. 
Vet. Medical Pres. (1) “W” Club Pres. (3). Baseball (1) and (2) Captain elect (3). 
Big Chief Campus Day '16. Executive Council Students’ Association (3). Class Tres- 
urer (1). Vice.-Pres. (2). 

SHAW, JAMES N. Aberdeen, Wash. Veterinary. Alpha Tau Omega. Vet. Medical. 
HAGGARD, FINCH. Seattle, Wash. Veterinary. Alpha Psi. Vet. Medical. 

JOHNSON, WALTER T. Chehalis, Wash. Veterinary. Alpha Psi. Vet. Medical. 


Page 81 






































































Adams 

Balnton 

Alexander 


Baker 

Brunlng 

Barnes 


Bookman 

Burgess 

Benbow 


Bens 

Burns 

Brower 


Page 84 
















r 





Byllings Camp 

Canfield Eaton 

Cole Collins 


Chapman 

Emmerson 

Davis 


Chase 

Engleson 

Doane 


Page 85 


























EffKf* 

Frie*e 

George 


Ehmer Finney Gnthrie 

Gannon Gleason Graham 

Gragg Halsey Hansen 


Page 86 

























Hart 

Hendrickson 

ITeiulron 

II Inman 

Gray 

Hardhlll 

I lathway 

Hayes 

Iverson 

Jarvis 

Jeffrey 

Johnson 



Page 87 












King 

Heathman 

Kulzer 


Knott 

Hopton 

Laird 


Kralowec 
H ungate 
Langdoa 


Kraatdti 

Hurst 

Lindahl 

























Lindahl 

Keyes 

Love 


Liiulley 
Key wood 
Mast 


Llndatrum 

Lauderdale 

Matters 


Livengood 

McCormick 

Matthew* 


Page 89 












R. Mom 

MrKlnatrey 

Parker 


Win. Moos 

Mlllor 

Peterson 


Nelson 

Mitchell 

Porter 


Niekelaon 

Murray 

Pratt 


Page 90 












Rlwe 

ROSS 

Roger* 

Reint 

* 

Phillip* 

Nordby 

Permatn 

Nye 


Sohactler 

F. Smith 

Smith 

Stanton 







I 


Page 91 


















Sterens 

Prell 

Wheeler 


Stftes 

Schuman 

Whltham 


Stone 

Shook 

Wiggins 


Turner 

Troy 

Williams 


Page 92 


















Quarrels 

Weeks 

Whiteman 


young 

F. Zimmerman 


Wlvel 

C. Zimmerman 







Page 94 









































































































STUDENT GOVERNMENT 


When men and women enter College it is presumed they are of suffi¬ 
cient maturity to begin desciplining themselves and to bear the respon¬ 
sibility of their own conduct. According to this theory the students at 
the State College of Washington have gradually been given almost the en¬ 
tire management of student activities. 

A burden of responsibility brings out an individual’s qualities, be 
they good or bad. It is a man’s fortune and that of the community in 
which he lives to show up strong under responsibility. It is his failure 
and future protection of the community if he shows up weak. Student 
Government makes possible the discovery and development of men and 
women of ability and it as surely exposes the weakling. It is fortunate 
indeed for a man to come into his own early in life and it is just as 
fortunate for the community to be made aware of his incapacities before 
he has had time to harm it. Student Government may then be character¬ 
ized as a tribunal, the duty of which is to try men and women, to select 
the best, and to weed out the undesirables. 

These results, however, are but incidental to the accomplishment of 
student government itself. Thru the successful operation of a store, 
thru the conducting of athletics, thru the control and management of 
social activities, student government truly performs a service to the 
State College, an inestimable assistance to the President and Faculty, 
and makes for content and satisfaction among the students. 
















Executive Council 



FINNEY 

BANGS 


MAXWELL 

BROWDER 


SORENSEN 

ZIMMERMAN 


PAUL BROWDER, President. 

« CLARENCE, ZIMMERMAN, Vice-President 

N^f LSn Je’^ e8Uent ' ~ • 

RAY KINNEY, . 

BENTON BANGS ! Members at Large. 


* Left School at close of 1st Semester. 


Page 97 












Women’s League Council 



Page 98 








Women’s Athletic Council 



Page 99 








SENIOR OFFICERS—First Semester 



BENTON BANGS, President. A. FREELS, Secretary, S. A. SORENSEN, Vice-President. 

Second Semester 



IRAS TROY, President. H. M. SKIDMORE, Vice-President. MAREA MELVIN, Secretary. 


Page 100 









Second Semester 



E. B. PARKER, President. ELSIE PHILLIPS, Secretary. CARL KING, Vice-President. 


Page 101 













LEA SMITH, President. MARIA COVE, Secretary. LeROY HANLEY, Vice-President. 


Second Semester 


SOPHOMORE OFFICERS—First Semester 


CLEM PHILLIPS. President. MARY SETZER, Secretary. ORIX PEARSON, Vice-President. 


Page 102 











FRESHMEN OFFICERS—First Semester 



CARL JOHNSON, President RAYMOND RUDBERG, Vice President. 

MARJORIE HEATON, Secretary. 


Second Semester 



LLOYD GILLIS, President. EIIN'A BRADBURY, Secretary. BERT STONE, Vice-President. 


Page 103 













Pau Helenic Council 



Wilmer 

Hungate 

McCrosky 


McCormack 

Holmes 

Hull 

Gannon 


Judges 

Troy 

Fulmer 


Page 104 








Student Store Directors 



Smith Larson Huntington 



Page 105 






Page 106 


















THE POW-WOW 


J. L. ASHLOCK, ’09 .... Editor 

P. T. BARNARD, ’04 - - - Business Manager 

VERNE GADDIS, ’10 - Asst. Manager 


The POW WOW is the organ of expression of the alumni 
of the State College of Washington. Its purpose is two-fold, 
since it is a medium of expression for the alumni and is a means 
by which they are kept in touch with doings of the college. 
Its services to the college are invaluable. In the past it has 
served to keep the “old grads” in close touch with the college, 
a feature of service that has had its influence keenly felt in 
the activities here. 


Page 107 





Page 108 




















THE EVERGREEN 


EDITORIAL STAFF 


First Semester 


Second Semester 


Minnie M. Worthen _ 

Assistant Editor 

John Dudley Roberts_ 

_ Assistant Editor 

Fred H. Schroeder 

_ Assistant Editor 




L. C. Callow _ 

_ ___ Sports 



Helen G. Goode 

_ _ Society 



Hill Williams_ 

__ .Miscellaneous 



Clarence W. Peterson. 

— Oratory, Debate 



Tim Somers __ _ . 

. Cartooning 



Marion McAnich - 

Cartooning 



Edna E. Babcock __ 

„ Dramatics 



Jot Whetzel __ __ 

--Dramatics 



Ralph Noerenberg _ 

Campus 



Zella C. Melcher 

_ -Organizations 



Nell McKay _ 

Women’s Athletics 



Della Prell _ 

__ _ Departmental 



Glen S. Walker.. 

__ Intercollegiate 



Amy Lewellen _ _ . 

_ -Music 



Marion Kells 

Reporter 



George Spinning _ 

-Reporter 



Howard Porter 

- _ _ Reporter 



Isabelle Hayes__ _ 

-Reporter 



BUSINESS 

STAFF 


Ervin E. King 

Business Manager 

Vernet L. Corlett-Asst. Business Manager 

The Evergreen is the official publictaion 

of the Associated Students of the State 

College of Washington. 

It is a weekly paper now in its twenty-fourth year. Its purpose 

is to serve the best interests of the college through an efficient news srvice. 


ORDER OF 

GROUP. 


Roberts 

Worthen 

McAnich 

Melcher 

Busby 

King 

McKay 

Callow 

Corlette 

Walker 

Porter 

Llewellyn 

Williams 

Noerenberg 

Hayes 


Page 109 


i 
























I 


# 



Page 110 












1918 CHINOOK 


Tom Jones Parry, Editor. Joe Davis, Manager. 

Russell Adams, Associate Editor. Norbert Kulzer. Asst. Manager. 


Myron Brower _ 

Wallace Reed -- 
Earle McCroskey 
Emily Babcock _ 
J. J. Whetsel ... 

Marion Busby_ 

William Moss _ 

Helen Marr_ 

Veva Parker _ 

Marjorie Heaton 

Charles Pratt_ 

Eric Klossner _ 


STAFF 


_Classes 

_Organizations 

_Men's Athletics 

_Womens Atheltics 

_Humor 

_Special Writer 

Dramatics and Music 

_Society 

_Artist 

_Artist 

_Decorator 

_Debate 


NOTE —Since Mr. Parry left college in April the editing of this volume 
has been under the direction of Joe Davis. 

The editor wishes to acknowledge valuable assistance received from per¬ 
sons not regularly upon the staff: Miss Rena Duthie, Miss Chapman, Mr. Mer¬ 
ritt and Dell McCormick. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Brower 

Adam* 

Whetsel 

McCroaky 

Parker 

Davis 

Parry 

Babcock 

Heaton 

Busby 

Moss 

Marr 

Kloasner 

K ulcer 

Pratt 

Rccd 























EDITORIAL 

An annual of this character should be, from the editor’s 
viewpoint at least, an illustrated history of a single school year. 
It may be more than this, or it may be less—depending upon the 
genius or lack of genius, originality or lack of originality, ambi¬ 
tion or lack of ambition on the part of the entire staff. This 
volume follows the intentions of preceeding volumes in being both 
more and less an illustrated history of a single school year. 

We have endeavored to be fair in every respect and have 
intentionally slighted no one. Mistakes will be found, of course, 
and if you happen to be an unfortunate and suffer because of one 
of them, we are sorry, very sorry indeed, but still have no apology 
to offer. 

There are many, many prominent individuals in this College 
of ours, and space would not permit us to satarize them all. If 
you are unable then to find your name or likeness in the comic 
section, rest secure in your knowledge of the reason therefor. 
On the other hand if some bit of humor “stings you” for a mo¬ 
ment, temper yourself to the spirit in which this book, is pre¬ 
sented ; and in an instance or two at least we will be much obliged 
if you will neglect to do even that. 

However, the staff believes in preparedness and has gone thru 
a period of intensive training. Nevertheless we are for peace and 
trust that diplomatic relations will have to be severed with 
nobody. 


Page 112 





Page 113 




































Page 115 










































Football 


BENTON BANGS, (Captain), considered by many to be the best ground gainer in 
the Conference, was unfortunate in bruising his leg in the first Conference game of the 
season, thereby hindering his work behind the line. His consistent training made him 
a valuable leader for the State College team and his loss will be sorely felt next fall 
when the team first reports. Third year on team. 


52 $ 52 £ 


CLARENCE ZIMMERMAN, (Captain-elect), after getting off on a late start, had 
more to do with what success the State Collegians had than any other man. His 
love for the game and clean sportsmanship has made him the most respected man on the 
State College team. Third year on team. 


s< si a 52 


ARTHUR DURHAM. “Bull” has the distinction of being a living advertisement 
for two great commodities, Mellin’s food and smoking tobacco. His sure toe and gen¬ 
eralship on the team has won several games for W. S. C. in his four years at college. 
His loss will be a loss, indeed, when the squad reports in the fall. Fourth year on the 
team. 


52 £5 S3 52 


ALFRED LANGDON. A1 was the most valuable man on the State College team 
last fail. His quick diagnosis of plays and always in the game spirit won him a place 
on many authorities’ all-star team. His loss to the team will be sorely felt by Coach 
Deitz, as he considered Langdon the greatest diagnoser of plays whom he has ever seen. 
Fourth year on the team. 


52 £ 52 52 


RAY LOOMIS was the only man who was chosen on the official All-Northwest 
eleven. His steady work and faithful training brought him from the ordinary class of 
player to the star of the team in one year’s time. Third year on the team. 


Page H7 









Page U8 























Football 


RICHARD HANLEY, known as "Rim-rock*’ or ‘ Mike." Hanley played a consistent 
game at half-back. His fighting face, a fast speed, threw terror in many opponents. 
Second year on team. 


£2 £2 £2 £2 


SILAS STITES, renowned for his body-blocking, plays the game on pure nerve. 
Handicapped by projecting bones, "Si" puts all that he has into the game and then 
some. Third year on the team. 


3 & £2 £2 


BASIE DOANE, dubbed "Bullet” Doane by his team-mates, played exceptional foot¬ 
ball for his weight and physical condition. His pulling of the unexpected always made 
him a valuable man on the team. To illustrate this, in one of the games Doane was 
seen to be all in from the players’ bench. The coach decided to send in a substitute for 
him, saying he was "all in," when Doane broke through for a fifty-yard run, hence his 
value as a Crimson and Gray warrior. Third year on the team. 


a £2 £2 SI 


WALTER HERREID, commonly known as "Hulda," told Deitz that he could play 
tackle against the best man in the Conference and proceeded to do it when he ran up 
against the Oregon phenom, Beckett. If ground wgs made around Herreid’s side of the 
line, a pile of several men holding down "Fat" could be seen. Second year on team. 


£2 £2 £2 £2 


RONALD FISHBACK, "Willie," the largest man on the team, played the whole sea¬ 
son with broken down arches which certainly impeded his speed and aggressive play¬ 
ing. On defense Fishback did not run up against a single man who could put him back. 
Second year on the team. 


Page 119 









Page 120 


























Football 


BERT BROOKS. The official crab of the team. Has never known what it is to 
sluff during a game. He was always doing his share and some of the other fellow’s. A 
greater tribute cannot be paid to any man than “Happy" Brooks. Second year on the 
team. 


£2 £2 £2 


RALPH BOONE has the size and speed to make him one of the greatest football 
players in America. He was the official punter of the team, averaging close to forty 
yeards for the season. Next year ought to be his great year on the gridiron. Second 
year on the team. 


S2 £2 £1 £2 


VERNON BROWN, the little Mormon from Southern Idaho, will be one of the best 
players in the West if he keeps improving as he did last season. A great defensive 
runner anh a sure returner of punts, he will be an able successor to Durham. First 
year on the team. 


£2 £2 & 


FRED HAMILTON. The only Freshman to make his letter, has the size to make 
one of the greatest guards Deitz will have at the State College. Running up against 
stiff competition in old letter men, “Ham" more than made good. First year on the 
team. 


£2 £2 £2 £2 


ROY HANLEY, rightly called “Leary” was an able understudy of Zimmerman. 
Deitz was so confident in his ability that “Zim" would be the first one to be moved to 
fill another’s shoes when an able substitute could not be found. First year on the team. 


Page 121 












Page 122 


































Football 


CLARENCE BOONE. When Clarence, or rather “Digger,” Boone leaves school a 
better-known man cannot be found. He has been subbing for three years and would 
have made the team long ago if effort and desire could have overcome his size. But 
he weighs scarcely one hundred and fifty and the handicap has been too large. But 
wait till next year and see. 


& £2 £5 


MAURICE MacOREGOR. “Scotch” played good football and only missed out on 
making his letter when an injured shoudler kept him out of the game. 


£2 51 £2 £2 


FRED GLOVER, broke into large headlines after his performance in the Whitman 
game. His speed and fight have caused him to be watched by the coaches for some time 
and next year will undoubtedly see “Fritz” in the first string line-up. 


£1 $ S2 £2 


RAY FINNEY, missed out on making his letter by one half after he had broken his 
foot in the Idaho game. His experience and cool-headedness made his vacancy felt 
several times during the rest of the season and it is hoped by the fans that “Buck” will 
not be out of the game next year. Third year on the team. 


£2 52 £2 S2 

FRANK SKADAN, the strong man from Spokane, will have three more years to 
show that an Irishman cannot be downed. His friends predict that it will be next year. 


Page 123 







Page 124 












FOOTBALL 

REVIEW OF THE SEASON 


With twelve letter men returned to school, the prospects for a winning football 
team were the brightest in the history of the State College. There was a man for each 
position and coached by “Lonestar” Deitz, the supporters of the Crimson and Gray 
team thought that it was only a question of how large the score was going to be. But 
one great essential was lacking on the squad. There was not the harmony which had 
existed the year before. Older heads were not there to hold the men in line. 

THE ALUMNI GAME 

The first game played on Rogers Field was the worst one. The Varsity allowed the 
old-timers to “kid’' them out of their best work. Then “Doc” Bohler pulled the Sam 
White stuff and ran fifty yards for a touchdown, winning the game. Even in this game, 
which had always gone practically the same way, the rooters saw that something was 
missing, but did not realize that their over-confidence was being transmitted. to the 
team. 


THE O. A. C. GAME 

By the time that the 0. A. C. team had arrived in Pullman, prospects were beginning 
to brighten. The team looked good, and played good, and the confidence of the crowd 
and players was the same. 

This confidence was shaken to a considerable extent when O. A. C. went home 
with a new pig-skin and the name of defeating the conquerors of Brown. The State 
Collegians played a better ground-gaining game but lost on fumbles, eleven in number, 
by the score of 13 to 10. It was only when the second string back-field went into the 
game that the State College scored. 

MONTANA FIRST ONE TO LOSE TO W. S. C. 

Followed by a great many “hoboes,” the State College men, went to Missoula re¬ 
solved to come back with the large end of the score. The harmony was forced upon 
them, the over-confidence was lacking, so the score was 27 to 0 against Montana. Only 
one time during the game was the W. S. C. goal in danger, when Bangs kicking from 
the side line, kicked out of bounds on the 17-yard line. After two bucks McQuarrie 
tried for a field goal but failed. 

The rooters who had “beat” their way to Montana, serpentined during the time 
between halves and got the big publicity in the Missoula papers for their organized 
work. 


Page 125 
































Football 


IDAHO ALSO FALLS BEFORE THE NEW TEAM 

Never over-confident against Idaho, the “Indians”’ put on their mud cleats, threw 
away their pads and won 31 to 0. The game was unsensational except for the numer¬ 
ous injuries which made the crowd realize the fight that was going on. Tne team 
played the game without the advice of Deitz who was in Portland witching Oregon arid 
Washington battle. 


OREGON WINS 

To Idaho should go the credit of the defeat in the hands of Oregon. Six of the 
first string men, bruised and torn so that they should not go into the game at all, and 
three others oil the side line, injured to such an extent that it was an impossibility for 
them to think of going into the game, the State College team held the Oregon team, 
which later defeated the University of Pennsylvania, to one-hundred and fifty yards 
from scrimmage. 

Boone, our punter and best defensive back-field man, was so injured in the third 
.play that he had to be taken from the game, leaving Zimmerman to play behind the 
line, although he could not raise his right arm from his side. This broke our defense 
entirely, leaving Beckett the chance to gain over ten yards on each exchange of punts. 
So the game was lost 12 to 3, although the Oregon team was just as confident as we 
had been against the Oregon Aggies. 

GONZAGA LOSES 18 TO 0 

After tw T o weeks’ rest the team went to Spokane and took the Micks into camp to 
the tune of 18 to 0. Most of the playing was done by second stringers as Deitz wanted 
to save his injured men for Whitman, on Thanksgiving. The Micks fought harder than 
any team which we had played during the season but were handicapped too much by 
their size. 


STARS APPEAR AT WALLA WALLA 

The last game of the season at Walla Walla on Turkey Day brought out stars which 
can be relied on to show well during the 1918 season. The final score was 46 to 0, due 
to a great extent by the playing of Brown at quarter and Glover at half, two men who 
can be relied upon to fill the shoes vacated by Bangs and Durham, who played their 
last game that day under the Crimson and Gray colors. 


Page 127 







Football 


WINNERS OF THE FOOTBALL W. 
BENTON BANGS (Captain). 


Clarence Zimmerman 

/ 

Ronald Fishback 


Arthur Durham 

Bert Brooks 

Walter Herreid 


Vernon Brown 

Fred Hamilton 

Ray Loomis 


Basil Doane 

Alfred Langdon 

Richard Hanley 


Ralph Boone 

Silas Stites 

Roy Hanley 



RATING 

OF NORTHWEST 

TEAMS, 1915 

1. University of Oregon 


5. 

University of Montana 

2. University of Washington 

6. 

University of Idaho 

3. Oregon Agricultural College 

7. 

Whitman College 

4. Washington State College 

8. 

Gonzaga University 

ALL NORTHWEST TEAM 

(Chosen by George M. Varnell, conference referee, for the American Sports Publish- 

ing Company, as official selection 

for the Northwest Conference for 1915.) 

Riseley, Oregon _ 

Center 


_ .Langdon, Washington State 

Snyder, Oregon __ .. - 

. _ - Guard - _ 



Seagrave, Washington U. _ - 

- - Guard 


- . Carnahan, Idaho 

Beckett, Oregon__ __ _ 

. Tackle - 


_ _ Bartlett, Oregon 

Grimm, Washington U._ _ _ 

. Tackle _ 


_ .Brooks, Washington State 

Loomis, Washington State __ 

__End-. 


- Zimmerman, Washington State 

Mitchell, Oregon. - - - 



__ Clark, Montana 

Huntington, Oregon _ 

, Quarter 


. -Durham, Washington State 

Conn, Oregon Aggies _ 

_Half_ 

_ 

- Bangs, Washington State 


Parsons, Oregon. - Half- 

Murphy, Washington U _ Full- 


-Montieth, Oregon 
.Hoover, Whitman 


Page 128 
























Page 129 


THE SQUAD. 











































ALBERT HARTMAN, CAPTAIN 


Page 131 










Page 132 





















Baseball 


(1) A1 Hartman (Captain). Undoubtedly the best pitcher in the Conference; 
pitched winning ball and led his team mates with a batting average of over .400. Im¬ 
mediately after leaving school he signed with Portland, later going to Tacoma where he 
made good. Fourth year on the team. 


£2 £2 £2 a 


(2) Albert Anderson (ex-Captain) was the top notch third baseman on the team. 
Never a strong batter, Andy managed to hit often when needed, making him a bad batter 
for opponents. His fielding of bunts and covering the ground made him a very valuable 
man at third. Fourth year on the team. 


£2 £1 £2 £2 


(3) Fred Schroeder (Captain elect) has the distinction of being the best backstop 
who has played for W. S. C. in many years. His superb throwing to second and all- 
around knowledge of the game, made him considered by many critics the most valuable 
man on the team. Second year on team. 


£5 £2 £2 £2 


(4) Norman Moss overcame a bad wrist which had hindered his pitching the year 
before and pitched better ball than any previous year. He came close to breaking his 
strike-out record of eighteen by whiffing sixteen in two games. Third year on team. 


£2 £2 £2 £2 


(5) Roy Bohler, playing short, did much towards winning the championship by his 
easy playing. Playing deep short and throwing true to first in every instance, gave him 
the rank among the shortstops of the Conference. Third year on the team. 


Page 133 








Page 134 






















Baseball 


(1) Lyman Passmore. Pink moved from the outfield to first and made good from 
the start. His hitting improved so much that he was moved from eighth place on the 
batting list to fourth. Second year on the team. 


22 22 £2 22 


(2) Fenton Smith told “Doc” that he could make good and proceeded to do It. 
Having the distinction of being the hero of the championship series the year before 
did not bother his fielding or hitting. A fielder who will make a great record before he 
finishes school. First year on the team. 


22 22 22 22 


(3) Stene Stenberg replaced Satterthwaite at second and then some. He was in 
the game every second and could always be depended on. Always a good hitter, Stene 
did much to disconcert pitchers by leading off with a good rap. First year on the team. 


22 22 22 £2 


(4) Basil Jerard, commonly known as “Snookey,” was always in the road of any 
ball which came into his territory. Sensational fielding and fair batting are his char¬ 
acteristics on the field. First year on the team. 


22 22 22 22 


(5) George Root was the hardest hitter on the team. Although he did not con¬ 
nect as often as Hartman, he hit much further for more extra bases than any other 
batter. First year on the team. 


Page 135 





Page 136 


THE SQUAD. 










Baseball 

REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

Baseball, always a prominent sport at the State College, and one in which several 
championships have been gained, followed the successful patch of basket-ball and foot¬ 
ball last year, giving us when the season ended a team with an undisputed right to the 
Northwest Conference title. The performance of the two premier pitchers, Hartman 
and Moss, together with the hitting ability of the entire team, made possible the fine 
record of the season. 

The pre-season was played on Rogers Field with the O A. C. nine, in a game of ten 
scoreless innings. For an early season schedule the exhibition of errorless baseball 
was remarkable. Following this game the Spokane Indians of the Northwest League 
held spring training camp at the college, and played a series of games with the col¬ 
legians. The professionals were superior at the bat and managed to win all three 
games, although they barely squeezed through on a 3 to 2 score in the opening match. 

The team got into its championship stride when it won two out of three games from 
the University of Montana. The stellar work of Hartman and Moss started the collegiate 
season and the batting average of the team rose steadily. The Montana scores were: 
6 to 4, 16 to 10, and 3 to 6. 

On their way to Montana, the Crimson and Gray team met and defeated Gonzaga. 
Captain A1 Hartman practically won this game alone by shutting out the “Micks” and 
batting a clean home run that scored three men. 

Two more games with Montana resulted in two close victories for the Missoulans. 
Up to the ninth inning of the first game W. S. C. lead, when the Montana team had a 
rally that won 8 to 7. In the second game the two teams were evenly matched and only 
the advantage of timely hits enabled the Montana nine to beat the visitors 6 to 4. 

The team returned from Montana to meet the University of Idaho in the first Con¬ 
ference game of the season. A hard battle was expected as the Muscovites had previously 
beaten the Spokane Indians. The best that they could do, however, was to hold Bohler’s 
men to a score of 5 to 1. In this game Hartman chalked up 13 strike-outs. The next 
day, with Moss in the box, the score was 5 to 0. 

The prospects for Conference honors made possible by the two victories over Idaho, 
were further increased when the team won two games from Whitman the following week. 
The first game was a 6 to 1 victory, and the second, which was one of the best games of 
the season, as won in the ninth when Schroeder drove the hit that scored two men. The 
crowd that was watching furnished the necessary pep to start the rally. 

Only two more games remained on the schedule and these, with our old-time rival, 
the University of Idaho, increased the interest of the fans in the Conference race. In 
both games the Idaho men were outplayed, which was evidenced by the scores—9 to 0, 
and 4 to 0. 

With the string of victories to its credit, W. S. C. now stood tied with O. A. C. for 
Conference honors. All arrangements had been made for the team to travel to Corvallis 
for the final series, when Coach Bohler received a telegram stating that O. A. C. had 
forfeited the championship. 

A big rally of students that night celebrated the second consecutive winning of the 
Northwest Conference baseball title, the third championship of the season, and the finish 
of the greatest year in the athletic history of Washington State College. 


Page 137 







Page 138 



















Baseball 


SCORES (Non-Conference Games). 


April 15, at Pullman—Washington State, 0; 0. A. C., 0. 

April 17, at Pullman—Washington State, 2; Spokane Indians, 3. 

April 19, at Pullman—Washington State, 2; Spokane Indians, 5. 

April 21, at Pullman—Washington State, 1; Spokane Indians, 9. 

April 25, at Pullman—Washington State, 6; University of Montana, 3. 
April 26, at Pullman—Washington State, 16; University of Montana, 10 
April 27, at Pullman—Washington State, 3; University of Montana, 6, 
May 2, at Spokane—Washington State, 8; Gonzaga U., 0. 

May 3, at Missoula—Washington State, 7; University of Montana, 8. 
May 4, at Missoula— Washington State, 4; University of Montana, 6. 


SCORES (Conference Games). 


May 12, at Moscow—Washington State, 5; University of Idaho, 1. 
May 13, at Pullman—Washington State, 5; University of Idaho, 0. 
May 19, at Pullman—Washington State, 6; Whitman, 1. 

May 20, at Pullman — Washington State, 2; Whitman, 0. 

May 23, at Moscow—Washington State, 9; University of Idaho, 0. 


ALL STAR TEAM AS SELECTED BY EVERGREEN 


Catchers —Schroeder, Washington State; Scheldneckt, Whitman. 
Pitchers —Hartman and Moss, Washington State; DeGrief, Whitman. 
First Base—Almquist, Idaho. 

Second Base — Stenberg, Washington State. 

Third Base — Anderson, Washington State. 

Shortstop — Bohler, Washington State. 

Center Field—Jones, Idaho. 

Right Field—Passmore, Washington State. 

Left Field — Palmer, Whitman. 


VARSITY TEAM. 


Catcher —Schroeder (Captain-elect ) . 
Pitcher—Hartman (Captain). 
Pitcher — Moss. 

First Base — Passmore. 

Second Base— Stenberg. 

Third Base—Anderson. 

Shortstop—Bohler. 

Right Field-Smith. 

Center Field—Jerard. 

Left Field—Root. 


