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STATE 

COLLEGE 

OF 

WASHINGTON 




















































Annual Publication of the Associated Students 
State College of Washington, Pullman, Washingtoi 


1958 

Chinook 


BRYAN HALL CLOCK, lighted at night, 
is a glowing sentinel for the campus. 





















ittern of red brick buildings nestled among evergreens and leafless trees on a sunny afternoon in early April . 


' a m p u s Home 

I arried Students . 105 

/omen Students . 115 

len Students . 149 


Campus Events 

Athletics .... 199 

Limelight 245 


Campus Activities 

Government 2 77 

Communications . 319 

ASCA .... 339 
Organizations . 355 












THE FIELD WAS MOMENTARILY CLEAR from halftime activities during Homecoming with Oregon. 


Campus Scene Is Ever Changing 


The campus around us provides an unending variety of pageantry. The overall image 
of red buildings against a green hillside merges into the specific picture of football . . . 
of waiting for the last straggling floats to pass ... of registration lines, movie lines and 
lines in Commons ... of saying goodnight to your date on the steps just before the door 
is latched ... of midnight study bouts before the next day's exam ... of packing 
hurriedly for spring vacation . . . and of returning to the campus for the final push of 
studies, activities and swirl of visitors. In retrospect, each remembers the many small 
happenings which form our ever changing campus scene. 













SWIFT ACTION OF PLAYERS INTERESTS SPECTATORS during the Homecoming game with Oregon while 
Band Day festivities add more color and interest to a half-time field still green late in the football season. 






MEN IN WORKING CLOTHES and piles of construction materials reminded onlookers 
that an enlarged fountain area was to be opened for use after Christmas vacation. 















A STUDENT ARTIST DECORATES the "plyboard windows" 
with a mural stating, "More CUB for More Cougars" 

SNIPPING THE RIBBON officially opens the new fountain 
area to the inspection of students and faculty. 

LIVE MUSIC IS PROVIDED by the Mickey Finn band to 
opening day viewers taking advantage of CUB specials. 


Expanded CUB Serves 
More Students, Guests 


After barely five years of use, the CUB was already too 
small in some areas. The end of Christmas vacation saw an 
enlarged fountain area which was bigger than any other 
student union's. A snack bar in the middle of the new area 
and many more tables, booths and chairs made room for 
more Cougars and campus guests. Earlier in the year ad¬ 
ditional space gave the student magazines a home. New 
automatic pin setters were installed in the bowling alleys, 
all making for an improved CUB that could be used by 
activity conscious students. 
















Little Things Best Remembered 
From College Activities, Studies 

A scattering of snow in winter, flowers and rain in spring are wedged into students' 
thoughts along with studying, grades and activities. At the year's end, the routine work 
involved in "making grades" or in participating in activities is not remembered with 
clarity. Sharper in our reflections are the little incidents — the faux pas the teacher 
made in forgetting to assign a paper before vacation, the spill at the bottom of the ski 
run, the successful cartoon drawn on a campaign poster, the joke told at the track meet. 
These are the things that make up our later remembrances of college. 


WINTER BROUGHT LITTLE SLOWDOWN in doss work or extra-curricular activity as these WSC 
coeds show by frolicking in the white snow of Red Mountain, Canada , while skiing between semesters. 


IN SHARP CONTRAST WITH WINTER are these spring daffodils by Troy hall that braved unpredict¬ 
able April weather to bring the campus a promise that spring is finally here to stay. 








TO THE REGENTS HILL GIRL trudging home after an evening at the library, the CUB becomes the 
hulking stern of a giant ship, lights twinkling across the barely whitened field. 







REGISTRATION IS SERIOUS BUSINESS . . . at least the lack of smiles on student faces would indicate 
that even to the experienced , registration at the beginning of each new semester is a painful chore. 


Registration marks the beginning 
and end to most students—the start of 
a new semester and end of vacation 

















THANK HEAVENS! The vets' desk was one line in which she didn't have 
to stand. 


"I'M SORRY, but we must have an extra nickel to cash this out-of-town 
check." 



















/ 


Studies, Cramming, Papers 
Form Academic Year 


Of WSC's many class buildings, perhaps Todd hall is most universally 
used. The busy "EE" major hurries from Carpenter to econ class there 
... the art student puts up his charcoal and paper to scurry to geology 
in Todd 344. . . The freshman finds himself at a night exam in Todd 
auditorium. Yes, Todd hall symbolizes the realm of academics — the 
realm of lab reports, cramming for mids, standing in line for textbooks, 
practicing for speech class, correcting the final draft of a theme due 
the next hour. Lights burning late at night in student houses tell the 
importance of WSC academic life. 


NATURE BOY DECORATES the library , 
acting as WSC's patron saint of education . 

MEANWHILE ALL IS QUIETNESS and 
whispers inside as students prepare for the 
next day's classes. 


12 





BECKONING TO THE MANY LATE AFTERNOON "CLOCK WATCHERS" WITHIN , the warm sun on the windows 
of Todd hall mirror the red brick, gray sandstone and the green evergreens of the exterior. 


13 






Activities Mean Busy Work 
For Participating Students 

Student activities above all mean activity. The campaigner putting up signs at six in the 
morning . . . the ASSCW committee secretary typing her minutes . . . the chairman 
phoning committee members . . . the track man taking that extra lap around the track to 
build up wind . . . the queen finalist making visitations during the dinner hour . . . 
the honorary president practicing for initiation . . . the club member sitting quietly in 
meeting . . . the social committee madly decorating for the spring semi-formal. All 
show that "student activities" is not a misnomer. 


THE IDAHO WALK—TRADITION BETWEEN WSC AND IDAHO—saw many Idaho students join their student body president 
and Argonaut sports editor for the seven mile trek to the victor's home after the annual "Baffle of the Palouse/' 




ACTIVITY STOPS DURING DINNER in the activity center , but 
glowing lights indicate meetings ahead. 


JUNIOR PROM POSTERS ARE SILK SCREENED in the small room 
off the Crafts Area in the CUB basement . 












WITH NICE WEATHER GRADUATION IS OUTDOORS, ending with a gleeful rush by the new 
graduates to the Women's gym for diplomas and depositing of caps and gowns. 













Campus 

Academics 


















18 














SENIORS 
















WSC Seniors' Spring 
Culminated With Early 
Finals and Multitude 
of Sudden Activity 



THE HOT SUN BURNED DOWN upon the graduates and viewers of 
Commencement. Once every few minutes the wind brought across 
a heavy cloud. 



THE LATE SPRING WEATHER WAS IN FAVOR of the graduating 
thousands , and the annual Senior Ball was held in balmy , 
comfortable weather. 



THE SPEECH-MAKING WAS OVER and it was finally time to file down to receive diplomas—what a long-awaited moment! 



SMASH DIVE FROM BEHIND caught this SOME WATCH THE NEWLY TAPPED , 

Crimson Circle tappee by surprise. others those to be taken next. 


20 






















THE SENIORS FOUND if was no easy task 
to balance mortar boards just 
right before march. 


A SENIOR EXPERIENCES that final flip of the tassel . . . college is over. SHE DIDN'T WANT TO , but that senior 

ride was inevitable. 




TODAY'S SENIORS REMEMBER the old 
entrance arch to the campus . . . 



GIVING WAY TO A PILE OF RUBBLE in 
the winter months of 1955-56 . . . 



TO BE REPLACED by a new monument on 
the Stadium Way entranceway. 


21 



















BETTY JANSEN—TOP TEN . . . worked her way up from frosh exec council 
to be sophomore secretary . . . held the reins of AWS as junior . . . chair- 
named YWCA Pop Corn Forums . . . tapped for Mortar Board and Phi 
Kappa Phi . . . Regents proud to claim her. 


Our First Registration 
Proved a Long Wait 
in a Two Block Line 


TORE AABERG 
Business 
Administration 
Hamar, Norway 


BERT ABEY 
Physics 
Spokane 


WILLIAM ACHESON 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Seattle 


KEITH AHOLA 
Civil Engineering 
Vancouver 


ANNA AJIROGI 
Home Economics 
Lanai City, Hawaii 


GARY AKERS 
Pharmacy 
Pullmon 


GLENN ALDRICH 
Agricultural 
Engineering 
Mossy rock 



JAMES ALLEMANDI 


Electrical Engineering 
Nighthawk 



DERL ALLEN 
Pharmacy 
Morton 

LARRY ALTON 
Mechnical Engineering 
Yakima 


BEVERLY ANDERSON 
Physical Education 
Blaine 

CAROL ANDERSON 
Home Economics 
Mullan, Idaho 


ELLEN ANDERSON 
Education 
Kent 

FRANKLIN 

ANDERSON 

Horticulture 

Longview 


MARVIN ANDERSON 
General Studies 
Spokane 

VERNON 
ANDERSON 
Civil Engineering 
Pullman 


HERBERT 
ARMSTRONG 
Civil Engineering 
Pomeroy 

WILLIAM AYLOR 
Speech 

Moscow, Idaho 


FRANK BACKUS 
Pre-Medicine 
Prosser 

SHARON BACON 
Home Economics 
Dayton 


NANCY BAGOTT 
Home Economics 
Palouse 

CAROLYN BAILEY 
Education 

Coronado, California 


ROBERT BAILEY 
Electrical Engineering 
Spokane 

RON BAILOR 
Sociology 
Spokane 



22 














DONNA BALCOM 
Music 
Seattle 

NORRIS BARBER 
Agricultural 
Education 
Billings, Montona 


RICHARD BARCLAY 
Physicol Education 
Pullman 

SHIRLEY BARKLEY 
Education 
Sunnyside 



TOM BARKSDALE 
Pre-Denistry 
Bridgeport 

ALAN BARR 
Doiry Science 
Monroe 


GAIL BARRETT 
Education 
Spokane 

NED BAXTER 
Electrical Engineering 
Pullman 




DUANE BERGEVIN 

JEAN BERNEY 

CAROLYN 

FREDERICK 

RAYMOND BAY 

Agricultural 

Home Economics 

BETHMANN 

BLACKWELL 

Engineering 

Okanogan 

Pharmacy 

History 

Dairy Science 

Walla Walla 


Spokane 

Spokane 

Maple Falls 

JAMES BEAMER 

ELWIN BLAIR 

RAYMOND 

MARGARET 

FREDERIC BLAUERT 

Pharmacy 

BLAISDELL 

BLANTON 

Agricultural 

Animal Science 

Rosalia 

Dairy Science 

Education 

Engineering 

Kennewick 


Randle 

Kent 

Spangle 


SHELBY BLY 

JERRY BOGGAN 

MARY JOAN 

BETTY BORNHOLT 


Electrical Engineering 

Animal Science 

BONING 

Music 


Pullman 

Anatone 

General Studies 
Leavenworth 

Tacoma 

JACQUALYN BEARD 

MAURICE 

PEGGY ANN 

JANET BOWLER 

CHARLIE BOWLS 

Education 

BOTTEMILLER 

BOWERS 

Home Economics 

Electrical Engineering 

Seattle 

WILLIAM BEARSE 

Pharmacy 

Vancouver 

Animal Science 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Auburn 

Palouse 

General Studies 

Puyallup 


IN 1954 MANY OF THIS YEAR'S SENIORS saw their First registration and 
waited in line early in the morning to get "right" classes. 


CHARLES BEEMAN 
Civil Engineering 
Spokane 


JAMES BEITINGER 
Business 
Administration 
Skagway, Alaska 


JOHN BENSON 
Pharmacy 
Lynden 

JAMES BELL 
Civil Engineering 
Kennewick 



23 























RAYMOND BOYD 
Electrical Engineering 
Pullman 


ROBERT BOYDEN 
Agricultural 
Education 
Monroe 


WILMA BOYDEN 
Home Economics 
Monroe 


BARBARA BOYE 
Business 
Administration 
Ephrata 


BARBARA 

BRADFORD 

Education 

Seattle 

MARY BREWER 
Secretarial Studies 
Mabton 


GEORGE 

BRADSHAW 

Business 

Administration 

Spokane 

JOYCE BRONSON 
Economics 
Santa Rosa, Calif. 


GERALD BRAND 
Police Science 
Bellevue 


DUDLEY BROWN 
Business 
Administration 
Grandview 


JOSEPH 

BREITENBAUCH 

Business 

Administration 

Camas 

MARILYN BROWN 
Education 
Pullman 


THEODORE BROWN WILLIAM BROWN 
Electrical Engineering Agricultural 

Pullman Education 

Dayton 


JOHN BRUNTLETT DOROTHY BRYAN 
Electrical Engineering Pharmacy 

Richland Colville 


NINETEEN FIFTY-FOUR SAW DEFEAT TO VANDALS for the first time in 
20 odd years with many of today's senior joining the "March on Idaho." 



WILLIAM BUGGE 
Civil Engineering 
Olympia 

CLARENCE BUNGAY 
Social Studies 
Spokane 


GARY BURGINYON 
Physics 
Spokane 

JOHN BURKE 
Philosophy 
Pullman 


MARILYN BURKE 
Home Economics 
Pullman 

GORDON BURKHER 
Social Studies 
Anchorage, Alaska 


DONALD BURNS 
Speech 
Yakima 

ROBERT BURNS 
Forrestry 
Washougal 


LYLE BYSE 
General Studies 
Bellingham 

LARRY CALVIN 
Business 
Administration 
Sitka, Alaska 


FREDERICK 
CAMFIELD 
Civil Engineering 
Port Townsend 

DONNA HARVEY 
Secretarial Studies 
Snohomish 


NORTON CARLSON 
Business 
Administration 
Yakima 

GEORGE CARPENTER 
Physical Metallurgy 
Spokane 


LOREN CARSON 
Horticulture 
Dayton 

KAREN CASS 
Sociology 
Pullman 



24 



















JERRY CHASE 
Education 
Cusick 





CAROL CHENEY 
Home Economics 
Seattle 


MARJORIE 

CHILDRESS 

Mathematics 

Pullman 

LORENE 

CHRISTENSEN 

English 

Opportunity 


KENT CHRISTENSEN 
Horticulture 
Cashmere 

DRUERY CLARK 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Pullman 


LAURA CLARK 
Home Economics 
Hastings, New York 

DANIEL CLEM 
Psychology 
Walla Walla 



ROBERT CLEM 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Richland 

SANDRA 

CLEVELAND 

Speech 

Pullman 


RICHARD CLINE 
Physics 
Lind 

WILLIAM COHEELY 
Business 
Administration 
Richland 


CLIFFORD COLLINS 
Geology 
Cordova, Alaska 

RICHARD COLLINS 
Pharmacy 
Yakima 


BEN COOK 
Speech 
Pullman 

GARY COOPER 
Business 
Administration 
Spokane 



ROBERT GROSSMAN—TOP TEN . . . active as Ferry sponsor and vice-presi¬ 
dent until traded single life for married bliss . . . Engineering Coordinating 
Council chairman and Crimson Circle took his time ... as did the YMCA 
and rifle team . . . joined Phi Kappa Phi too. 


That Same Frosh Year 
We Lost to the Vandals 
and Walked to Moscow 


ROBERT COPE 
Forestry 
Orting 


JIM CORLISS 
Horticulture 
Yakima 


ARTHUR 

COPENHAVER 

Business 

Administration 

Sunnyside 

JOHN CRAMBLIT 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Keller 


JOY COPENHAVER 
Home Economics 
Spokane 


ELAINE CROSSLAND 
Music 
Grandview 


MICHAEL CORLESS 
Pre-Law 
Sunnyside 


HAZEL CROWDER 
Music 
Spokane 



25 



















KATHY KANOUSE—TOP TEN . . . senior class and ASCA secretary . . . 
reined as Little International, Harvest Ball and May queen during her four 
years . . . kept busy on ASSCW and ASCA committees, being named "Aggie 
of the Year" . . . served Wilmer hall as sponsor and vice-president . . . Phi 
Kappa Phi member. 


Butch Died That 1st Year 
and Butch V Arrived 


to End Basketball 

Year 

RUTH CROWE 
Sociology 
Pullman 

RICHARD CURTIS 
Business 
Administration 
Pullman 

ARTHUR CUTLER 
Electrical Engineering 
Richland 

BEVERLY DALSTONE 
Psychology 
Tacoma 

EARL DARRAH 
General Studies 
Pullman 

ELWOOD DART 
Horticulture 
Peshastin 

JAMES DAVIDSON 
Forestry 

Walla Walla 

GERALD DAVIS 
Political Science 
Walla Walla 



HELLON DAVIS 
Education 
Everett 

RALEIGH DAVIS 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Pa sea 


ROY DAVIS 
Police Science 
North Bend 

JERRY DEARTH 
General Studies 
Bremerton 


GARY DELLES 
English 
Colville 

Jl HENN DHONG 
Police Science 
Pusan, Korea 


JOE DIXON 
Geology 
Walla Walla 

BEVERLY DOBLER 
Education 
Tacoma 


MARGARET DODD 
Home Economics 
Yakima 

DANIEL DOUGHERTY 
Horticulture 
Burlington 


JACQUELYN DOXON 
Education 
Auburn 

CHARLES DRAKE 
Physical Education 
Kuna, Idaho 


BEVERLY DREISOW 
Agronomy 
Kent 

WALLACE 
DUCHATEAU 
Police Science 
Enumclaw 


WILLIAM DUGGER 
Forrestry 
Marysville 

STANLEY EASTON 
Social Studies 
Spokane 



26 


















DORIS ECKHART 
Education 
Almira 

FRANKIE ELLS 
Education 
Danville 


ELLEN ELTERICH 
Education 
Port Angeles 

ROGER EMBLEN 
Business 
Administration 
Pullman 


NORMAN ENG 
Fine Arts 
Spokane 

PHILLIP ERDMANN 
Electrical Engineering 
Pullman 


DONNA ERICKSON 
Social Studies 
Pullman 

LARRY ERNST 
General Studies 
Yakima 


JUDY EVANS 
Education 
Spokane 

SUSAN FALK 
Home Economics 
Yakima 


HOWARD FARLEY 
Agriculture Economics 
Pullman 

CALVIN 

FRANKHAUSER 

Speech 

Monroe 


DONALD FARR 
Pharmacy 
Spokane 

ROBERT FIELDS 
Wildlife Management 
Ontario, Oregon 


TED FILER 
Social Studies 
Toppenish 

EUGENE FISHER 
Civil Engineering 
Spokane 



GUY FISHER 
Agricultural 
Engineering 
Tonasket 

LLOYD 

FREUDENSTEIN 
Physical Education 
Tacoma 

VIOLA MAE FRAHM 
Home Economics 
Mount Vernon 


LARRY FISHER 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Pullman 

LEE FRITSCH 
Wildlife Management 
Rockfard, Maine 

KENLEY GARD 
Pre-Medicine 
Vancouver 


ROBERT 
FITZSIMMONS 
Poultry Science 
Clarkston 

ROBERT GANSON 
Business 
Administration 
Winslow 

GLENDA GEIB 
Speech 
Wilbur 


VERNER FOISY 
Electrical Engineering 
Prosser 

RICHARD FOWLER 
Industrial Arts 
Pullman 

KEITH GEORGE 
Animal Science 
Thorp 


JO ANNE GERL 
Fine Arts 
Pullman 


JOHN GERTH DONALD GIEDT RICHARD GILBERT 

Bacteriology Chemical Engineering Electrical Engineering 

Yakima Medical Lake Colville 



27 















ROBERT GUERIN 
Agricultural 
Engineering 
Bellingham 

DON GUILLIAMS 
Hotel Administration 
Tacoma 


ANNE GYLLENBERG 
Journalism 
Longview 

ROBERT HACKNEY 
Pre-Dentistry 
Seattle 


CAROLE HADLEY 
Home Economics 
Auburn 

RODNEY HAHN 
Agricultural 
Education 
Pullman 



GLENN HALL 
Physical Education 
Northport 

WAYNE 
HALVORSON 
Dairy Science 
Kalispell, Montana 


RONALD GILBERT 
Pharmacy 

Seattle 

EDGAR GOAKEY 
Civil Engineering 
Richland 

CHARLES GODDARD 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Spokane 

ARTHUR 

GOODFELLOW 

Architectural 

Engineering 

Glendale, California 

MICHAEL HANDER 
Business 
Administration 
Buckley 

WILMA GOOSSEN 
Home Economics 
Spokane 

RICHARD GORDON 
Physics 

Asotin 

REFERD GORMAN 
General Studies 
Yakima 

MARVIN GOULET 
Business 
Administration 

Yakima 

DENTON HANFORD 
Civil Engineering 
Pullman 

ROBERT GRADY 
Pharmocy 
Eureka, California 

MICHAEL GRAY 
Agronomy 
Washtucna 

RONDY GREEN 
Physical Education 
Spokane 

ROBERT GRIBBEN 
Electrical Engineering 
Veradale 


KENNETH GRILLO 
Pharmacy 
Spokane 

PER GROBSTOK 
Business 
Administration 
Oslo, Norway 

TOR GROBSTOK 
Civil Engineering 
Oslo, Norway 

JOY GROTEPAS 
Education 

Vancouver 

SUHEIL HANNA 
Civil Engineering 
Beirut, Lebanon 

JUNE HANNAH 


Education 

Spakane 

WINTER 1954-55 SAW THE ALPHA PHIS MOVE from their temporary stay 
in mud flats to a modern new house . 



EDWARD HANSON 
Geography 
Electric City 

JANET HANSON 
Home Economics 
Mount Vernon 


THOMAS HARBOUR 
Business 
Administration 
Pullman 

PAUL HARLEMAN 
Speech 
Newport 



28 

























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B 




M , 


PATRICIA HARMS 
Education 
Millwood 

ELIZABETH HARRIS 
Education 
Redondo 


MARILYN HARRIS 
Education 
Seattle 

MARY ELLEN 
HARVEY 
Home Economics 
Selah 


MICHAEL HARVEY 
Police Science 
Pullman 

MARY HASLAM 
Home Economics 
Beaver 


DARRELL 

HATHAWAY 

Horticulture 

Wapato 

ALAN HATTRUP 
Agronomy 
Uniontown 


DWIGHT HAWKES 
Physical Education 
Seattle 

THEODORE HAYES 
Agronomy 
Spokane 


JEAN HEDMAN 
Home Economics 
Auburn 

ANDERS 
HENRIKSSON 
Business 
Administration 
Stockholm, Sweden 


KAY HENRY 
Bacteriology 
Colfax 

LEE HENRY 
Animal Science 
Menlo Park, California 


THOMAS HIBBEN 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Tacama 

GERALD HILLIER 
Range Management 
Sacramento, 
California 



LEONARD KRAZYNSKI—TOP TEN... Crimson Circle elected him treasurer, 
then vice-president . . . chairmaned International Festival Committee . . . 
saw action as officer of Tau Beta Pi and Cosmo Club . . . saved time for 
track and choir . . . Kappa Sig's glad to see him elected Winter King his 
junior year. 

During ’56 School Year 
Alpha Phi’s Made Move 
to New Sorority House 


JOHN HIPKE 
Electrical Engineering 
Seattle 


MAURICE HOOD 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Spokane 


DOUGLAS HIPP 
Philosophy 
Bellevue 


DONALD HOPPEL 
Electrical Engineering 
Pullman 


FRED HOFFMAN 
Business 
Administration 
Vancouver 

TOMOYOSHI 
HORIUCHI 
Business 
Administration 
Hilo, Hawaii 


DONALD HOILAND 
Electrical Engineering 
Montesano 


NANCY HORSCHEL 
Bacteriology 
Wapato 



29 












ANN McCLURE —TOP TEN . . . worked on publications as 'Green news and 
Chinook division editor . . . also found time to edit the Agriculturist . . . led 
YWCA as president during senior year . . . lived at Davis until married . . . 
joined Theta Sigs, Phi Kappa Phi and Mortar Board also. 


The Start of Soph Year 
Saw Regent Hill Girls 
Light Windows 'Hi Dad’ 


MARILYN HORTON 
Education 
Wenatchee 

NANCY HOWARD 
General Studies 
Mercer Island 


RALPH HOSELEY 
Business 
Administration 
Pullman 

JOHN HUGHES 
Pre-Veterinory 
Medicine 
Boise, Idaho 


ELIZABETH 

HOUSTON 

Sociology 

Chehalis 

RICHARD 
HULSEMAN 
Civil Engineering 
Pullmon 


BEVERLY HOWARD 
Educotion 
Meridian, Idaho 

ALVIN HUMPHREY 
Agricultural 
Engineering 
Reardon 



MARY ELLEN 
HUMPHREY 
Education 
Pullman 

RAY HUNTER 
Economics 
Spokane 


WILLIAM 

HUNTINGTON 

Speech 

Sequim 

SIDNEY HUNTLEY 
Agriculture 
Colfax 


MARSHA ICKES 
Foreign Languages 
Spokane 

EERO JAASKA 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Marysville 


CAROL JACKLIN 
Education 
Spokane 

SUE JACOBSON 
Bacteriology 
Bremerton 


MARGARET 
JACQUOT 
Home Economics 
Pullman 

ELIZABETH JANSEN 
Social Studies 
Seattle 


BRUCE JAROS 
Industrial Arts 
Pullman 

MARILYN JENKINS 
Home Economics 
Spokane 


NORVAL 

JOHANSON 

Agronomy 

Kent 

BRUCE JOHNSON 
Civil Engineering 
Clarendon Hills, 
Illinois 


DONALD JOHNSON 
Wildlife Management 
Pullman 

MAECEL JOHNSON 
Physicol Education 
Alderwood Manor 



30 














NATALIE JOHNSON 
Education 
Spokane 

RAYMOND 

JOHNSON 

Mechanical 

Engineering 

Spokane 


ROBERT JOHNSON 
Electrical Engineering 
Clarkston 

JANETTE JONAS 
Education 
Camas 



LAWRENCE JONES 
Pre-Law 
Spokane 

DAVID JUNGROTH 
Chemical Engineering 
Pullman 


ADNAN KAMAL 
Chemistry 
Nablus, Jordan 

KATHRYN KANOUSE 
Horticulture 
Olympia 




SADAO KINOSHITA 

ROBERT KING KIRK 

DONALD 

STANFORD 

TOULA 

Education 

Pre-Veterinary 

KISSINGER 

KITTERMAN 

KARAIOANNOGLOU 

Seattle 

Medicine 

Electrical Engineering 

Agronomy 

Home Economics 


Pasadena, California 

Spokane 

Pullman 

Thessaloni, Greece 

IRWIN KLUNDT 

EARL KNAPP 

JOANNE KNUTSON 

ALLAN KOCH 

BARBARA KARNIS 

Chemistry 

Business 

Education 

Agronomy 

Education 

Woodland 

Pasco 

Administration 

Spokane 

Arlington 

Ritzville 


ANTOINETTE 

LEONARD 

DONALD 

HELEN KROOK 


KRALEVICH 

KRAZYNSKI 

KRONHOLM 

Home Economics 

LORNA KEENER 

Education 

Aberdeen 

Civil Engineering 
Nairobi, Kenyo 

Mechanical 

Engineering 

Pullman 

Kennewick 

Home Economics 

ROBERT KRUSSEL 

ROBERT LACEY 

MILDRED LADWIG 

RAY LANDES 

Seattle 

Electrical Enginnering 

Police Science 

Education 

Agricultural 

DAVID KELLEY 

Civil Engineering 
Snoqualmie 

Polouse 

Pullman 

Govan 

Education 

Ajlune 

"HI DAD" IN LIGHTED WINDOWS was 

the innovation of Regents Hill girls 


for the 1955-56 Dad's Day sign contest. 