WINNERS OF THE “W” IN BASEBALL 


Albert Hartman (Captain) 
Fred Schroeder 
Albert Anderson 


Norman Moss 
Roy Bohler 
Lyman Passmore 


Fenton Smith 
George Root 
Basil Jerard 


Page 139 





























Track 



LUSKER McCROSKEY, CAPTAIN 











Track 



LUSKER McCROSKEY (Captain) closed his fourth 
year of track competition by putting up a new record 
of total number of points made in the four years. This 
makes the second record that Luck leaves at which future 
stars must shoot. Fourth year on the team. 


& a £3 52 


AL MILLER (Captain-elect) annexed a few points for 
his team in the dashes and succeeded in winning high 
point honors for the second consecutive year. 


a SI Q SI 


CARL KING the largest man on the team shoved the 
shot and put the discus in true “Rose form.” From im¬ 
provement which he has shown, Carl ought to be the 
best known weight man on the coast. 


Page 142 










Track 


BOYD SCHLAEFER the man who runs on nerve was 
seriously handicapped during the season by a strained ten¬ 
don. At that he ran a good second to both Woodruff and 
Smith and added many needed points to Washington State’s 
success. 





£2 £2 £2 S2 


PERRY THOMPSON a consistent trainer was unfor¬ 
tunate in all meets in railing to show up to his real form. 
His strength will be sorely felt because of his absence on 
this year’s team. 


£2 £2 £2 £2 


CHARLIE SMITH can run all day and then some, at 
least that is what opponents think. He crossed the tape 
first in every race he entered in the two-mile during the 
season. 



Page 143 








Track 



ROY SCHACTLER jumped from a mediocre runner to 
the first division. His greatest record was in the Confer¬ 
ence Meet when he ran the last 440 of the relay and nosed 
out Morrison of Idaho hy six inches after the latter named 
man had over ten yards handicap. This was after he had 
hung up a new college record of 49.1 in the 440. 



£2 £2 £2 £2 


FLOYD WOODRUFF is the best miler in the Confer¬ 
ence, long and lanky, he splits the wind in fast time and 
before another season is over will smash some records. 


£2 £2 £2 £2 


GEORGE WITT one of the two freshmen to make the 
team was a consstent hurdler of no mean ability. George 
with a little more training to develop speed will make the 
best get up and step to win first honors. First year on the 
team. 


Page 144 













Track 


IVAN PRICE the other freshman on the team made 
his letter by covering over twenty-one feet in the broad 
jump. “Pricey” is expected to win many points in the 
broad jump before he leaves school. 


£2 £2 £2 £2 


HUGH McCLUNG a recruit from Seattle proved to be 
a good running mate for Miller. His work on the relay 
team and in the sprints strengthened the team much more 
than can be estimated. 


£2 £2 £5 £2 


BILL HORN closed his senior year at the State Col¬ 
lege by giving all he had and then some. Bill was unfor¬ 
tunate in running up against an exceptionally good field in 
the middle distances. For his nerve, diligent and faithful 
training in the last four years the Athletic Council voted 
him a letter, the second honorary letter ever given at 
W. S. C. 


Page 145 








Page 146 










Track 

ANKENY FIELD 

WHITMAN COL/LEGE VS. WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE. 

Walla Walla, May 5, 1916. 

MILE RUN. Time, 4:41— (1) Woodruff, W. S. C.; (2) Schlaefer, W. S. C.; (3) Mc¬ 
Kay, W. 

440-YARD DASH. Time, 53 flat— (1) Schactler, W. S. C.; (2) Martini, W. S. C.; (3) 
Thompson, W. 

120-YARD HURDLES. Time, 16:1—(1) McCroskey, W. S. C.; (2) Witt, W. S. C.; (3) 
Price, W. S. C. 

100-YARD DASH. Time. 10:1—(1) Hoover, W.; (2) Miller, W. S. C.; (3) Edwards. W. 

TWO-MILE. Time, 10:13—(1) Smith, W. S. C.; (2) Schlaefer, W. S. C.; (3) Woodruff, 
W. S. C. 

880-YARD RUN. Time, 2:04 1-6— (1) McKay, W.; (2) Hurd. W.; (3) Horn, W. S. C. 

220-HURDLES. Time, 24:4—(1) Hoover, W.; (2) McCroskey, W. S. C.; (3) Witt, 
W. S. C. 

220-YARD DASH. Time, 22:2—(1) McClung, W. S. C.; (2) Miller, W. S. C.; (3) Ed¬ 
wards, W. 

SHOT-PUT. Distance. 38 ft. 11% in.—(1) King, W. S. C.; (2) Miller, W; (3) Me- 
Croskev 3 ^ 

DISCUS. Distance, 116 ft., 8 In.—(1) Miller, W.; (2) King, W. S. C.; (3) Yenney, W. 

JAVELIN. Distance, 160 ft., 2 in.—(1) Hoover, W.; (2) Witt, W. S. C.; (3) Schactler, 
W. S. C. 

BROAD JUMP. Distance, 20 ft., 5 in.—(1) McDonald, W.; (2) Price, W. S. C.; (3) 
Gaizer, W. 

POLE VAULT. Heighth, 10 ft., 7 in.—(1) H. Thompson, W. S. C.; (2) P. Thompson, 
W. S. C.; (3) Blackman, W. 

HIGH JUMP. Height, 5 ft., 5 in.—(1) Witt and McCroskey, W. S. C. tied; (2) Pot¬ 
ter, W. 

RELAY, Conceded to W. S. C. 

ROGERS FIELD 

WASHINGTON STATE VS. IDAHO UNIVERSITY 
Pullman. Washington, May 13, 1016. 

MILE RUN. Time, 4:35 2-5— (1) Woodruff, W. S. C.; (2) Schlaefer, W. S. C.; (3) 
Phillips, W. S. C. 

440-YARD DASH. Time, 50:4—(1) Massey, I.; (2) Schlactler, W. S. C.; (3) Dingle, I. 

120-YARD HURDLES. Time, 16:4—(1) Cunningham, I; (2) McCroskey, W. S. C.; 
(3)Witt, W. S. C. 

100-YARD DASH. Time, 10:1—(1) Morrison, I.; (2) Richmond. I.; (3) Betty, I. 

TWO-MILE. Time, 10:9:1—(1) Smith, W. S. C.; (2) Schlaefer, W. S. C.; (3) Phil¬ 
lips. W. S. C. 

880-YARD RUN. Time, 2:01:3—(1) Gerlough, I.; (2) Massey, I.; (3) Horn, W. S. C. 

220-YARD HURDLES. Time, 25 flat—(1) McCroskey, W. S. C.; (2) Cunningham. I.; 
(3) Witt. W. S. C. 

220-YARD DASH. Time, 22 flat—(1) Morrison, I.; (2) Miller, W. S. C.; (3) McClung, 
W. S. C. 

SHOT PUT. Distance, 40 ft.. 3^ in.—(1) Bohl, I.; (2) King. W. S. C.; (3) Brooks, 
W. S. C. 

DISCUS. Distance, 125 ft., 9 in.—(1) Lommonson, I.; (2) King. W. S. C.; (3) McClure, 
W. S. C. 

JAVELIN. Distance, 159 ft.—(1) Betty, I.; (2) Smith, W. S. C.; (3) McCroskey, W. S. C. 

BROAD JUMP. Distance, 21 ft.. 11 in.—(1) Morrison. I.; (2) Price, W. S. C.; (3) 
Betty, I. 

POLE VAULT. Heighth, 11 ft., 10*4 in.—(1) Thompson, W. S. C.; (2) Cassidy, I.; (3) 
Smith, W. S. C. 

HIGH JUMP. Heighth, 5 ft., 7 in.—(1) McCroskey. W. S. C.; (2) McClure, W. S. C.; 
(3) Jones, I. 

RELAY WON BY IDAHO.' Time, 3:26:2—(Dingle, Parr, Gerlough, Massey). 


Page 147 










Page 148 































Track 

MONTANA FIELD 

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA VS. W. S. C. 

Missoula, Mont., May 20, 1916. 

440 YARD. Time, 53:2—(1) Schactler, W. S. C.; (2) McClung, W. S. C.; (3) Freder¬ 
icks, M. 

MILE RUN. Time, 4:44—(1) Woodruff, W. S. C.; (2) Schlaefer, W. S. C.; (3) Smith, 
W. S. C. 

120 HURDLELS. Time, 17:2—(1) Witt, W. S. C.; (2) McCroskey, W. S. C.; (3) Mc- 
Quarrie, M. 

100 YARDS. Time, 10:1—(1) Miller, W. S. C.; (2) McClung, W. S. C.; (3) Schactler, 
W. S. C. 

2-MILE. Time, 10:32—(1) Schlaefer, W. S. C.; (2) Smith, W. S. C.; (3) Orr, M. 

880 YARDS. Time, 2:06:1—(1) Jones, M.; (2) Horn, W. S. C.; (3) Woodruff, W. S. C. 
220 HURDLES. Time, 27—(1) McCroskey, W. S. C.; (2) Witt, W. S. C.; (3) Brown, M. 
220 DASH. Time, 23:1—(1) Miller, W. S. C.; (2) McClung, W. S. C.; (3) Grant, M. 

SHOT PUT. Distance, 43 ft., 10 in.—(1) Kerran, M.; (2) Bentz, M.; (3) King, W. S. C. 

DISCUS. Distance, 140 ft., 6 in.—(1) Bentz, M.; (2) McQuarrie, M.; (3) King, W. S. C. 

JAVELIN. Distance, 144 ft., 7 in.— (1) Hawk, M.; (2) Higgins, M.; (3) Sanderson, M. 

BROAD JUMP. Distance, 21 ft., 4M> in.—(1) Wolfe, M.; (2) Price, W. S. C.; (3) Hig¬ 
gins, M. 

POLE VAULT. Heighth, 11 ft., 6 in.—(1) Thompson, W. S. C.; (2) Smith, W. S. C.; 
(3) Brown, M. 

HIGH JUMP. Heighth, 5 ft., 7y 2 in.—(1) Wolfe, M.; (2) McCroskey and Witt, W. S. C., 
tied. 

RELAY. Washington State. Time, 3:36. (McCroskey, Witt, Miller, Schactler.) 

STADIUM FIELD 

S. A. A. C. VS. W. S. C. 

Spokane, Wash., May 27. 

MILE RUN. Time, 4:41—(1) Wessils, S. A. A. C.; (2) Woodruff, W. S. C.; (3) Smith, 

w. s. c. 

440 YARDS. Time, 52:1—(1) Schactler, W. S. C.; (2) McClung, W. S. C ; (3) Morse, 
S A A C 

100 YARDS. Time, 10—(1) Pearson, S. A. A. C.; (2) H. Williams, S. A. A. C.; (3) 
Miller, W. S. C. 

2-MILE. Time, 9:48— (1) Smith, W. S. C., (2) Werta, S. A. A. C.; (3) Scnlaefer, W. S. C. 
880 i ARDS. Time, 2:00:1—(1) Wessels, S. A. A. C.; (2) Horn, W. S. C.; (3) L. Will- 
iams S. A A C 

220 HURDLES. Time, 27—(1) McCroskey, W. S. C.; (2) Glick, S. A. A. C.; (3) Witt, 
W. S. C. 

220 DASH. Time, 22:3—(1) Pearson, S. A. A. C.; (2) H. Williams, S. A. A. C.; (3) 
Miller, W. S. C. • 

SHOT PUT. Distance, 42 ft., 2 in.—(1) Dietz, W. S. C.; (2) King, W. S. C.; (3) Mc¬ 
Croskey, w. s. c. 

DISCUS. Distance, 118 ft., 11 in.—(1) King, W. S. C.; (2) Kuhn, S. A. A. C.; (3) Dietz, 
W. S. C. 

JAVELIN. Distance, 152 ft., 3 in.—(1) Bullivant, S. A. A. C.; (2) Dietz, W. S. C.; (3) 
Smith, W. S. C. 

BROAD JUMP. Distance, 21 ft., 4 in—(1) Johnson, S. A. A. C.; (2) Dietz, W. S. C.; 
(3) Thompson, W. S. C. 

POLE VAULT. Heighth, 11 ft., 6 in.—(1) Thompson, W. S. C.; (2) H. Thompson, 
W. S. C.; (3) SmitlT, W. S. C. 

HIGH JUMP. Heighth, 5 ft., 6 in.—(1) H. Williams, S. A. A. C.; (2) Johnson, S. A. A. 
C.; (3) McCroskey, W. S. C. 

RELAY. Time, l:30:2-^-S. A. A. C. (Glick, L, Williams, H. Williams, Pearson.) 


Page 149 









Page 150 














Track 

ROGERS FIELD 


INTERSCHOLASTIC TRACK MEET 
May 12, 1916. 

50-YARD DASH. Time, 5:3—(1) Pearson, North Central; (2) Morse, North Central; 
(3) Nordyke, Colfax. 

100-YARD DASH. Time, 10:1—(1) Pearson, North Central; (2) Nordyke, Colfax; (3) 
Glick, L. C. 

120- YARD HURDLES. Time, 17 —(1) Phillips, Davenport; (2) Lenwood, L. C.; (3) 
Cook, North Central. 

220- YARD HURDLES. Time, 26:2— (1) Nordyke, Colfax; (2) Glick, L. C.; (3) Ivy, 
Davenport. 

220-YARD DASH. Time, 23:1—(1) Pearson, North Central; (2) Fogarty, Ellensburg; 
(3) Nordyke, Colfax. 

SHOT PUT. Distance, 42 ft., 1 in.—(1) McKay, Endicott; (2) Watt, L. C.; (3) King, 
Davenport. 

JAVELIN. Distance, 132 ft., 10 in.—(1) Miller, L. C.; (2) Armstrong, Colfax; (3) Yenni, 
Walla Walla. 

DISCUS. Distance, 111 ft., 1 in.—(1) Kuhn, L. C.; (2) King, Davenport; (3) McKay, 
Endicott. 

POLE VAULT. Heighth, 10 ft., 9 in.—(1) Hoffman, Walla Walla; (2) Meyers, John¬ 
son; (3) Smith, L. C. 

HIGH JUMP. Heighth, 5 ft., 7 in.— (1) Miller, L. C.; (2) Phillips, Davenport; (3) Dume, 
North Central. 

880-YARD RUN. Time, 2:5:1—(1) Parker, Colfax; (2) Winslow, Wenatchee; (3) Perry, 
Ellensburg. 

440-YARD DASH. Time, 50.3— (1) Parker, Colfax; (2) Morse, North Central; (3) 
Squires, Pullman. 

MILE RUN. Time, 4:52:3— (1) Sturdevant, Colfax; (2) Parker, Colfax; (3) Kreps, 
Pullman. 

BROAD JUMP. Distance, 20 ft.. 10 in.— (1) Sohns, North Central; (2) Jaycox, Walla 
Tvr a ii«* T-Tnfvnpr Walla Walla 

HALF-MILE RELAY. Time, 1:38-1—North Central (Morse, Stone, Lentz, Pearson). 
Meet won by North Central, Spokane. 


INTERSCHOLASTIC RECORDS 

50-YARD DASH. Time, 5:2—Watson of Tekoa (1910). 

100 YARDS. Time, 10:1—Cooke of Ellensburg (1910). 

POLE VAULT. Heighth. 10 ft. 9 in.—HofTman of Walla Walla (1916). 

DISCUS. Distance, 112 ft., 7 in.—Englehorn of Spokane (1909). 

HIGH JUMP. Heighth. 5 ft., 10 in.—Coe of Spokane (1909). 

HIGH HURDLES. Time, 16:2—Johnson of Lewis and Clark (1915). 

LOW HURDLES. Time. 26:2—Nordyke of Colfax (1916). 

SHOT PUT. Distance, 47 ft., 5 in.—Watson of Tekoa (1911). 

JAVELIN. Distance. 151 ft., 11 in.—Bullivant of North Central (1915). 

BROAD JUMP. Distance. 21 ft., 9^ in.—Johnson of Lewis and Clark (1915). 
440-YARD RUN. Time, 50.3—Parker of Colfax (1916). 

MILE RUN. Time. 4: 37—Schlaefer of Pullman (1911). 

880-YARD RUN. Time, 2:5:1—Parker of Colfax (1916). 

220-YARD DASH. Time, 22—Cooke of Ellensburg (1910). 

MILE RELAY. Time, 3:39:4—Spokane in 1911. 

HALF-MILE RELAY. Time, 1:35:4—Pullman in 1915. 


Page 151 





Track 


PACIFIC NORTHWEST CONFERENCE TRACK MEET 


WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE 
June 3, 1916. 





I. 

MILE RUN. Time, 4:27:1. 

(1) Coleman, 0. A. C.; (2) McKay, W.; (3) Schlae¬ 

0. 

W. 

W.S.C. 

O.A.C. 

fer, W. S. C. 

440-YARD DASH. Time, 48:3. 

(1) Kadderly, 0. A. C.; (2) Schactler, W. S. C.; 

— 

3 

1 

5 

(3) Wilson, 0. 

120-YARD HURDLES. Time, 15:2. 

1 

— 

3 

5 

(1) Muirhead, 0.; (2) Hoover, W.; no third. 

100-YARD DASH. Time, 10 flat. 

(1) Richmond, I.; (2) Morrison, I.; (3) Edwards, 

5 

3 

— 

— 

W. 8 

TWO-MILE RUN. Time, 9:54:3. 

(1) Smith, W. S. C.; (2) Bostwick, 0.; (3) Schlae¬ 

—- 

1 

— 

— 

fer, W. S. C. 

880-YARD DASH. Time, 1:59:1. 

(1) Nelson, 0.; (2) Gerlough, I.; (3) Kadderly, 

3 

— 

6 

— 

0. A. C. 3 

220-YARD HURDLES. Time, 24:2. 

(1) Hoover, W.; (2) McCroskey, W. S. C.; (3) 

5 

— 


1 

Damon, 0. A. C. 

220-YARD DASH. Time, 21:3. 

(1) Morrison, I.; (2) Miller, W. S. C.; (3) Rich¬ 

— 

5 

3 

1 

mond, I. 6 

SHOT PUT. Distance, 40:66. 

-- 

— 

3 

— 

(1) Johnson, 0. A. C.; (2) Bohm, I.; (3) Fee, 0. 3 

POLE VAULT. Heighth, 12 feet. 

(1) Cassidy, I.; (2) Fee, 0.; (3) Thompson, 

1 

— 

— 

5 

W. S. C. 5 

DISCUS THROW. Distance, 132.8. 

(1) Cole, 0. A. C.; (2) Bartlett, 0.; (3) Loma- 

3 



1 

son, I. 1 

HIGH JUMP. Heighth, 6:1.92. 

o 

— 

— 

5 

(1) Muirhead, 0.; (2) Bryant, 0. A. C.; (3) Fee, 0. — 
BROAD JUMP. Distance, 18:11. 

6 

— 

-- 

3 

(1) McDonald, W.; (2) Fee, 0.; (3) Muirhead, 0. — 
JAVELIN THROW. Distance, 184:1. 

4 

5 

-- 

-- 

(1) Fee, 0.; (2) Damon, 0. A. C.; (3) Dement, W._ 

RELAY RACE. Time, 3:25:1. 

5 

1 

-- 

3 


(1) W. S. C.— McClung, McCroskey, Miller, Schactler; (2) Idaho—Dingle, Parr, Ger- 
lough, Morrison; (3) Oregon —Wilson, Nelson, Goreskey, Staub. 


TOTALS 

University of Oregon - 37 

University of Idaho __ 29 

Oregon Agricultural College _ 28 

Washington State College.. __ 22 

Whitman College _ 18 


WINNERS OF THE ‘T IN TRACK 


Lusker McCroskey, f Captain)Perry Thompson 


Alfred Miller 
Carl King 
Boyd Schlaefer 


Charles Smith 
Roy Schactler 
Floyd Woodruff 


George Witt 
Ivan Price 
Hugh McClung 
Wililam Horn 


Page 152 














Basketball 



CAPTAIN ROY BOHLER. 


Page 153 

















/ 



Page 154 
































In Appreciation 


It was not until a year, or maybe a year and a half 
ago, when “Doc” Bohler was seriously considering the 
proposition of leaving the State College of Washington 
that we—the students—really awoke to a full apprecia¬ 
tion of him. Now that he is here still, secure amongst 
us as we believe, it is safe to say that we will not again 
fall into a lethargy of concieted satisfaction. For all 
that “Doc” Bohler has done for the Athletic Department 
of the State College, and for all that he will do; for the 
clean sportsmanship of the man; for his integrity; for 
the man himself,—this spirit of appreciation does and 
shall prevail. 


Past 155 






Page 156 











































Basketball 


Hoy Bohler (Captain) played out of his regular position again this year and more 
than made good. He was not able to get the tip-off on most of his opponents but his 
superb floor work more than made up for this deficiency. Fourth year on the team. 

& $ & £2 


Al Soreson (Captain-elect) would rather play forward than guard, but his steady 
persistency all of the time, so essential to his personal and his team's success, was his 
motto, making him the most dependable man on the team. Third year on the team. 

£1 £2 £2 £2 

Ed Copeland is from Walla Walla and is proud of it. He was considered by many 
to be the best guard seen on the Pullman floor last season. His quick diagnosis of plays 
and lightning action were his greatest assets. Second year on the team. 

£2 £2 £2 

Bob Moss is the smallest man on the team and is always ready to fight with the 
pluck of a bantam. His work cannot be praised too highly as he and Price, team¬ 
mates of high school days, were two great causes for the team’s success. Third year on 
the team. 


£2 51 £2 £2 

Ivan Price is the best forward on the Pacific Coast. He appears to be the slowest 
man on the State College team when it is nothing more than his easy playing which 
gives such an impression as he runs Copeland a race for the speed merchant of the team. 
One thing is known, Pricy never let an opponent hand him anything. 

£5 SJ £2 £2 

Glen Glover, the only substitute to make his letter on the greatest team that has 
carried the Crimson and Gray colors on the basket-ball floor, certainly deserves much 
more credit than is given him. He is expected to make a strong bid for the center 
position by Bohler next year. 


Page 157 






Page 158 


THE SQUAD. 









Basketball 


REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

A fitting tribute to the scintillating team-work of the State College team which rep¬ 
resents the general sentiment of the many fans which witnessed the crimson and gray 
team in action was from Jerry Nisson, coach of the Montana University team. Nissen 
in a wire to Bohler said: “Of all of the Northwest basket-ball teams that I have seen, I 
would select for the first All Northwest team the Washington State team intact” That 
statement also summarizes the work of the season in as good a manner as it could be 
summarized. They won by team-work and nothing more. Each man played as a cog in 
a well-oiled machine depended upon the other man and it is doubtful if any authority 
could choose a better balanced team than the one coached by “Doc” Bohler this winter. 
Even “Doc,” never having been known to brag, in speaking of the All Northwest selec¬ 
tions to one of the members of the team, said: “If it was not for the criticism which 
would be heaped upon our heads, I would choose all of you fellows on the team.” 

Starting out the season in the holidays in the Big Bend country, the State College 
team started a winning streak which was not stopped until the team met California after 
having arrived in Berkeley from the North the night of the game. The team lead in this 
memorable game 11 to 8 at the end of the first half and would have won if the referee 
had not allowed the larger men from the Bear State to rough the smaller State Col¬ 
legians. 

After finishing the season in true championship form, the only team which could 
challenge the rights of Bohler’s men to the championship was California. They based 
their argument on the result of the two games played on their own floor, one of which 
was won by W. S. C. However, they would not journey North and play the Crimson and 
Gray five on the Pullman floor, so the Washington State team rightly claimed the cham¬ 
pionship of the Pacific Coast and Northwest Conferences, 


WINNERS OF THE M W" IN BASKETBALL 


Roy Bohler (Captain) 
Alber Sorenson 


Robert Moss 
Edwin Copeland 


Ivan Price 
Glenn Glover 






Basketball 


THE VARSITY 


Bob Moss- 

Ivan Price . 
Roy Bohler _ 
A1 Sorenson 
Ed. Copeland 
Glen Glover 


..Forward 

-.Forward 

_Center 

_ Guard 

_ Guard 

Sub-Guard 


ALL NORTHWEST AS SELECTED BY BOHLER 


Gray (Idaho) _Forward 

Price (Washington State) - Forward 

Dement (Whitman) _Center 

Bohler (Washington State) __ Guard 

Copeland (Washington State)-Guard 


ALL PACIFIC COAST AS SELECTED BY BOHLER 


Price (Washington State)_Forward 

Sieberts (Oregon Aggies)-Forward 

Hejelte (California) _Center 

Bohler (Washington State) ___ Guard 

Staatz (Washington University) - Guard 


INTERSCHOLASTIC BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

Walla Walla high school won first honors in the Interscholastic Basketball Tourna¬ 
ment held at the State College March 9-10, by defeating Harrington in the final game by 
the score of 60 to 23. Ellensburg was a close runner-up to the teams in the finals, show¬ 
ing a well-balanced team which is given credit above Wenatchee, the team which tied 
her for third place. 


Page 160 













































Page 162 

















Wrestling 

COLE, wrestling for the first time, made his letter in the O. A. C. and Washington 
meets. He drew twice in both meets only to lose on decisions in the final matches. 


£ 3 3 & 


LINDSAY, wrestled in the 125-pound class and went against the hardest men in any 
of the colleges and universities met. losing in one and drawing in the other. 


£3 £3 Si £$ 


TAYLOR (Captain) won two and lost one in the three meets in which he partici¬ 
pated during the year. He was very aggressive and had the crowd’s decision in the 
match he lost, although the referee judged against him. 


£$ £2 £1 £2 


EWING (Captain-elect) has the distinction of winning all of the matches that he 
went into. This is an enviable record as he wrestled the most reputable men in the 
Northwest Conference. 


£2 ±2 £2 £2 


HABLERMAN drew one and won one in the meets In which he participated. He is 
the smallest man on the team and the fastest. 


Montana, 12. 

Oregon Aggies, 32. 

University of Washington, 9. 


RESULTS OF MEETS 

Washington State, 35. 
Washington State, 8. 
Washington State, 20. 


WINNERS OF THE "W" IN WRESTLING 

Robert Taylor (Captain) Cole 

Clarence Ewing Albert Haberman 

Jean Lindsay 


Page 163 










Tennis 

MUTTY, playing his usual conservative game, won the matches in which he par¬ 
ticipated in this year. His cool head work made him a most dependable man during 
the season. 


£2 £2 & & 


MELROSE (Captain) is the best College tennis player in the Northwest. His 
slashing drives and sure placing won every match that he was in during both the try¬ 
outs and intercolegiate matches. 

S3 £2 £2 £3 

GRAHAM introduced a new style of play to the tennis fans and players of the tour¬ 
naments. He also won all of his matches and helped Melrose win the championship 
of the Inland Empire at Walla Walla. 


TENNIS MEETS 

Montana University, 1. Washington State, 4. 

Inland Empire Championship at Walla, won by Washington State. 


Page 164 























Page 165 

























JUNIOR TRACK MEET 


INTER-CLASS TRACK MEET 


Fresh, 81. 
Sophs, 25 
Juniors. 10. 
Preps, 10. 
Seniors, 5. 


Sophs. 53. 
Fresh, 46. 
Seniors, 31 
Preps, 1. 
Juniors, 0. 


Inter-fraternity baseball won by Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Frosh-Soph football game won by Sophs, 13 to 7. 

Vet.-Pharmic football game won by Vets, 25 to 0. 

Mucker-Civil football game won by Muckers, 6 to 0. 

INTERCLASS BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT WON BY SOPHS. 
Interfraternity basketball won by Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
Boardinghouse basketball tournament won by Dorm Firsts. 
INTERCLASS WRESTLING WON BY SENIORS. 

Interfraternity indoor-baseball won by Sigma Nu. 

Senior-Faculty indoor-baseball game won by Seniors, 25 to 3. 


P a 8 e 166 










FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM. 


CROSS COUNTRY 

CLASS MEET 


Seniors, 69. 
Junior, 33. 


Saturday. November 13, 1915. 


Time, 30.15 


Freshmen, 42. 
Soph, 30. 


Smith, 20; Soph. 
Phillyes, 19; Frosh. 
Hansen, 18; Senior. 
Melrose, 17; Junior. 
Smith, A. E., 16; Junior. 
Passmore, 15; Senior. 


Lewis, 14; Senior. 
Eide, 13; Senior. 
Mustard, 12; Frosh. 
Brown, 11; Frosh. 
Vetter, 10; Soph. 
Murdock, 9; Senior. 


IDAHO MEET 


Saturday, November 20, 1915 


Smith, 6; W. S. C. 
Hansen, 5; W. S. C. 
Smith, 4; W. S. C. 
Wright, 3; Idaho. 
Agee, 2; Idaho. 


For ray, 1; Idaho. 
Melrose, — ; W. S. C. 
Passmore, — ; W. S. C. 
Phillips, —; Idaho. 

W. S. C., 15; Idaho, 6. 

Time, 28:5:3 


Page 167 














Swimming 



MERRIN 

Harold “Kahanamoka” Merrin shouldered the responsibility of 
the winning of the championship for the State College in the Pacific 
Northwest Athletic swimming meet held at the "Nat” in Spokane in 
June. Merrin won first in the 440, 220 and 880 dashes and took second 
in the 100, making a total of 18 points and winning the meet for 
W. S. C. 


Page. 168 





Page 169 

























Page 170 


WOMEN’S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 











Athletics 


THE WOMEN’S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

The Women’s Athletic Association is an organization, the purpose of which is to 
promote a high physical efficiency among the women of the College by fostering an in¬ 
terest in gymnastic and athletic activities. Membership is open to all women enrolled 
in the institution. The association is governed by a board of control composed of the 
officers of the assocation, a representative from each class in the College and one from 
the Elementary Science Department, one member representing each activity for which 
awards are made, and the Physical Director of Women. 

Interclass contests keep up a lively interest in athletics throughout the year. Con¬ 
tests are held in Hockey; Basketball; Baseball; Track; and Tennis. The Honor Team 
in Basketball, selected for all-round good sportsmanship, consisted of Grace Stonecipher 
(T9) and Della Prell (T8) f Forwards; Vernon Barnes (T9), Center; Nancy Hughes 
(T9) and Dorothy Sorenson (’20), Guards. 

Awards are made in Hockey; Basketball; Baseball; Cross Country; Track; Tennis; 
and the highest award given by the Association is the “W. A. A.” 

The Basketball tournament this year resulted in victories for the class of 1919. 

The Baseball, Track, and Tennis tournaments also resulted in victories for the 
class of 1919 last year. 

The Inter-Sorority Tennis cup was won by the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority. 

W. A. A. OFFICERS 


Emily Babcock _ President 

Irene Palmer - Secretary 

Miss Sweezey - Treasurer 


REPRESENTATIVES 


Marie Cave _ 

Edna McKinistry __ 

Grace Stonecipher - 

Nancy Hughes - 

Mildred McMaster _ 

Louise Stilke - 

Esther Horan (First Semester) 
Edna Babcock (Second Semester) 

Ruth Murray - 

Marlon Nelson - 

Grace Douglas _ 

Sadie Rendells _ 


- -Cross Country 

_ Hockey 

_ Basketball 

_ Track 

-- Tennis 

_ .Baseball 

_ Senior Representative 

_Senior Representative 

_ Junior Representative 

-Sophomore Representative 
Freshman Representative 
__ E. S. D. Representative 


Page 171 
































BASEBALL TOURNAMENT. 

Cup won by 1919 team, captained by Marie Cave. 

GIRLS’ ALL-STAR BASKETBALL TEAM 

Vernon Barnes _ Center Dorothea Sorenson _Guard 

Nancy Hughes - Guard Della Prell _ Forward 

Grace Stonecipher - Forward 

Baseball Tournament won by 1919 class 1919 vg 1919 32 to 16 1919. 

1919 vs. E. S. D.—29 to 24—1919 1919 vs! E. S. D.—29 to 18—E.‘ S. D. 

1918 vs. E. S. D.—22 to 20—1918. 1919 vs. 1918—27 to 16—1919 

Tennis Tournament won by Class of 1919. 

Inter-Sorority Tennis won by Kappa Alpha Theta. 

Track Tournament won by Class of 1919. 

Score: Junior, 11; Sophomore, 6 ; Freshmen, 0; E. S. D., 23. 

Sadie Rendells, Representative. 



CO-ED RIFLE CLUB 

Marie Cave--President Alice Lodge—Secretary Anita Kincaid-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 


Mary Pentland 
Lillian Otto 
Nora Jensen 
Myrtle Peterson 
Pearl Leonard 
Kate Argo 
Catherine Harder 
Ellida Nelson 
Frances Randle 
Hazel Crawford 


Peg Mitchell 
Margaret Gw inn 
Alma Anderson 
Minnie Worthen 
Sara Laney 
Gladys Larrabee 
Helen Gillette 
Iras Troy 
Ruth Cofman 
Alga Edwins 


Geraldine Crossland 
Zelma J. Coates 
Kathleen Gray 
Gladys Seneco 
Alice Lodge 
Elsie Worthen 
Dorothy West 
Carrie Griel 
Valley Bigly 
Frances Lincoln 


Marie Cave 
Anita Kincaid 
Beatrice Ertle 
Hazel Devenish 
Elsie Renne 
Louise Stilkey 
Montana Williams 
Marie Weldon 




Page 173 





















Page 174 




































Page 175 
























Debate and Oratory 



For the signal success of Washington State’s debate teams 
during the last few years, too much credit cannot be given 
Coach Overman. Because of his fairness, his helpful sugges¬ 
tions and his ability he may truly be characterized as the 
debater’s true friend and companion. His loss to the State 
College will be keenly felt—the Reserve Officer’s Training 
Corps has secured a rare man. 


Debate and oratory at Washington State College are under the direct control of 
the Student’s Association and are supported by a fixed proportion of the funds obtained 
by the Association from all students enrolling in college. The administration of mat¬ 
ters connected with forensic activities is left to a debate committee of three and the 
regularly employed coach. Positions on the teams which represent the College are 
open to all undergraduate students. Debaters are chosen by the coach after a number 
of trial debates rather than after a single tryout. Besides the regular inter-collegiate 
contests held annually, an interclass debate, a Freshman-Sophomore oratorical con¬ 
test, and a declamatory contest are held. Gold emblems are awarded to students who 
represent the college in either oratory or debate; a silver loving cup is given to the 
winner of the interclass contest; and gold medals or cash prizes are awarded the winners 
of the other contests. W. S. C. has also been represented in the state prohibition 
contests. In the past, as well as at the present time, the State College has always been 
ably represented in debate and oratory and this success is due largely to the effective 
work of Coach E. L. Overman. 


Page 176 












Debate 


THE DEBATE COMMITTEE 


Joseph Passoneau, Chairman. Henry Hartman. Ellen M. Keyes. 


TRIANGULAR CO-ED DEBATE 

W. S. C.-U. of W., WHITMAN 
April 15, 1916 

W. S. C., Affirmative, vs. U. of W., Negative, at Pullman. 

Team: Lucile Davis, Ines Williams. Won by U. of W. 

W. S. C., Negative, vs. Whitman, Affirmative, at Walla Walla. 

Team: Ellen Keyes, Laura Maxwell. Won by Whitman. 

U. of W., Affirmative, vs. Whitman, Negative, at Seattle. Won by U. of W. 
Question: Resolved that the LaFollette Seaman Act should be repealed. 


AFFIRMATIVE. 


NEGATIVE. 



DAVIS 


WILLIAMS 


MAXWELL KEYES 


WINNERS OF DEBATE AND ORATORY “W” 


Henry Hartman. 

Tom Jones Parry 
Clarence W. Peterson. 
John Matsen 
Eric Egge. 

Noel Bakke. 


Russell Adams. 
Eric Klossner. 

F. Marion Busby. 
Joseph Passoneau. 
Carlyle Kellogg. 
Daniel Dupertuis. 


Lyman Passmore. 
Glei* W. Trussell. 
Lora Maxwell. 
Ellen M. Keyes. 
Lucile Davis. 

Ines Williams. 


Page /77 





Debate 

W. S. C. VS. UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 

December 29, 1916 

Debate relations between Washington State and the University of Idaho date back 
to 1903. The first was a single debate, being held at Moscow. After two years debate 
relations with Idaho were dropped for some time, being resumed later in the form of 
dual debates, and still later these were changed to triangular debates including the Ore¬ 
gon Agricultural College. In 1915 this triangular was discontinued and the dual de¬ 
bate with Idaho alone was again adopted. 

AFFIRMATIVE. 



RAKKE PETERSON MAT8KN 

Affirmative at W. S. C.—Noel Bakke, Clarence Peterson, John Matsen. 
Negative at Idaho—Carlyle Kellogg, Daniel Dupertuis, Tom Parry. 

Both debates won by the University of Idaho. 

NEGATIVE. 



KELLOGG DUPERTUIS PARRY 


Question: Resolved, that all imigrants seeking admission to the United States 
should be made to pas a literacy test. 


Page 178 







Oratory 


WHITMAN VS. W. S. C. DUAL DEBATE 

FEBRUARY 9, 1917. 


AFFIRMATIVE. 



In 1911, the Northwest Triangular was 
organized with W. S. C., the University 
of Washington, and Whitman College as 
contestants. From 1911 to 1916, this was 
an annual event. This year the triangu- 
Iar debate was discontinued and a dual 
debate with Whitman was substituted. 


TRU88EL 


PARRY 


Affirmative at W. S. C.— 

Glenn Trussel. 

Tom Jones Parry. 
Won by W. S. C. 


Negative at Whitman— 

Paul Browder. 

Daniel Dupertuis. 

Won by Whitman. 


Question: Resolved, that a plan sim¬ 
ilar to the Industrial Disputes Investiga¬ 
tion Act of Canada should be adopted in 
the United States for the settlement of 
industrial disputes in those industries 
coming under the jurisdiction of the In¬ 
terstate Commerce Commission. 


NEGATIVE. 



BROWDER DUPERTUIS 


Page 179 












Debate and Oratory 



INTERCLASS ORATORICAL CONTEST. 

In this contest all collegiate students are eligible 
to compete for collegiate honors and in the same con¬ 
test a winner for the Freshman Sophomore contest is 
picked from entrants representing those two classes. 
The interclass contest was begun in 1896; the Freshman 
Sophomore contest, in 1902. 


1916 CONTEST. 

Winner of Interclass Contest—John Matsen. 
Winner of Fresh-Soph. Contest—John Matsen. 



Page 180 






























Judging Teams 


Nelson 

Morgan 


Horall 


Cowan 

Russell 



STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

Washington State’s preeminence in the field of Animal Husbandry was sus¬ 
tained this year as usual by the Stock Judging Team. Competing wdth three 
of the strongest teams in the West—U. of C., Idaho and 0. A. C.—this team won 
second place. We may well be proud of the work of all five men and respect 
especially the ability of two members: Robert Cowan won individual honors 
at the Pacific Exposition held at Portland, and Victor Morgan returned to 
Pullman with the distinction of being highest scorer of sheep. 


Page 182 







(Judging Teams 



Callow 


Poison 


HI nmn ri 


BUTTER JUDGING TEAM 

In a clash with the O. A. C. representatives at Portland, the W. S. C. butter 
judging trio won by a margin of thirty-eight points. 


APPLE JUDGING 

Roy Larson won a elear cut victory as student representative and judge 
at the National Apple Show held in Spokane during the week of November 
26, 1916. 


Page 183 






Page 184 




































Page, 185 





























Music 


GLEE CLUB 

The audience applauds, the curtain goes up, and forth upuon the stage steps sixteen 
lusty young songsters of the Washington State College Glee Club. So began the first 
concert of the twentieth annual tour. The people of Colfax were highly appreciative 
and were well pleased with the numbers rendered. The solos, quartets and instrumen¬ 
tal selections were especially well received, but it remained for Brother Ehmer as bari¬ 
tone soloist to bring down the house. (N. B. —He forgot to remove his overshoes.) Next 
morning, six o’clock, and we were on our way to Wallace, Ida. A short lay-over at 
Teako permitted Slatz Wilson and others to call up the loved ones at home. We sang 
to a small but appreciative audience that night and took our departure the next morn¬ 
ing for Missoula, Montana. The crossing of the line as we entered Montana was the 
signal for outbursts of great joy, especially from Bill Moeser. While enroute the Buffalo 
Club initiated several new members. It was surprising how well the boys “came thru.” 
It was at Anaconda that the string quintette established their reputation as entertainers. 
They played for a dance held In the lobby of the Montana Hotel, and from the way the 
Anaconda girls acted and talked, it was the best music they had ever heard. 

We left Anaconda the next morning on an electric train headed this time for Great 
Falls. A three-hour stop-over in Butte gave the boys an opportunity to see this famous 
“Smoky City” of the West. We terminated our visit there by a thrilling auto race 
through the narrow, crooked streets to the train. About ten o’clock that evening we 
reached that city of all cities, Great Falls. 

Great Falls is unanimously the best town visited by the Club this season. The Park 
Hotel was our headquarters, and we can say, we never received better treatment. Dur¬ 
ing the following afternoon, Saturday, we sang for the Lumberman’s Convention at the 
Rainbow Hotel. That night, due to the untiring efforts of David G. Kuehl and Harold C. 
Bell, former member of the Glee Club, our apperance was greeted by a packed house. 
The solo numbers were espcially commended, Miss Walden responded to repeated en¬ 
cores and Vivian simply carried away the house. Sunday morning w'e gave a sacred 
concert at one of the leading churches. On the whole, we cannot say too much for Great 
Falls. I*ts citizens put their automobiles at our disposal and gave us what we term a 
royal reception. Sunday afternoon there were many exchanges of cards and addresses. 
We wonder if all the boys kept their promises. 

On our way to Libby we were permitted, through the courtesy of the Great North¬ 
ern, to have our car set out on the siding at Glacier Park station. We remained there 
over night, giving a short concert to a few of the natives of that famous summer resort, 
in the evening at the depot. The next morning we had a real ham and egg breakfast 
In a real mountain log cabin. After a short inspection of the grounds and the big hotel, 
our train came and were again on our way. A cloudy day prohibited us from getting 
very much of a view of the Park, but we were obliged to the G. N. just the same. 


Page 187 






Music 


At Libby the ingenuity of stage manager Matters was taxed to the utmost but the 
ability of the Club came to the rescue, and we gave our concert on a bare stage; just 

like the Greeks of olden times. Libby liked us fine; they told us so. 

The following night we sang to a small but appreciative audience at Newport, Wash¬ 
ington, and the next morning were on our way to Troy, Montana. While there we made 
the acquaintance of Mr. Duffy Doonan and enjoyed his pleasant, home-like hotel. The 

string quintette gave a dance in the opera house after the concert. The whole town 

was there and we were afraid we would have to leave the quintette with them. A climax 
was reached, however, when the boys were aroused at 3 A. M. the next morning to catch 
the train for Spokane. That departure will be long remembered. 

Our concert in Spokane Thursday, at North Central High School auditorium, was a 
success in every sense of the word. The large auditorium was well filled and the audi¬ 
ence highly pleased. 

Davenport listened to us on Friday night and Andy Anderson distinguished himself 
as a reader. Saturday we were again in Spokane and were royally entertained by the 
University Club. The concert given in the Club was highly appreciated and a dance after¬ 
ward ended one of the most successful tours the Glee Club has ever taken. 

The annual post-mortem of the trip, a big crab feed was held two weeks later at 
Mrs. Kuria Strong’s home. 



Page 188 













Music 



POLYHYMIA SEXTETTE 

The Polyhymia Sextette, directed by Mrs. Kuria Strong and under the manage¬ 
ment of Eric Egge, made its first concert appearance in Colfax, May 22nd. Miss Dorothy 
Chamberlain entertained the singers at a lovely luncheon before the concert. It is said 
that a person can sing best when in a state of mental and physical satisfaction. Be it 
therefore resolved that Miss Chamberlain receive the credit due her for the Sextette’s 
first successful appearance. 

The next expedition was to Moscow. A splendid reception, a broken ukalele, but, 
withal, a kindly feeling for the rival town describes this trip very well—at least from 
the entertainers’ viewpoint. 

The following evening the Sextette preyed upon Lewiston to the extent of two con¬ 
certs. It was unanimously considered their best appearance. They were banqueted 
and entertained in royal style while in the city, and they will long remember the splen¬ 
did good times showed them by the Elks. 

Personnel 

Juanita Strong and Dorothy Chamberlain—First Soprano. 

Mrs. Buerstatte and Margaret Turnbull—Second Soprano. 

Vera Barnard (Soloist) and Josephine Heily—Contralto. 

Mrs. Kuria Strong—Director. 

Lorena Ferrier—Piano Soloist and Accompanist. 

Eric Egge—Manager. 


Page 189 










THE STATE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 

One of the principal exponents of Classical Music at the College is the orchestra 
conducted by Professor Herbst. Works of the greatest composers are studied and per¬ 
formed, giving the students and people of Pullman an opportunity to hear the great 
musical works. 

The orchestra, this year has thirty-two members and instrumentation is complete. 

During the year the orchestra appeared in Moscow, Garfield and in Spokane. The 
home concert was given May 25th and on May 26th, the orchestra, chorus and soloists 
presented Mendelssohn’s “Elijah." 

The program of the season consists of Beethoven’s “Fifty Symphony," “Lohengrin'’ 
music by Wagner, Liszt’s “2nd Hungarian Rapsody,” “Tales From the Vienna Forest." 
Waltz by Strauss. 

Mme. Herbst, as soloist sang, “Wie nahte mir der Schlummer" from “der Frei- 
schuetz," with orchestral accompaniment. 


THE COLLEGE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


STRINGS 

VIOLINS 

Carl L. Engelbart, Concert Master 
Dorothy McMaster 
Beulah Kelly 
Dorothea Hill 
Edwin Bailor 
Eleanor Wilmer 
F. A. Masek 
H. H. Moberley 
Ray Love 
Orrie Fulton 
Margaret Gwinn 
J. B. Bosse 
Ludwig Ruehl 
Walter Hendron 


Prof. Gottfried Herbst, Conductor 


VIOLA 
Clarence Nash 
’CELLOS 

Floyd S. Zimmerman 

L. B. Miller 

M. Windus 
BASS 

J. L. Detkin 
Albert Ely 
PIANO (Harp) 

Amy Lewellen 
WOOD-WIND 
FLUTE 

C. R. Williams 
OBOE 

Oliver Kildow 


CLARINETS 
Niel Thomas 
Jervis Fulmer 
BASSOON 
O. R. Rogers 
BRASS 
CORNETS 
O. A. Fisher 
C. E. Lohnes 
HORNS 

Willis Mason 
Sam’l Christman 
H. L. Kimmel 


PERCUSSION - TYMPANII AND DRUMS 


Floyd S. Zimmerman, Student Manager 


TROMBONE 
Harold Risley 
Cecil Sly 


THE COLLEGE STRING QUARTETTE 


Prof. Herbst, Coach Dorothy McMaster, Violin 
Beulah Kelly, Violin 


Carl L. Engelbart, Viola 
Floyd S. Zimmerman, Violoncello 


Page 190 









Page 191 




















Schweer 

Stephenson 

Alavord 

Nave 


C Iodine 
Pent land 
Alvard 
Ca»ce 


Chingrin 

Skidmore 

Pall 


Faulkner McKay 

Miner Lincolnfelter 

Ltngdrtn Patrick 

Green Laird 


Page 192 









Hall Springer Cont* Hanke 

Hartnell Courtney Devonlsh Carlaon 

Wilkins Falkener Houiuie McCoy Holey 

McCall Wanaer Mesford Boreiwoo 





Page 193 























Lawerjr 

1‘awlaskl 

Dark 


Mcllqulian C’aplen 

Austin Sfalilt>erg 

Fornfclat Leonard 

Krause 


La Follette Stocking 

Anderson Nourse 

Blgby Sind t a 

Larson 


Page 194 

























THE CHORAL SOCIETY 

This organization is an outgrowth of the two choral societies of the past three sea¬ 
sons—“The Women’s Choral Club” and the “Orpheus Club.” 

Their work, individually, and together, especially in the opera performances, 
“Faust,” in 1915, and “II Trovatore,” in 1916, was of such order and so deserving of 
recognition, that the College authorities this year decided to include Chorus singing 
in the curriculum, making it acceslble to all students desirous of making a serious study 
of the greater choral works—free of charge, and with a one hour credit. 

The success of the undertaking has been very pronounced, the chorus having learn¬ 
ed the oratorio “Elijah,” by Mendelssohn, which will be given in May at the College 
Auditorium, with full orchestra accompaniament and the best artists available for the 
solo parts. 

The semi-weekly rehearsals are conducted by Mme. Ina Wright Herbst. 


Page 195 









CLARINETS 

Thomas, N. S., Captain 
Fulmer, J. M. 

Lindsay, J. C. 

Ziegler, A. L. 

Collis, R. C. 

PICCOLO 
Williams. C. R. 

OBOE 

Kildow, G. O. 

SAXAPHONES 
Freeman, E 
Lloyd. G. ML 
Phy, Mark T. 

CORNETS 
Reise, C. D. 

Fisher, 0. A. 

Lavigne, C. A. 

Lohnes, C. E. 

Hall, C. A. 

Jaques, G. E. 

Winquist, E. C. 
Rudstrom, E. W. 


ALTOS 
Bond, L. B. 
Christman, S. H. 
Greisinger 
Hailing, A. 
Kimmel, H. 
Layne, R. 
Edwards, L. G. 

TROMBONES 
Fredericksen, C. 
McClure, N. C. 
Risley, H. 
WInana, A. D. 
Yerington, Chas. 

BARITONES 
Dunlap, E. A. 
Haines, R. S. 

BASS 

Benbow, L. M. 
Colvin, G. J. 

DRUMS 

Martini, L. K. 
Kuykendall, L 
Sly, C. M 


Page 196 










Page 197 













































Dramatics 


The general plan for dramatics at Washington State College is to co-operate with 
the Drama League of America in the selection of college plays in the endeavor to pro¬ 
duce the best examples of modern and classical drama. By so doing, through the educa¬ 
tion of the college audience, better and more intelligent audiences are created; so that 
they in turn will demand only what is best by professionals in dramatic production. 
The intelligent audience understands, encourages, and supports this class of dramatics 
in the colleges. 

Four plays are scheduled each year, in addition to the Senior play. This play is 
written by a committee selected by the class and is for the purpose of encouraging 
original writing. The remaining four plays include one farce, one comedy, an example 
of modem drama, and one classical drama. This plan gives variety and opportunity for 
wider development. Tryouts for these plays are open to all college students and the 
responsibility of management is as follows: One play each semester is given by the 
honorary dramatic society, Mask and Dagger; the third play is given by the Websterian 
Literary Society; and the fourth is presented by a different literary society each year. 

The societies interested in dramatics feel that the whole plan of their work is sug¬ 
gested by the meaning of the word “amateur”— one who loves. The plays have been 
selected with the idea of opportunity for artistic effect rather than by any reputation the 
play may have as a professional success. 

It is thought and hoped that by the education of the college audience, the average 
American audience will be made more intelligent and will in turn demand of profes¬ 
sionals only what is best in drama. 


% 


Page 198 





Dramatic 


“AT THE FEET OF SOPHOCLES” 

SENIOR CLASS PLAY, 1916 


Written by John H. Binns, Gladys Persels and Loren Dumas 
Members of the Class 


CAST OF CHARACTERS 


John Hobbs, the Hero- 

Don Cook, the Sport- 

Duperstein, the Detective_ 

Bob Watson, the Shadow- 

Hi Price, the Ag- 

Hack Sampson, the Athlete_ 

F. Augustus Heinze, the Wise Guy. 
Dr. Popper, the Unfortunate Prof.— 


__ . Mr. John H. Binns 

,__Mr. Mark G. Brislawn 

_Mr. Loren Dumas 

_Mr. A. K. Millay 

Mr. Forrest G. Murdock 

_Mr. E. Butler Smith 

_Mr. Loren Dumas 

_Mr. Harold Vercler 


Dill Phix f Mr. Philip Dix 

Eidic Erry > Members of Student Social Committee -l Mr. Enoch Torpen 
H. Percigold ] [Mr. Frank Worthen 


Daisy Cook, Don’s Cousin-Miss Mooney Curry 

Frances Brewer, Olympia Queen_Miss Gladys Persels 

Mary Dean, Assistant Dean of Women__Miss Anita Worth 

Brownie Cameron, Sorority Girl-Miss Beryl Campbell 


The production of the original play “At the Feet of Sophocles," marks the revival 
of an old college tradition which has been allowed to lapse. It is to be hoped that in 
the future many more original plays will be produced. While the scenes of the play are 
on the Washington State campus, they are not to be taken as picturing actual conditions. 
They rather exaggerate and satirize the little inconsisencies of everyday life which, after 
all, make most of the fun of living. 


ACT 1—The Gym at registration time. 

ACT II—Moscow Mountains, Senior Sneak, four years later. 
Scene 1, Morning. 

Scene 2, Evening. 

ACT III—Tanglewood, the next day. 


Page /99 





















Dramatic 


“AS THE LEAVES” 

Presented by the 
MASK AND DAGGER CLUB 
Friday. April 14, 1916 


CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Giovanni Rosani. __ Eric Egge 

Guilia, his Second Wife _ Dorothy Chamberlain 

Tommy _ Mark Brislawn 

Nannele _ Edna Babcock 

(Children of Giovanni by his first wife.) 

Massimo, their Cousin _ Lusker McCroskey 

Signora Irene, Sister of Giovanni _ Florence Forrest 

Signora Lauri _ Lorenna Ferrier 

Mme. LaBlanche, a Dressmaker - Margaret Turnbull 

Helmer Strile, an Artist _ Harry Aumack 

Andrea, Steward _ Mr. O’Neil 

Gaspare, Tommy’s Valet - Albert Hansen 

Lucia, an old servant_Isabel Hayes 

Marta, a Cook _ Alice Lodge 

Porters _ Carl Piersons, Richard Smith 

Director _ Miss Augusta Archer Roziskey 

Business Manager _ Mr. Wm. A. Moss 




SYNOPSIS 

ACT I—The drawing room in the Rosani home at Milan. 

ACT 11—Interior of a chalet near Geneva. 

ACT III—The same as in the second act. 

ACT IV—The same as in the second act. 


DANDY DICK 

By A. W. PINERO 
Produced by 

THE MASK AND DAGGER CLUB 
November 10, 1916 

CAST 

The Very Rev. Augustin Jedd, D. D., Dean of St. Marvell’s _ George Witt 

Sir Tristram Mardon, Bart_ Ray Rudberg 

Major Traver, the Hussar, quartered at Durnstone, near St. Marvell’s _ Jot Whetsel 

Mr. Darbey, the Hussar, quartered at Durnstone, near St. Marvell’s— William Moeser 

Blore, Butler at the Deanery_ Lewis Callow 

Noah Topping, Contsable at St. Marvell’s - Howard Worthen 

Hatcham, Sir Tristram’s Groom _ Harold Bohannan 

Georgiana Tidman, a Widow, the Dean’s Sister- Dorothy Chamberlain 

Salome, the Dean’s Daughter _ Leona Doerr 

Sheba, the Dean’s Daughter _ Vivian Strong 

Hannah Topping, formerly in service at the Deanery - Isabel Hayes 


Page 200 

































“THE FORTUNE HUNTER” 

A COMEDY BY WINCHELL SMITH 
Produced February 9, 1917, by Town and Faculty talent, as follows: 

Nat Duncan, the Fortune Hunter _ Melvin J. Muckey 

Henry Kellogg, a Rising Roung Financier-H. Myron Smith 

Mr. Burnham, a Promoter - Thomas J. McKinney 

Sam Graham, the Village Druggist _ Frank F. Potter 

Mr. Lockwood, the Village Banker _ Lester H. Folger 

Roland Barnette, the Bank Clerk _ Edwin M. Bailor 

Pete Willing, the Sheriff __ A. Tremayne Flagg 

Tracey Tanner, the Liveryman's Son _ John H. Jonte 

Mr. Sperry, a Drummer ____ C- L. Hix 

Tom, the Errand Boy __ Brinton Edwards 

Betty Graham, Daughter of the Druggist - Mrs. F. J. Ostermann 

Josie Lockwood, Daughter of the Banker _ Mrs. H. H. Smith 

Angie, Josie’s Friend ___ Kathryn Hinkley 

Director - M. J. Muckey 

Coach.. _ Zelva Mecklem 

Stage Manager _ E. D. Alvord 

Electrician _ J. P. Fairbank 

Orchestra _Carl Engelbart 

EVERGREEN: “ ‘The Fortune Hunter’ was far above all expectations.” 

PULLMAN TRIBUNE: ‘‘Undoubtedly the best amateur play that has been pro¬ 
duced in Pullman.” 


Page 20 / 
























Dramatics 


CANDIDA 

BY BERNARD SHAW 
CHARACTERS 


Eugene Marchbanks, a Poet ___ L. J. Perrier 

Rev. James Maver Mowell, a Socialist _ Warren J. LaFollette 

Rev. Alexander Mill, the Curate _ Carl A. Stahlberg 

Mr. Burgess, Mowell's Father-in-Law - - John H. Clark 

Candida, Mowell’s Wife _ Margaret Gwinn 

Proserpine Garnett, the Typist --- Else Phillips 


“ELECTRA” 

OF EURIPIDES 
Presented by 

THE TALAMIAN LITERARY SOCIETY AND THE MASK AND DAGGER DRAMATIC 

CLUB 

March 16, 1917 

CHARACTERS IN THE PLAY 

CLYTEMESTRA, Queen of Argos and Mycenae; Widow of Agamemnon. 