DONALD KESTLE 
Zoology 
Seattle 

GENE KILLIAN 
Agricultural Educotion 
Monson 


LARRY KING 
Agricultural 
Engineering 
Prosser 

WALTER KING 
Electrical Engineering 
Butte, Montana 



31 














AUDREY LANE 

RICHARD LANG 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Davenport 

Oak Harbor 

JOHN LARSON 

LEE A. LARSON 

Economics 

Political Science 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Spokane 

DONALD J. LEE 

DONALD K. LEE 

Animal Science 

Electrical Engineering 

Goldendale 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

KENNETH 

CAROLINE 

LEINWEBER 

LENNART 

Fine Arts 

Education 

Richland 

Everson 


STEN LARKIN 

GEORGIA 

Animal Science 

LARIMORE 

Spokane 

Education 

Tacoma 

SIK KOON LAU 

BILL LEBOW 

Electrical Engineering 

Physical Education 

Singapore, China 

Spokane 

SONYA LEE 

WILLIAM LEHMANN 

Home Economics 

Forestry 

Denver, Colorado 

Ephrata 

JACK LE WARNE 

VERGIL LINDSEY 

Hotel Administration 

Forestry 

Bellevue 

Fairfield 



EDWARD P. LINK 
Hotel Administration 
Mead 

WILBUR LINN 
Economics 
Yakima 


MARILYN LIPSCOMB 
Bacteriology 
Hailey, Idaho 

NANCY LITCHFIELD 
General Studies 
Spokane 


ROBERT LOFGREN 
Agronomy 
Homer, Alaska 

RAYMOND LORENZ 
Electrical Engineering 
Pullman 


LYNN LOUDENBACK 
Business 
Administration 
Cashmere 

WENDELL LOVE 
Chemical Engineering 
Garfield 


DUANE LUHN 
Animal Science 
Spokane 

CARL JAMES LUST 
Political Science 
Pullman 


ROBERT 
MACKECHNEY 
Hotel Administration 
Seattle 

BEN MACOMBER 
Electrical Engineering 
Riley, Oregon 


JOHN MAC PHEE 
Speech 
Spokane 

IRVIN MAGIN 
Geography 
Pullman 


BRUCE MALCOM 
Forestry 
Eatonville 

ANNIE CLAIRE 
MALINGRE 
Business 
Administration 
Paris, France 



32 






















WARREN MALLORY 
Agronomy 
Pullman 

WILLIAM MALONEY 
Physical Education 
Butte, Montana 


ELWIN MANICKE 
Animal Science 
Issaquah 

JIM MANRING 
Horticulture 
Yakima 


MARILYN 
MANSFIELD 
Sociology 
North Bonneville 

BARBARA MARESH 
Home Economics 
Washougal 


BARBARA MARTIN 
Home Economics 
Kennewick 

BONNIE MARTIN 
Business 
Administration 
Kent 


MICHAEL MASON 
Pre-veterinary 
Medicine 
Seattle 

CAMILLA 
MATTHIESEN 
Home Economics 
Alderwood Manor 


PAUL MAUGHAN 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Pullman 

KAREN MAXFIELD 
Physical Education 
Chelan 


RICHARD MAXSON 
Business 
Administration 
Pullman 

JANICE MC BRIDE 
Education 
Spokane 


ROGER MC CANN 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Pomeroy 

ANN MCCLURE 
General Studies 
Pullman 


33 



STAN McCLURE—TOP TEN . . . active as Stimson sponsor and IK, going on 
to be sophomore class president and YMCA president as a junior . . . Phi 
Eta Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi and Crimson Circle sought his membership . . . 
found time for marriage, varsity tennis and chairmaning the Model U.N. 
delegation. 


Many Have Forgotten 
the Early Morning Fire 
That Gutted Services 


DAVID MCCLURE 
Chemistry 
Ketchikan, Alaska 


STAN MCCLURE 
Political Science 
Greenacres 


J. STANLEY 
MC CLUSKEY 
Pharmocy 
Pullman 


STEVE MC COWAN 
Chemistry 
Montesano 


KITTY MC DONALD 


Sociology 

Seattle 


GORDON 
MC DOUGALL 
Psychology 
Yardley 


MARY LOU MC GEE 
Education 
Pendleton, Oregon 


VIRGINIA 
MC INTYRE 
Sociology 
Portland 






















CAROL SWANSON—TOP TEN . . . served the board of control as Sopho¬ 
more Greek Woman and later as ASSCW secretary . . . active in Mortar 
Board , Spurs , Westminister , chorus and Fish Fans . . . led Cougar Campus 
Chest committee . . called the Delta Gamma house home. 


With Elections Nearing 
the MPC Climaxed Year 


With 

Stuart 

at Rostrum 

WILLIAM MC KAY 
Education 
Wilbur 

DONALD 

MC KELLAR 
Business 
Administration 
Bellevue 

BETTY MC LEAN 
Education 
Cowiche 

BILL MC MECHAN 
History 
Enumclaw 

STAN MC NAIR 
Electrical Engineering 
Dayton 

LAURA MCVICKER 
Home Economics 
Cashmere 

MARILYN MELIN 
Sociology 
Olympia 

JUDSON MELTON 
Farm Mechanics 
Spokane 



LLOYD MERCER 
Agricultural Economics 
Addy 

DON MERRIAM 
Electrical Engineering 
Pullman 


ELMER MESSINGER 
Industrial Arts 
Pullman 

HAROLD MIELKE 
Pre-Medicine 
Veradale 


KENNETH 
MILHOLLAND 
Agriculture Education 
Pullman 

BARBARA MILLER 
Foreign Languoges 
Berkeley, California 


ROBERT LEE MILLER 
Physical Education 
Camas 

VIRGINIA MILLER 
Business 
Administration 
Gig Harbor 


RICHARD MILNER 
Physical Education 
Cashmere 

MARLENE MITCHELL 
Social Studies 
Yakima 


DONALD MOE 
Social Studies 
Anchorage, Alaska 

ROBERT MOEHRING 
Electrical Engineering 
Tacoma 


CURTIS MOHR 
Music 

Sandpoint, Idaho 

ROBERT MONARCH 
Chemical Engineering 
Enumclaw 


CATHERINE 
MONROE 
General Studies 
Wenatchee 

MONA JOYCE 
MONROE 
Home Economics 
Bellingham 



& 


34 











LOIS MONTGOMERY 
Education 
Stevenson 

LAVERNE MOORE 
Pharmacy 
Spokane 


PHYLLIS MOORE 
Home Economics 
Opportunity 

FRANK E. MORBY 
Forestry 
Cook 


JANICE MORGAN 
Education 
Olympia 

JACK MORICE 
Business 
Administration 
Spokane 



DICK MORRIS 
Business 
Administration 
Spokane 

SHIRLEY MORROW 
Education 
Leavenworth 



m 

m 


A 





WILLIAM NELSON 

REX NEWBURN 

WILLIAM NEWMAN 

THOMAS STELL 

GARY MOSER 
Industrial Arts 

Coltan 

Police Science 

Police Science 

General Studies 

NEWMAN 

Dayton 

Malta, Ohio 

Spokane 

Anthropology 

Port Angeles 

DAVID MOW AT 

KARL NILSEN 

ALAYNE BEACH 

CLIFFORD NOPP 

ELDA NORDHEIM 

Agriculture 

NOBLE 

Forestry 

Home Economics 

Agronomy 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Port Orchard 

Home Economics 
Hoquiam 

Richland 

Walla Walla 


DEE NORTON 

WILLIS NORWOOD 

EDWARD G. NOYD 

PAT O'BRYAN 


Journalism 

Business 

General Studies 

Hotel Administration 


Seattle 

Administration 

Wenatchee 

Sacramento, Calif. 

HARRY 


Everett 



MURABAYASHI 

GORDON ODELL 

BILL OGILIVIE 

COLLEEN O'HARA 

DORIS OLDENBURG 

Architectural 

Agricultural 

Industrial Arts 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 

Engineering 

Engineering 

Outlook 

Vaughn 

Seattle 

Pullman 

Davenport 





JAMES NAKASONE 
Electrical Engineering 
Honolulu, Hawaii 


ABDUL NAQIB 
Education 
Damascus, Syria 

CAROLYN NELSON 
General Studies 
Spokane 


GARY NELSON 
Electrical Engineering 
Millwood 

MARIA NELSON 
Home Economics 
Olympia 



1956'S MOCK CONVENTION was of more interest to some than it was to 
Sam, the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals' delegate. 


35 





















RALPH PEHRSON 
Fine Arts 
Yakima 

ALAN PETER 
Civil Engineering 
Ellensburg 


ELLETT C. PETERS 
General Studies 
Spokane 

CYNTHIA PETERSEN 
Education 
Pullman 


DALE PETERSEN 
Agricultural 
Engineering 
Pullman 

BEVERLY PETERSON 
General Studies 
Colville 



/ , 


DONALD PETERSON 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Pullman 

JAMES PHIPPS 
Geology 
Aberdeen 


RONALD OLDHAM 

ROBERT OLIVER 

BRUCE OLSON 

JACK OLSON 

STERLING 

Business 

Electrical Engineering 

Hotel Administration 

Business 

Administration 
Walla Walla 

Walla Walla 

Tacoma 

Administration 

Seattle 

PICKERING 

Physics 

Tonasket 

JACK OPPELT 

TOM OPSTAD 

GARY OSBORN 

MARILYN OTT 

ALAN PICKETT 

Electrical Engineering 

Pre-Veterinary 

Mathematics 

Physical Education 

Elma 

Medicine 

Pullman 

Ephrata 

Marysville 

Mechanical 

Engineering 

Spokane 

ROBERT 

GORDON PAGE 

JOHN PARKS 

JUDSON PARSONS 


OVERSTREET 

Agronomy 

Pharmacy 

Agriculture 


Forestry 

Seattle 

Walla Walla 

Pullman 

Seattle 


JANILY NESSEN 

ROBERT PEARSON 

GEORGE PEDERSON 

RICHARD PEHL 

JEAN PIERINI 

PATRICK 

General Studies 

Industrial Arts 

Chemical Engineering 

Industrial Arts 

Education 

Seattle 

Ridgefield 

Spokane 

Raymond 

Fall City 

MYRNA PIERSOh 


Home Economics 
Everett 


SPRING 1956 SAW STEVENS HALL CELEBRATE 60TH ANNIVERSARY 


and the retirement of Lulu Holmes, dean of women. 



MARLENE PLEWA 
Sociology 
Tacoma 

JAMES POPE 
Business 
Administration 
Clarkston 


JENNIE POPKEMA 
Speech 
Carnation 

NICHOLAS POPOFF 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Pullman 



36 














STANLEY PRATT 
General Studies 
Tekoa 

ROBERT PRESCOTT 
Animal Science 
Seattle 


DARRELL PRESNELL 
General Studies 
Pullman 

NORMAN PREWITT 
Police Science 
Auburn 



ELEANOR PRICHARD 
General Studies 
Pullman 

ARLENE PRINCE 
General Studies 
Clarkston 


JACK PRINCE 
Animal Science 
Oceanside, California 

LEE PRITCHARD 
Sociology 
Selah 


PATRICIA PURDOM 
English 
Seattle 

THOMAS PURKETT 
Business 
Administration 
Bynum, Montana 


EVAN PURSER 
Agronomy 
Mesa 

DONALD PUTNAM 
Pharmacy 
Pullman 


RONALD PYEATT 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Hoquiam 

CHARLES QUINN 
Hotel Administration 
Spokane 


WILLIAM RADTKE 
Chemical Engineering 
Pullman 

ROBERT RAE 
Fine Arts 
Everett 



SUE STOFFEL —TOP TEN . . . Kappa Alpha Theta vice-president . . . went 
up the rungs to become Evergreen editor . . . presided over Panhellenic as 
a junior and chairmaned AWS convention as a senior . . . active in Young 
Republicans, Theta Sigma Phi and Motor Board too. 


Steven's Anniversary 
Tea Reminded Sophs 
How Old College Is 


LEONARD RALSTON 
Music 
Tacoma 


WILLIAM RANDALL 


Civil Engineering 
Everett 


JOAN RANEY 
Recreation 
Tacoma 


MILTON RANTA 
Pharmacy 
Port Angeles 


DICK RAPPUHN 
Poultry Science 
Startup 


FRANK RASMUSSEN 
Electrical Engineering 
Bellingham 


PEGGY RAUN 
History 
Spokane 


MARGARET RAUPP 
Home Economics 
Winlock 



37 











SUE RICHEY 
Education 
Tacoma 



BOB OVERSTREET—TOP TEN . . . jumped from frosh exec council to sopho¬ 
more vice-presidency, junior class presidency and then ASSCW veep's spot 
. . . had time for YMC A, Crimson Circle , IFC, IFCC, Forestry club and ad¬ 
vanced ROTC . . . served the TKE's as their social chairman. 