ELECTRA, Daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. 

ORESTES. Exiled Son of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. 

A PEASANT, Husband of Electra. 

AN OLD MAN, formerly Servant of Agamemnon. 

PLYADES, Friend of Orestes. 

AEGISTHUS, Usurping King of Argos and Hycenae, now Husband of Clytemnestra. 
MESSENGER. 

CHORUS of Argive Women with their Leader. 

HANDMAIDS of Clytemnestra. 

The scene is laid in the Mountains of Argos. 

Time; Before the dawn. 

The play was first produced between years 414 and 412 B. C. 


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Society 


MAY FETE 

The seventh annual May Fete was more in accordance with the old customs of cele¬ 
brating May Day than ever before. 

The procession, with the queen-elect and her attendants, the Lord High Chancellor, 
the Maid of Honor, the Ladies in Waiting, passed slowly across the lawn to the throne. 
The Herald announced the occasion, after which the Queen was crowned by the Lord 
High Chancellor. 

A special feature was the dance by little children. The solo dances were especially 
pleasing and were greatly appreciated by the spectators. 

The other folk dances and winding of the May-pole brought the May Fete to a close. 

Queen of May - Juanita Gregory 

Ladies in Waiting_Anna Waller, Beryl Campbell 

Ladies in Waiting - Anna Waller, Beryl Campbell 

Lord High Chancellor _ Mr. Skidmore 


JUNIOR PROMENADE 

The Junior Prom was the most charming formal affair of the year. 

The decorations were carried out in the Senior class colors and the shaded lights 
cast a soft glow over the gaily dressed throng. 

During the grand march and through the first dance the Seniors wore their caps 
and gowns, after which, all traces of their dignity vanished with the caps and gowns. 

The music was especially good and even though the floor was somewhat crowded and 
1:30 came all to soon. 


HARD TIMES BALL 

Campus Day was fittingly brought to a close by the Hard Times Ball. 

At 8 o'clock the green caps of the Frosh were duly burned and the crowd proceeded 
to the gym. To the onlooker such things as studies or work were deemed impossible 
to this crowd. The music was all that one could wish for, and refreshments consisted 
of left-overs from the Campus Day eats. Several dances were devoted to Straw-bosses 
and the squad which had accomplished the most work. 

The visitors from the various High Schools entered into the spirit of the dance and 
to express it in their words, it was “some dance.” 


Page 205 








Society 


MILITARY BALL 


The annual Military Ball was by far the most realistic military one which Washing¬ 
ton State College has ever witnessed. The decorations were strictly military—the old 
gym being completely transformed into a huge red, white and blue tent. Crossed arms 
and shields were placed around the balcony and a large illuminated emblem representing 
the pin of "Scabbard and Blade," occupied a conspicuous place at the end of the room. 
Several dances were devoted to men in uniform and to civilians. During one of the dances 
for "men in uniform" the light were dimmed and a large light played upon the Scabbard 
and Blade emblem. Several of the dances were announced by the sounding of the 
Revielle which added to the existing military spirit that prevailed throughout the even¬ 
ing. 


THE VARSITY BALL 


The annual Varsity Ball, being a dance given in honor of the "W" men, was as 
usual, one of the best attended dances of the year. 

The “W” blankets, the envy of all, were the only form of decorations. Although 
the decorations were not elaborate, few even noticed their absence as they were kept 
busy dancing. 

Several special dances were reserved for the “W" men and coaches, while the guests 
enthusiastically aided in making the ball a decided success. 


OCTOBER 


7 — Sophomore Class Informal 


21 — Frosh Class Mix 


NOVEMBER 


10 — Mask and Dagger 


24—Y. M. C. A., Vaudeville 


DECEMBER 


8— Idaho Debate 

9— Varsity Ball 


15— Y. W. C. A. Xmas Bazaar 


JANUARY 


6—All Pledge Dance 


19—Mrs. Van Ogle 


FFEBRUARY 


9— Fortune Hunter 
16 — Shakespearean Formal 
20—Zoellner Quartette 


21— Military 

22— Hoffman 
24—Glee Club 


MARCH 


9— Debate (Whitman) 
16—Electra 


23—Gym Show' 


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Page 208 














Military 


‘'With a profound sense of the solemn and even tragical character of the 
step I am taking and of the grave responsibilities which it involves, but in un¬ 
hesitating obedience to what I deem my constitutional duty, I advise that the 
congress declare the recent course of the imperial German government to be 
* * * war against the government and people of the United States; * * * 

“Neutrality is no longer feasible or desirable where the peace of the world 
is involved and the freedom of its peoples, and the menace to that peace and 
freedom lies in the existence of autocratic governments. * * * 

“We are accepting this challenge of hostile purpose because we know that 
in such a government, following such methods, we ean never have a friend; 
and that in the presence of its organized -power * * * there can be no assured 
security for the democratic government of the world. * * * 

“We have no quarrel with the German people. We have no feeling to¬ 
ward them but one of sympathy and friendship. * # * 

“We have no selfish ends to serve. We desire no conquest, no dominion. 
We seek no indemnities for ourselves, no material compensation for the sacri¬ 
fices we shall freely make. We are but one of the champions of the rights of 
mankind. * * * 

“It is a fearful thing to lead this great peaceful country into war, into 
the most terrible and disastrous of all wars, civilization itself seeming to be 
in the balance. But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight 
for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts—for democ¬ 
racy • * * for the rights and liberties of small nations, for a universal do¬ 
minion of right by such a concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and 
safety to all nations, and make the world itself at last free. 

“To such a task we can dedicate our lives and our fortunes, everything 
that we are and everything that w T e have with the pride of those who know 
that the day has come when America is prepared to spend her blood and her 
might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which 
she has treasured. God helping her, she can do no other.’’—Woodrow Wilson. 


Page 209 










Page 210 


CAPTAIN OSTERMAN, U. S. A. 



















Military 


The year 1916 brought many changes worthy of note to the Military Department of 
the College. The College was given an especially high honor by the War Department 
w'hich designated it as a “distinguished college’' through the excellence and efficiency 
shown by the cadets throughout the year and the demonstration of their abilities at the 
annual inspection. 

In addition to winning the esteem of all our people throughout the United States, 
who have the best interests of the country at heart, the announcement to the Military 
and Naval Forces of the nation that the State College is one of the foremost in teaching 
the elements of the military profession, the distinction to the College has a pracicai 
value to the students In that it permits the College to appoint a lieutenant to the reg¬ 
ular army and one to the marine corps without scholastic examination. It also adds 
prestige to such graduates who desire to enter the army but have not been so fortunate 
to 'secure the President's appointment and who must enter through regular examination, 
for they are selected before graduates of all other colleges, not distinguished. 

Two cadet officers were tendered the President’s appointment this year, two were 
commissioned through the regular examination, and several more will be examined in 
the near future. In this one year more State College men will have entered the service 
than in all the years since the establishment of the College. As the years come these 
men will take their places among the leaders of the Military and Naval forces in the 
same way as their classmates will become leaders in civil pursuits. 

The military department recognizes the debt It owes the nation for providing free 
education to our young men and women at all the land grant colleges; it knows that 
w'hen Abraham Lincoln in 1862, through Mr. Morrill, acting in ministerial capacity, 
formulated the plan of building up the nation In agricultural pursuits, he realized, through 
the scenes of the Civil War then being enacted, that there was a great need for men 
trained in military science. Therefore, the department, wishing to meet the obligation 
placed upon the colleges and the students, who directly receive the benefits of the wisdom 
of the great men who enacted such liberal law's, is fully alive to the fact that it must 
use every effort to compensate the nation by turning out young men w-ho in the event 
of war will be equipped to lead the masses of our people in battle as they lead them in 
peace. 


Page 211 








8gl. IMickett Cadet Col. Todd Lieut. Aahbrooke 

Sgt. Connell Capt. Oaterman Sgt. Lawrence 

Cadet Major Zluk Cadet Major Raney 





Page 212 





























Military 


STAFF OF U. S. ARMY INSTRUCTORS 
Captain Osterman, Commandant Cadets_ U. S. A. 


Lieutenant Ashbrook _U. S. A. 

Sergeant Connel _ U. S. A. 

Sergeant Lawrence___ U. S. A. 

Sergeant Puckett _ - —---- -U. S. A. 


OFFICERS OF W. S. C. C. C. 
Colonel Paul Todd 


First Battalion Second Battalion 


Major Raney 

Company A— 

Captain Laird 

Second Lieutenant Babcock 

Second Lieutenant Davies 

Company B— 

Captain Croonquist 
Second Lieutenant Tollifson 
Second Lieutenant Laney 
Second Lieutenant Cunningham 

Company C— 

Captain Broughton 
Second Lieutenant F. Smith 
Second Lieutenant Hollman 

Company D— 

Captain Ross 
First Lieutenant Dargan 
First Lieutenant Cutler 
Second Lieutenant Pence 


Major Zink 

Company E— 

Captain Goodin 
First Lieutenant Collins 
Second Lieutenant Aumack 
Second Lieutenant Lyle 

Company F— 

Captain Moss 
First Lieutenant Shannon 
Second Lieutenant Baker 
Second Lieutenant Hopkinson 

Company G— 

Captain Van Voris 

First Lieutenant E. McCrosky 

Second Lieutenant Reed 

Company H— 

Captain Bohler 

First Lieutenant Miller 

Second Lieutenant Bailey 


Page 213 














Page 214 













Page 2/5 









Page 216 




















Page 217 






















Page 218 
























Religious Organizations 


YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Organization 1916-1917 


ADVISORY BOARD 


Prof. L. F. Jackson, Chairman 
Mr. C. L. Hlx, Treasurer 
Mr. R. A. Hungerford, Finance 
Dr. J. W. Caughlan, Finance 


Mr. F. C. Forrest 
Dr. Bruce McCully 
Prof. H. V. Carpenter 
Prof. W. S. Thornber 

Prof. Geo. Severance 
General Secretary—Melvin J. Muckey 


CABINET 


CHARLES J. BROUGHTON _President 

ERVIN E. KING_First Vice President 


Director of Campus Service. 


C. GLENN KING_ 

STEICH WAKABAYASHI 

TROY T. LINDLEY _ 

HOWARD R. PORTER ... 

WALLACE REED _ 

RICHARD BURBANK — 
JULIUS HOLLMAN_ 


-Employment 

-Foreign Students 

_Literature 

__Publicity 

_Social 

_Visitation 

_Second Vice President 


Director of Community Service. 


HOWARD O. LISLE __Boys’ Work 

HOMER MATHEWS _Deputation 

MARION E. LEA _Industrial 

H. NOEL BAKKE _Secretary 


Director of Religious Education 


WILLIAM F. COLE 
JEAN E. HUNTINGTON 
EARL S. ROBERTSON - 

HENRY DeYOUNG_ 

C. STEWART PRATT - 


_Meetings 

_Student Classes (Campus) 

_Student Classes (Church) 

Student Volunteer Movement 
_Treasurer 


Director of Membership and Finance 
ERI B. PARKER_Director of Promotion Force 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Huntington 

King 

Hollman 


Parker 

Reed 

King 

Cole 


Broughton 
Mildly 
Rnkke 
De Young 
Robertson 


Pratt 

Porter 

Wnkabayaabi 

Male 


Mathews 

Burbank 

I.en 


Page 219 
























Mr. Melvin J. Muckey, General Secretary of the Y. M. 

C. A., is serving his first year in this position. He is a 
graduate of the University of Iowa, '16, where he took a 
prominent part in the student activities, notably debate and 
oratory. He is a member of Delta Sigma Rho, Phil Delta 
Kappa, and A. F. I., an honorary Senior fraternity. Be¬ 
sides his undergraduate experience in the Y. M. C. A., of 
Iowa University, Mr. Muckey has had two years’ experience 
in county work of the same nature. Under his administra¬ 
tion the work of the local 
organization has seen great 
progress. The membership is 
over four hundred, a one hun¬ 
dred per cent increase over 
last year. 

Mr. Charles J. Broughton 
was President of the Y. M. 

C. A. from March, 1916, to 
March, 1917. Mr. Broughton 

is a senior, and is closing up this year a college course of 
varied activity. He is a member of Crimson Circle, Scab¬ 
bard and Blade, and Sigma Nu, and has taken an active 
interest in fraternity, military, and student activities, in 
addition to his duties as chief executive of the Y. M. C. A. 
As president of the local organization, Mr. Broughton has 
displayed a degree of tact and geniality, and a capacity for 
work, that have contributed largely to the success of the 
work of the Y. M. C. A. of the past year. 




Page 220 















Mr. Raymond Robins was brought to Washington State 
College by the Y. M. C. A. for a series of addresses March 
30 to April 2. Mr. Robins is one of the strongest speakers 
to college men available today. He is a national figure 
because of his work along social and industrial lines, as 
well as because of his work in the Progressive Party. His 
burning, throbbing message created a profound impression 
on faculty and students alike. Mr. Robins will always be a 
welcome visitors at Washington State College. 


DEPUTATION TEAM 




Cole 

Lisle 


Boliler Muckey 

Mathews 


Clark 

Williams 


Page. 22 / 




















































Religious Organizations 


YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Organized 1894 

Marie Nuzum Foulkes, General Secretary 


Hilda Bainton - 

Myrl Chapman 
Jennie McCormack 

lone Gay - 

Mildred France - 

Helen Lauderdale . 

Edith Dark _ 

Irene Palmer- 

Neil Williams _ 

Helen Halroyd - 

Alice Hanke _ 

Bernice Chilton —_ 


CABINET 


_ President 

_ Treasurer 

_ Corresponding Secretary 

_ Membership 

—Annual Member of Field Committee 

-Social 

- Employment and Trains 

- Publicity 

- Social Service 

_ Religious Meetings 

- Bible and Missions 

- Ways and Means 


"The purpose of this organization is to lead students to faith in God through Jesus 
Christ, and into membership and service in the Church; to promote their growth in 
Christian faith and character, especially through the study of the Bible; and to in¬ 
fluence them to devote themselves in united efforts with all Christians, to making the 
will of Christ effective in human society, and to extending the kingdom of God through¬ 
out the world. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Ralnton 
McCormick 
France 
louder dale 


Chilton 

Calmer 

Hiillruyd 

Gay 


Dark 

Chapman 

Hanke 

Williams 


Page 223 



























Religious Organizations 


THE NEUMAN CLUB 

OFFICERS 


H. Myron Smith - President Luella Hopton-Secretary 

J. Schuller _ Vice President Erich Klossner _ Treasurer 


For the first time in the history of Washington State College a club has been or¬ 
ganized for Catholic students. The purpose of the club is for the spiritual and intel¬ 
lectual advancement of its members, the furtherance of their social union and the en¬ 
couragement of what is best in College life. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Kkmsner 

Reisaneaur 

Hinckley 

Hopton 

Klosxner 

Polaon 

Miller 

Schuler 

Smith 

Matty 

Haberman 

McCay 


Wallace 

Donlin 

Weber 

Pringle 

Roach 

Johnson 

Benz 

Bcuz 

Palnwski 

Cleaf 

Shook 


McGrath 


Page 225 












Page 226 

























































































































Page 227 




























































Page 228 



























































KAPPA SIGMA 

GAMMA MU CHAPTER 
(Chartered March 6, 1909) 


1917 

Frank L. Shannon 


1918 


C. A. Zimerman 
John MacRae 


W. A. Moss 
Joe Davis 


1919 


Wm. Barnard 
Bert Brooks 
Andrew Semple 
Madison Davis 
Homer Johnson 
S. M. Corbell 


Jean Lindsay 
R. O. Wilson 
Harry Gibbs 
Vernon Brown 
Marion Lea 


1920 


Wm. Sabiston 
Lewis Kreps 


Harry Benson 
Fred Prescott 


PLEDGES 


Walter Menzel 
Dean Adams 
Harold Decker 
Floyd Arnold 


Walter Oliver 
David Matthews 
Claud Walker 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Lea 

McRae 

Semple 

Moss 

Sabiston 

Lindsay 

Wilson 

Shannon 

Davis 

Prescott 

Brooks 

Gibbs 

Kulser 

Benson 

Johnson 

Corbell 

Barnard 

Krepa 

Zimmerman 

Brown 









I 



Page 230 

















































Page 231 

































SIGNA NU FRATERNITY 


DELTA IOTA CHAPTER 


1917 


Trevor S. Goodyear 
J. Maurice McGregor 
Albert M. Anderson 


T. Arthur Durham 
Louis P. Mutty 
Harold Sharkey 


Earle M. McCroskey 
Frank F. McDougall 
Alfred D. Miller 
Edwin W. Copeland 
W. Brice Toole 


Earl Dunlap 
Donald E. McGregor 
Leander P. Tollefson 
Alex T. McGregor 
Ralph R. Boone 


Joseph G. Saboe 
Raymond H. Rudberg 
Frank R. Skadan 


Earle \V. Whitman 
Leonard T. Woodland 
Robert M. Hill 


1918 


Richard E. Hanley 
Charles J. Broughton, Jr. 
Ralph Emerson WMlson 
Robert W. Moss 


1919 

Clarence R. Durham 
Leroy B. Hanley 
Earle C. Woodland 
Clarence S. Holmes 


1920 


William C. Moeser 
Eugene G. Curti 
Carl Johnson 


PLEDGES 

Campbell Wilson 
W. Mason Leigh 


Leigh 
Hanley 
Saboe 
Dunlap * 
Woodland 
Whit ham 


Cnrtl 
It ml berg 
Tollefson 
Hanley 
McGregor 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Anderson Wilson 

Copeland Durham Hill 

Broughton Boone Toole 

Mas* McCroskey Moeser 

Egg e Goodyear McGregor 

Skadan Mutty 


Holmes 

Sharkey 

Johnson 

McGregor 

Wilson 

McDougal 


Page 233 








Page 234 












































































Page 236 















































ALPHA TAU OMEGA 

WASHINGTON GAMMA CHI CHAPTER 
(Chartered May 20, 1911) 


FACULTY 

M. K. Snyder M. K. Akers 

MEMBERS 
1917 

J. J. Whetsel 
J. N. Shaw 


P. M. Browder 
Roy Bohler 
Roy Larson 


1918 


B. B. Doane 
N. W. Brian 
J. R. Cunningham 


Glen Glover 
L. J. Klenholz 


1919 


H. S. Olin 
G. L. Cook 
W. L. McCredie 


G. D. Witt 
F. L. Glover 
J. Z. Hollmann. 


1920 


J. Witt 
R. Farrow 
Mark Phy 


B. McKenzie 
Wm. Drumheller 
C . Lavigne 


PLEDGES 


S. G. W. Archibald 
L. Gillis 
W. Morrison 
C. Studer 
J. Berlin 


T. Collins 
C. Lohnes 
E. Edwards 
P. Hedger 


McKinzie 

Studer 

ORDER OF GROUP. 

Larson 

Bohler 

Glover 

Hollmnn 

Morrison 

Browder 

Whetzel 

hrave 

Furrow 

films 

Olin 

Klenholz 

({lover 

Witt 

Cook 

Lohnls 

Witt 

Hedger 

McCredie 

LeVIgne 

McKay 

Drumheller 

Collins 

Cunningham 

Berlin 

Archibald 

Phy 


Page 237 




Page 238 





























































V— — - - — 

Page 240 




































































SIGMA PHI EPSILON 

WASHINGTON ALPHA CHAPTER 
Date of Installation, March 2, 1912 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 


Rudolph Weaver 
Frank N. Bryant 


Clarence Hix 
E. A. Alvord 


POST GRADUATE 


Lyman Passmore 


1917 


Charles J. Melrose 
Ervin E. King 
Harold J. Cundy 
Carl F. Dietz 
Arvid P. Croonquist 


W. Percy Goldsworthy 
Wilfred H. Talley 
Benton M. Bangs 
Arthur M. Goff 
Aubrey C. Miller 


Henry E. Turner 
Carl C. King 
John N. Stone 
Myron T. Brower 
Clarence Ewing 


1918 

Basil Jerard 
Silas Stites 

W'illlam H. Ilopkinson 
Ungell Iverson 
Ray W. McKenna 


1919 


Clement A. Phillips 
Howard Hine 
William M. Byers 
Louis Leidl 
Ernest Hix 
Charles Smith 


Lynn M. McKinstry 
Harry C. Lynde 
Eugene I. Alvord 
Vernet L. Corlett 
Ernest Henry 


Bert L. Stone 
Albert T. Fleming 
Kenneth F. Cable 


1920 

Glenn E. Strickler 
Harold H. Henry 


Roland H. Abbott 
Fred Hamilton 


PLEDGES 

Hayden Bridwell 
Neal Thomas 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Corlett 


Goldsivortby 


Ewing 


McKenna 

Henry 

Byers 

Delta 

Goff 

Cundy 

Hix 

Henry 

McKinatry 

Alvord 

Bangs 

Tally 

King 

Hlne 

Flemming 

Hopkinson 

StltCB 

Melro.se 

Jerrard 

Croonquist 

Leidl 

Stone 

Cable 

Stone 

Lynde 

Phillips 

Miller 

King 

Iverson 

Turner 

Brower 

Strickler 


Page 241 







■K 



Page 242 













































Page 243 
























Page 244 

































































LAMBA CHI ALPHA 

TAU ZETA CHAPTER 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
EM win M. Bailor 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 


J. C. B. Horral 

C. H. Worthen 

Robert L. Taylor 

1917 

H. Noel Bakke 

Paul E. Todd 

Robert Cowan 


1918 


Robert J. George 

C. Glen King 

1919 

Lewis C. Callow 
Howard Porter 

Morgan W. Rowland 
John I. Lehman 

Carl A. Stahlberg 
Charles Hunter 
William R. Daggert 
Donald H. McLeod 

1920 

William I. Cole 
Charles Yerrington 
Frank W. Logan 
Walter 0. Johnson 
Arthur T. Erspamer 
Gerald W. Miller 

Chester Frederiksen 
Andrew J. George 
Russel S. Hoover 

PLEDGES 

Henry W. Olson 
Leslie M. Eakin 
Arthur D. Lyon 

Allen Bayer 

Clayton H. Rychard 
William Whiting 
Russel L. Talbert 


Floyd M. Bulmer 
Bryan M. Lewis 
Fenton 0. Fales 


Callow 

Olsen 

Lyons 

Talbert 

George 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Johnson 

Krspnrmer 

Lehmnn 

Fredrickson 

Whiting 


Cole 

Miller 

Genrliigtou 

Born ho It 

Hunter 

Horrall 


Worthern 

Bakke 

Todd 

Cowan 


George 

Porter 

King 

Paggett 

St ah! berg 

Taylor 


McLeod 
Rowland 
Fales 
I/0« an 
Hoover 


Rychard 

Boyer 

Bulmer 

Lewis 

Kokin 


Page 245 






Page 246 





































































Page 248 







































Boone 

Stephenson 

Barnhardt 

Larson 

Holmes 

Finnell 


SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 

Founded at the U. of Alabama, 1856 
WASHINGTON BETA CHAPTER 
Charter granted March 9, 1915 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

C. A. Cornelson R. P. Cope 

A. L. Strausz T. H. Wright 


FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
1917 


L. H. Stenberg 
J. E. Huntington 


T. D. Tyrer 
R. C. Howard 


H. H. Mathews 
F. F. Smith 
M. R. Finney 
R. H. Loomis 


1918 


F. H. Schroeder 
R. M. Young 
L. M. Benbow 


I. L. Price 

H. P. Barnhart 

J. Graham 
J. Maloney 
R. G. Duthie 


1919 


G. W. Staggs 
D. G. Jerue 
R. Noerenberg 
D. R. Stephenson 
D. M. Taggert 


A. K. Holmes 
William Larsen 
J. W. Boone 


1920 


R. C. Copeland 
W. J. Finell 
G. J. Colvin 


Wayne Phillips 
J. H. Green 
M. F. Mendenhall 
R. C. Collis 
C. V. Schriver 


PLEDGES 


F. E. Kellogg 
J. L. Hardy 
M. S. Smith 
C. F. Morlson 
Owen McCroskey 


Boone 

Trimble 

Staggs 

Benbow 

Smith 


ORDER OF GROUP. 
Howard 

Finney Tyrer 

Stenberg Loomis 

Schroeder Young 

Landen Huntington 


Price 

Fishbaek 

Maloney 

Copland 

Mathews 


Colvin 

Duthie 

Jeene 

Taggart 

Graham 

Noerenberg 



Page 249 












Page 250 

































































/ 



Page 251 













































Page 252 







































































V 

DELTA 

Organized February 11, 1911 
(Local) 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Charles A. Isaacs Milton J. Newhouse 


FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
1917 


Frank W. Zink 

Alfred C. Langdon 

1918 

S. Albert Sorrenson 

Russell W. Chase 
Wallie Reed 

Errick Klossner 

Floid N. Woodruff 

1919 

Clarence Laird 

Leo J. Stevens 
Chester W. King 

Ray R. Lewis 

Kenneth P. Corson 
John W. Devine 

1920 

Homer R. Martin 
Clyde C. Brotherton 

Buell J. Felts 

Roy R. Bowers 

Verl D. Keiser 

Rufus C. Schnebly 
Marion E. McAninch 


Dudley C. Mecum 
Philip E. Myers 
Robert D. Schnebly 
Wilbur L. King 

Merton C. Parker 
Ralph L. Marble 

Alfred L. Hales 

PLEDGES 

Warren J. Lafollette 
Edward S. Brown 
Ray Bruce 


ORDER OK GROUP. 


Schnebly 

Keyaer 

('hast* 

Ixnnes 

Sorenson 

King 

Schnebly 

Itrnce 

Lewis 

Woodruff 

Reed 

Langdon 

King 

Felts 

Martin 

Laird 

Zink 

Mecum 

Brown 

Parker 

Stevens 

McAninch 

Myers 


Kioto* nor 


Brotherton 















Page 254 











































































& 

(Local, Organized Jan. 17, 1912.) 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE. 

Carl M. Brewster Jesse W. Beyer 

William T. Shaw Ray M. O’Day 

A. Tremayne Flag C. B. Hammond 


FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1917. 


Henry Hartman 
D. Chester Evans 


Lucien N. Jones 
J. Albert Hartman 


1918. 

Howard H. Langdon 
Willis E. Mason 
Willard J. Matters 
Eri B. Parker 


Logan Wheeler 
Ray E. Love 
Hubert Spaulding 
Roy Schactler 


1919. 


Rielly R. Friedline 
David H. Laney 
Neal C. McClure 
Harrold Merrin 


John P. Matsen 
C. Robert Nelson 
E. Lee Smith 
Leon K. Martini 


1920. 

Carl Izet 

Clarence W. Peterson 
T. Warren Love 
Leslie C. Fertig 


Jervis Fulmer 
Donald J. Stewart 
William Z. Laney 
Carlyle Kellogg 


PLEDGES. 


Nolen C. Hollen 


Roy Jenkins 


PATRON. 
William Hislop. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Peterson 


Evans 

Sundqulst 


Hollen 

Laney 

Langdon 

Jones 

Hartman 

Wheeler 

McClure 

Maaon 

Love 

Hartman 

Matters 

Lore 

Spalding 

Nelson 

Kellogg 

Parker 

Laney 

Seh ac tier 

Matsen 

Izett 

Merrin 

Martini 

Smith 

Fulmer 

Fertig 


Friedline Stewart 


Page 25 5 






Page 256 



















































Page 257 






































































DELTA SIGMA FRATERNITY 

(Local) 

CHARTER MEMBERS 

POST GRADUATE 
Otto Voss 

1917 


Paul Slefner 

1918 

M. F. Potter 

Chester D. Ries 

Troy T. Lindley 

Chas. F. Lindstrum 
Geo. F. Root 

1919 

H. 0. Blake 

Frank F. Ghiglione 
J. C. Jackson 

R. H. Sterne 

K. 0. Hunter 

Wendell P. Brown 
Chas. E. Adams 

H. H. Sappington 

Ray W. Ropes 

1920 

C. D. Cook 

W. E. Hamilton 

D. A. McEacheran 

S. J. Clerf 

Jack E. Ray 

C. Bryan Cormana 
Arthur 0. Medby 

Wm. Scotton 

Walter A. Durgan 

PLEDGES 

Ray Kincheloe 

H. H. Adams 

W. H. Crisman 

D. C. Kurtz 

Frank Weber 

F. K. Schroeder 

J. B. Steel 

E. J. Eggert 


L. J. Ketchum 

A. A. Moore 

G. R. Myron 

E. W. Pearson 


Seottou 

Rope* 
Med by 
Myron 
Pearson 
Ketebuin 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Durban 

McEchran 
Sappington 
Lindley 


Ray 

It r own 

Slefner 

Stearne 

Hunter 

Clerf 


Adams 

Jackson 

Gbiglione 

Moore 

Potter 

Voss 


Root 

AdaiuB 

Shrader 

CUrtsinan 

Klnclieloe 


Kurtz 

Tormona 

Lliulstrum 

Eggert 

Hamilton 

Cook 







11.Hllil.lluJl.iim'. Iiii.imm- iillinmii.HtiiH runi.illiiH.Urn .HiJl.nm.tHjiH.inii ,i 



_ .. WOMENS 
FrATERNITIEc/’ 


Page 260 























































































































































Page 262 







































































PI BETA PHI 


WASHINGTON BETA CHAPTER 
Chartered July 6, 1912 


1917 


Alice Lodge 
Edna McCroskey 
Franc Babcock 
Esther Horan 


Edna Babcock 
Mildred France 
Mary Ellen Nash 


1918 


Elsie Freakes 
Olive Brunning 
Helen Canfield 
Emily Babcock 
Else Phillips 


Helen Hungate 
Ruth Quarrels 
Nellie Emerson 
— Flossie Miller 
Jean Burns 


1919 


Zelia Melcher 
Edith Boone 
Lenore Emerson 


Marian Nelson 
Margaret Adams 
Gracia White 


1920 


Harriet Phister 
Leona Doerr 
Ruth Garrison 
Lucy Mann 


Nell McKay 
Beatrice Hall 
Lucile McCroskey 
— Grace Douglas 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Arinins 

Mann 

McCroskey 

Roonc 

Doerr 


Melcher 

While 

Rabe«>ck 

Quarles 

Canfield 

Phister 


McCroskey 

France 

Babcock 

Burns 


Lodge 

Babcock 

Horan 

Freaks 


Brunning 

Huugate 

Miller 

Emerson 

IMtHlli* 

Garrison 


Hall 

McKay 

Nelson 

Emerson 

Douglass 






Page 264 


























































Page 266 













































ALPHA DELTA PI 


Chartered October 5, 1912 

SORORES IN FACULTATE 
Bertha Engelland, Post Graduate 


SORORES IN UN1VERSITATE 


Clara Boekke 


POST GRADUATES 

Elizabeth Richardson 


1917 


Anne Ratliff 


Verona Hull 


1918 


Corrine Barclay 
Illah Larrabee 
Gladys Larrabee 
Myrtle Peterson 


Margaret Riesenaeur 
Ara Chisum 
Caroline Grief 


1920 


Alma Hann 
Delta Hann 
Carrie Shaw 
Verla McAlister 


Katherine Johnson 
Elfrida Engelland 
Amanda Suksdorf 
Fara Laney 


PLEDGES 


Adeline Bresler June Squires 

Catherine Hill 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


SllRW 

Harm 

Larrabee 

Laney 

Barclay 


Suksdorf 

Gannon 

Richardson 

Engelland 

Bressler 


Reisaneaur 

Hull 

Borkke 

Weeks 

Peterson 


Hann 

Hill 

Engelland 

RatlifTe 

Ckisutu 


Squires 

Johnson 

Larrabee 

McAlister 

Grief 






Page 268 






































































Page 270 















































KAPPA ALPHA THETA 


Alpha Sigma Chapter 
March 8, 1913 


SORORES IN FACULTATE 

Marien Sweezey Verne Gaddis 

Florence Walter Augusta Roziskey 

Grace Coulter 


SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 
1917 


Lila Bryan Clementine Prior 

Iras Troy 


1918 


Juanita Strong 
Glenna Troy 
Edna McKinstry 


Dena Whiteman 
Helen Marr 


1919 


Vernon Barnes 
Cecil Bengamen 
Lorena Farrier 
Verla Strausz 
Helen Goode 
Claribel Glidden 


Mildred Hardy 
Dorothy Hinman 
Mildred McMaster 
Dorothy McMaster 
Marie McGregor 


1920 


La Velle Dutton 
Ida Greene 
Helen Heer 
Doris Hudson 
Margaret Gwinn 
Marjorie Heaton 


Erna Bradbury 
Jeanette Schriber 
Mary Sanders 
Jessie McGrath 
Elenore Wilmer 
Nellie Davies 


Heuton 

Wf later 

Green 

Goode 

Bradbury 

Davies 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Troy 

Glidden 

McMaster 

Wilmer 

McMaster 


Prior 

Whiteman 

Ferrler 

Hinman 


an 

Troy 

McKinstry 

Marr 

Barnes 


Benjamin 

Hardy 

McGregor 

McGrath 

Strausz 


Heer 

Scriber 

Dutton 

Gwinn 

Hudson 

Sanders 







Page 272 




















































Page 273 












Page 274 


































ALPHA CHI OMEGA 


OMEGA CHAPTER 
Washington State College 

1917 


Irene Palmer 

1918 

Jennie McCormack 

Leila Nordby 

Rachel Shuman 

Emma McCormick 

1919 

Cicely Permain 
Helen Holroyd 
Beryl Wadsworth 

Dorothy Alvord 

Anne Palmer 

Mary Setzer 

Dorothy Chamberlin 
Grace Stonecipher 

1920 

Gertrude Stephens 
Doris Lay 
Josephine Heily 
Elizabeth Henry 
Beulah Kelly 

Evelyn Bradbury 

Hazel Bradbury 

PLEDGES 

Amy White 

Lida Windus 

Helenmead Chisler 
Frances Donnellan 
Eleanor Hinckley 


Elleida Nelson 
Estelle Downer 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


White 


Hinkley 


Bradbury 

Donnellan 

Chamberlain 

Alvord 

McCormick 

Stephens 

Nelson 

Stonecipher 

Leigh 

McCormack 

Schuman 

Bradbury 

Healy 

Palmer 

Chrisler 

Kelly 

Wadsworth 

Windus 

Holroyd 

Permain 

Palmer 


Nordby 


Setzer 












































































Page 277 


















































Page 278 






























SIGMA BETA PI 

Organized October 5, 1908 


SORORES IN UNIVERS1 TATE 
1917 


Ida Hansen 
Shirley Holmes 
Ethel Johnson 
Gladys Brecount 


Luella Hopton 


Marea Melvin 
Golda Freels 
Annetta Freels 
Norma Tuson 


1918 


1919 


Bernice Chilton 
Florence Forest 
Bernice White 


Mattie Patti son 
Bertha Judges 
Ruth Harding 


1920 


Blanche Lowarv 
Genevieve Collins 
Georgene Felts 
Ruth Johnson 
Julia Miller 


Mable Morgan 
Lucile Meany 
Emily Spinning 
Madge Witt 


HONORARY 


Barbara Drum Mrs. A. W. Taylor 

Mrs. C. H. Schuele 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Miller 

Morgan 

Lowery 

Johnson 

Huntington 

Chilton 


Johnson 

Tuson 

Freels 

Felts 

West 


Drum 

Freels 

Hanson 

Holmes 

II 


a .wfi 


White 

Brecount 

Pattisou 

Melvin 

Hopton 


Meany 

Collins 

Witt 

Forrest 

Harding 

Judges 












Page 280 






































Page 282 















































Page 283 


















































Page 284 









ALPHA ZETA 


E. E. King 
J. Huntington 
Roy Larson 
S. A. Sorensen 
A. P. Croonquist 
R. C. Howard 
P. Goldsworthy 


E. D. Lenard 
Glen Guthrie 
Russell Adams 
Carl King 
R. L. Benbow 
J. L. Stevens 
C. B. Harroll 
H. Hartman 
F. E. Bailey 
Robert Cowan 


Noel Bakke 
Stanley Boyer 
F. L. Russell 

Clem Phillips (Pledge) 


Goldswortb 

Bakke 

Cowan 

Adama 


ORDER OF GROUP. 

Russell 

Larson King Sorrenson 

Hartman Howard Horrall 

Stephens Leonard King 

CroonQuiat 


Huntington 

Guthrie 

Benbow 

Boyer 


Page 285 



Page 286 

















































ALPHA PSI 


Kappa Chapter 
Chartered April 6, 1915 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 


Dr. S. B. Nelson 
Dr. J. W. Kalkus 


Dr. P. H. Dirstine 
Dr. E. E. Wegner 


FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 


C. H. Dills 
F. H. Haggard 
J. F. Lester 


1917 


W. T. Johnson 
H. C. Luce 


1918 


R. M. Mast 
H. M. Beckmann 
R. L. Gilliam 
W. G. Hart 
E. A. Ehmer 


J. Barnhardt 
L. P. Bond 
G. W. Staggs 


D. M. Ahr 
H. H. Green 
O. C. Davis 


1919 


1920 


D. C. Evans 
D. H. Jarvis 
R. S. Nelson 
R. H. Sterne 


H. E. Turner 
C. C. Dunham 


D. G. Jerue 
F. H. An ties 
D. E. McGregor 



A national Veterinary fraternity, the purpose of which is to further interests in 
Veterinary Science at the State College of Washington. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Bond 

Homes 

Boruliart 

Green 


Evans 
Mast 
A u tier 


Dirstine 

Luce 

Iiecknaan 

Olir 


Nelson 

Kalkus 

Dills 


Wegner 

' 

Nelson 

Davis 


Turner 

Elmer 

Jarvis 


Gilliland 

Hart 

Stevens 

McGregor 


Page 287 






Page 288 





CRIMSON CIRCLE 

Organized March 6, 1911 


OFFICERS 

Carl Dietz - President 

Henry Hartman _ Vice President 

Charles Broughton - Secretary-Treasurer 

Benton Bangs - Sergeant-at-Arms 


ROLL 


A. M. Anderson 

Ray Finney 

Roy Bohler 

A1 Sorenson 

A1 Hartman 

E. E. King 

Carl D. Raney 

Henry Turner 

Tom Tyrer 

Roy Larson 

Corwin Babcock 

Eric Egge 

William A. Moss 

Roy Schachtler 

Clarence Zimmerman 

Vic Morgan 

Tom Parry 

Jean Huntington 

Paul Browder 

Willard Matters 

Arthur Durham 

Robert Howard 


An honorary Junior-Senior society, composed of the leaders in thought and action 
in all student activities and organized for the purpose of joining together all factions 
of the student body as one, with a common aim—the development of a greater State 
College of Washington. 


M089 

Browder 

Egge 

Zimmerman 

Morgan 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Hartman 

Howard 

Bangs 

DlltS 

Rainy 


Larson 

Huntington 

King 

Sorrenson 

Broughton 


Finney 

Parry 

Turner 

Hartman 

Matters 


Page 289 










* $iat«-Colley* 'if ' Vashinyton* 

CHIN 






Page 290 














































DELTA BETA 


FRATRES IN UNIVERS1TATE 



1917 


Paul Browder 

Noel Bakke 

Henry Hartman 

1918 

Ralph Lundquist 
Joseph Passonneau 

Tom J. Parry 

F. Marion Busby 

Eric Klossner 

1919 

Russell M. Adams 
Eric Egge 

Daniel Dupertius 

John 

P. Matsen 



1920 


Clarence W. Peterson 


Glen Trussell 


Carlyle Kellogg 


Delta Beta is an honor forensic fraternity organized for the purpose of promoting 
oratory and debate among the several colleges of the Northwest, and within the College 
itself. The organization at the present time includes all the men who have won the 
official “W” either in debate or oratory. A campaign for Delta Sigma Phi, the largest 
and best established honor forensic fraternity in the United States, is under way, with 
excellent prospects for ultimate success. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Bakke 

Peterson 

Kffge 


Busby 

Browder 

Matsen 


Hartman 

Parry 

Klossner 

Adams 


Page 291 








Page 292 






GAMMA TAU 

Organized May, 1913. 


OFFICERS 

Norma Tuson _____ President 

Lora Maxwell - Vice President 

Meryl Chapman ..._ Secretary-Treasurer 


Gladys Brecount 
Meryl Chapman 
Ida Hansen 
Shirley Holmes 
Esther Horan 
Blanche Jeffrey 
Jennie McCormack 


ROLL 

Edna McCrosky 
Lora Maxwell 
Norma Tuson 
Christine Woods 
Minnie Worthen 
Clementine Prior 


ALUMNAE MEMBERS 


Floy Bean 
Grace Coulter 
Marie Wilmer Kulzer 
Alice Wagnor 
Mary Williams Love 
Zoe Bean Covil 
Grace Eccles 
Edna Richardson 
Marie Vestal 
Luella Crossland 
Winifred Winders Fie 
Hilda Musgrove Todd 
Eva Maxwell 
Blanche Wiley 
Mary Anderson 
Margaret Becislaure 
Laurel Henry 
Zelva Mecklen 
Kathrine Stein 


Nellie Belfre 

Esther Bull Flagg 

Elizabeth Jacobsen 

Eva Smalley Williams 

Irma Turner 

Irma Harrison 

Gladys Keyes 

Lillian McLeon 

Doris Shumaker 

Ella Alexander 

Beryl Campbell McWhorter 

Iva Davidson 

Juanita Gregory O’Day 

Alice McElhinney Burford 

Gladys Persels 

Anna Waller 

Myrtle Weldin 

Esther White 


Gamma Tau, the Senior Women’s honor society, was organized May, 1913, by the 
Senior class of 1913. It’s purpose is to dignify achievement in College activities and 
to recognize scholarship. Election is made from the second semester Junior women 
and first semester Senior women who have completed at least ninety hours of colle¬ 
giate work, with no more than fifteen hours of C grades, and no B grades, and who 
have won distinction in four lines of collegiate activity, such as, organization, music, 
dramatics, oratory, debate and athletics. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


McCrasky 

Brecount 

McCormick 

Holmes 

Wood 


Maxwell 

Worthen 

Chapman 

Palmer 


Horan 

Hanson 

Prior 

Tusan 

Jlffry 


Page 293 

































KAPPA PSI 

Organized 1914 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Prof. I. H. Pierce 

GRADUATES 


V. T. McCroskey 
H. Armstrong 
G. F. Mannring 
J. H. Bradbury 


J. W. Rembowski 
O. J. Foss 
A. O. Walsh 


1917 


C. H. Johnson 
C. A. Edgrens 
H. McClung 
C. R. Baker 
J. A. Fish 
C. C. Calvert 
P. H. Siefner 
M. F. Potter 


J. G. Moore 
F. N. Woodruff 
W. M. Sodorff 
J. C. Shoudy 
A. I. Baker 
R. E. Jensen 
L. R. Babcock 


1918 


E. G. Curti 
H. J. Bailie 
C. W. Blackman 


R. V. Bruce 
C. Hill 


H. L. Kimmel 
C. R. Durham 


PLEDGES 


F. Webber 


Curti 

Durham 

Shanahan 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Babcock 

Woodruff 

Shoudy 

Hamilton 


Jensen 

Kimmel 

Siefner 


Blackman 

Totter 

Hill 

Weber 


Baker 

S«>dorff 

Bailie 


Page 295 








Page 296 















THE MASK AND DAGGER CLUB 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 

Jot J. Whetsel _ President 

Iras Troy _ Vice President 

Edna Babcock - Sec.-Treas. 


Second Semester 

Edna Babcock _ President 

Harry C. Lynde _ Vice President 

Dorothy L. Chamberlin _ Secretary 

Eric Egge - Treasurer 


ROLL 


Jot. J. Whetsel 
Edna Babcock 
Iras Troy 
William Moss 
Eric Egge 
Ruth Harding 


Harry C. Lynde 
Dorothy L. Chamberlin 
Dwight Stephenson 
Vivian C. Strong 
Lewis Callow 
Lorena Ferrier 


Perrier 

Stephenson 

Troy 

Callow 


ORDER OF GROUP. 

Whetsel Chamberlain 

Babcock Egge 

Moss Harding 

Strong Lynde 


Page 291 




















Moss Camp Kulzer Miller 

Langdon Parmalee Doanc Passmore 


OMEGA 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
C. G. Warfel 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 


GRADUATES 


W. E. Mitchell 

Geo. Forrest 

T. Z. Humphrey 

J. I. Preissner 

R. Schunerman 

Victor Menaglie 

F. H. Miller 

H. E. Doelle 

Geo. Meany 

John F. Foran 

Robert Keffer 

F. B. Mason 

W. Coulter 

T. H. Rosenkranz S. Swanson 

Lewis Grant 

R. B. Shelledy 


A. C. Miller 

1917 

J. G. Parmalee 

C. C. Camp 

1918 

Norbert Kulzer 

A. C. Langdon 


W. H. White 

Chester King 


J. H. Hinckley 

H. McCroskey 


B. B. Doane 

L. E. Traeger 

Lyman Passmore 

1919 

W. H. Hopkinson 


Omega is an honorary mining fraternity, founded to bind the miners of this college 
in a closer professional relationship, and to lend an influence for the development of a 
greater W. S. C. School of Mines. 


Page 298 








PHI NU PI 



Page 299 










Page 300 

















SCABBARD AND BLADE 

Chartered 1916. 

Scabbard and Blade is a society of cadet officers; a national honorary military so¬ 
ciety with subordinate companies at colleges and universities having departments of 
military science and tactics. 

The active members of the society are cadet commissioned officers, graduate officers, 
officers of the United States army, officers of the National Guard, and officers of the 
college who are connected with the military department of the institution may be hon¬ 
orary members. 

Scabbard and Blade was organized to develop and foster the ideals and practice 
of military education in the United States and particularly in the various colleges and 
universities in which military science and tactcs were a part of the currculum. 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 


Captain Fredrick J. Osterman, 30th U. S. Infantry 
First Lieutenant Roy Ashbrook 
Sergeant W. N. Puckett 


FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 


Col. Paul E. Todd 
Major Carl D. Raney 
Major Frank W. Zink 
Capt. Clarence Laird 
Capt. E. B. Parker 
Capt. K. D. Ross 
Capt. H. H. Van Voris 


Capt. C. C. Broughton 
Capt. Roy Bohler 
Capt. A. P. Croonquist 
Capt. W. A. Moss 
First Lieut. E. L. Collins 
First Lieut. F. L. Shannon 
First Lieut. Wallie Reed 


ORDER OF GROUP. 



Mow 


Collins 


Engel hurt 

Puckett 

Ashbrook 

Lawrence 

Croonquist 


Laney 

Osterman 

Zink 

Laird 

Shannon 

Todd 

Vnn Voris 

Reed 


Parker 


Ross 



Page 301 







Page 302 











SIGMA TAU 

ETA CHAPTER 
Chartered 1916. 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 


M. K. Akers 

A. C. Abell 

M. K. Snyder 

J. W. Bayer 

B. L. Steele 

L. W. Edwards 

Rudolph Weaver 

F. W. Buerstatte 

F. G. Tucker 

W. A. Pearl 

J. P. Fairbank 

H. V. Carpenter 

G. E. Thornton 

FRATRES 

IN UNIVERSITATE 

1917 

C. H. Jensen 

C. J. Melrose 

C. D. Raney 

J. E. Geue 

W. E. Saupe 

C. H. Worthen 

P. E. Todd 

C. F. Dietz 

A. M. Goff 

1918 

C. C. Boone 

B. Benz 

C. C. Camp 

W. I. Nichalson 

C. C. Ewing 

D. M. Alexander 

A. C. Cole 

E. B. Parker 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

E. F. Keyes 

J. I. Pressiner 

A. J. Turner 


Sigma Tau is a national honorary engineering fraternity composed of Juniors and 
Seniors, founded to promote the principles of scholarship, practibility and sociability 
among engineering men. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Reger 

. Alexander 

Todd 

Raney 

Melrose 

Dietz 

Edwards 

Sohrelder 

Pearl 

Jensen 

Goff 

Beuretatte 

Carpenter 

Akers 

Worthen 

Parker 

Thornton 

Weaver 

Able 

Ewing 

Gene 

Nicklexon 

Benz 

Cole 

Snnpe 


Page 303 

















TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB 


OFFICERS 


Henry Hartman _ President 

Robert Howard _ Vice President 

Norma Tuson _ Secretary-Treasurer 


ROLL 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 


Henry Hartman 

Glenna Troy 

Carl Rainey 

Iras Troy 

Russell Adams 

Edna Babcock 

Chester Worthen 

Edna McCroskey 

Noel Bakke 

Alice Lodge 

Robert Cowan 

Helen Hungate 

A. P. Croonquist 

Jennie McCormack 

W. P. Goldsworthy 

Leila Nordby 

Aubry Miller 

Irene Palmer 

E. E. King 

Ida Hansen 

Charles Broughton 

Gladys Brecount 

Paul Browder 

Shirley Holmes 

Eric Klossner 

Ethel Johnson 

Joseph Passoneau 

Norma Tuson 

J. G. Parmelee 

Helen Lauderdale 

Dan Depertuis 

Laura Maxwell 

Jean Huntington 

Meryl Chapman 

Robert Howard 

Ellen Keyes 

Hill Williams 

Hilda Bainton 

Christine Wood 

Zora Gannon 

Skidmore 


ALUMNI 

MEMBERS 

Mrs. C. C. Todd 

Marie Foulkes 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray O’Day 

Doris Schumaker 

Florence Waller 

Mr. and Mrs. A. T. 

Grace Coulter 

Zelva Mecklem 

Verne Gaddis 

Barbara Drum 


HONORARY MEMBERS 

Dr. and Mrs. E. A. Bryan Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Kruegel 

Prof, and Mrs. F. A. Thomson Miss Agnes Craig 


The Twentieth Century Club is an organization whose purpose is to further the 
intellectual and cultural life at the Washington State College. From time to time during 
the year, the Club brings to the College well-known leaders of thought and action who 
give of their experience to the students. 

Membership is limited to forty, and members are elected from the Senior and 
Junior classs. 


Page 304 










Page 305 





















Page 306 




































WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE BRANCH 
OF THE 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 

C. H. Worthen _._ President 

D. M. Alexander _ Vice President 

C. J. Melrose _ _ _-Secretary 

W. Hendron _Treasurer 

Second Semester 

D. M. Alexander __ President 

B. Benz __ - _Vice President 

C. W. Cutler _ Secretary 

S. E. Stites _ Treasurer 

ROLL 

D. M. Alexander C. H. Jensen 

R. C. Flock E. H. Williams 

D. Rostosen W. Hendron 

H. S. Miller C. E. Guse 

C. V. Shriver W. H. Nicholson 

H. Klockmann B. Benz 

W. H. McGlaughin A. Carlson 

C. H. Worthen C. Cole 

H. Olson Ries 

A. L. Nilson A. H. Haberman 

C. D. Raney A. L. Ziegler 

E. L. Collins W. Reed 

J. L. Williams S. E. Stites 

A. E. Smith E. B. Ehrke 

E. M. Miller P. E. Todd 

F. Laws W. E. Saupe 

C. W. Cutler 


FACULTY MEMBERS 


M. K. Akers M. K. Snyder 

H. V. Carpenter 


018011 

Farrier 

Mlllor 

Miller 

Nlcklenon 

Lauuhlln 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Eliake Rons 

Hendron Stites Rood 

Jen.son Todd Rainey 

Geue Carpenter Sttupe 

Smith Akers Flock 

Alexander Worthen 


Nelson 

Carlson 

Shriver 

Cole . 

Haberman 

Schuler 


Page 307 










■ 



I.lons 

Cook 

Hartman 

Edrltljje 


H!ne 

Moody Turner 

Benkhart Cannon 

Pratt Gerrard 


Page 308 











/'j na JS 


wssrf 


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Ftf/OR/W 

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I !#*& C LaHG£ 

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Hosmwd Him: 
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Ktplaj* Jome^M 
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THE ABjCHITSCTS CLV3 


Page 309 





































































■■ 














DAIRYMEN’S CLUB OF STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON 


OFFICERS 


Joe C. Knott _ President 

R. B. Burbank _ Vice President 

Clarence M. Bach. _ Secretary and Treasurer 


MEMBERS 


Guy C. Anderson 

Joe C. Knowles 

Lorraine C. Christian 

Charlie V. Hanson 

J. W. Bylling 

A. H. Gerriets 

A. C. Gragg 

Earl G. Barnes 

A. J. Leonard 

Clarence M. Bach 

Elmer O. Leonard 

Silas T. Smith, Jr. 

Richard B. Burbank 

Wm. Best 

Walter H. Geue 

Douglas C. Ford 

James J. Hansen 

W. S. Thornber 

Fred B. Wivell 

Joe C. Knott 

H. M. Wivell 

Arnold C. Sweet 

Roy M. Phillips 

Wm. T. Putnam 

S. P. Mustard 

Thos. J. Ashton 

R. L. Brackett 

T. T. Lindley 

George W. Wilson 

A. B. Nystrom 

J. C. Meyer 

Carl F. Erickson 

Chas. W. Krassin 

Benton M. Bangs 

Thos. H. Wright, Jr. 

Stanley D. Boyer 

Howard 0. Lisle 

Geo. Hinman 

Robert L. Taylor, 

Lewis C. Callow 

J. Kendall Poison 

R. W. McKenna 


At the close of the last year a group of students who are majoring in dairying, see¬ 
ing the need of further discussion of some subjects other than obtainable in class rooms, 
organized what is known as the Dairymen’s Club of State College of Washington. 

The object of the club is solely practical, and as stated in its constitution, is in¬ 
tended to promote a closer relationship among the students and instructors interested in 
dairy hubsbandry, and to supplement class instruction by the discussion of topics per¬ 
taining to the dairy industry. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Callow 

Barnes 

Pntnam 

Welvel 

Knoft 

Bach 

Anderson 

Sweet 

Leonard 

Poison 

Wilson 

Best 

Nystrom 

Phillips 

Boyer 

Krassin 

Chrlstaln 

Bangs 

Taylor 

Hanson 

Billings 

McKenna 

Knowles 

Lisle 

Ashton 

Mustard 

Welvel 

Hinman 

Hanson 

Gerritts 


Page 311 















mmm 


Page 312 










DAYTON CLUB 

Organized 1914 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 


Second Semester 


Andrew L. Nillson _ President 

Wen del P. Brown _ Vice President 

Lottie Hunt - - Sec.-Treas. 


Wendel P. Brown _ President 

Walter Hendron _ Vice President 

Lottie Hunt _ Sec.-Treas. 


ROLL 


Charles J. Broughton, Jr. 
Wendel P. Brown 
Earl A. Dunlap 
Lloyd G. Edwards 
Myrtle S. Flitner 
Harold H. Hendron 


Lora Carol Hunt 
Lottie Hunt 
Troy Lindley 
Andrew L. Nillson 
Ward A. Rinehart 
Floy Ester Wallis 


Purpose—A boosting medium between Dayton and Washington State College. 
Membership—Students from Dayton registered at the Washington State College. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Edwards 

Wallis 

Lindley 

Rh in e-heart 

Hunt 

Hunt Nelson 

Hendron 

Brown 

Hendron 

Broughton 


Page 313 













Tiimilerclale 

Woo<t 


Ferrier 

Horau 


Gay 

Palmer 


ELLEN H. RICHARDS CLUB 

The purpose of Ellen H. Richards Club is to emphasize the work of the Home Eco¬ 
nomics Department, and to bring before its members things of Interest that are not 
stressed directly in class work. 











FRENCH CLUB 

OFFICERS 


Elizabeth Richardson _ President 

Erna Babcock _ Vice President 

Beatrice Ertle _ Secretary 

Mary Nash _ Treasurer 


ROLL 

Helen Layton 
James L. Delkin 
Frances J. Lincoln 
Erna Bradbury 
Lora Laney 
W. T. Barnard 
P. M. Jacobson 
Fred Prescott 
Montana Williams 
Mabel Carscallen 
Rebekah Lynde 
Nellie Maynard 
Amanda Nash 
Florence M. Waller 
Helen G. Goode 


Dorothy Hinman 
Vivian Strong 
Bernice White 
Helen Hungate 
Fran-c Babcock 
Cicely Permain 
Amy White 
Catherine Turner 
Lynne Cahan 
Clare Wallace 
Isabelle M. Haynes 
Mabel B. Gerber 
Dorothy West 
Jessie McGrath 
Beatrice Ertle 
Flossie J. Miller 


HONORARY 

Mr. Cruegel 
Mrs. B. McCully 
Dr. Golder 
Miss Day 


MEMBERS 

Mrs. Wm. Goodyear 
Prof. J. W. Graham 
Mrs. Goodyear 


The French Club has been organized for the purpose of bringing the students to¬ 
gether socially outside the class period, not only to become more fluent in speaking the 
language but to a better understanding of French ideals and customs. Students in ad¬ 
vanced classes are entitled to membership in the club. 