As Juniors We Started 
Year With Lots of Pep 
For "Suds” and Team 


MARK REINBOLD 
Farm Mechanics 
Davenport 


WILLIAM REINKE 
Poultry Science 
Chehalis 


CHERYL REMLEY 
Psychology 
Dryden 


LOIS RENNILSON 
Recreation 
Berkeley, Colifornia 


JAMES RHODES 
Electrical Engineering 
Spokane 


GLEN RICHARDS 
Civil Engineering 
Toppenish 


GRANT 

RICHARDSON 

Psychology 

Pullman 


ROGER RICHERT 
Architectural 
Engineering 
Shelton 



DOUGLAS 
RICHMOND 
Animal Science 
Colville 


JOHN RINGLER 
Dairy Science 
Friday Harbor 

RANDY ROBERTS 
Business 
Administration 
Spokane 


RICHARD 

ROBINSON 

Economics 

Seottle 

GLENN RODEMEN 
Electrical Engineering 
Richland 


BOB 

ROCTCISOENDER 
General Studies 
Bothell 

MARY JANE 
ROGERS 
Education 
Seattle 


DELORES ROHLMAN 
Physical Education 
Puyallup 

BOB ROSE 
Animal Science 
South Bend 


DAVID ROSENQUIST 
Agronomy 
Seattle 

JERRY ROSLUND 
Hotel Administration 
Pullman 


DON ROTH 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Yakima 

DAN ROWLEY 
Civil Engineering 
Spokane 


JACK RUCKER 
Forestry 

Hayden Lake, Idaho 

LESLIE RUDY 
Physical Education 
Wenatchee 



38 










DAVID RUSHO 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Seattle 

ALAN RUSSELL 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Mesa 


GRANT RUSSELL 
Business 
Administration 
Eltopia 

DELMAR SANFORD 
Wildlife Management 
Wapato 


ROBERT SAUNDERS 
Music 
Tacoma 

ROBERT SAWYER 
Business 
Administration 
Spokane 


PHILIP SCHAUBLE 
Agriculture 
Saint John 

NANCY SCHELDRUP 
Home Economics 
Bellingham 



DONALD SCHILLING 
Economics 

Spokane 

JANET SCOTT 
Sociology 

Tacoma 

KENNETH SCOTT 
Pharmacy 
Newport 

NORMAN SCOn 
Agricultural 
Engineering 

Mead 

NORMAN SEILSTAD 
Electrical Engineering 
Eltopia 

FRED SCHILLINGER 
Business 
Administration 

Spokane 

HELEN SETTERS 
General Studies 
Endicott 

DIXIE SHAFFER 
Home Economics 
Enumclaw 

ELIZABETH SHARP 
Pharmacy 
Clarkston 

HASSAN SHATILA 
Civil Engineering 
Zahle, Lebanon 


JACQUELINE SHAW 
Sociology 
Kennewick 

CAROL SHEFFELS 
Home Economics 
Govan 

SUZY SHEN 

Home Economics 
Shanghai, China 

GLORIA SHEPHERD 
Bacteriology 
Selah 

THEODORE 

SCHMIDT 

Business 

Administration 

Omak 

ALLAN SHIELDS 
Business 
Administration 
Spokane 

MILDRED SHIELDS 
Music 

Colfax 

ALLEN SHULER 
Animal Science 
Ritzville 

JOHN SHUTTEE 
Police Science 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 


JANET SCHNEIDER 
Business 
Administration 
Marysville 


THE FOOTBALL SEASON in 1956-57 storied with lots of enthusiasm for a 
new coach and for what students hoped was a "new team." 


PEARL SCHOLL 
English 
Walla Walla 

RUSSELL 
SCHOONOVER 
Agricultural Education 
Wapato 


MARY SCHUTZMAN 
Education 
Tacoma 

ALFRED SCHY 
Chemistry 
Pullman 



39 


















JOHN SIMPSON 
Agricultural 
Engineering 

Saint John 

RICHARD SIMPSON 
Chemical Engineering 
Spokane 

DELMAR SISLER 
Pre-law 
Wenatchee 

CHESTER SLACK 
Horticulture 
Wenatchee 

DAVID SLOTHOWER 
Business 
Administration 
Vancouver 

ANN SMITH 

Home Economics 
Yakima 

LAWRENCE SMITH 
Civil Engineering 
Ephrata 

LEONARD SMITH 
Civil Engineering 
Othello 

MARY JANE SMITH 
Home Economics 
Ephrata 

PAT SMITH 
Recreations 
Gallatin Gateway, 
Montana 

RICHARD SMITH 
Physics 

Pullman 

STEPHEN SMITH 
Animal Science 
Pullman 

JERRY SOBOTTA 
Pharmacy 
Pullman 

GERALD 

SOVEREIGN 

Business 

Administration 

Susick 

RONALD SPANGLER 
Industrial Arts 
Tacoma 

JOHN SPEAR 
Pharmacy 
Puyallup 


THE NEW DORMS NEARED COMPLETION IN THE WINTER OF '57 with 
many men from the prefabs hoping to make the move before the end 
of the year. 



KENNARD SPEEGLE 
Sociol Studies 
Wilbur 

WILMA SPRAGUE 
Music 
Pullman 


GERALD STAIRS 
Forestry 
Pullman 

PRISCILLA STANTON 
Chemistry 
Enumclaw 


JOHN STEDMAN 
General Studies 
Dayton 

KENT STEEN 
Botany 
Pullman 


RICHARD STEVENS 
Electrical Engineering 
Burley 

JIM STILLER 
Horticulture 
Walla Walla 


DALE STOCKMAN 
Agronomy 
Sprague 

DON STOEBNER 
Pharmacy 
Spokane 


SUSAN STOFFEL 
Journalism 
Pullman 

GAIL STRAIT 
Physical Education 
Spokane 


ERVIN STRITZKE 
Agricultural 
Education 

Winchester, Oregon 

JAMES STROH 
Agronomy 
Pullman 


RONALD STRONG 
Mining Engineering 
Bremerton 


ROGER STROUD 
Social Studies 
Spokane 



40 

















WILLIAM STUART 
Animal Science 
Bartow, Florida 

DAVID STUHR 
Psychology 
Camas 


RICHARD SUBRA 
Pharmacy 
Austin, Minnesota 

MARY KAY 
SUHADOLNIK 
English 
Prosser 


GARY SUNDQUIST 
Business 
Administration 
Tacoma 

GUNILLA SVENSON 
Foreign Languages 
Kalmar, Sweden 


JERRY SWAIN 
Fine Arts 
Richland 

CAROL SWANSON 
Education 
Spokane 


FRANK SWANSON 
Poultry Science 
Edmonds 

JAMES 

SWARTWOOD 

Agriculture 

Sumas 


MARILYN SWEENEY 
Home Economics 
Belt, Montana 

RAY TAIPALE 
Forestry 
Olympia 


PAUL TANZER 
Industrial Arts 
Seattle 

JOEL TATE 
Electrical Engineering 
Kennewick 


JERRY TAYLOR 
Horticulture 
Olympia 

GIFFORD THOMAS 
Social Studies 
Electric City 



NORM SCOTT—BIG TEN . . . saw the chairmanship of Commission on Com¬ 
mittee Evaluation . . . Farmhouse vice-president . . . tapped for Crimson 
Circle , Phi Eta Sigma , Phi Kappa Phi . . . active as ASCA historian and 
Alpha Zeta member . . . joined Tau Beta Pi, YMCA and Intervarsity 
Christian Fellowship too. 

Fall Left, Spring Came 
And New Men's Dorms 
Neared Moving In Point 


CLIFFORD 

THOMPSON 

Mechanical 

Engineering 

Langley 

CHARLES TIDWELL 
Pharmacy 
Aberdeen 


RICHARD 
THOMPSON 
Chemical Engineering 
Pullman 

JOHN TIPPLE 
General Studies 
Pullmon 


GERALD THORSEN 
Speech 
Tacoma 


TOM TOMTAN 
General Studies 
Seattle 


NORMA THORSEN 
General Studies 
Colfox 


MELVIN TRANUM 
Civil Engineering 
Seattle 



41 













DURING THE 1956-57 BASKETBALL SEASON KARL HANSEN started his 
brave comeback from an injury suffered in tumbling. 


Fall Saw Karl Hansen 
Making Comeback 
From Gymnastic Injury 


VINCENT TRAPP 
General Studies 
Spokone 

ROBERT TURNBOW 
Speech 
Spokane 


JUDITH TUCKER 
General Studies 
Liberty Lake 

RONALD UDELL 
Animal Science 
Yakima 


TERRY TUCKER 
Agricultural 
Engineering 
Walla Walla 

BARBARA ULLMAN 
Home Economics 
Seattle 


DAVE TURKINGTON 
Physical Education 
Vancouver, 
British Columbia 

CHRISTEN UPPER 
Chemistry 
Kent 



MIKE UPSHAW 
Business 
Administration 
Colfax 

BURNELL 
UPTAGRAFFT 
Police Science 
Seattle 


PHILIP URNESS 
Wildlife Management 
Colfax 

MICHEL 
VAN ACKERE 
Political Science 
Paris, France 


KENNETH 
VAN BECK 
Pharmacy 
Tacoma 

JUNE VANDE BRAKE 
Home Economics 
Thorp 


BILL VAN GELDER 
Civil Engineering 
Spokane 

JIRI VANOUREK 
Agricultural 
Economics 
Czechoslovakia 


TOM VAN WELL 
Social Studies 
Wenatchee 

MARY VATNSDAL 
English 
Pullman 


EDWARD 
VEENHIUZEN 
Dairy Science 
Pullman 

JENNETH VIMONT 
Home Economics 
Chehalis 


LOUIS VIMONT 
Business 
Administration 
Chehalis 

ROBERT VIRTUE 
Pre-dentistry 
Vancouver, 
British Columbia 


RICHARD VOGEL 
Industrial Arts 
Pullman 

ROBERT VOGELMAN 
Speech 
Spokane 



42 













JUSTIN 

VON GORTLER 
Business 
Administration 
Santa Barbara, 
California 

HENRY VOSTRAL 



Agronomy 

Ritzville 

GLADYS WAHL 
Education 
Aberdeen 

JIM WATSON 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Spokane 


NORMAN WEBBER 
Horticulture 
Bellingham 



RONALD WEBBER 
Business 
Administration 
Davenport 


JACOB WEBER 
Animal Science 
Ritzville 

NANCY WEBSTER 
Music 
Tacoma 


BERT WEINRICH 
Pre-medicine 
Wenatchee 

RICHARD WEISS 
Electrical Engineering 
Yakima 


JOHN WELDON 
Business 
Administration 
Malden 

PATRICIA 

WESTBROOK 

Education 

Tacoma 


DARREL WESTOVER 
Hotel Administration 
Portland, Oregon 

LARRY WHITE 
Speech 

Roseburg, Oregon 




FLOYD WHYATT 

SHARON WILBER 

Architectural 

Physical Education 

Engineering 

Nespelem 

Tacoma 

JANET 

RAYMOND 

WILLIAMSON 

WILLIAMSON 

Home Economics 

Forestry 

Mabton 

Pullman 

KENT WOLD 

BARRY WOO 

Journalism 

Electrical Engineering 

Olympia 

Seattle 

RICHARD WOODS 

ROBERT 

Forestry 

WYNECOOP 

Omak 

Forestry 

Wellpinit 


BRUCE WILKINS 

NANCY WILLIAMS 

Chemistry 

Physical Education 

Onalaska, Alaska 

Olympia 

BILLIE WILLS 

EARL WINECK 

Home Economics 

Psychology 

Wawawai 

Anchorage, Alaska 

ARNOLD WOOD 

REX WOOD 

Geology 

Pre-dentistry 

Pullman 

Richland 

TERENCE YEAGER 

WARREN YEEND 

Hotel Administration 

Geology 

Pullman 

Dixie 


THE INTRODUCTION OF GREEK WEEK CAME IN 1957, climaxed by the 
running of a human chariot race in which "Sam" even got in the act. 



43 






















JOHN YOST 
History 
Pullman 


ROBERT WALTER ZABEL 

YOUNG Farm Mechanics 

Speech Stortup 

Pasco 


GWENYTH 

ZEDIKER 

Home 

Economics 

Cashmere 


LARRY ZEHN 
Agriculture 
Spangle 


Spring Commencement 
Witnessed the Last 
WSC Nursing Grads 




JANET BAUGHMAN 
Tekoa 

MARIE CLINE 
Pullman 


MRS. ROBERT 
CRAWFORD 
Pullman 

MILDRED JAEGER 
Pasco 


BETTY KELLER 
Dayton 

CAROL MILLER 
Spokane 


SANDRA MINOR 
Pullman 

KAREN SANDSTROM 
Bellevue 


MARGARET 
SIMPSON 
Saint John 

MYRNA STRYCKER 
Pullman 


ARLEEN THRESS 
Richland 

MERILYN YENNEY 
Walla Walla 



44 























Phi Beta Kappa 

National Scholastic Honorary 
in Liberal Arts 


Frank Backus • Nancy Bishop 

• Leo Butler 

Virginia Caspersen • Marjorie Childress 

Earl Darrah • Joe Dixon 

• Larry Ernst 

Josef Hadar • Elizabeth Houston 

Elizabeth Jansen • 

Lawrence Jones 

Donald Kestle 

• Delbert Kole 

Marilyn Lipscomb « 

i Ann McClure 

Stanley McClure • 

Steve McCowan 

Eugene Omey • 

Rose Peterson 

James Phipps • 

Leonard Ralston 

Peggy Raun • Carl Rosenkilde 

• Pearl Scholl 

Gloria Shepherd • Kathleen Swenson 

Marian Ulrich • 

Bruce Wilkins 

Warren Yeend 

• John Yost 


Phi Kappa Phi 

National Scholastic Honorary 


Beverly Anderson • Mary Anderson • Mary Bailey 

Bruce Belshaw • Joe Bergevin • Henry Bjorklund 

Joseph Breitenbauch • Marilyn Brown • Gary Bryan 

Virginia Caspersen • Gerald Cederbloom • Mary Colburn 

Estelle Cooksey • Douglas Corey • Richard Daniel 

Patricia Deal • Ruth Dean • Joe Dixon • Stanley Easton 

David Ellis • Robert Farley • Lee Faulkner 

Larry Flodin • Nancy Feichter • Richard Fowler 

Cline Frasier • Virginia Greenlee • Gary Grunewald 

Freddie Guyer • Rodney Hanneman • Mary Ellen Marvey 

Lowell Hendricks • Jerry Hook • Nancy Horschel 

Arlyn Horton • Idalee Hutton • Janis Ikstrums 

Lawrence Jones • Lynne Jorgensen • Kathryn Kanouse 

Donald Kestle • Allan Koch • Igor Kosin • Joanne Knutson 

Helen Krook • Harriet Kruse • Arlys Landerholm 

Audrey Lane • Donald Lee • William Lehmann 

Franklin Leitz • Vergil Lindsey • Edward Link 

Marilyn Lipscomb • Robert Lofgren • Carl Luhn 

Kenneth Marshall • Karen Maughan • Richard Maxson 

Roger McClellan • John McCluskey • Steve McCowan 

Catherine Monroe • Gary Nelson • Willis Norwood 

Karen Olsen • Janily Patrick • Anthony Peressini 

Janice Poage • William Porter • William Purcell 

Margaret Raney • Peggy Raun • Marjorie Reinhold 

David Roberts • Glen Rodeman • Robert Rose 

Carl Rosenkilde • Karen Sandstrom • Robert Saunders 

Nancy Scheldrup • David Schuy • William Schink 

Pearl Scholl • Hassan Ahmad Shatila • Charles Shaul 

Sherril Slichter • Dixie Smith • John Spry • Gerald Stairs 

David Stiefbold • Ronald Strong • Kathleen Swenson 

Theresa Thorp • John Wacker • Lesnick Westrum 

Ed Wicker • Willard Winters • John Yost 


45 












WILLIAM ACHESON edited 
WSC Technometer. Presided 
over Ferry Hall, Intervarsity 
Christian Fellowship and 
Roger Williams Foundation. 
Joined Phi Kappa Phi, Phi 
Eta Sigma, ASME. 