Page 315 



















Page 316 












FOREST CLUB 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 


T. S. Goodyear_ President 

H. H. Hendron_Vice President 

R. M. Smith_Secretary 

0. T. Peterson_Treasurer 


T. S. Goodyear 
F. F. Ghiglone 
Ole T. Peterson 
A. H. Chesser 
W. Byron Miller 
Louis Leidl 
E. Lee Dunlap 
Chas. Yerington 


F. F. Ghiglone _ President 

H. H. Hendron_ _ Vice President 

T. S. Goodyear _ Secretary 

0. T. Peterson _ . _Treasurer 


ROLL 

Harold H. Hendron 
Paul H. Gerrard 
Chester Frederickson 
P. L. Minard 
Richard M. Smith 
George A. Ely 
Joe Wilson 


HONORARY MEMBER 
F. G. Miller 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Frederickson Ghigtione 

Dunlap Goodyear 

Lcldel Hendron 


Peterson 

Miller 

CheHser 

Minnrd 


Page 317 



















Baines 

Sweet 

Lytle 

King 


Talbert 
K 1<I well 
Kinehloe 
Leu ton 


Iloran 

Hallman 

Chapinun 

Yerriugton 


Cole 

Loilgo 

MIsel 

McDannlcl 


Mall 

Latshaw 
Wash bun 
French 


HESPERIDES CLUB 

Organized during the fall of 1916, for the purpose of bringing the students from these 
counties into closer communication, and to make a better State College of Washington. 


Students enrolled 

S. T. Arnold 
J. M. Baines 
W. C. Chapman 
H. B. Clees 
W. F. Cole 
G. A. Ely 
W. L. Easley 
M. B. Farwell 
R. M. Garrison 
P. C. Gooden 
W. R. Hall 


from Okanogan, Ferry and 

J. Z. Hollman 
H. Hartman 
E. M. Horan 
R. D. Jensen 
C. G. Kellogg 
J. R. Kinchelo 
C. G. King 
V. Kidwell 
G. M. Larson 
J. E. Latshaw 
A. M. Lodge 


Chelan Counties 

M. E. Lytle 
H. Mioel 

C. I. Newman 

D. Robinson 
A. C. Sweet 
R. L. Talbert 
G. H. Simon 
C. Yerrington 
W. A. Whiting 
Pres., W. F. Cole 
Sec.-Treas., Alice Lodge 




Page 318 










Klonsner 


Clnrk 


Clark 


Chapman 


Day 


LOHESE CLUB 

Organized in 1913 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 

Mildred Klossner _ President 

Mabel Clark _ Treas. and Commissary 

Janice Day _ Secretary 


Second Semester 


Mabel Clark-President 

Bessie Clark_„. Treas. and Commissary 
Meryl Chapman-Secretary 


ROLL 


Mattie Brett 
Celia Burgess 
Lela Burgess 
Meryl Chapman 
Bessie Clark 
Laura Clark 
Mabel Clark 
Ethel Dana 
Pearl Dana 
Janice Day 
Winnie Fitzgerald 
Dorothy Guthrie 


Nell Jarron 
Mildred Klossner 
Ethel Sargent 
Mrs. McCune 
Nannine Mclver 
Joy Morse 
Clara Nye 
Tilly Ross 
Bertha Savage 
Alice Swartz 
Myrtle Westland 
Ruth Whiteman 


CHARTER MEMBERS 


Ruth Aten 
Meryl Chapman 
Nell Jarron 
Mildred Klossner 
Alta Sargent 
Ethel Sargent 
Bessie McCulloch 
Sadie McKenzie 
Eva Maxwell 


Lora Maxwell 
Clara Nye 
Bess Ranton 
Babe Shaw 
O’Enone Shaw 
Eugena Struppler 
Frances Swarz 
Celia Thompson 
Elizabeth Weeks 


The Lohese Club was organized in 1913 with the help of the Y. W. C. A. Secretary, 
Miss Mary Anderson, but is now an entirely independent organization. It is a coopera¬ 
tive, hot-lunch club, maintained by the girls who live too far from the campus to go home 
for lunch. The Club, running on a regular schedule, is entirely self-supporting. 










Page 320 


lb 






THE HORTICULTURAL CLUB 


This organization is composed of students majoring in Fruit Growing, Floriculture, 
Landscape Gardening, and the Faculty of the Department of Horticulture. The Annual 
Apple Show featured by the Club is one of the important events of the college year. 

OFFICERS 


First Semester 


Second Semester 


Forbes Bailey_ President 

E. S. Robertson _ Vice President 

Floyd S. Zimmerman _ Sec.-Treas. 

Roy Larsen _ _ Reporter 


E. S. Robertson_President 

Wm. Buell_Vice President 

Floyd S. Zimmerman_Sec.-Treas. 

A. Nelson_Reporter 


ROLL 


Miss Mildred Aumiller 

H. N. Bakke 

L. M. Benbow 

H. O. Blake 

H. Bayer 

E. S. Brown 

W. C. Buell 

R. W. Chase 

H. B. Clees 

H. H. Ideno 

H. S. Hartman 

H. R. Hayworth 

J. Z. Hollman 

A. H. McCuddy 

C. F. Morrison 


W. 0. Morrison 
Miss Alice Munn 
Miss Grace Peterson 

E. S. Robertson 
A. Semple 

D. J. Shrader 

F. S. Zimmerman 
Roy Larsen 
Forbes Bailey 
Prof. R. J. Barnett 
Prof. O. M. Morris 
Prof. A. L. Strausz 
C. B. Sprague 

F. W. Allen 
H. Gooding 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Zimmerman 

Chase 

Brown 

Schraeder 

Breel 


Morris 

Larson 

Semple 


Clees 

Morrison 

Benbow 

Hollman 

Robertson 


Page 321 














I* $iaf» * 

-1 IN 




Page 322 






















































Parker Hill Day 

Heaton Croonqust 

SPANISH CLUB 


Dorothea B. Hill _ 

I 

(. - _ -President 

Veva Parker _ ’ 

r OFFICERS 

) 

J Vice President 

Janice Day . | 

J .Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. Croonqulst __ _ - 

ROLL 

* —Sergeant-at-Arms 


Elizabeth Votaw Gertrude Stephens Margaret Adains Louis Mutty Steich Wakabayashl Bennie Clark 

Mary Setzer 
J. R. Cunningham 
H. O. Lisle 
Kathleen Johnson 
H. R. Newhlnney 
Ray Hanley 
Earle McCroskey 
Mildred McMaster 
Esther tambcrt 
Jack Ray 
Belle Hartnell 
Lonla F. Champlln 
Kenneth F. Cable 
A. VV. Newman 
Flora Ann Frlese 


Susie Core 
D. W. Hilbom 
A. Plro 
F. F. Potter 
A. H. Hondo 
F. C. Chalfant 
2arla C. Castllo 
Marie Brett 
Violet Nonneman 
Alta Wiggins 
Glen VV. TruMell 
Janies F. Fostwin 
W. B. Van Atnburgh 
Flossie Haya 
Ethel Entnu 
A. D. Miller 


Helen Ilolro.vd 
Charles Barclay 
Clayton Rychard 
Ernest Henry 
Clarence VV. Laird 
Earl Freeman 
Edythe Olson 
Harriet Phlster 
Aniunda Nash 

J. vv. Boone 

Win. H. Ilopkinson 
F. N. Bryant 
F. M. Rowlee 
E. Salzmnnn 

K. Dunlap 

L. Palmer 


H. Bradbury 
S. Nelson 
Florence Evans 
Rosetta Schua 
Ray Loomis 
Ruth Garrison 
Mabel Morgan 
Grace West 
Naomi Smith 
C. G. King 
J. M. Clark 
Ben Tamoka 
O. R. Neal 
John S. Sollt 
LIlllau Lull 
Alice Kreese 


Mildred Klossner 
Erich Klossner 
Doris Lay 
Wallie Reed 
Bertha Judges 
Veva Parker 
Vina Jensen 
Frances Randle 
H. R. Smithson 
Clair Hathaway 
Golda Freels 
Janice Day 
W. V. Brown 
J. M. McGregor 
Emily Babcock 
Dorothea B. Hill 


M. J. Gnagy 
B. H. Lehmann 
G. O. Kildow 
7. D. Roberta 
Ray Rudt>erg 
Frances Donncllan 
Nellie Davies 
Jeanette Scrlber 
Evelyn Bradbury 
Selena Preece 
Esther Effert 
E. L. Peterson 
E. O. Tut hum 
K. T. Rendull 
Marjorie Heaton 
Pearl Leonard 


Page 323 











Page 324 











MINING ENGINEERING AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

Affiliated Student Society of the American Institute of Mining Engineers 


FACULTY 


Prof. Francis A. Thomsen 
Prof. C. G. Warfel 
Prof. Solon Shedd 


♦Prof. F. M. Handy 
Asst. Prof. Olaf P. Jenkins 
Prof. I. H. Pierce 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 

James G. Parmalee_President 

Cecil C. Camp_Vice President 

Aubrey C. Miller_Sec. and Treas. 

John Maloney_Reporter 

Basil B. Doane_Sergeant-at-Arms 


•Leave of absence 1916. 


Second Semester 

Aubrey C. Miller - President 

A. C. Langdon _ Vice President 

Norbert G. Kulzer _ Sec.-Treas. 

Leon F. Johnston _ Reporter 

Robert Moss _ Sergeant-at-Arms 


ROLL 


C. C. Camp 

A. S. Boyer 

John M. Maloney 

R. W. Moss 

B. B. Doane 

L. B. Hanley 

L. D. Johnston 

R. E. Hanley 

A. C. Miller 

J. W. M. Van der Hayden 

Janies G. Parmalee 

A. 0. Medby 

Norbert G. Kulzer 

Wm. Woodland 

H. W. Mcrrin 

A. C. Langdon 

Hector Munn 

W. H. Hopkinson 

J. H. Cairns 

Lyman Passmore 

P. A. Washburn 

A. E. Dohlke 

A. C. Hansen 

E. Mathews 

W. J. Fennell 

R. C. Collis 

J. K. Berlin 

H. W. Doudl 

H. J. Bohanen 

Lee Day 

A. K. Holmes 

C. A. Stewart 

W. S. Larsen 

H. Meecum 

L. Alyger 

Roscoe Duthie 

R. S. Hoover 

C. C. Clark 

SHORT-COURSE 

MINERS 

John D. Ulley 

H. Arrasmith 

Edwin Joyce 

L. E. Allen 

H. Wolverton 

Charles Hard 

W. E. Whitney 

J. W. Van Dyke 

J. K. Sullivan 

W. S. Thomas 

STUDENTS NOT IN COLLEGE 

W. A. White 

J. K. Horning 

J. H. Hinckley 

L. E. Jraeger 

H. McCroskey 

Chester Kellogg 

Wm. Corson 


I-age 325 




















Neff 

Welden 


Harmellus 

Lowery 


Isaacs 

McBride 


Bryant 

Schuman 


Folsom 

Crnlg 


NEWTONIAN SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 


Edith A. McBride^ _ President 

Dorothy M. Neff _ Secretary-Treasurer 

Ina P. Craig - Reporter 


MEMBERS 


Prof. C. A. Isaacs 
F. W. Bryant 
C. L. Hix 

Prof. E. C. Colpitts 
Marie Weldin 
Rachel Shmuan 
Edith McBride 


Dorothy Neff 
Ina Craig 
Elsie Renne 
Florence Evans 
Flossie Folsom 
Blanche Lowary 
Frank Hermelius 










Hopkinson 

Smith 

Putnam 

Price 

Callow 


Weivel 

Binns 

Putnam 

Newman 

Lindsay 


Andreson 

Patrick 

Troy 

Troy 

Hoover 


Taylor 

Boyer 

Mustard 

Weivel 

Boyer 


Page 327 


Richard 

Mlnard 

McKenna 

Mesford 

Peterson 



















Page 329 

































































































SADDLE AND SIRLOIN CLUB 


OFFICERS 


L. Mu tty . 
A. Halsey _ 
T. Lindley 
G. Guthrie 
L. Jones _ 


_ President 

Vice President 

_Secretary 

_Treasurer 

_Reporter 


ROLL 


Jack Horrall 
J. D. Hamilton 

E. J. Barnes 

D. C. King 

J. E. Hamilton 
Troy Lindley 
A. Sorenson 

E. O. Leonard 
Orin Pearson 
A. Halsey 

W. A. Stanton 

F. G. Kastenbader 
Harry Webster 

J. Laird 
M. Laird 
L. Jones 
Prof. His lop 
Mr. Howell 
Mr. Krantz 
R. L. Ellson 
L. C. Brown 
H. A. Walter 
Guy Jaques 

L. Fertig 
W. F. Talley 

M. L. Brown 
M. H. Haller 


A. L. Wolfe 
H. O. Worthen 
Percy Goldsworthy 
R. D. Schnebly 

D. Bregg 

E. Cook 

F. C. Putman 
Robert Cowan 
W. P. Brown 

G. Guthrie 

R. C. Schnebly 

C. Richard 
Bryan Cormana 
Geo. Hinman 

H. H. Sappington 

D. L. Shrader 
Sam Shuman 
Robert Nelson 
Warren Love 

H. R. Mewhinney 
L. Mutty 

John Kendall Poison 

F. W. Rowlee 
J. L. Stevens 
Fred Russel 
Victor Morgan 


Edwards 

King 

Morgan 

Putman 

Taylor 

Horrall 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Love 

Nelson 

Newhlnney 

Clirf 

Jaques 

Jones 


Cowan Sehnebley 

Barnes Schrader 

Wappenstine Burger 
Lehman King 

Starton Brower 

Brown 


Sehnebley 

Poison 

Cundy 

McClure 

Croonqulst 


Halsey Laird 

Huntington Williams 
Lindley Webster 

Tally Roach 

Wolf Hinman 

Mutty Kurt* 


Laird 

Lehman 

Guthrie 

Binns 

Russell 

Sehuman 


Page 329 
















Page 330 

















S. C. P. A. 


OFFICERS 


First 

M. F. Potter- 

Semester 

_ __ President 

Second Semester 

L. E. Cox -- _ _ - 

-President 

J. C. Shoudy„_ _ - 

_ Vice President 

P^rsnn 

. Vice 

President 

Miss Mary Matsen 

_ _ __ _ Secretary 

Miss B. Lloyd 


..Secretary 

J. C. Shoudy 

. -Treasurer 

Paul Hamilton 


.Treasurer 


ROLL 


R. Abbot 
A. H. Anderson 
Henry J. Bailie 
Emil J. Benz 
G. H. Berg 
C. W. Blackman 
R. S. Bruce 
A. I. Baker 
Eugene Curti 
N. K. Bouck 

L. E. Cox 
Gladys Durham 

M. L. Dickinson 
C. Durham 

C. A. Edgren 
Elfrida Engelland 
Maidee Farwell 
W. H. Griesinger 
Paul Hamilton 
Edith C. Harter 
Ora M. Hickman 


R. M. Hill 
Louise F. Holzer 
Viola Irwin 
R. E. Jensen 
H. L. Kimmel 
Beatrice Lloyd 
Anna J. Matsen 
M. J. Matsen 
P. H. Maskenthine 

C. W. Person 
Albert Piro 
H. S. Price 
M. F. Potter 
Eugenia Reeves 
P. H. Siefner 

D. G. Shannahan 
Dewey Smith 

J. C. Shoudy 
F. J. Weber 
C. T. Wilson 


ORDER OF GROUP. 



Seiffuer 


Bailie 


Kim mol 

Ertel 

Harter 

Erwin 

Benz 

Price 

Farwell 

Anderson 

Holzer 

Bouck 

Lewi* 

Webber 

Curti 

Hamilton 

Blackman 

Potter 

Matsen 

LIyod 

England 

Bruce 

Cox 

Durham 

Jensen 

Mataen 

Baker 


Page 331 


















SEALTH CLUB 

OFFICERS 


Doris Lay, President Grace Peterson, Sec-.Treas. 

H. B. Boyer, Vice-President 


ROLL 


R. M. Adams 
J. J. C. Allen 
C. Babcock 
H. N. Bakke 
H. J. Barbee 
C. P. Barclay 
Mildred Barnes 
H. B. Bayer 
J. K. Berlin 
Wm. Best 
R. L. Brackett 
M. T. Brower 
J. L. Delkin 
Henry DeYoung 
R. Dewson 
Agnes E. Ericksen 

E. P. Gilland 
Kathleen Gray 
M. H. Haller 
C. Delta Hann 
Alma M. Hann 
M. Alma Hann 
C. V. Hanson 
Anne M. Jacobson 

L. N. Jones 
Frank E. Kellogg 

M. C. Kells 


G. J. Kralowec 
J. M. Lang 
Doris Lay 

H. 0. Lisle 

F. W. Logan 
R. H. Loomis 

A. F. McDougal 
Bertha L. Mcllquham 
Edna McKinstry 

H. E. Meade 
Allida S. Nelson 
Leila C. Nordby 
Grace Peterson 
J. K. Poison 
J. D. Roberts 
Francis M. Rowlee 
J. G. Saboe 

F. K. Schroeder 

G. H. Smalley 
R. M. Spaulding 

B. Stensland 
R. Sutton 

C. L. Turner 

H. E. Turner 
L. J. Turner 

W. A. Wappenstein 
G. W. Wilson 


Page 332 








Davies Barnard Phister 

Doerr Fbllllpu McGrath 

Olmsted 


THE SPOKANE CLUB 

The Spokane Club of the State College of Washington was organized in 1914 by stu¬ 
dents enrolling from the Spokane high schools. It has grown steadily both in member¬ 
ship and activity so that today the Club ranks as the strongest county organization on 
the campus. The Club membership includes all students whose homes are in Spokane 
County. At the beginning of the second semester, membership was well over 150 students 
The present year has been by far the most active in the history of the Club. The dances, 
two at the College and one in Spokane, have been given by the Club to further its pur¬ 
pose, which is primarily to interest prospective Spokane high school graduates toward 
Washington State. A beautiful trophy was awarded the North Central high school for 
its successful football season. This cup is to become the permanent possession of the 
team winning it two out of three times. The present Club plans are toward an active 
campaign to get a greater percentage of students to come to W. S. C. next fall. 

The officers of the Club for fall semester were: President, Clement Phillips; Vice 
President, Nellie Davies; Secretary, Leona Doerr; Treasurer, Harry C. Olmstead. For 
the second semester the officers were: President, W. T. Barnard; Vice President; 
Secretary; Treasurer, H. C. Olmstead. 


Page 333 










Page 334 


SPOKANE CLUB 





























ROLL 


D. M. Alexander 

A. M. Anderson 

S. Geo. Archibald 
Kate Mary Argo 
H. F. Aumack 

C. M. Bach 
F. E. Bailey 
W. T. Barnard 
H. P. Barnhart 
F. E. Bergren 
Harold J. Bohanon 

T. J. Bolitho 

C. J. H. Bornholdt 
Erna E. Bradbury 
Emmett A. Brandt 
Leita L. Brandt 
Gladys J. Brecount 
H. H. Bridwell 
\V. C. Buell 
W. M. Byers 

K. F. Cable 
Helen A. Canfield 
Lila B. Chingren 

E. L. Collins 
Gordon Cook 

R. C. Copeland 
W. H. Crisman 
J. E. Crites 

H. J. Cundy 
J. R. Cunningham 
Eugene G. Curti 
Wm. R. Daggett 

S. Edith Dark 
Nellie E. Davies 
J. A. Davis 
Hazel B. Devenish 

B. B. Doane 

L. Arline Dodds 
L. Georgia Doerr 
Estelle Mae Downer 
Mary E. Dwight 
Wm. G. Eddy 
Blodwen E. Evans 

C. C. Ewing 
B. J. Felts 

A. T. Fleming 
Mildred L. France 
A. J. George 
Wm. P. Goldsworthy 
May Gonderman 
Clarence E. Guse 
Finch Haggard 
Beatrice Hall 
Alice E. Hanke 
Leroy B. Hanley 
R. E. Hanley 
Ruby A. Harding 
Mildred E. Hardy 



M. Virginia Heaton 
Josephine Mary Heily 
C. W. Hineman 
Elenor F. Hinkley 
E. L. Hix 
Merril R. Hoff 
H. Hopps 
C. B. Horrall 
Verona G. Hull 
C. R. Hunter 
H. A. Irvin 
Basil Jerard 
C. Johnson 
C. H. Johnson 
E. A. Johnson 
Glen Johnson 
Katherine Johnson 
O. W. Johnson 
L. D. Johnson 
Harold F. Jones 
Leslie J. Kienholz 
W. L. King 
R. A. Landen 
J. F. Lester 

J. O. Lindahl 
Olof W. Lindgren 
H. C. Luce 

H. C. Lynde 
R. M. Lynde 
Jennie Mae McCormack 
Anna May McCoy 
Jessie M. McGrath 

K. G. McKay 
Linn M. McKinstry 
W. J. Matters 


Dudley C. Meceem 

A. O. Medby 
Z. C. Melcher 

C. J. Melrose 
H. W. Merrin 
Pearl M. Mitchell 

D. H. Moodhe 
Wm. L. Morgan 
Amanda Nash 
Mary Ellen Nash 
R. A. Noerenberg 
H. S. Olin 

H. C. Olmstead 
Henry W. Olsen 
J. Osterback 
Mattie Pattison 
Loenidas Penn 
C. G. Permain 

E. L. Peterson 
C. A. Phillips 
Harriet L. Phister 
W. A. Powell 

H. H. Power 
Della L. Prell 

F. L. Prescott 

J. T. Roberts 
M. R. Roberts 

K. D. Ross 

R. H. Rudberg 
T. L. Ruehl 
Wm. D. Sabiston 
Andrew Semple 
J. M. Shaw 
Mary E. Shook 
May M. Siemeens 
W. I. Simonton 
Frank Skadan 

E. L. Smith 

F. R. Spaulding 

G. W. Staggs 

C. A. Stahlberg 
Anne E. Stauffer 

D. J. Stewart 

B. I. Stone 
Elsie Ellen Stone 
J. N. Stone 

L. G. Swartz 
Lucile E. Tarbet 
G. A. Tobin 

E. W. Tollefson 
Catherine Turner 
Clare C. Wallace 
Ellen A. Wallhoff 
J. Judsen Whetsel 
Amy Lillian White 
A. D. Winans 

J. W. Witt 
Madge V. Witt 


Page 335 






SPHINX CLUB 



Baines 

Billings 


Breymen 

Chesser 



Hanson 

Wakabayisha 


McKay 


Best 


Knowles 

Saupe 

Weivel 

Llncolnfelder 

Guy 

Windqulst 

Jensen 

Johnson 

Helander 

Blmlshnne 

Putnam 


Mustard 

Cole 



Back 

Kinchloe 


Washburn 

Wanzer 



Page 336 






SPHINX CLUB 



Harder 

Harder 

Ball 

Selirander 

Shuman 

Gnagy 


Aunmek 

Sweet 

Sutton 

Chapman 

Anderson 

Kddy 

Vagler 

Mcllveeu 

01 instead 

Meaford 

Pearson 

Muller 

Gnagy 

French 

Miller 

Garrots 

Klldow 

Tresheau 

Miller 

Awleraon 

Fountain 

King 

Putnam 

Dunlap 

Bailie 

De Youug 

Coolie 

Carlson 


Page 337 







SPHINX CLUB 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 

Orin Pearson_President 

E. Grunkel _ Vice President 

Henry De Young _ Secretary 

C. G. King _ Treasurer 

Henry J. Bailee - Reporter 


Second Semester 


William Saupe _ President 

C. D. Cook _ Vice President 

Leslie S. Tromanhauser _ Secretary 

Wm. G. Eddy _ Treasurer 

Tim Somers _ Reporter 


L. S. Tromanhauser 

B. 0. Nelson 
H. H. Harder 
L. W. Dickinson 

R. 0. Jensen 

R. Garrison 

C. H. Lam 

S. Lambert 
G. H. Simon 

C. I. Newman 

B. Haynes 

J. Passonneau 

N. Thomas 

G. 0. Kildon 

H. J. Bailie 

S. Bailie 

E. W. Swapp 
H. V. Bayley 
W. T. Putnam 

F. C. Putnam 

R. M. Spaulding 

A. M. Illman 

C. H. Eldridge 
L. R. Sutten 

S. Wakabayashi 

F. Killian 

T. J. Ashton 
Roy Layne 

W. M. Thomson 

T. C. Webster 

L. Bennett 

A. H. Hansen 
R. L. Elsom 

E. E. Waybright 
E. L. Dunlap 

M. Katula 

B. Mulvey 
M. Smyth 
E. B. Ehrke 
P. C. Gains 

C. G. King 
J. C. Allen 
H. Hopps 


W. McHughs 
W. A. Powell 
J. F. Fostevin 
S. J. Guldjord 
P. Fuller 
R. Anderson 
J. M. Fountain 

F. 0: Blair 

O. Miller 

A. L. Wooten 

C. L. Mesford 
E. Peterson 
H. F. Jones 

B. Austin 
J. Hansen 
A. C. Sweet 

P. A. Washburn 
W. S. Chapman 

D. Moodhe 

L. E. Jackson 
0. A. Fisher 
J. D. Hamilton 

E. A. Madsen 

C. Cramer 

L. Knight 

H. F. Schafer 

D. C. Ford 

E. Mathews 
J. I. Gaines 
R. H. Gaines 
E. Kudstrum 

G. Parker 
J. Geue 

M. F. Mendehall 
M. B. Mclllvun 
W. B. Miller 

A. H. Chesser 
W. L. Sunblod 
A. Atloson 
L. Anderson 
J. Lingenfelter 
C. E. Winguist 
R. C. Treasher 


ROLL 

F. Kostemboder 

C. M. Bach 
S. Mustard 
J. M. Baines 
R. M. French 

A. Piro 

H. 0. Breum 

D. Stewart 
J. Delkin 
R. Jensen 

L. E. Cox 

M. Gnagy 
M. Hoff 

B. Gnagy 

A. L. Ziegler 
A. H. Haberman 

O. E. Herrett 
H. M. Walker 

C. L. Pinkerton 
J. D. Royer 

A. W. Rookstool 
J. Yates 

E. Stevens 

L. Penn 

W. S. Schroll 

D. T. J. Ball 
W. Helander 
W. Finnell 

E. A. Larsen 
H. F. Aumack 

P. Cole 

W. F. Hansen 
R. Schactler 
H E. Anderson 
A. Gerrietts 
J. Knowles 
Wm. Best 
A. J. Ely 

J. F. Justice 

M. F. Potter 
P. Siefner 

G. W. King 

K. D. McKay 


T. Somers 

L. Chaplin 
W. Geue 

G. V. Thistlewaite 
Wm. Saupe 

E. R. Johnson 
R. D. Tucker 

D. W. Hilborn 

H. S. Miller 
P. Gerrard 
O. R. Neal 
J. Bortruff 

J. W. Byllings 

G. Kralowic 

D. Kurtz 
J. E. Ray 
Wm. Hall 

E. Latshaw 

A. L. Markley 
C. H. Muller 

M. Brandt 

C. W. Brennan 

F. B. Wivill 
O. W. Johnson 
A. Carlson 

R. B. Burbank 
O. C. A. Pearson 
W. A. Powell 

H. Olmsted 

E. E. Kern 
W. Cooley 
J. Kinchello 
C. E. Skinner 

H. R. Haworth 
C. Guse 

E. W. Tollefson 
L. Reuhl 
E. Brandt 
Wm. G. Eddy 

S. I. Bardwell 
H. De Young 
H. M. Wanser 


Page 338 
















Kildaw 

Xourse 

Savage 

Christman 


Gnagy 

Corbell 

Kulier 

Thomas 


Gnugy 

McKay 

Rohm 

Fountain 


339 



















Page 340 






STEVENS HALL 


HONORARY MEMBERS 

Dean Rhoda M. White Miss May Gonderman 

SOPHOMORES 


Kate M. Argo 
Blowden E. Evans 
Lottie Hunt 
Kathleen M. Kidder 
Agnes B. Miner 


Bernice O. Redington 
Gertrude P. Ruley 
Esther M. Sell 
Louise F. Stilke 
Mary K. Yates 


FRESHMEN 


Erna C. Bradbury 
Leita L. Brandt 
Varian L. Carpenter 
Margaret I. Coplen 
Selma-Gene Coates 
Christine M. Curtis 
Alberta N. Davis 
Laura A. Dodds 
Francesca D. Donnellan 
Agnes E. Ericksen 
Ada R. Erwin 
Glenna M. Fletcher 
Belle Hatrnell 
Ethel A. Hastings 
Maudie D. Hender 
Eleanor F. Hinckley 
Retta Jensen 
Katherine Johnson 
Eula R. Kazee 
Alice E. Kresse 
Fanny Mae Kyle 
Lillian Lail 
Esther A. Lambert 


Frances J. Lincoln 
Blanche E. Lowry 
Lucile K. McCroskey 
Ethel S. McCaw 
Anna M. McCoy 
Gladys D. Mcllveen 
Rachel L. Moe 
Alice Munn 
Ellida S. Nelson 
Margaret H. Patrick 
Alma L. Paul 
Selena A. Preece 
Grace C. Peterson 
Florence Peterson 
Eugenia Reeves 
Ruth E. Seibird 
Jeanette Scriber 
Martha D. Schweer 
Luella E. Smith 
Agnes Sorenson 
Dorthea Sorenson 
Dorothy E. West 
Ida Mae Wilkins 


E. S. D. 


May E. Dwight 
Kathleen D. Gray 
Clara E. Kitto 
Rebecca M. Lynde 


Bertha L. Mcllquham 
Dora M. McAllister 
Mamie A. Thompson 



Page 342 











































































Page 343 








































Page 344 
















































ORDER OF GROUP. 



Mast 


Eh liter 


Gooding 

Gosterln 

Perstlne 

Staggs 

Collins 

Hendrickson 

Bond 

Knlkus 

Hart 

Haynes 

Harter 

Ivolling 

Wegner 

Wkltham 

Nelson 

Evans 

Beckman 

McGregor 

Green 

Sterne 

McKay 

Davis 

Justice 

Johnson 

Turner 

Darker 

Young 


Page 345 








Page 346 







WILLARD HOUSE 




Helene Dupertuis 
Beatrice Graham 
Eula Bowers 
Pearl Mitchell 
Esther Rudstrom 
Mabel Carscallen 
Clare Wallace 


ROLL 

Ruth M. Murray 
Helen L. Stocking 
Helen Gillette 
Montana Williams 
Geraldine Wright 
Ethel E. Miller 


Willard House, adjoining the campus, is occupied by an organization of girl stu¬ 
dents founded to further the common interests of the group members. The organ¬ 
ization is entirely independent of any other and has as its object the providing of an 
approved group life for the members. The members have their own officers and have 
jurisdiction in matters relating to their own house. 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Williams 

Wallace 

Graham 

Bowera 


Dupertius 

Cnrscallon 

Murray 

Gillette 

Miller 


Mitchell 

Stocking 

Wright 

Rudstrum 


Page 347 












Page 348 















WHITMAN COUNTY CLUB 



Organized 1915 

OFFICERS 

First Semester 

Second Semester 

Wilfred H. Talley_ 

President Leon K. Martini- _ _ _ - President 


Leon K. Martini _ Vice President Annetta Freels _ Vice President 

Ellen M. Keyes _ Secretary Marie Cave_Secretary 

Ernest E. Henry _ Treasurer Ernest E. Henry _ Treasurer 

The Whitman County Club is composed of all students of the College from Whit¬ 
man County, and those enrolled from outside the State. The club has adopted for its 
aim, “A bigger and better W. S. C.” 


Gunderson 

Freels 

ORDER OF GROUP. 

Henry 

Martini Keye9 

Cave Tally 


Page 349 














3 U *2 

<D £3 
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Page 350 























Page 351 







Page 352 


















YAKIMA VALLEY CLUB 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 

Robt. Cowan_President 

Lorraine C. Christian- Vice President 

Bessie Simmonds_ _Secretary 

Edith McBride _ Treasurer 


Second Semester 

Lorraine C. Christian.. _ President 

Dwight Shrader __ Vice President 

Helen Lauderdale _ Secretary 

S. K. Bardwell Treasurer 


ROLL 


Ruth Allshouse 

S. K. Bardwell 
L. P. Bond 
Evelyn Bradbury 
Hazel Bradbury 
E. S. Brown 
Evelyn Buck 

E. W. Burkhardt 
Percy Butchart 
Helemead Chrisler 
L. C. Christian 
Gladys Clark 

J. H. Clark 
Marion Clarke 
C. A. Cole 

R. Cowan 

Esther Dollenbacher 
E. A. Ehmer 

T. R. Fear 
Mabel Gerber 
C. V. Gliddey 
Paul Hamilton 
A. C. Hansen 

K. P. Johnson 
Donald Kurtz 
Kathryn Jones 
Bertha Judges 

E. E. Kern 

F. Kostenbader 
Alice Kresae 
Lillian Lail 
John Laird 
Marple Laird 
Helen Lauderdale 
Abbie Leach 


Helen Lee 
Francis Lincoln 
J. S. Lingfelter 
Edith McBride 
W. L. McCredie 
Selma Hilgeson 
W. E. Mason 

L. R. Meyer 
J. C. Meyer 
Mabel Morgan 
Dcrothy Neff 
Marion Nelson 
C. R. Nelson 

C. F. Pinkerton 
Clementine Prior 
W. Reed 
E. S. Robertson 
H. Sharkey 
Rachel Shuman 
Samuel Shuman 
Bessie Simmonds 
Hazel Slaght 
R. T. Smith 
W. C. Stanton 

M. D. Steensen 
Verla Strausz 
Alice Terry 

R. C. Treasher 
A. Ward 
C. A. Webber 
H. W. Webster 
L. Wheeler 
Ralph Wilson 
Velma McComb 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Cowan 

Windquist Bowers 

Robertson Miller 

Nelson Reed 

Brown 


Christian 

Neff Sluglit Kurtz 

AllshouMe Webster 

Lincolnfelder Laird 

Hamilton Laird 


Page 353 
































































* 


COLUMBIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 


OFFICERS 


First Semester 


Second Semester 


Christine Wood _ President 

Marie Weldin _ Secretary 

Edith Keywood _ Treasurer 

Ruth Murry _ Sergeant-at-Arms 

Meryl Chapman _ Attorney 

Elsie Wort hen _ Reporter 


Della Prell _ 

Celia Burgess . 
Mary Matsen 

Laura Clark_ 

Meryl Chapman 
Neil AVilliams _ 


__President 

. -Vice President 

-Secretary 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

_Attorney 

_Reporter 


ACTIVE MEMBERS 


Celia Burgess 
Meryl Chapman 
Laura Clark 
Gladys Clark 
Kathryn Conney 
Geraldine Crossland 
Janice Day 
Edith Dark 
Flosise Folsom 
Florence Goudy 
Mae Hurst 
Ellen Keyes 


Edith Keywood 
Clara Kunath 
Anne Matsen 
Mary Matsen 
Ruth Murry 
Olive Newhall 
Della Prell 
Florence Reese 
Neil Williams 
Georgia LaFollette 
Mary Yates 
Cecily Permain 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Naomi Smith 
Lora Maxwell 
Minnie Worthen 
Mable Clark 


Marie Weldin 
Christine Wood 
Lila Chingren 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Kunatb 

Clark 

Matsen 

Welden 


Prell 

Crossland 

Murray 

Clark 

Wood 


La Follette 

Mannviell 

Obingrin 

Day 

Clark 


Chapman 
Davis 
Burges 
Wort ben 
Dark 


Matsen 

Williams 

Keyes 

Keywood 


Page 355 


















Page 356 

























WASHINGTON LITERARY SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 


Larsen _ President 

C. S. Robertson _ Vice President 

H. De Young _ Secretary 

G. King _ Treasurer- 


ROLL 

Bardwell, S. K. 

Bailey, F. 

Brock, W. 

Clark, J. H. 

Courtney, D. 

Cowan, Robt. 

Chapmen, W. S. 

Dana, Bliss 
DeYoung, H. 

Caddy, W. G. 

Gnagy, B. 

Guthrie, G. 

Hartman, H. 

Hakey, A. 

King, C. G. 


E. S. Robertson __ President 

Wm. Ealder - Vice President 

P. F. Washburn __ Secretary 

Hakey _ Treasurer 


Koisnen, Enk. 
Larsen, Roy 
Mewhirnj', H. 
Mesford, C. 
Putman, F. C. 
Putman, W. 
Russell, F. S. 
Robertson, E. S. 
Stahlberg, C. A. 
Stewart,- Dan. 
Wansen, H. M. 
Washburn, P. T. 
Williams, Claum 
Wililams, Hill. 


Cowan 

King 

Stahlberg 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Brack 

Klossner 

Chapman 

Putnam 

Putnam 


Williams 

Hartman 

Russell 

Wanzer 

Larson 

Halsey 


Mesford 

Courtney 

Washburn 

Gnagy 

Laird 


De Young 

Williams 

Rddy 

Guthrie 

Robertson 


Page 357 












































WEBSTERIAN DEBATING SOCIETY 


ROLL 


S. D. Boyer 
W. P. Brown 

W. P. Goldworthy 

K. B. Johnson 
Carl King 
E. E. King 

R. L. Lauderdale 

T. T. Lindley 
J. P. Matsen 
J. Passomeau 
Orin Pearson 
C. W. Person 
W. H. Talley 

S. Wakabayashi 
S. Wabayashi 

J. G. Parmalee 
P. M. Browder 
Ira Nicholson 
C. J. Broughton 
Marion Lea 
Daniel Dupertuis 


G. H. Livengood 
Andrew Newman 

E. E. Horn 

L. C. Christian 

M. Wivell 

C. A. Phillips 
Silas Stites 
R. R. Burbank 
James Hansen 
J. S. Lingfelter 
C. W. Brennen 

F. W. Carlson 
I. J. Ray 
Arthur Goff 

E. A. Larson 
C. W. Peterson 

F. Kostenbaaer 
E. E. Waybright 
R. L. Elsom 
Ward Rinehart 


ORDER OF GROUP. 


Goldsworthy 

Lauderdale 

Stites 

Welvel 

Worthen 


Brown 

Carlson 

Christian 

Pearson 

Hanson 

Browder 

Tally 

Taylor 

Lindley 

Rhineheart 

Goff 

Newman 

Lea 

Matsen 

Corlette 

King 

Peterson 

King 

Breeraan 

Callow 

Phillips 

Wakbayisha 

Lincolnfelder 

Boyer 


TALAMIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 








Page 361 

























































































THE YEAR’S REVIEW 


Enrollment beginning on September 20, 1916, surpassed by almost 300 
the total registration during the first semester of the previous year. Depart¬ 
mental gains varied from 20 to 300 per cent. The increase was due both to 
the return of a large number of old students and to a record-breaking enter¬ 
ing class. 

Concurrent with the opening of college was the installation of Omega 
Chapter of Alpha Chi Omega, the women’s fourth national fraternity on the 
campus. Nineteen members of the former Alpha Theta Sigma local were 
admitted as charter members of the new organization. In the course of the 
year, Delta Sigma, a local, and the ninth fraternity of men, was organized. 
The chapter home is at 511 Colorado. 

Among the men of the class of 1920, such football candidates as Hamilton, 
Skadan, Lyons, Eakin and Leidl, showed to advantage, but because of compe¬ 
tition with the fourteen eligibles from the 1915 championship team, only the 
first named broke into the lineup for the prized “W.” Brown and Leroy 
Hanley, sophomores, received letters for the first time. 

Though beaten in two close games, one by the Oregon Aggies, 13 to 10, 
the other by the University of Oregon. 12 to 3, the State College eleven went 
through what would ordinarily be considered a very successful schedule. The 
overwhelming defeat of Montana, 27 to 0; Idaho, 31 to 0; Whitman, 48 to 0, 
and Gonzaga, 18 to 0, attest the strength of the Crimson and Gray. Langdon, 
center, and Durham, quarterback, completed their fourth year of collegiate 
football. Clarence Zimmerman, end, was elected to succeed Benton Bangs as 
captain. 

After weeks of Shylocking, Wm. H. Dietz (Lonestar) attached his sig¬ 
nature to a coach’s contract for the 1917 eleven. Stalk’em, whoop! And 
Dietz is out for the scalp of the jinx which appeared last fall in the ’varsity- 
alumni game on October 7. Also on that date and the day previous occurred 
the Washington Banker-Farmer convention attended by 350 visitors. The 
meeting will be held annually at Washington State. 

During October, almost constant negotiations between President Holland 
and the Sophomore leaders resulted in the almost complete elimination of 
hazing, including the indiscriminate paddling of Frosh. A pledge of honor 
assures the keeping of college tradition by the first year men. Score one, 
for the Freshmen! However, in the annual supremacy bouts, the infants lost 
by a wide margain. The under-class football clash was won by the Sophs, 
13 to 0. 

While the under-classmen were waging their earlv-year struggle, Uncle 
Sam, with the idea of making real fighters of students, detailed Lieutenant 
Ashbrook, Sergeants Conell and Lawrence to aid Capt. Ostermann with cadet 
drill. Sargeant Puckett was reinstated to the active list. At the same time, 
instruction was extended in theory of military tactics, and later, the State 


Page 362 







College received signal recognition in the establishment of a unit of the Of¬ 
ficers’ Reserve Training Corps, from which upper-classmen having completed 
two years of the required training are eligible for places as cadet officers, 
receiving a stipend of 75 dollars per semester. As a member of the distin¬ 
guished list, Washington State is entitled to ten appointees as lieutenants in 
the United States army, the candidates to be limited to the senior class. 

Almost simultaneously with the extension of the military came similar 
development of the college extension service. Expansion in engineering— 
civil, mechanical, chemical, electrical, mining— and in rural architecture, in¬ 
creased the service of the extension department to the State of Washington by 
at least one-third. 

The all-round growth of the college was celebrated on Home-Coming Day, 
November 4, by a record-breaking gathering of old grads. (Evidently there 
was a common hunch concerning the 31 to 0 score against the time-honored 
foe from across the state line. But it’s no hunch at all to some of us— we 
expect just such a battle.) 

Students and visitors numbering in excess of 2,000 attended the annual 
apple show of the 3rd and 4th of November, which surpassed, in practically all 
details, any previous exhibit. Roy Larsen, general manager of the State Col¬ 
lege show, followed up his success by a clear-cut victory as student represent¬ 
ative and judge at the National Apple Show, held in Spokane during the 
week of November 26. 

Another student of Washington State, Robert Cowan, won individual hon¬ 
ors as a judge of livestock at the Pacific Exposition, held at Portland, Ore., 
December 4t.h to 8th inclusive. Victor Morgan was returned high scorer of 
sheep at that meet. In competition with representatives from Idaho, 0. A. C. 
and the University of California, the Washington State College five-man 
team was awarded second place. State College livestock competing with 
entrants from all parts of the Northwest, brought an aggregate of eleven 
hundred dollars in prizes and sales. 

In a meet of butter judges, also held at Portland, but. in the month of 
March, Washington State representatives won over 0. A. C. by 38 points. 

Curtain, but no intermission! 

Yes, the first college play of the year, given on November 10th by Mask 
and Dagger, was one of a delightful number, coached by Miss Augusta Rozisky. 
The list includes “Candida,” on January 26, by the Washington Literary; 
“Electra,” on March 16, by Mask and Dagger, and the Talamian Literary; 
“Green Stockings,” April 29, by Websterian Literary. “The Fortune Hunter,” 
coached by Miss Zelva Meeklem and presented February 9 by members of 
the college faculty, merits special mention. 

The months of December and January are particularly noteworthy, not 
alone for their ushering in and out respectively of the most welcome Xmas 
holidays, but also for events significant in the history of Washington State. 
For early in December, the State College, together with Leland Stanford, was 


Page 363 







admitted to the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, thus bring¬ 
ing the total membership of that organization to six. However, Washington 
State College retained her place as one of the seven institutions in the North¬ 
west Conference. The Freshmen ineligibility rule was adopted in both or¬ 
ganizations. 

Preliminary to the after-holidays legislative fight, legislators-elect, prin¬ 
cipally from Whitman and Spokane counties, visited the campus where, from 
personal observation and mingling with students and faculty, they learned of 
the college and its needs. Needless to say, these same lawmakers, with the 
co-operation of President Holland and other Washington State partisans, pre¬ 
served the courses and obtained the appropriation for which the college 
contended. 

The new year, 1917, began with yet another gathering in Pullman—the 
annual convention of Wheat Growlers, Millers and Shippers’ Association, 
which voted to reconvene at the State College on January 2, 1918. Following 
the grainmen, there came to the campus men and women of varying ages ami 
occupations—bankers, farmers, mechanics, miners, housekeepers — all to at¬ 
tend the annual Winter Short Course. The enrollment was upwards of 150. 
As usual, popular courses were agriculture and home economics, but the new 
classes in mining and gas engines had large enrollments. 

While almost everyone had been spending his vacation at home, “Doc” 
Bohler’s basketball squad had been practicing at the expense of several ath¬ 
letic teams, notably among which was the S. A. A. C. of Spokane. Later, 
the race for the championship of two conferences, including a series of gruel¬ 
ling contests in a trip to California, showed the Capt. Bohler-Sorenson-Moss- 
Price-Copeland combination as among the best ever assembled. But a single 
game was lost—that to the University of California—'and it was as promptly 
returned. Though California was defeated by no other team, yet she could 
scarcely dispute the right of Bohler’s five to the title. Sorenson will succeed 
Roy Bohler as captain. 

Not to be outdone, the cadet rifle team again walked away with the na¬ 
tional championship, this time by a margin of some one hundred fifty points 
over the nearest rival—the Michigan Aggies. 

Yet another college group, the Glee Club, negotiated territory in league 
boots. The musicians travelled more than 1,200 miles to points in Eastern 
Washington, Northern Idaho and Western Montana. 

Capt. Bob Taylor’s aggregation of wrestlers won handily from their 
opponents from the universities of Washington and Montana, but lost to the 
Oregon Aggie’s stallers and sprinters. Besides Capt. Taylor, who finished 
his collegiate eareer on the mat, Ewing, captain-elect; Cole, Lindsey and Haber- 
mann received letters. 

Those awarded W.’s in debate were Daniel Dupertius, Noel Bakke, Clar¬ 
ence Peterson, John Matsen, and Carlyle Kellogg who, with Tom Parry, 
were members of the teams which met defeat in the dual meet with Idaho. 
In the other inter-collegiate contest, that with Whitman, Tom Parry and Glen 


Page 364 






Trussel, the latter receiving his debate successfully argued the affirm¬ 

ative, while Paul Browder and Daniel Dupertius met defeat at Walla Walla. 

The contest scheduled with Oregon Agricultural College to take place 
late in April, was called off and the money equivalent to the expense of such 
meeting was subscribed to the Red Cross. 

Prize money for the Annual Declamation contest was put to the same 
use, though the contest was held as usual. Miss Erna Bradbury and John 
Matsen were the winners of first and second places respectively. 

Throughout the year, the college community has heard such noted visit¬ 
ing speakers as the late Dr. Percival Lowell, Dr. E. A. Winship, Charles F. 
Dole, Dr. Lind ley and others. Among musical entertainments, Josef Hoffman’s 
piano recital of February 22 was the feature attraction. Under the auspices 
of the Y. M. C. A., Raymond Robins, national figure in politics and social 
welfare activities, gave a series of talks to both special and open houses. The 
final appearance of Mr. Robins, on April 2, was before a mixed audience of 
students, townspeople and teachers of Whitman county. 

The annual institute of the county instructors was held at the State Col¬ 
lege. The teachers will return for a three-day session next year. 

After America’s entrance into the wprld war, resolutions were sent to 
Washington representatives in Congress pledging the support of the Associated 
Students, singly or in a body, of any measures that the President and Congress 
of the United States might deem wise and might see fit to enact. Resolutions 
favoring universal military training were rejected by vote of the assembly. A 
third set of resolutions, calling for an economic survey of the college and all 
items connected thereto was adopted. Compilation of lists of resources was 
immediately begun. 

Though some students enlisted for active service in the navy and in the 
regular army, by far the larger number applied for places in the Reserve Offi¬ 
cers’ Corps. Seniors and faculty members who were due to depart for train¬ 
ing quarters at San Francisco, joined in cadet drill both before and after 
the encampment of the week beginning April 23. It has been unofficially 
announced that a summer training camp will be established at the State Col¬ 
lege, thus adding to the number of people on the campus during the six weeks 
of the summer session. Dr. Cleveland, head of the Department of Education, 
will again be in charge of the summer school, which will have as one of its 
main features, a school for coaches of high school athletics. The classes in 
coaching will be instructed by Alonzo A. Stagg of the University of Chicago, 
and by J. Fred Bolder, Director of Athletics at Washington State. 



Page 365 







Vanity “ , Hor\fc' 


Page 366 



















Page 367 
































































































ALL PREP OFFICERS. 
First Semester. 



Kincaid Gray 


Second Semester. 



Dent 


Harms 


Gray 


Page 368 










MIDDLE PREP OFFICERS 



Qoodin Adams Gray 


SENIOR PREP OFFICERS 



Harder 


Thom it s 


Crossland 


Page 369 



























Page 370 






























ELEMENTARY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
ATHLETIC RECORDS 


FOOTBALL 


E. L. S. 6 _ ___ Colfax High School 3 

E. L. S. 6 - — _ . Walla Walla High School 1 

E. L. S. 20_ _ Pullman High School 0 

E. L. S. 6 - Lewis and Clark High School 20 

E. L. S. 6- - North Central High School 26 

E. L. S. 44 - - - -Opponents 56 

BASKETBALL 

E. L. S. 21 - Pullman 22, at Pullman 

E. L. S. 16 - -.Johnson 28, at Pullman 

E. L. S. 10 - Endicott 14, at Pullman 

E. L. S. 10 _ Uniontown 30, at Pullman 

E. L. S. 15 --- Walla Walla 46, at Pullman 

E. L. S. 19 __ _ Endicott 25, at Endicott 

E. L. S. 10_Walla Walla 44, at Walla Walla 

E. L. S. 10 - Waitsburg 44, at Waitsburg 

E. L. S. 9 __ Milton 30, at Milton, Oregon 

E. L. S. 18 _ Waitsburg 33, at Pullman 

E. L. S. 18 _ Pullman 50, at Pullman 



Page 371 























Page 372 












Page 375 






































































50T1E1T'ME IN JIM 1 BONE PER COPY 



Published by 


Bore, Head &Cq 


Page 375 









































































EDITORIAL 


PLATO 

Was once heard to EXCLAIM: 

“MY GAWD, let me laugh;” 

Whereupon some one HIT him 
AN awful WALLOP on the 
FUNNY-BONE 
And he BURST into 

UNCONTROLABLE expressions of MIRTH. 
When his MAP 
Resumed its TOPOGRAPHY 
He said: “HIT ME AGAIN.” 

Q. E. D. 

If we HIT YOU, 

TURN the OTHER side. 

IT IS WRITTEN. 


THIS has been a PECULIAR YEAR. 

The Frosh-soph MASSACRE sort of 
TOOK the ZAZ out of things (ZAZ is 
The U. of C. word for PEP). 

The FROSH had to be BROUGHT UP 
TOO tenderly. They did not receive 
The PROPER STIMULUS to a HEALTHY 
Career. 

But we can’t turn Back the UNIVERSE; 
The KAISER has control of that. 

Be that as it may the FROSH rejoice 
To know that GERMAN will soon be 
A DEAD LANGUAGE. 

HOCK DER KAISER. 


SEARS says that an EDITORIAL 

Should express ACCURATELY and TERSELY 

The EDITOR’S views. 

WE don’t believe in saying 
EVERYTHING we THINK. 

FOR INSTANCE, 

We think that RAY LOOMIS 
Is too promiscuous in 
His FUSSING, but far be it from 
Our intentions to SAY SO. 

GRUB was offended last year; 

He was offended the year BEFORE. 

Said he got A D. D. L. D. 

But he took LAURA JEAN’S advice 
And moved his TRUNK to the 
THETA HOUSE. 

WE don’t believe that TANGLEWOOD 
Would be a good BIRD of PARADISE 
AS some believe, 

Because too many BIRDS 
Would make it—WELL 
They would take all the HEAVEN 
Out of the FUSSER'S life. 


Page 376 




















TANGLEWOOD 


Back behind old lake De Puddle, 

Filled with singing frogs and mud, 

There’s a place where sweethearts cuddle, 
It’s that place called Tanglewood. 

In a jungled oleander, 

Perfumed with life’s maidenhood, 
We are hid from eyes of slander, 
Thanks to dear old Tanglewood. 
As we gather there in couples, 

'Scapen from the Dean that would 
Keep our girls at home in buckles, 

We're secure in Tanglewood. 

We’re secure from Jthodyation, 
We’re secure from Thomsonhood, 
We're secure from all damnation, 
Heaven is this Tanglewood. 

Each man thinks he has the dearest 
Of the cheering girls that would 
Be the dearing dear that’s nearest 
To her man in Tanglewood. 



But no love was ever warmer, 

Nor no Goddess half so good. 

As that girl I call my charmer 
When me meet in Tanglewood. 

In a spot with bows o’er hanging, 

Shapen like unto a hood, 

There’s a place too low for standing,— 

Oh! You dear old Tanglewood! 

This old haunt's too dear for leaving 
Here no real man can be good! 

Cozy corners all too pleasing 
Crowd this place called Tanglewood. 



—JOS. PASSONNEAU 



“What’s the matter with him?” 
“T. B.” 

“Tuberculosis?” 

“No, Theda Bara.” 


Page 377 


































I guess not study. 


Page 378 









































































COED FASHIONS 

BY LADY MacDUFF CORDON 




Too much mustard. 

* * * * 

They’re wearing them higher here than in Hawaii. 

* * * * 

Chickens wear all the colors of parrots. 

* * * * 

Spring eliminates the wrist watch. 

* * * * 

Ear rings are also tabooed. 


Green is “at home/’—shoes to eyes. 

* * * * 

Orange blossoms are much in demand. 

* * * * 

Eve would blush at some of the decollettes. 

• • * * 

Ivory continues to be worn; replaced in some instances by bone. 

* * * • 

The “swan-neck” of the days of Annie Laurie is coming back. 



Phi Theta Phi Initiating Team. 


SHE: How do you like my new beige tussur?” 

HE (Jack Graham): “Aint got nothing on my Loffard.” 


Page 379 














FRATERNITIES 

A fraternity is a group of men who look and act alike gathered together in one 
house and usually in one room. “Fraternity" comes from the Yiddish word ‘phrater” 
meaning a stable for the bull. These stables are set on the hill at intervals that can 
be covered by a healthy oath. Some have more men than others and fewer places to 
put them. Some of the duties of a fraternity man are to loan suits, hats, shoes, and 
ties when and where needed; to wake up at 3 P. X. and laugh at something intended 
by a soph to be a joke; to make long-time loans without interest or thanks; and to 
discuss “class" at the dinner table. 

Every man is supplied with a gold pin which he wears on his vest, or in summer, 
on his shirt. If the weather is exceedingly warm he wears it on his bathing suit. He 
is told to loan his pin to the first girl who falls for it. Then he sticks around as long 
as his meal ticket lasts. If the girl is honest he gets his pin back. This happens three 
or four times a year. 

Fraternity men have to be initiated. That is too bad. But it is something to write 
home about even if they have to stand up to write. Every fraternity has alumni just as 
a college has alumni but the former are more important. When one comes back to the 
fold they don’t kill the fatted calf; no, they just shoot the bull. 




Page 380 


















THINGS WE ARE PAID NOT TO TELL 

1. How Bill Moss got the name of “Rain Check" Bill. 

2. The number of times Doris Lay has done her solo dance. 

3. Melvin J. Muckey’s manner of taking a shower bath. 

4. That Dud Roberts attended dancing school. 

5. How Dean White gets the cream. 

6. That Joe Passonneau has been engaged “two and one-half times." 

7. How the Sigma Nu’s got Campbell Wilson. 

8. What Bolitho eats for breakfast. 

9. That Dean White received a telephone call at “Purity." 

10. Why Sharkey didn't go back to the University. 

11. How Dorothy got Sparkle his job in the library. 

12. That Paddy Zink took five Pi Phi's to the jitney show during Xmas vacation. 

13. Why Hobson had his office on the third floor of the Ad building. (And why 
he was reduced to the basement.) 

14. The pass-word to the “muckers" society. 


1st STEWED: “Do you think I'll get 'nother winter outa thish overcoat?" 
2nd STEWED: “Not if yuh take 'nother hard fall out uvit." 


THE COED’S PARADISE 

WHAT IT IS NOT: 

1. Angels and feathers. 

2. Gold paved streets. 

3. Platonic friendship. 

4. Eternal “day." 

WHAT IT IS: 

1. A Poiret perpetration. 

2. Shady lanes. 

3. A jeweled “frat" pin. 

4. Constant moonlight. 


REQUIEM 

I sing a song of sorrow; 

Bow down your weary head. 

The perky profs may now rejoice 
My little horse is dead. 

The honor system's come to stay 
It's bruited far and wide; 

The bull alone must pull me through 
Now, since my pony died. 


Page 381 














L°°K'va/-<V A H (. A • 




Page 382 






































































































































FROM THE STUDENT’S DIRECTORY 


PRESIDENTS— 

Adams 

Jackson 

Buchanan 

Lincoln 

Wilson 

BROWDER 

POETS— 

Emerson 

Gray 

Moore 

“Wadsworth” 
DUTCH SCHROEDER 

NOVELISTS— 

Harding 

Reeves 

Rinehart 

MARION BUSBY 


BIRDS— 

King, Fisher 

Guse 

Sei-bird 

MISS - ? 