GLENN ALDRICH served as 
ASCA and Alpha Tau Alpha 
president; active in Alpha 
Zeta, FFA, Phi Delta Kappa, 
advanced ROTC, the WSC 
dairy judging team and 
ASSCW election board. 


BEVERLY ANDERSON was 
active in WRA, being 
president, and president of 
Sports Club. A member of 
Spurs and Pi Lambda Theta, 
she joined Mortar Board 
and Phi Kappa Phi. 


JANET BOWLER debated 
with the varsity debate 
squad, presided over Pi 
Kappa Delta and was a 
member of Omicron Nu and 
Pi Lambda Theta. She was 
a Chi Omega officer. 


DUDLEY BROWN was 
Chinook editor. Spark 
business manager, Kruegel 
hall secretary and sponsor. 
Served on three ASSCW 
committees and as IPAC 
vice-president. 


VIRGINIA CASPERSEN 
chairmaned International 
Festival committee, served 
Alpha Phi's as an officer, 
joining Phi Kappa Phi, Phi 
Beta Kappa and Alpha 
Kappa Delta as a senior. 


Outstanding Seniors Selected 
In Night Committee Meeting 

Each year four to five per cent of the senior class is selected by a faculty-student 
committee as "Outstanding Seniors." These seniors are chosen on character, activities, 
leadership and scholarship. The committee meets late into the night during final ses¬ 
sions, pouring over point sheets and making value judgements. Finally, the motion 
comes to end the selection, and the committee turns to picking ten of these seniors as 
the "Top Ten"—five women, five men. Complete consent of the committee is needed 
to name each of the Top Ten. Then with busy work over, the committee sends the re¬ 
sults to the printers and anxiously waits for Senior Convocation. 


LARRY JONES was tapped 
into Pi Kappa Delta, Pi 
Sigma Alpha, Phi Kappa Phi, 
and Phi Beta Kappa. Pi 
Kappa Alpha veep. Young 
Demos veep. Prexy of Pre- 
Law Club, Channing Club 
Prexy. Outstanding debator. 


HELEN KROOKwas prexy of 
Omicron Nu and Gamma Pi 
Beta. Tapped into Phi 
Kappa Phi and Spurs. 
Chairmaned Registration 
Ball and Soph Tolo. Active 
in YWCA, AWS, and 
ASSCW work. 


EDWARD PAT LINK 
belonged to Phi Eta Sigma, 
Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma lota. 
Beta Theta Pi house officer, 
IK treasurer, chairmaned 
Beta quartet. Was elected 
to Sr. class exec council, 
active in ASSCW. 


MARLENE MITCHELL, 
Evergreen news and 
Chinook layout editor. 
Spark business manager, 
A.D. Pi secretary. 

Also Theta Sigma Phi 
orcheis vice-president and 
on AWS committee. 


KATIE MONROE worked on 
ASSCW Cub Music and 
Lecturer Artist committees. 
Sang in choir, was Phi Chi 
Theta prexy, member of Pi 
Lambda Theta and Phi 
Kappa Phi. KAT secretary. 


ANTOINETTE MURDOCH, 
active in Spurs, Chinook, 
Evergreen, Agriculturist. 
Served Sigma Kappa as 
vice-president. Also a 
member of Lariat club. 
Alpha Kappa Delta. 


PAUL MAUGHAN was Beta 
Theta Pi president. Crimson 
Circle president. Member 
of Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma 
Tau, and ASME. Major 
standing in Advanced Army 
ROTC program. Active in 
YMCA, IFC, ASSCW. 

STAN PRATT had a term as 
Senior Greek Man on the 
board of control, also on 
Cub Dance and Activities 
Board. Served Sigma Nu as 
veep. Phi Mu Alpha as 
secreta ry-t reasu rer. 


BETTY MC LEAN was Kappa 
president, AWS treasurer. 
Was in Spurs and Mortar 
Board, Panhellenic, Pi 
Lambda Theta. Represented 
independents on soph exec 
council and was dorm 
sponsor before pledging. 

WILLIAM J. RANDALL, 
Lambda Chi vice-president. 
Member of Sigma Tau, Gray 
W, YMCA, Jr. IFC, ASCE. 

He sparked wrestling team 
as captain, taking third 
place in PCCs. 


HAROLD MIELKE edited 
Fusser's Guide, was 
Homecoming committee 
chairman, IFC rush 
secretary. Served as officer 
in Beta house, was active in 
IK's and Pi Tau loto. 

JOAN RANEY worked on 
ASSCW International 
Festival and Foreign Films 
committees. Spurs, Do Si Do, 
WRA, Pilgrim, Cosmo, 
and Hawaiian Clubs. 

Served Regents, Mortar 
Board as veep. 








JICKI CASTLE, Senior Greek 
Woman on the board of 
control, an Alpha Phi officer 
and member of AWS com¬ 
mittees. Served on junior 
expanded exec council and 
ASSCW rally committee. 


RALEIGH DAVIS worked up 
through Kappa Sig offices 
to be prexy. Also presided 
over A.I.A and a member 
of Tau Beta Pi, Phi Kappa 
Phi and advanced AFROTC. 


GARYDELLES served 
Crimson Circle as secretary, 
elected to class exec councils 
and later junior class 
vice-presidency. Joined 
YMCA and was a Phi Sig 
fraternity officer. 


JACQUELYN DOXON 
presided over A.D. Pi 
sorority. Was Junior 
Panhellenic member; she 
served as a Spur her 
sophomore year. A member 
of AWS full council too. 


SUSAN FALK acted as 
Evergreen news and society 
editors. Theta Sig treasurer, 
and IFCC committee 
chairman. On Mademoiselle 
College board; AWS 
Public Relations chairman. 


KEITH GEORGE was a 
member of ASSCW social 
skills committee. Mu Beta 
Beta, Livestock Judging 
Team. Also Crimson Circle 
treasurer, 4-H veep, junior 
prom chairman. 


JEAN HEDMAN served 
Chinook as business 
manager, AGD as treasurer 
and president. Chairmaned 
Winter Week, served on 
Cub Game committee. 
Spurs, and Panhellenic. 


BETH HOUSTON was AWS 
veep, wore both white and 
black outfits of Spurs and 
Mortar Board. Was sponsor 
at Regents Hill, ASSCW 
Idaho Commission member, 
and chairmaned AWS 
committees. 


MARILYN JENKINS served 
the Delta Gammas as 
treasurer and president. 
Was president of Mortar 
Board, officer of Presidents' 
Council. Worked in Omicron 
Nu, headed a YWCA 
frosh commission. 


BRUCE JOHNSON was 
ASCE treasurer and prexy. 
Scabbard and Blade 
treasurer. Worked on 
Military Ball, ASSCW 
community relations 
committee. He served on 
Engineering Council. 


NATALIE JOHNSON was 
active in AWS, YWCA, and 
WRA. Was Theta prexy. 
Election board secretary, 
Jr. Prom general chairman. 
Served Mortar Board as 
historian. Was in Sigma 
Tau Alpha. 


JAN WITKOWSKI JONAS 
chairmaned Frosh-faculty 
weekend committee, was 
head sponsor at Regents 
Hill until marriage. Pi 
Lambda Theta member, 
active in YWCA and 
AWS activities. 



PEGGY RAUN served on 
YWCA Frosh Commission, 
Jr. Panhel, Wesley 
Foundation, Cub Art 
Committee, Chinook copy 
staff, AWS committees. 

Also Kappa Delta and Phi 
Alpha Theta veep. 

RONALD UDELL joined IK's, 
Jr. IFC, Crimson Circle, 
Alpha Zeta and Lariat 
Club. Chairman of ASSCW 
Cub Games committee, he 
also served on Cub 
Program Council, Union 
Board and Activities Board. 


DAVE ROBERTS acted as Jr. 
IFC and Phi Sig president. 
Took minutes for 
Engineering Coordinating 
Council. Spent time on 
junior class executive council 
and as Historian for 
Crimson Circle. 

BARBARA ULLMAN was 
Regents head sponsor 
and president. Also in 
Spurs, YWCA, Soph 
Council, Omicron Nu, 

Phi Kappa Phi, Pi 
Lambda Theta, chorus, 

WRA, ASSCW committees. 


ALICE SAAR I, Senior 
Independent Woman on 
board of control. Home¬ 
coming committee, YWCA 
commission leader. Spur, 
Chinook division editor, 
Duncan Dunn treasurer, 
sponsor, social chairman. 

MARY VATNSDAL worked 
on ASSCW International 
Festival Committee and 
Election Board. Chairmaned 
AWS Big Little Sis 
Committee, was Delta 
Mu president. Spur. Delta 
Delta Delta sorority veep. 


ELIZABETH STACKHOUSE 
went to board of control as 
Jr. Greek Woman. On 
Improvement of Instruction 
Committee, AWS Big Little 
Sis and class dance 
committees. In Jr. Pan, 
Spurs, Pi Lambda Theta. 

EDWARD VEENHUIZEN 
chairmaned ASSCW 
Activities Board, Harvest 
Ball and Little International. 
On executive council of 
IK's and ASCA. Also a 
member of 4-H, Mu Beta, 
Alpha Zeta, Newman Club. 


GAIL STRAIGHT acted as 
Phi Kappa Tau 
vice-president, active in 
frosh and varsity 
football and baseball. 
Football captain during 
senior year. President of 
Gray W, he joined IK's, 

HENRY VOSTRAL, tapped 
for Crimson Circle, Phi 
Eta Sigma and Phi Kappa 
Phi. Presided over AGR 
house. In IK's, FFA, 
Agronomy club, ASSCW 
Traffic Safety Com¬ 
mittee, Alpha Zeta. 


BILL STUART ably served as 
ASSCW prexy and YMCA 
commission chairman. 
Acacia prexy too. Active in 
Lariat Club, chorus, 
livestock judging teams, jr. 
varsity debate. Chairmaned 
Mock Political Convention. 

JOE ZEEBEN was a sponsor 
at Ferry Hall, captain of 
the varsity track squad and 
a member of the varsity 
boxing team. Also found 
time for Sigma Tau, Tau 
Beta Pi, American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers. 














Vet Medical Degree 
Bestowed on 47 by 
Only Vet School in 
Whole Northwest 


ROW 1: 

ERNEST BENNETT 
Renton 


CLAY BURNUM 
Gooding, Idaho 


JACK CARKEEK 
Bremerton 


GEORGE CLARKE 
Issaquah 


DONALD CRIMMINS 
McMinnville, Oregon 


ROW 2: 

ROBERT DOLPHIN CONRAD DONOVAN JOHN DUFF 

Fossil, Oregon Republic, Pennsylvania Seattle 

FORD EBNER ADOLPH ERICKSEN 

Pullman Vancouver 


ROW 3: 

CHARLES GARDNER GERALD GARDNER NEIL HALEY 

Boise, Idaho Boise, Idaho Pullman 

RICHARD HALL GARNER HARSTON 

Pullman Cowley, Wyoming 


ROW 4: 

CLIFFORD JELMBERG DONALD JENKINS DEAN JENSEN 

Quincy Pullman Edmunds 


LARRY JONES 
Pullman 


GEORGE KLAVANO 
Pullman 


ROW 5: 

LLOYD LAUERMAN, JR. 
Mount Vernon 

RICHARD LONG 
Pullman 


JOHN LEE RAYMOND LOAN 

Pullman Pullman 

ROBERT LUNGER 
Everson 


ROW 6: 

JOAN MARSHALL 
Ekalaka, Montana 

DEAN MILLER 
Spokane 


WES MARSHALL 
Omak 


WARREN MCCULLOCH 
Spokane 

ROBERT MOHR 
Puyallup 


ROW 7: 

WILLIAM NOBLE 
Columbia Falls, Montana 

MAX PERRY 
Palouse 


DAVID OLNEY 
Spokane 


GLEN OVERTURF 
Cut Bank, Montana 


THEODORE PETERSON 
Pullman 


ROW 8: 

DOUGLAS PHILIPS VERNON REITAN ALLEN SCHAUFFLER 
Medford, Oregon Bend, Oregon Pullman 


FRANK SHACKELFORD 
Pullman 


WILLIAM K. SMITH 
Almire 


ROW 9: 

FREDERICK STUMP 
Puyallup 


DE VON TERRY 
Rockville, Utah 


JACK WARD 
Hysham, Montana 


JAMES WARD 
Mt. Lake Terrace 


EUGENE WEGNER 
Pullman 



ROW 10: 



CLYDE WHITEAKER 

JAMES WILLIAMS 

ROY WRIGHT 

Kalama 

Ogden, Utah 

Tacoma 




























































ADMINISTRATION 






Social Responsibilities 
Were Included in the 
Duties of WSC’s Fine 
Administrative Heads 



THE WIVES OF THE ADMINISTRATION spent a delightful afternoon 
entertaining Mrs. Albert Rosellini at tea. 



DEAN CATHERINE NORTHRUP enjoyed talking with mothers and 
daughters Mothers' Weekend at the President's lawn party. 



PRESIDENT FRENCH AND THE BOARD OF REGENTS TAKE THEIR DIGNIFIED POSITIONS at the Commencement exercises for the 
1958 graduating class. 




MRS. FRENCH AND MRS. ROSELLINI at 
the Homecoming banquet. 


OUR LIKEABLE DEAN OF THE FACULTY 
is caught by the photographer while 
painting his boat. 


50 

















GOVERNOR ROSELLINl cut the < 
the Governor's Ball as Dr. French 
looked on. 


LIKE A MIGHTY CASTLE the Ad building looms on the skyline with Bryan. Symbol of the 
administration, the building has grown too small, forcing many administrative 
offices elsewhere. 


FOREIGN STUDENTS WERE WELCOMED 
to the WSC campus by the 
friendly administration. 



THE SUCCESSFUL ADMINISTRATION of 
the college was supported by many 
unseen workers. 



ADMINISTRATORS' DELIGHT—treeings 
which could lead to forbidden 
campus water fights. 



AN ACTIVE DEAN has much paper work 
to do—his desk is always full, it seems. 


51 
















WITH WSC ROOTER'S CAP in hand. Governor Albert Rosellini viewed the half-time entertainment of the 1957 Homecoming game 
from the CUB balcony before he joined President C. Clement French for the crowning of the queen. 


Governor Rosellini Attends Homecoming 


Besides attending Homecoming, Governor Albert D. Rosel¬ 
lini saw the launching of a new tradition at WSC — an 
annual Governor's ball — honoring Washington's govern¬ 
or. Although plane trouble almost kept him from attending 
the January event, which was to help root statewide team¬ 
work and understanding, students and faculty watched as 
he and his wife started the first dance. A native of Wash¬ 
ington, he was born in Tacoma and received his early 
education there. He was later granted his degrees in law 
and liberal arts at the commencement exercises for the 
class of 1933 at the University of Washington. In 1938 he 
was elected state senator and remained in this position 
until his resignation to enter the office of governor. Since 
that time he has been a frequent guest at Washington 
State College. 


GOVERNOR ALBERT ROSELLINI spends much time at his desk in 
Olympia, Washington's capitol, considering matters 
relating to WSC. 












WSC’s Administrative Head—President French 


DR. FRENCH MAINTAINED THE RESPECT of his WSC associates 
with his friendship, wisdom and advice. 



A large land-grant institution, such as the State College 
of Washington, is a complex organization to administer. 
The problems of many students, staff members and friends 
of the institution are likely to flow across the always busy 
desk of President C. Clement French. Yet his door is always 
open to the need of anyone from any quarter. On campus 
and off. President French has spread goodwill for our 
college. His hand is always extended in friendship. His 
quick and ready smile flashes on campus, in his local 
church and club work, and wherever in the nation key 
educators gather to solve their problems. Unselfish serv¬ 
ices, complete understanding and counseling and Dr. 
French's continued efforts towards the betterment of the 
State College of Washington have become deep-rooted 
in the lives of his friends. 


53 












CARL PETTIBONE 
Treasurer, Board of Regents 


Regents Form Governing Group, 
Encourage WSC Building Program 

Each year on the first Wednesday in April, the Board of Regents meets to elect it presi¬ 
dent, vice-president and treasurer. These men, plus the secretary of the board who is 
the president of the college, compose the governing group which meets approximately 
once a month. Dr. C. Clement French is ex-officio secretary of the board. The enactment 
of regulations, adoption of the building program and the disposition of money appro¬ 
priated to the State College are only a few of the duties which they are authorized to 
perform. In their meetings, they discuss revenue, decide on personnel actions and hear 
reports on academic, administrative and financial matters. 



BOARD OF REGENTS—ROW 1: William N. Goodwin, Ralph T. Gillespie, Alan Rogers. ROW 2: Stanton J. Hall, Milton W. Durham, C. Clement 
French. Also on the board are Frances P. Owen and H. Rodgers Hamilton. 


54 













JOHN PARKHILL 
President 



HUNTLY GORDON 
First Vice-President 


ROBERT NEILSON 
Second Vice-Presidnt 



Homecoming Provides a Time 
for Alumni Association to Gather 


The year 1957-58 was of special significance for the Alumni Association of the State 
College of Washington. This was the charter year for the Scholarship and Development 
Fund, marking the change from a dues program to one of gifts from WSC alumni and 
friends. Fund monies each year are allocated to the college areas of greatest need — 
scholarships, fellowships, research and special projects. The Honor Roll of Contributors 
for this charter year will include 2117 names. The Alumni Association represents the 
interests and views of its members, which includes all former students of the state col¬ 
lege. Regular meetings of the Association Board of Directors are held twice a year in 
the fall and spring. 




THE HOMECOMING DINNER held in the CUB ballroom brought together past WSC graduates. Those with the golf caps are from the year 7932, 
the class honored at this year's Homecoming. 


55 















S. TOWN STEPHENSON, DEAN OF FACULTY, talks with Mr. H. L. 
Keenleyside before his winter convocation. 


Administrative Staff 
Serves WSC Students 

Dean of the faculty, S. Town Stephenson, is the coordinator 
of academic administration. Included here are many services 
that are of importance to students. Familiar to all is the office 
of admissions and registrar. An advisory program is avail¬ 
able to everyone as undergraduates and again as graduate 
students. An effective general extension program is main¬ 
tained also. Besides rendering student service, the college is 
concerned with the education of all people. Library facilities, 
audio-visual and research material, in addition to being of 
use to the students, is generously made available to the 
community. For all these resources, WSC has a student and 
public service program of which it can surely be proud. 



ASSCW OFFICERS AND ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS are all involved in the opening of the expanded fountain area. 



CLAUDE SIMPSON 
Director of Admissions 
and Registrar 



JIMMIE WILLIAMS 
Associate Registrar 



STAN BERRY 

Associate Director of Admissions 



G. DONALD SMITH 
Director of Libraries 


56 


















LINES OF STUDENTS , waiting for their packets, wind through the Administration building. 



STUDENTS LEAVE the Administration building 
after picking up their registration packets. 



STUDENTS WISHING TO USE the microfilm 
machine get information from library staff. 




1 



WILLIAM GNAEDINGER 
Director, Audio-Visual Center 


NORMAN BRADEN 
Director, General Extension Service 


STEWART HAZLET 
Dean of Graduate School 


PETER REMPEL 
Coordinator of General 
Education and Curriculum 
Advisory Program 


57 



























CARL PETTIBONE is the business 
manager and comptroller at WSC. 


Business Management's Efforts 
Make WSC Campus Run Well 

Many hours of work comprise the daily duties of the area of Business Management, 
under the direction of Carl Pettibone, Business Manager. The divisions of this area are 
eight, four dealing mainly with the fine looks and usability of the campus. The staffs 
of the Purchasing Agent and the College Architect help to carry out this goal, as do 
the Food and Housing and Buildings and Grounds staffs. One may find the Budget 
office. Comptroller's office and the Tabulated Records division knee-deep in facts and 
figures. Then there's the personnel manager, who keeps the State College staffs well- 
stocked. 



THE ARCHITECT MAKES MANY TRIPS to inspect the new women's dorms now being constructed by Regents Hill. 



LLOYD EVEREST 
Personnel Officer, 
Staff Personnel Office 



GUY BRISLAWN 

Purchasing Agent, Purchasing Office 




JACK FEISE 

Supervisor of Office of Tabulated Records 


58 












EXPLAINING COMPLICATED IBM EQUIPMENT in the office of tabulated records 
is a big job. 



MUCH TIME IS SPENT keeping track of all the 
registered cars in the WSC Car Pool. 



DORMITORY STUDENTS find that obtaining a 
meal ticket means a trip to the Ad building . 



V. LAUREN SHELTON 
Comptroller, Accounting Office 


S. C. MARKLEY 

Superintendent, Buildings and Grounds 


JAMES ANDERSON 
Budget Officer, Budget Office 


SELMA STREIT 
Director, College Housing 
and Food Service 


59 






















STAN RHEINER HARRIET CADY 

Executive Secretary, YMCA Executive Director, YWCA 



JOHN CLEVENGER 
Dean of Students 


Dean Clevenger Directs the Area 
of Student Relations on Campus 


The entire area of Student Relations is under the direction of J. C. Clevenger, dean of 
students. His duties include coordinating and advising the YWCA and YMCA direc¬ 
tors; the advisor to international students; CUB management; and the directors of the 
Placement Bureau who aid in finding employment on campus and in the state or 
foreign countries; the Counseling Center who aids in personal, educational and voca¬ 
tional advice; and Memorial Hospital that works for the physical welfare of all stu¬ 
dents. Cooperating with Student Relations is the ASSCW, which helps unite students 
for the purpose of working together. 



THE PLACEMENT BUREAU arranges job infer- SOME STUDENTS received flu shots from the 
views for students . Health Center. 




PLACEMENT BUREAU STAFF—ROW 1: Erva Mosher, Norine Jelmberg. ROW 2: Betty Dart, Marilyn Rich, Barbara Procter, 
Barbara Wagner, Richard White, Walter Bristol. 


60 


















WALTER BRISTOL 
Director, Placement Bureou 


HARRY ZION 

Director, Student Health Service 


WILLIAM CASS 

Director, Student Counseling Center 




COUNSELING CENTER STAFF—ROW 1: Joyce Dickie, Harriet Long, Claudette Berry. 
ROW 2: Don Duncan, Ken Blood, Frank Voile. ROW 3: William Cass, Ray Olson, 
Jim Linden. 


WSCS FRIEND IN NEED to oil international 
students , Mrs. Campbell , shows a campus map to 
one of them. 



THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE STAFF takes a break from a busy schedule. Standing: Joanne Russell , Dr. Betty Adams , Dr. Harry E. Zion , 
Ruth Luce , Teri Weir. 


61 




















FRANK NOFFKE 
Director 

Wilson Compton Union 


WILLIAM BIERBAUM 
Assistant Director 
Wilson Compton Union 


BERYL ROBERTS 
Staff Assistant 
Wilson Compton Union 


MARVIN SWENSON 
Program Adviser 
ASSCW Activities 


Cub Directors and Assistants 
Supervise Our Busy Union 

"More Cub for More Cougars" was the theme of the fall of 1957, as work on the 
elaborate fountain addition was evident. The new school year also brought changes 
and increased production and use in other parts of the Compton Union Building. The 
Games area, located on the ground floor, sported a new automatic pin-setter for 
WSCs bowling enthusiasts. The Crafts area, in the basement of the Cub, had more 
use this year than ever before. Pottery and jewelry were produced in quantity by the 
evening classes. Typewriters clacked on into the night, and the editors worried and 
juggled copy ot get the Evergreen and Chinook out; the basement also housed other 
publications, including the Agriculturist and Spark. On the fourth floor of our Union 
Building is the hotel — modern and convenient, although not nearly large enough for 
those Dads' Day and Graduation weekends. The third floor was occupied by the 
activity-minded. 



FREE HOT DOGS were passed out during the CUB opening ceremonies. Frank Noffke and Marvin 
Swenson observe in the background. 



ROGER MUNN 

Assistant Food Service Supervisor 
Wilson Compton Union 



JAMES SKINSTAD 
Assistant Food Service Supervisor 
Wilson Compton Union 



RAGNHILD EDWARDSON 
Assistant Food Service Supervisor 
Wilson Compton Union 


62 




























EDITH CELETTE 
Activities and Social 
Adviser, ASSCW Activities 


VERNA DUNCAN 
ASSCW Activities Adviser 


JOYCE SCOTT 
Junior Accountant 
Wilson Compton Union 


HELEN HANNAH 
Desk Suprevisor 
Wilson Compton Union 



HAROLD TAYLOR 
Building Engineer 
Wilson Compton Union 



H. C. CHRISTENSON 
Games and Night Supervisor 
Wilson Compton Union 





AT THE CLUB CHRISTMAS PARTY, Santa Claus made a great hit. 


63 


RAY AYERS 
Fountain Supervisor 
Wilson Compton Union 





















I 



ALLEN MILLER 
Director 

Office of Information 



RALPH DEVLIN 
Publications Superintendent 
Printing Department 




THE PRINT SHOP is the source of printed materials sent throughout the state , making it necessary to 
keep the machinery in top shape. 


The Four Areas of State Relations 
Spread News of the State College 



The four areas of State Relations, headed by Allen Miller, play key roles in spreading 
the news of the State College. The office of information, the office of publication, the 
college news bureau and the radio and television service each play their part in the 
system of mass media that continues to keep our college well known. The college 
news service handles the general college news and puts out WSC REPORTS, a news- 
feature quarterly that is sent to more than 15,000 alumni and parents of the students. 
Material for all parts of the institution is edited and published by the office of publi¬ 
cations, while the office of information maintains contact with the rest of the world. 
KUGR, KWSC, the WSC transcription service and campus television activities are all 
included under the radio and television service. 


DENNIS MORRISON 
Manager 

College News Bureau 


64 























SCHOOLS 








Faculty Members 
Donned Formal Attire 
for Duties / but Usually 
Are Informal , Friendly 


MOM AND KIDS MEET DADDY at the end the his school day—he 
with sore feet , they with cries of welcome. 


AN ABSTRACT FIGURE is significant to these architecture students , 
while the rest of us just don't understand! 



ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE CLUB the faculty lounge is found. Students escape from classes in the fountain area, while the faculty do 
likewise here. 



SOME FACULTY MEMBERS find relaxation 
in leaving families home to join towns¬ 
people at bridge. 


f 



WSC'S FACULTY file out of commence¬ 
ment while two small observers wonder 
and contemplate. 


66 




















WSC FACULTY WIVES PRESENTED A SKIT during the intermission at their dance. 



DR. KIES IS A SYMBOL of WSC to A FACULTY MEMBER had no success in 

many graduates. finding a space. 


67 



IT IS VERY EASY to reel in the mail 
bag in Troy! 