FISH— 

Trout 

White 

Cottle 

BILL MOSS 

MISCELLANEOUS— 

Ideno 

Ahr Knott 
Moss, Bach 
Cannon, Bangs 
Frye, Day 
Sweet, Mustard 
White, Knight 
Justice and Wright 
IZETT, LUCE 




Tj<0 ' «. »«.—— 

WHY BOYS LEAVE HOME. 


A SORORITY LAY 

O sister dear please let me wear 
Your Georgette crepe tonight; 

My crepe de chine is such a mess 
And simply looks a fright.” 

“No sister dear, my Georgette crepe 
Tve changed for black sateen; 

I now wear callico instead 
Of silks and crepe de chine; 

My milan hat and lisere 
And taffeta are quite passe 
In other words they’re dead. 

The frills and furbelows are gone; 
Plain Jane has come into her own,— 
The Allies must be fed.” 


Page 383 










































































Page 384 





















































































































PROGRAM 


1. Invocation - Chancellor Torpen 

2. Speeches by initiates. 

Bangs—“Why a Debater Cannot Possibly Be a Good President.” 

Parry—“Why an Athlete Cannot Possibly Be a Good Vice-President.” 

Morgan—“Why Athletes Should Be Kept Off the Executive Council and Self- 
Supporting Students Given a Chance.” 

Sorenson—“Why My Opponents Were Elected.” 

Stites—“The Wail of the Football Team.” 

Hartman — “Why an Indiana Man Should Not Be Trusted With the Editorship.’* 
Turner—“Bill Moss’ Failure as a Yell Leader.” 

3. Ritual. 

1. Do you swear to be loyal to the Down and Out Association, and to do your 
best to put others down and out? Ans. I do, so help me Paul Browder. 

2. Do you swear eternal hatred to a'l successful candidates for offices and 
all others who make a success of anything? Ans. I do, so help me Clarence 
Zimmerman. 

3. Do you swear to support all bad measures and oppose all good ones? Ans. 
I do, so help me Anderson and Finney. 

4. Do you swear to encourage professionalism and discourage clean sport? 
Ans. I do, so help me Bohler, Moss and Durham. 

5. Do you swear to support mob violence at all athletic affairs and all-college 
dances? Ans. I do, so help me Bill Moss. 

6. Do you swear to support mud slinging, yellow journalism, and every form 
of misrepresentation? Ans. I do, so help me Marion Busby. 

4. Announcement of officers for next year. 

Dodds—Imperial Ostracized Imperator. 

Turner—Supreme Lord High Chancellor of the Realm. 

Hartman—Vice Lord High Chancellor of the Realm. 

Stites—First High Slusher. 

Bangs — Second High Slusher. 

Sorenson—First Low Piker. 

Morgan — Second Lowest Piker. 

Parry—Lowest Piker. 

5. Song. 

We’re licked this year, we’re licked the year before, 

There’ll be others licked next year. 

If there never ain’t no more. 

When we’re licked we’re crabby as can be 
For we are members of the Dodds family. 

Glorious, glorious, one defeat is quite enough, for us, 

Glcry be to God, one defeat is quite enough, 

For none of us could take a lickin’ more. 

6. Yell. 

Mush, Slush, 

Down and Out. 

We’re licked. 

Rah! Rah! 


Page 385 







Our college life’s 
A checker game; 

A campus the board, 

No move is the same 
For the king row you 
strive 

Someone moves,—look 
alive. 

IT’S YOUR MOVE NEXT 


If not a student 
And no double “A”s 
Grace your card, 

To the Ad hie away; 

You have twenty demerits, 
Says Rack “We can’t 
bear it.” 

IT’S YOUR MOVE NEXT 


If you ’re a student 
20 hours double A, 

A regular star, 

(Intelligent rays} 

And you once had a “D” 
You can sing merrily, 
IT’S YOUR MOVE NEXT 


You stand on the bridge; 
(Moon lights her hair) 
Look into her eyes; 

(Many men look there) 
She looks down and smiles 
With devilish wiles. 

IT’S YOUR MOVE NEXT 


your 


Daughter of Eve 
When you go to the Dean, 
And tell when, why 
And where you were seen, 
“Absolutely Miss Pippin” 
Starts you a trippin 
IT’S YOUR MOVE NEXT 


And when with 
sheepskin 

You stand on the brink 
Of the universe ready 
To teach it to think, 
Someone’s at the king- 
row 

One move before you. 
IT’S YOUR MOVE NEXT 


Page 386 . 



























1. The quillist. 

2. The 3-chord ukist (ta, dum, ti, ta). 

3. The engaged couple in the balcony at the dance. 

4. The gink who talks more than three times in one assembly meeting. 

5. The bohunk who elbows two chairs in class. 

6. Hoot Glasgow. 

7. The guy who has the gym locker above yours. 

8. The magazine hog. 

9. The midnight serenader. 

10. The pantry pillager. 


“What are you laughing about?” 

“Well this is a—ha ha rehearsal, ho ho—” 

“A rehearsal for what?” 

“Well, you see, I have to laugh at Prof. Cleveland’s jokes in fourth period class tomorrow.” 


“I hear Wally Heed has a new song.” 
“No, it’s just a Lay.” 


QUOTED 

LEONA D—“Now that I’m going to be a laundress, I wish I had lived two thousand years ago.” 


Brevity may be the soul of Witt, but it certainly is not his stature. 



Page 387 




















I* ««' 

|h|imh»« 




r— 




» 




$ 


* 

9 V 

9 



! o o 

♦ 

P, 



o * 

Jj 


« .4 

1 





r.ON.SOLI D A T I 0 NS 


Page 388 





































He has just finished a thesis on “Concrete. 1 
It must be a massive work. 


“Brethe it lightly dear/’ she said. 

His brawny arm around her waist; 

He breathed, “I love you” but his breath 
Concealed a sound that she could taste. 


PROF.—1 see you’re back again. 

CALLOW—Break it gently Prof. How many hours? 


SEARS — You’ll find this to be characteristic; the male sex 
here, talks athletics and girls, and the female sex, — well the 
female sex doesn’t discuss athletics. 


SEEING W. S. C. FIRST 

VISITOR — “Could you direct me to the Student’s Pass?’’ 


A GOOD JOKE WHEN SPOKEN 

ARTHUR — “I hear the Theta’s pulled Heer last night/’ 
MILDRED (Smiling) — “What was the row about?’’ 










AMBITION 


Page 390 








Advertisements 


Lee Allen Hardware _ Pullman 

The Artopho _ Pullman 

Auto Transfer _ Pullman 

Dr. E. A. Archer - .Pullman 

Bon Ton _ Pullman 

P. O. Brown son _ Pullman 

M. J. Chapman _ Pullman 

Chambers & Ford _ Pullman 

City Market _ Pullman 

V. W. Clarkson _ Pullman 

Cline's Studio _ Pullman 

Colfax National Bank_Colfax 

Corona Typewriter Sales Co._.Spokane 

Crane Co._ -Spokane 

Dairy Machinery Co - Seattle 

Doerr-Mitchell Electric Co... Spokane 

D. C. Dow_Pullman 

Dutton's _ Pullman 

J. P. Duthie _ Pullman 

Economy Stores Co_Pullman 

Emerson Merc. Co _ Pullman 

Fallquist Bros. _ Pullman 

First National Bank of Pullman_ 

__ Pullman 

The Fountain Bakery. _ _ Pullman 

J. K. Gill Co _ Portland 

Green wait & Folger _ Pullman 

John W. Graham _ Spokane 

J. E. Hammond _ Pullman 

Hamilton’s Hdw _ Pullman 

Hotel Majestic_Spokane 

Hotel Seattle_-- _ Seattle 

Dr. A. E. Hudson_Pullman 

R. J. Hurd & Co_Spokane 

F. S. Harmon Co _ Spokane, Tacoma 

Imperial Candy Co _ Seattle 

Jones & Dillingham Co_Spokane 

Dr. F. K. Kaylor _ Pullman 

D. D. Kimball _ Pullman 

Krause's Marshmallows_Spokane 


T. C. Martin - Pullman 

Jos. Mayer Bros _ Seattle 

Manring’s Corner Drug _ Pullman 

McCloskey & Co _ Pullman 

McPhail _ Pullman 

Miller’s Cafe _ Pullman 

Miller Dervant _ Spokane 

Miller’s Jewelry Store _ Pullman 

Model Bakery _ Pullman 

The Nook Cafeteria _ Pullman 

Oakes Cafe _ Spokane 

Dr. E. T. Pattee _ Pullman 

The Palace Livery _ Pullman 

J. C. Penny Co _ Pullman 

Pullman Amusement Co_Pullman 

The Pullman Laundry_Pullman 

The Pullman State Bank _ Pullman 

Dr. A. A. Rounds _ Pullman 

Roslyn-Cascade Coal Co.__Roslyn, Wn. 

The Sanitary Barbers _ Pullman 

The Sanitary Laundry_Pullman 

C. R. Sanders Co _ Pullman 

Saxony Knitting Co _ Seattle 

M. Seller & Co _ Spokane 

Seattle Engraving Co _ Seattle 

Shurat's Walkover Boot Shop_ 

-Spokane 

Spokane Drug Co _ Spokane 

Spokane Hdw. Co_Spokane 

State College of Washington„Pullman 

Stewart & Holmes Drug Co_Seattle 

Students’ Book Store - Pullman 

W. W. Stoddard_Pullman 

Tull & Gibb, Inc _ Spokane 

The Tower Barbers_Pullman 

L. M. Varney _ Spokane 

Watt’s Pharmacy _ Pullman 

West’s_Pullman 

The White Drug Store _ Pullman 


Page 391 

















































































Kensal Clothes 


YOU CAN NOT BUY 
BETTER THAN 
KENSAL CLOTHES. 


THAT IS WHY THEY 
ARE SO 

ATTRACTIVE TO 
YOUNG MEN 

WHOSE CLOTHES 
IDEALS WILL COUN¬ 
TENANCE NO COM¬ 
PROMISE TO THE 
BEST. 

WE ARE DISTRIBU¬ 
TORS FOR 
KENSAL CLOTHES. 


R- JL Hurd Co- 

CLOTHIERS, HABERDASHERS, HATTERS 

SPOKANE 













B OOKS, Stationery, Office Sup¬ 
plies and Furniture 

The modern business man is our best customer. 


Sc (3q> 


707-709-711 Sprague Ave. 


SPOKANE 



H otel 
majestic 


W. S. C. Headquarters 


Rates per Day 
$1.00 and Up 


MODERN ACCOMMODATIONS 
PROMPT SERVICE 
REASONABLE RATES 


MRS. W. H. MURPHY, Prop. 


City Mar ket 

QUALITY AND QUANTITY 

Royal and Chinook 
Brands of Ham and Bacon 


Page 393 

























The Nook Cafeteria Confectionery 

Genuine Chinese Noodles, Chop Suey 
P-M Chicken Tamales and 
Chili Con Carne 


<l Manring’s Old Corner Drug” 


SUNDAY FEATURES 
Cafeteria Dinner 12:00 to 2:00 
Special Music During the Evening 


Q 


atronize your store 

for all 


Eats 
Books 
Papers 
Novelties 
Fancy Stationery 
Athletic Supplies 
Drawing Instruments 

Send your mail orders to us for prompt service. 


p Students Book Co. Tri P 

J- Aiv/ E. N. CLARK, Mgr. J--LJ.V-/ 


J. P. Duthie 

Coal, Wood, Lumber, 

Building Materials, Paints, Oil, Glass, 
Flour and Feed. 

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON 


The Pullman 
Laundry 

is equipped with the most modern 
machinery and turns out first class 
work and gives prompt service. 

Pullman Laundry 

Phone 38 Pullman, Wash. 


Page 394 

















A Store of 

INDIVIDUAL SHOPS 

Whether you are in attendance at W. S. C. or not SANDERS’ is 
always an interesting STORE 

You Will Always Find 

Fashion’s Smartest Creations 

Introduced Through This Store. 

We always show the new things in 

Coats, Dresses, Blouses, Skirts 

Yardage Materials of all seasonable goods. 

SHOES 

In the Popular Colors and Latest Styles. 
The Gentlmen Will always find here the correct styles in 

Collars, Neckties, Hosiery, Shirts, 
Sweaters, etc. 

The Store is Founded on 

QUA LIT Y—S T YLE—SER VICE 

We Solicit Your Patronage. 

PULLMAN'S QUALITY STORE 

C. R. SANDERS CO. 



age 395 











COMPLIMENTS OF 

Crane Co. 



Spokane, Washington 

mammmmam'mmmmimmm 


Page 396 










Page 397 













































Up-to-the-Minute 



'J'HE Young, Aggressive Col¬ 
lege Man demands the 

Latest and Best 
in Everything 

This dainty package will 
please you and the 

High Grade Chocolate 

will delight you. 


(p /bciete 
^Lfiocotetj 1 

Made by 

Imperial Candy Co. 

Seattle 


Page 398 














A 

Sh 

\ Walkover A 
f SHOES W 

L FOR MEN AND WOMEN M&) 

message of peace to human soles. 

Prices $4.50 to $18.00 

uart’s Walkover Boot Shop 

“The Shop Ahead” 

719 RIVERSIDE AVE. 

Spokane, Wash. 

THE WHITE | 

DRUG STORE 

THE QUALITY STORE 

Rinkley & McMahon 

Greenawalt-Folger Co. 

General Merchandise 


A store that supplies the student trade with all 
that is newest and latest in Dry Goods, Clothing, 
Men’s Furnishings, Shoes and Ladies’ Ready-to- 
Wear. 

The Grocery Department carries a complete stock 
of Staple and Fancy Groceries. 


GREENAWALT-FOLGER CO. 

Phone 77 

Tull & Gibbs, Inc. 

Spokane’s Greatest Home-Furnisliing Store 
1st Ave. at Wall St. 

Your Credit Is Good 

Highest Quality Merchandise at Lowest 
Prices. 

WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG AND 
CREDIT TERMS. 

H. H. OAKES, Manager J. W. OAKES, Proprietor 

Oakes Cafe 

Best Cup of Coffee on Earth 

714-718 Sprague Avenue a \rr nr a orr 

Phone Main 1874 SPOKANE, WASH. 


Page 399 


















TYPEWRITERS 


ALL MAKES 




Corona Typewriter Sales Co. 

J. F. McCOOK, Mgr. 

14 Howard, Spokane, Wash. 


ALUMNI PINS, 

COLLEGE SEAL PINS, 
FOBS, ETC. 

PENNANTS and 
PILLOW TOPS 

Watt’s Pharmacy 

Mail orders from old students given 
prompt attention. 


A Full Line of 

Dairy, Creamery 
and Cheese Factory 
Equipment 

Supplies of All Kinds 

Write Us for Catalog 


DAIRY 

MACHINERY CO. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE 

FOUNTAIN 
* BAKERY 

W. S. C. Headquarters 

LUNCHES 
ICE CREAM 


D. C. DOW 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
First National Bank Building 
PULLMAN, WASH. 


F. J. Kayler 

DENTIST 

Office Phone, 13; Res. M. 246. 
Opposite Post Office 


Economy Store Co. 


A Chain of 
Stores which 
gives you the 
opportunity 
of cash buy¬ 
ing for less. 


Why Pay More? 


Page 400 
























The Most Practical Institution of 

Learning in the_ Pacific Northwest 

The State College 
of Washington 

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON 



E. O. HOLLAND, Ph.D. 

President 

** 

Full four-year courses, leading to the bachelor’s degree, given in the fol¬ 
lowing departments of study: 

Mathematics, Civil Engineering, Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Agriculture, 
Horticulture, English Language and Literature. Economic Science and History, 
Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mining Engineering. Modern 
Languages, Geology, Home Economics, Pharmacy, Veterinary Science, Education, 
Mus*’c, ^Forestry, General and * Architecture. 

*Xo degree offered. 

The following short-course schools are also maintained: 

Department of Elementary Science (3 years), teaching Domestic Economy, 
Agriculture. Manual Training and High School Work; Pharmacy (2 years); 
Assaying (10 weeks): Dairying (1 year): Winter School for Farmers (6 weeks), 
teaching Fruit Growing, Soil Management, Crop Production, Dairying, Stock 
Judging, Forestry and Household Management. 

FACULTY OF 130 OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

WELL EQUIPPED LABORATORIES, LIBRARY AND MUSEUMS 
SPLENDID GYMNASIUM 

TUITION FREE. EXPENSES VERY MODERATE. HEALTHFUL 

SURROUNDINGS. 

A postal card addressed to the Registrar will bring you full information by 

return mail. 


Page 401 










Lee Allen 


HARDWARE, 
CROCKERY, 
OILS, 
PAINTS 
AND GLASS 


PULLMAN, 


WASH. 



“The nearest place 
to home” 

Your 

Costumes 

WigS and 

“Make-up” 

for plays given at the State College 
can be procured at 

Miller-Dervant’s 

COSTUMERS, WIG-MAKERS 
AND THEATRICAL SUPPLIES 

209-211 W. Post Street 
SPOKANE, WASH. 


T. C. MARTIN 

CALL 41 

For Taxi Service 


TOURMALITE 

THE WHITE ENAMEL OF QUALITY 

There is no whiter or more lasting 
decorative Enamel made. 

IT BRIGHTENS AND BEAUTIFIES 
THE HOME. 

Jones & Dillingham 

PAINT MAKERS 

SPOKANE LEWISTON 


FALLQUIST BROS. 

MACHINISTS, ENGINEERS. 
AND 

MACHINERY MERCHANTS 


PULLMAN, 


WASHINGTON 


F. O. BROWNSON 

LUMBER 

Building Material, Coal and Wood 
PULLMAN, WASH. 


PLUMBING 

Heating and Sheet Metal Work 
General Repair Work 

J. E. HAMMOND 

Grand Street, PULLMAN, WASH. 


For 

BOOKS, OFFICE EQUIPMENT, ARCHITECTS’ 
AND ENGINEERS’ SUPPLIES, SOCIAL STA¬ 
TIONERY, KODAKS AND KODAK SUPPLIES, 
ETC., ETC., COMMAND US. 

THE J. K. GILL CO. 

Third and Alder Sts. - PORTLAND, ORE. 


Page 402 






















Pullman State Bank 

PULLMAN, WASH. 


ESTABLISHED 1892 


OFFICERS 

R. C. McCROSKEY . President 

J. L. METSKER . Vice-President 

J. N. SCOTT ... Cashier 

R. E. DOTY. Asst. Cashier 


DIRECTORS 
R. C. McCROSKEY 
J. N. SCOTT 
H. KIMBROUGH 
E. MAGUIRE 
J. L. METSKER 




PULLMAN 

AMUSEMENT CO. 

Grand Theatre and Theatorium 

The Home of High Class Plays 
and Stars 






Page 403 













































FRATERNITIES 

of the 

STATE COLLEGE OF 
WASHINGTON 

Make the 

HOTEL 

SEATTLE 

Your 

HEADQUARTERS 
Where you will find 

SERVICE 

EFFICIENCY 

COURTESY 

European Plan 
Rates $ 1.00 and up 

HOTEL SEATTLE 
GRILL 

Excellent Food 

Perfect Service 
at Moderate Prices 

HOTEL SEATTLE 

R. L. HODGDON, Mgr. 
Pioneer Square Seattle 


W. W. STODDARD 

SHOE REPAIRING 

All Work and Material Guaranteed 
312 E. Main Street 
PULLMAN, WASH. 

Model Bakery and Ice Cream Parlor 

We make our own Bread. Cakes, Pies, Ice Cream and Sherbets 

We cater to all Social and Business Entertainments 
for anything in our line. Let us figure with you. 

PHONE 90 H. M. BECK, Prop. 


We have jewelry of every kind plus 
fair prices and a service that aims to 
protect your interests. 

We are always pleased to show latest 
designs and advice concerning pur¬ 
chases. 

We carry a large assortment of de¬ 
pendable goods. 

Will you not call on us? 

McPHAIL, Jeweler 


WANTED—A job in the U. S. 
Army. 

BILL MOSS. 

BULL DURHAM. 
EX-PRES. BROWDER. 


TWO CLEAN TOWELS 

For 

EACH CUSTOMER 
At 

The Tower Barbers 

PULLMAN, WASH. 


Page 404 




















J 


THE ARTOPHO STUDIO 

PULLMAN’S LEADING 
PHOTOIST 


COLLEGE DAYS ARE MARSHMALLOW DAYS! 

INSIST ON 

Krause’s Marshmallows 


In THE NIFTY 
BLUE TINS 


Always 
Temptingly 
Tender! 



You’ll Find Them 
EVERYWHERE 


The 

Colfax National Bank 

COLFAX, WASH. 

OLDEST AND LARGEST BANK 
IN WHITMAN COUNTY 

Resources, $2,100,000.00. 


Our Helen was a lover of nature 
and its way; 

She would waken in the morning, 
scratch her arms and cry 
“O'Day!” 


Page 405 


























If not called to . . . 

WAR 


We wish to enjoy your patronage 
as in the past 


Millers Jewelry Store 

Roslyn-Cascade Coal 
Company 


MINERS and SHIPPERS 

GENUINE ROSLYN 


COAL 


Roslyn, Wash. 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 
Written for all kinds, by 

M. J. Chapman 

Students! 


DR. A. A. ROUNDS 

DENTAL SURGEON 

EMERSON BLDG., PULLMAN, WASH. 

Patronize 

CHINOOK 

Advertisers 


\ 


Page 406 
















L. M. Varney 

Tailor Made Shirts 

Baseball Uniforms 
and Pennants 

Phone Riverside 1710 
S. 208-20854 Howard Street 
SPOKANE, WASH. 


Cline’s Studio 

Modern Photography 


W. S. C. is bounded on the east 
by the Atlantic, on the south by 
Mexico, on the north by Canada, 
and on the west by an “Italian sun¬ 
set.” 


DUTTON’S 

The Home of 
CANDIES that PLEASE 


OUR ICE CREAM IS THE BEST. WE CAN FUR¬ 
NISH ALL WANTS OF THE STUDENTS WITH 
THE RIGHT KIND OF GOODS—WITH PROMPT 
DELIVERY. 


Page 407 


































AUR Advertisers 
^ Made This Book 
Possible 

The Doerr-Mitchell Electric Co. 

MAKERS OF LIGHTING FIXTURES 

JOBBERS 

ALL KINDS OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

118 and 120 Lincoln Street (Op Post Office) 

Tel. Main 5460 SPOKANE, WASH. 

D. D. KIMBALL 

Furniture and Undertaking 

PULLMAN - WASHINGTON 

CHAMBERS & FORD 

Phone 26 

FLOUR, FEED, POULTRY 'SUPPLIES AND PRODUCE 

Special price on Flour. Graham, Farnia, Whole Wheat and Buckwheat. 

In large quantity to Fraternities, Sororities or any student organization. 

ALL FLOUR GUARANTEED 

WANTED—A few good indoor 
baseball men. We have an attrac¬ 
tive proposition to offer. Apply 
Kappa Sigma House. 

Miller’s Cafe 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 
CORRECT PRICE 

Special Consideration for Students 

DR. E. A. ARCHER 

OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN 

AH Curable Diseases Treated 

Emerson Bldg. 

PULLMAN, - WASHINGTON 

LAUNDRY THAT PLEASES 

The Sanitary Laundry 

Phone 325 

PULLMAN, - - WASHINGTON 

WEST’S 

For 

NEW AND SECOND-HAND 
FURNITURE 

303 MAIN STREET 


\ 


Page 408 



















The Sanitary 
Barbers 

HAMILTON’S 

HARDWARE 

DR. E. T. PATEE 

Physician and Surgeon 

Rooms 3 and 4, Emerson Bldg. 

Phone 100 Pullman, Wash. 

DR. A. E. HUDSON 
DENTISTRY 

Telephone 322 

First National Bank Building 

PULLMAN, WASH. 

STUDENTS 

Ask your merchant how much cheaper he could sell you merchandise 
if you buy 175 times as much and pay spot cash for the goods. 

His answer will tell you why we sell the same goods for less. 

We buy merchandise for 175 cash stores. All under one management. 

Ik J- C. Penney Co. £i 

INSURE WITH 

McCLASKEY 

Inland Empire Distributors 

OLDSMITH 

GEOLOGY . 

“What is that nezv mountain on 
the map near Seattle?” 

i( That is a mountain of recent 
formation , now extinct” 

VJ UARANTEE 

Athletic Goods 

M. SELLER & COMPANY, Spokane, Washington, 
factory distributors of: 

Big Three Washing Machines, 
Belding-Hall Refrigerators, Florence Oil Stoves, 
Wiss Shears, Kraeuter Pliers 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR THESE. THEY 
ARE GUARANTEED TO GIVE SATISFAC¬ 
TION. 

Spokane Hardware Co. 

516 Riverside Ave. 

Spokane - Wash. 


















Chemicals 


Glassware 

WHEN YOU WANT SUPPLIES FOR 


School, Cement Testing or 

Bacte riological Laboratories 

REMEMBER 

Stewart & Holmes Drug Co. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

Are Headquarters 


Microscopes 


Assay Supplies 


WHEN IN PULLMAN CALL AT 

=== THE — 


B 

0 

N 


One of the Most Up-to-Date Places in the 
Northwest 

RETAIL AND WHOLESALE 
CANDIES AND ICE CREAM 

We have special room for parties, banquets, 
luncheons, etc. 

SPECIAL MERCHANT'S LUNCH 
Served from 11:00 to 2:00 P. M. 

Special Dancing 

SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER 
From 6 to 9 P. M. Music. 


T 

O 

N 


\ 


Page 410 
























Class, Fraternity and 

Sorority Emblems— 

Medals, Dance Pro¬ 

grams and Souvenirs 


Catalog and Designs Upon Request 


JOS. MAYER & BROS. 

MAKERS Seattle, U. S. A. 


Try 

Manring’s Corner Drug 

FIRST 

"Hy” Manring Dalejinnett 


The Palace Livery 

I. J. LEE, Proprietor 
PHONE 88 


Auto Transfer Co. 

Transfer and 
Storage 

WE HAUL ANY THING ANY 
TIME ANY WHERE 
PHONE 88 


Everything 
in Drugs 

Sundries 

Fixtures 

Soda Fountains 

Soda Fountain Accessories 

Laundry Supplies 

Spokane Drug 
Co. 

Wholesale Druggists 

Spokane, Wash. 


Page 411 

























ONE-THIRD OF LIFE IS SPENT 
IN BED 
USE A 

SLUMBERITE 

MATTRESS 

AND INSURE GOOD HEALTH 

At Your Dealers—$18.50 

Manufactured by 

Ieattle F.S.Harmon&Co. PORTLAND 


Desired: Peace! 

“University of Seattle” 


YOUR BANK BOOK IS THE GREAT 
TEXT BOOK IN THE 

College of Success 

Students Find Their Success Easier When 
They Have an Account in the 

First National 
Bank 

OF PULLMAN 

“THE HOME OF THE PALOUSE 
DOLLAR” 


OFFICERS. 

M. W. WHITLOW, President. 

O. L. WALLER, V r ice*President. 

M. SCI1ULTHEIS, JR., Vice-President. 
F. C. FORREST, Cashier. 

C. F. ANDERSON, Assistant Cashier. 
J. O. PATTERSON, Assistant Cashier. 


The Best 

Athletes 

And Critical 

Students 

Demand 

Saxony Sweaters 

MADE BY 

Saxony Knitting Co. 

SEATTLE 


I 


Page 412 
















Application for Permission to 
Punish a Freshman 

I, John Brown , of the SOPHOMORE, hereby ask for the permis¬ 
sion of the President, Faculty, Student's Social Committee, and the 
Humane Society to punish Bill Smith, a FRESHMAN, in a manner 
specified in another article for an offense committed Feb. 21st, 1917, 
against the college public. Witnesses, the Crimson Circle and the “W” 



EMMERSON’S MERCANTILE CO. 


Page 413 


















The 

HERALD 

PR 

INTERY 


TS equipped to turn out 
any kind of printed 
matter promptly, and 
in the very best style 

COLLEGE and SOCIETY WORK 

□ 

A SPECIALTY □ 


Programs 

Pamphlets 

Posters 

Menu Cards 

Dance Programs 

Calling Cards 

Society Stationery 

PHONE US AND OUR REPRESENTATIVE 

WILL CALL ON YOU Next Door to Post Office 

Phone 53 

PULLMAN, Washington 


Page 414 
















PHOTO ENGRAVINGS 
Made by 

SEATTLE ENGRAVING CO. 

College Annual Specialists 
SEATTLE. WASH. 


Page 415 













X 




















■ 

* t