DR. BARLOW was really "tapped" for 
Crimson Circle! 



"UNDER THE SPREADING Chestnut Tree" 
. . . a class. 

















L. L. MADSEN 
Director, Institute 
of Agricultural Sciences 



S. P. SWENSON 
Dean 

College of Agriculture 



HORTICULTURE STUDENTS ENJOY WORDS of advice from authority when dealing with begonias. 
The green house is their lab. 



C. A. SVINTH 
Director of Agricultural 
Extension Service 



College of Agriculture Shown 
To Be Original Nucleus of WSC 


Washington State college, known widely for its excellent agricultural school, main¬ 
tains necessary administrative branches of the college of agriculture. It could be of 
interest to note that the college of agriculture was the definite nucleus of WSC at the 
time the school was founded — and that now, although it is still a definitely strong 
factor, it has been joined by other schools and colleges also of key importance. 
Through the coordinated program of the Institute of Agricultural Sciences a large 
variety of courses of study are offered which prepare students for farming and ranch¬ 
ing and for professional careers in agricultural business, communications, conserva¬ 
tion, education, industry and research. 


JOHN MILLER 
Assistant Director 
Agricultural Extension Service 


68 












AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING STUDENTS learn how to work with various 
types of metals. 



STUDENTS LEARN to scrape hogs at the agricultural 
experiment station . 


■ 



MARGARET HARD is using a testing machine in the 
Home Economics department. 



LEONARD YOUNG 
Assistant to Director 
Washington Agricultural 
Experiment Stations 



MARGARET HARD 
Department Chairman 
Home Economics 
Experiment Station 



ROMEO LEGAULT 
Department Chairman 
Agricultural Chemistry 


69 





















I 



WALTER SLOCUM 
Deportment Chairman 
Rural Sociology 


H. S. TELFORD 
Department Chairman 
Entomology 


B. R. BERTRAMSON 
Department Chairman 
Agronomy 


Ag Students All 
Study Animals, 
Seeds, Bugs 
and Sociology 


THE STUDY OF INSECTS is beneficial to many students in the field of agriculture. 




STUDENTS IN AGRONOMY LAB CLASSES are shown how to weigh and test various types of grains. 


70 
















james McGinnis 

Department Chairman 
Poultry Science 



TWIN CALVES MAKE AN INTERESTING STUDY for students in animal husbandry. 


71 












JUNE ROBERTS 
Department Chairman 
Agricultural Engineering 



A. O. SHAW 
Department Chairman 
Dairy Science 



ELMER WORKING 
Department Chairman 
Agricultural Economics 



STUDENTS INTERESTED IN DAIRYING inspect the making of coffage cheese which is ladled out for inspection with a snow-like shovel. 


72 

















HOWARD BARLOW 
Director, 

Institute of Technology 



JOHN SPIELMAN 
Dean, 

College of Engineering 
and Mineral Techology 



W. C. AITKENHEAD 
Director, 

Mining Experiment Station, 
Industrial Research 


WSC Institute of Technology Aims 
At Area Industrial Needs 


Considered unique in its field in the Northwest, the WSC Institute of Technology aims 
at the industrial needs of this area. The eight different departments in the College of 
Engineering and Mineral Technology offer a wide variety of training to ready students 
for job opportunities available in each. Comprehensive model study of an East Pakis¬ 
tan dam and use of sawmill waste wood through manufacture of boards from left-over 
shavings and chips are two representative studies of the industrial research divisions. 
Extension services, allied with research, sponsors industrial short courses, conferences, 
publication of institute bulletins and newsletters and general extension work for the 
industries of the state. A grant this year by the Atomic Energy Commission has boosted 
plans for graduate training in nuclear fields. This AEC grant will now make possible 
laboratory work and research leading to the MS degree in nuclear engineering. The 
nuclear reactor building to house this area should be available for student use and 
research in the fall of 1958. 



WILLIAM KNIGHT 
Head, 

Technical Extension Services 



AN INSTRUCTOR IS DEMONSTRATING THE MODEL DAM IN ACTION, used by Civil Engineering majors for practical application. 


73 























THESE THREE INTENT INDIVIDUALS are using o microscopic photo device used in analysis of metal. 



GEORGE AUSTIN 
Department Chairman 
Chemical Engineering 


ATTIE BETTS 
Department Chairman 
Electrical Engineering 


DONALD MASSON 
Department Chairman 
Mining 


74 












E. B. MOORE 
Department Chairman 
Civil Engineering 


H. A. SORENSON 
Department Chairman 
Mechanical Engineering 


HARRY WELLER 
Department Chairman 
Architectural Engineering 


WSC Engineering Grads 
Received Their Diplomas, 
Declaring Them Slide Rule 
Masters of the Trade 


PICTURED IS AN EXAMPLE of a study in texture and strength. The architectural engineering 
students designed and developed such artistic models. 


75 
















ALBERT THOMPSON 
Dean 

College of Sciences and Arts 



T. H. KENNEDY 
Associate Dean 
College of Sciences and Arts 



ROGER RAY 
Associate Dean 
College of Sciences and Arts 



KEITH MONAGHAN 
Department Chairman 
Fine Arts 



KEMBLE STOUT 
Department Chairman 
Music 


Sciences and Arts Contribute 
To a Complete Education 

The State College program in liberal education concerns itself with man's 
origin and destiny, with the nature of the world in which man lives, and 
with the search for what is true and worthwhile in life. Therefore, a student 
in search of such an education would find himself in the College of Sciences 
and Arts. Music, philosophy, English, physics, history and anthropology, to 
mention only a few, are included in this vast educational program. This broad 
unit is a basic college at WSC, for all students have to have at least a few 
courses from the liberal arts area in order to graduate. This way the Col¬ 
lege of Sciences and Arts contributes knowledge to all students. An under¬ 
standing of cultural, intellectual and social aspects of life are essential in 
the world today, and we can receive these through this liberal arts program. 
With them we are educated; wrthout them we are somewhat less. 



WHILE IT SNOWS OUTSIDE , a music instructor gives lessons on the organ. 


76 



















GOVERNOR ROSELLINI TALKS WITH A STUDENT in chemistry lab as she conducts 
an experiment. 



PAUL ANDERSON 


Department Chairman 
Physics 



CHARLES CAMPBELL 
Department Chairman 
Geology 



77 


J. L. CULBERTSON 
Department Chairman 
Chemistry 


HERBERT EASTLICK 
Department Chairman 
Zoology 


SIDNEY HACKER 
Department Chairman 
Mathematics 



















ADOLPH HECHT 
Department Chairman 
Botany 


CHARLES SKINNER 
Department Chairman 
Bacteriology, Public Heolth 
(Deceased May 10, 1958) 


ARNE LINDBERG 
Department Chairman 
Foreign Languages 


All Sciences and 
Foreign Languages 
Work Together to 
Make Students Aware 
of Changing World 



113 


‘WL 


m 



LOOKING INTO A TYPICAL BOTANY LABORATORY , a graduate lab 
instructor points out special characteristics of leaves. 




WALLIS BEASLEY 
Department Chairman 
Sociology and Anthropology 


JAMES ELDER 
Department Chairman 
Psychology 


DONALD McCALL 
Department Chairman, Police 
Science and Administration 


78 

















H. V. ALWARD, JR. 
Coordinator 
Journalism 



LEWIS BUCHANAN 


Department Chairman 
English 


JUDSON CRANDELL 
Department Chairman 
Speech 




TESTING FOR HEARING is an important aspect of speech work with children. Janice Brake is trying to determine the quality of hearing the 
little girl has. 




PAUL BECKETT 
Department Chairman 
Political Science 


RAYMOND MUSE 


Department Chairman 
History 


DONALD WELLS 
Department Chairman 
Philosophy 



79 



















GOLDEN ROMNEY 
Dean of Physical Education 
Recreation and Athletics 



STAN BATES 
Director 

Intercollegiate Athletics 



HILDA ROBERTS 
Director 

School of Nursing 



ROBERTA FRASIER 
Department Chairman 
Child Development 



HELEN SMITH GLEN GALLIGAN 

Department Chairman Department Chairman 

Physical Education for Women Physical Education for Men 


Professional Schools Mean Work 
Familiar to Most Students 


The nightly transcription of shorthand notes . . . the veterinary student's anticipation 
as he prepares to perform his first operation . . . the weeks spent at Campus House 
learning the techniques of home management . . . the thoughts of the student in child 
development as she helps a small child walk . . . the conglomeration of musical sounds 
as one passes Agony hall . . . the education major's weekly observations . . . the ex¬ 
pression of the future homemaker as she looks at her lopsided cake . . . the pharmacy 
student as he learns to prepare prescriptions . . . the routine of physical examinations 
necessary for all men going into advanced ROTC . . . the business administration major 
as he struggles through his first semester of accounting — all these help to compose 
the wide field of professional schools familiar to most WSC students. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION develops many skills , among those is skill on the bars. 


80 





















UPPERCLASS STUDENTS in the School of Veterinary Medicine inspect the upper choppers 
of a silk/y-coated Irish Setter , who is not particularly interested in it at all. 



ERNEST STONE 
Dean, College of 
Veterinary Medicine 



SAM KENZY 
Department Chairman 
Veterinary Microbiology 



PAUL KLAVANO 
Department Chairman 
Veterinary Physiology and 
Pharmacology 



G. R. SPENCER 
Department Chairman 
Veterinary Pathology 


RICHARD OTT 
Department Chairman 
Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
and Surgery 


JON McCURDY 
Department Chairman 
Veterinary Anatomy 


81 
























EUGENE CLARK 
Dean, School of 
Economics and Business 



ANNE CORCORAN 
Department Chairman 
Secretarial Studies 



RALPH THAYER 
Department Chairman 
Economics 



R. D. TOUSLEY 
Department Chairman 
Business Administration 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJORS MUST LEARN the intricacies of an IBM machine in order 
to be experts in their field. It amazes the rest of us how anyone can figure them out at all! 



DRILL ON THE TYPEWRITERS fill the study hours of secretarial studies majors. By the end of their 
second typing course they know well that "Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of 
the party." 


82 






















IN AN ACTIVE MILITARY CLASS the chalkboard is being used to explain a military tactical maneu¬ 
ver. Time will tell whether or not these students will prove themselves in the challenging military 
life . 


Home-Cooked Meals Will Assist 
Active Military Husbands, WSC 
Home Economics Majors Assert 



VELMA PHILLIPS 
Dean 

College of Home Economics 



DELIGHT MAUGHAN 
Department Chairman 
Foods and Nutrition 



ELIVARA PARTIDA 
Department Chairman 
Textiles and Clothing 



GUSTAV BACHARACH 
Department Chairman 
Military Science and Tactics 



PAUL HELMICK 
Department Chairman 
Air Science and Tactics 



SELMA STREIT 
Department Chairman 
Institutional Economics 


83 





















ZENO KATTERLE 
Dean 

School of Education 



HAAKON BANG 
Dean 

School of Pharmacy 


Two Diverse Areas Help Make 
Professional Schools Respected 



AN INTRICATE PATTERN is formed by the necessary glassware in a Pharmacy laboratory. 



SO MANY OF US call June the end of our school year until September , but summer school looms ahead for many . 


84 


















MILITARY 















Air Force, Army Men 
Culminated Their Year 
With an Outstanding 
Federal Inspection Day 



AT FEDERAL INSPECTION MANY AWARDS were presented. Among 
the impressive decorating ceremonies was this, 
for the outstanding squad. 





AN ARMY INSPECTING GENERAL takes a close look at an ROTC 
student's rifle. The polishing and cleaning paid off for the student. 



FEDERAL INSPECTION CALLED MANY STUDENTS OUT OF CLASS to sit on the hill-side in the sun; 
they braved the heat for the bands and marching. 



COLONEL BACHARACH was called on to 
direct the Grand March at the 
Governor's Ball. 



AIR FORCE SPONSORS smartly salute for 
the inspecting crew of student and 
national officers. 


86 














ONE OF THE MOST GALA EVENTS OF THE YEAR, the Military Ball , drew to a close with 
midnight near. Uniformed men and formally attired women remembered this dance long after. 




DOWN THE RAMP for the long-awaited 
moment of turning in the uniform . . . 


THE BIG DAY IS OVER; it is time to take 
the uniform from the closet for the last 
time ... 



ENDING FOUR YEARS OF DUTY , Army 
Head Sponsor received scroll from 
Colonel Bacharach. 



EACH ARMY SPONSOR received a rose 
and recognition at Federal Inspection. 



WELL, thank heavens , till next year 
it's over . 


87 



















Life in Army ROTC 
Affects Collegians 

Deep in the college lives of hundreds of WSC men is their 
membership in the United States Army Reserve Officer 
Training corps. This unit prepares students for commissions 
in any branch of the Army through completion of four 
years of training. A selected group, this year numbering a 
dozen, were commissioned directly into the regular Army, 
thus placing this group of second lieutenants exactly on 
the same status as the West Point graduate. The WSC regi¬ 
ment this year numbered 840, with of course sophs and 
frosh in basic and advanced for upperclassmen. Both 
groups shared drills, called leadership laboratories/ 


DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN, MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS— 
Colonel Gustav Bacharach. 




OFFICERS—SEATED: Major Orr, Colonel Kennedy, Major Cowley. STANDING: Captain Boccella, Captain Loe, Captain Brown, 
Captain Alverson, Captain Johnston. 



88 
















Part-Time Soldiers 
Learn by Command 


Student leaders of the regimental staff truly run the cadet 
corps. These college men set up drill schedules. They com¬ 
mand and operate in detail the regimental cadet corps. 
These are the men who develop responsibility by planning 
the local program and executing it to fit precisely into the 
national goal of the United States Army. On campus stu¬ 
dent staff leaders exercise this responsibility through their 
battalion staffs. All preparations climax each year in tra¬ 
ditional Federal review and inspection. This May the in¬ 
specting group came from an Army corps in Fort Lawton, 
Seattle. 



REGIMENTAL STAFF—ROW 1: Richard Thompson, Joy Grotepas, 
Delmar Sisler. ROW 2: Don Moe, Lynn Fleming, Dick Asimus, Dale 
Petersen. 



FIRST BATTALION STAFF—ROW 1: Dick Jan¬ 
sen, Sharon Justice. ROW 2: Alan Barr, James 
Likes, Don Kachinsky. 


SECOND BATTALION STAFF—ROW 1: Leon 
Young, Sylvia Ormsby. ROW 2: Bob Miller, 
Bob Young, John Gilleland, Richard Smith. 


THIRD BATTALION STAFF—ROW 1: Darrell 
Presnell, Dahleen Dahl. ROW 2: Michael Har¬ 
vey, William Pixlee, David Stephenson. 



COMPANY COMMANDERS 1ST BATTALION COMPANY COMMANDERS 2ND BATTALION COMPANY COMMANDERS 3RD BATTALION 
—Darrell Hathaway, Roy Davis, Irwin Klundt. —Harvey Williams, King Kirk, Larry Fisher, —Pat O'Bryan, Alan Peter, Elwin Blair, Steve 

Noel Brown. Smith. 


89 




































DISTINGUISHED MILITARY STUDENTS — ROW 1: Lew Morris, Maurice Winter, Stephen Smith, Robert Miller, Donald Moe, Darrell Hathaway, Donald Hinrichs, Justin von 
Gortler, Delmar Sisler. ROW 2: Leonard Ralston, Harvey Williams, Richord Thompson, Richard Asimus, Michael Harvey, John Fosberg, Bruce Johnson, Ted Brown, Darrell 
Presnell. ROW 3: Roy Landes, Curtis Mohr, Frank Swanson, Elwin Blair, Noel Brown, Duane Bergevin, Richard Mercer, Alan Peter, Larry Butts. ROW 4: Lloyd Axtell, David 
Rosenquist, Richard Jansen, Lynn Fleming, King Kirk, Kaye Straight, Phillip Erdmonn, Dale Petersen. 



ROTC FLIGHT PROGRAM STUDENTS—Stephen Smith, Eugene Fisher, 
Leonard Ralstron, Jack MacPhee, Richard Mercer, Duane Bergevin. 


Army Finds Wings 
For Chosen Seniors 

This year marked innovation of a flight program as part 
of a broadened Army ROTC unit. This phase is limited to 
seniors who have passed a battery of tests, after having 
made application for the brand new program. Selection 
is made by the permanent staff, in consultation with the 
volunteer's academic department head. This extra-curricu¬ 
lar addition is conducted at the Pullman-Moscow airport 
under sub-contract to specialists of the Pullman-Moscow 
Flying service. It brings 35 hours of ground and 35 hours 
of flight instruction. It leads to a private pilot's license and 
opens the door to many special opportunities in the new 
Army. 



HR 

ARMY SPONSORS—ROW 1: Myrna Ball, Bonnie Noe, Arlene Knauss, Margie Haselton, Nancy Henricksen, Sylvia Ormsby, Dahleen Dahl, 
Mary Jett. ROW 2: Margaret Strachan, Carol Smith, Carol Johnson, Janet Keene, Joy Grotepas, Leanne Wood, Sharon Justice, Patty Nordquist. 


90 

















Band Music Sparks 
Wide Life Including 
Mastery of Rifles 



ARMY ROTC RIFLE TEAM — KNEELING: Harry Banan, Kenneth Ponti, Jerry Jensen, 
Richard Gibford. STANDING: Robert Grossman, Jack Wright, Larry Coppock, Roy 
Percival, Owen Purser, Henry Boccella. 



THE ARMY-AIR FORCE ROTC BAND, advised by Roger Torgerson, 
had a full year of playing for early morning drills and final review. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MILITARY ENGINEERS — ROW 1: John Tipple, Jerry Davis, Duane Bergevin, Bruce Johnson, Phillip Erdmann, Harold Shafer, Major Orr. ROW 2: 
Eugene Fisher, James Bricked, Grant Emigh, Robert Lean, Stanley Loreen, James Miller, Bob Gifford. ROW 3: Newton Clark, Doug Shaul, Dick Bertholf, David Irving, Thomas 
Doan, Janis Ikstrums, David Barclay, Don Labberton. 


91 





















SCABBARD AND BLADE MEMBERS — ROW 1: Kenneth Kennedy, Darrell Presnell, Dan Clem, Larry Butts, Willard Tissue, Michael Harvey, Norman Prewitt, Dale Petersen. 
ROW 2: Kay Straight, Richard Jansen, David Rosenquist, Harold Bucholz, Ron Strong, Norton Carlson, Lynn Fleming. ROW 3: Steve Smith, Robert Miller, Bill Bearse, Alan 
Peter, Franklin Leitz, Bruce Johnson, Curtis Mohr, Ralph Ostheller. 


Scabbard and Blade 
Has Proud History 


SCABBARD AND BLADE OFFICERS—Dale Petersen, Kenneth 
Kennedy, Bruce Johnson, Steve Smith. 


Beckoning selected men is invitation to the WSC company 
of the national Scabbard and Blade, honorary military fra¬ 
ternity open to juniors and seniors. The local unit is one of 
the nation's oldest. In conjunction with Arnold Air society 
it conducts the Military ball and the Military convocation. It 
selects and orients sponsors, and performs other campus 
services. 



SCABBARD AND BLADE PLEDGES—ROW 1: David Wilson, Chris Comstock, Maurice Winters, Jack Nagle, Karl Allgeier, Virgil Myers, Doug Lindley. ROW 2: Robert 
Wendt, Don Labberton, Alan Williamson, Richard Axelson, Janis Ikstrums, Mark Shuman, Cliff Martin, Tim Seth. ROW 3: Duane Christensen, Gary Higgins, Doug Shaul, 
Dick Jensen, Tom O'Hara, Dan Tompkins, Dale Erdelbrock, Roger Kvomme. 


92 















THE PERSHING RIFLE HONOR GUARD stands at attention for Major General 
Howze, Deputy Commanding General, Sixth U.S. Army, during inspection. 


Crack Drill Unit 
Hailed by Crowds 

Perfection is the goal of all men who join Per¬ 
shing Rifles. This company of freshmen and 
sophomores is under direction of upperclassmen. 
Precision drill is the goal and this is tested in area 
competition with other matching companies. At 
festivals and on campus the Pershings star. 



PERSHING RIFLE OFFICERS—ROW 1: Darrell Presnell, 
Richard Collins, Bonnie Noe. ROW 2: Douglas Shaw, 
Janice Ikstrums, Robert Tocher, Gary Storment. 



PERSHING RIFLE MEMBERS STAND AT "PARADE REST" while practicing under the guidance of adviser Captain Willard Alverson. 


93 








THE OPERATION OF A MACHINE GUN takes the attention of these basic military students. 



LOOK SHARP . . . 



FEEL SHARP ... 


BE SHARP . .. 



FOR INSPECTION .. . 




Start for Officers 
In "Leadership” Labs 


"STACK ARMS" was the command given by the company commander. 




Never in this life to be forgotten are the three hours per 
week invested in basic training in Army ROTC. Two hours 
in the classroom plus one hour of drill teaches at least the 
rudiments of many aspects of the military life. And eventu¬ 
ally about 40 per cent go on to commissions. 


M-7 RIFLES certainly can get dirty. 











THESE WSC MEN fix mortar on target during field operations. 


95 


Summer Soldiering 
Offers Dizzy Days 

Summer camp comes but once in the career of the ad¬ 
vanced Army ROTC student. Those crowded six weeks at 
Fort Lewis are memorable for being one day in the life of 
a private, with the next day's wheel of fate giving you 
officer responsibilities. You learn weapons, war and more. 


"UP IN THE AIR" go these summer camp trainees. 














Colonel Paul Helmick and Cadet Colonel John Price. 


Fine ROTC Program 
Due to Leadership 

The work and efficiency of the AF-ROTC program depends 
chiefly on the organization of two persons, the cadet 
colonel, who is a senior student in the AF-ROTC program, 
and the colonel, who is a regular member of the USAF. 
The colonel is responsible for the training of all cadets 
and delegates authority to the instructors of the four 
groups for class room instruction. The cadet colonel is re¬ 
sponsible for the instruction of the leadership lab, more 
commonly called "drill." The sergeants carry out the ad¬ 
ministrative duties of the wing. 



SERGEANTS—ROW 1: Harvey Godbey, John Gamble, Frank Morri¬ 
son. ROW 2: Gerald Bash, Kenneth Johnk, Earl Simmons. 







GROUP IV INSTRUTOR GROUP III INSTRUCTOR GROUP II INSTRUCTORS—Captain Carl GROUP I INSTRUCTORS—Major Richard 
Captain John Calhoun. Major William Sanford. Spaeth, Captain James Anderson. Seebach, Captain John Crocker, Captain 

John Phelan. 


96 












Staff\ Commanders 
Are Carefully Chosen 

It is the important duty of the cadet colonel to select the 
members of the wing staff for the school year while he 
is serving his term as cadet colonel. He also selects the 
group commanders. The members of the wing staff and 
the group commanders are carefully selected on the basis 
of the leadership, scholarship and character required for 
a fine Air Force officer. 



STAFF II—ROW 1: Reed Schoonover, Lloyd Mercer. ROW 2: Tom 
Tomtan, Bob Overstreet, Jerry Swain. 



STAFF III—ROW 1: Robert Mackechney, James Bell. ROW 2: Jerry 
Floyd, Stanley McClure, Mike Mason. 



STAFF IV—ROW 1: Richard Curtis, Gary Osborn. ROW 2: Robert 
Ganson, T. Stell Newman, Paul Maughan. 



STAFF V—ROW 1: Max Starkel. ROW 2: Dick Schaefer, Dave Jones, 
Mike Manring. 




WING STAFF—ROW 1: John Price, Gary Osborn, Lloyd Mercer. ROW 2: Gary Nelson, Raleigh 
Davis, James Bell, Jerry Swain. 


MEMBERS OF THE WING STAFF met 
often for informal discussions concern¬ 
ing their work. 


97 





Air Force Selects 
Outstanding Men 

The Air Force Rifle Team always makes a fine 
showing at the matches it enters in the area of 
the Inland Empire. The group is composed of fall 
volunteers, who are enrolled in AF-ROTC and 
are interested especially in rifle matches, both 
postal matches and shoulder-to-shoulder. The 
Air Force distinguished military students awards 
are carefully considered before the title is con¬ 
ferred. They are nominated in the spring of their 
junior year, are observed carefully at summer 
training and then are considered by the USAF 
headquarters for a regular commission, which 
means a career in the Air Force. This title is one 
of the finest that can be bestowed upon a mem¬ 
ber of the AF-ROTC advanced cadets. The Angel 
Flight is selected by Arnold Air Society, and is 
an auxiliary group to the Arnold Air Society. 
Their duties are to carry out the work of the 
cadet colonel in any way they may assist him. 



AIR FORCE RIFLE TEAM—ROW 1: Steven Frichette, Delbert Hanson, Larry Garri¬ 
son. ROW 2: Stan Sasaka, Alvis Cromer, Gary Eastep, John Herdrich, Michael 
Schwab, Michael De Groat, Paul Helmick. 



DISTINGUISHED MILITARY STUDENTS—Robert Mackechney, John Price, Stanley McClure, Bob Roetcisoender, Reed Schoonover. 


98 












ANGEL FLIGHT—ROW 1: Mary Lou McGee, Sally Jo Mattila, Connie LeGore, Karen Newby, Sharon Wilber, Gwen Zediker, Eunice Larson, 
Kathy Kanouse. ROW 2: Carolyn Nelson, Janet Chisholm, Sue Hicks, Marianne Bussanich, Margot Miller, Kathy Johnson, Linda Hayes, 
Anne Corliss. 


MEMBERS OF ANGEL FLIGHT enjoyed an in- SAN ANTONIO , TEXAS , Air Force 
formal inspection of Air Force equipment. flight training center , is pointed out. 



AIR FORCE SPONSORS inspect 
models of jet airplanes. 






IT WAS A HOT DAY , but some of the officers were able to stand in the shade , with the men at parade rest , prior to entering Roger's field. 


99 




















WITH SWINGING RIFLES , the spectacular Air Force drill team performed an intricate routine in the field house, preparing for 
Federal Inspection. 


Volunteers Form 
AF Drill Team 


One of the most spectacular events of the WSC 
academic year is Federal Inspection. It has many 
fine demonstrations in it, but one of the most 
enjoyable is when the Air Force drill team per¬ 
forms with its snappy precision drilling and in¬ 
tricate patterns of drill. The group is composed 
of volunteer members, mostly from the freshman 
and sophomore classes. This important division 
of the AF-ROTC wing is usually commanded by 
a junior in advanced training. 



OFFICERS OF THE DRILL TEAM led the group in their 
performance during Federal Inspection. 



PAUSING IN THEIR PRACTICING , the Air Force drill team had a minute to pose 
for a formal portrait. 


100 











ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY—ROW 1: Robert Ganson, Robert Mackechney, William Michael, Charles Scamahorn, Bob Roetcisoender, John Price, 
Max Starkel, Jerry Gunter. ROW 2: John Armstrong, Gerald Parlet, Mike Manring, Bob Koch, Jerry Swain, Glenn Aldrich. ROW 3: Dick 
Schaefer, Jay Archer, Frank Zahniser, Larry Garrison, Dave Bosse, David Jones, George Cooper, Don VanLeuven. 


Advanced Cadets 



AT A TEA HELD IN THEIR HONOR , five sponsors were presented with cerificates 
of honorary membership to Arnold Air Society . 


Form Honorary 

Arnold Air Society is a group, sometimes con¬ 
sidered an honorary, which carries out the so¬ 
cial functions of the Air Force wing. The Angel 
Flight works with the group in this capacity. The 
group is composed of cadets in the advanced 
division of the AF-ROTC program. The organ¬ 
ization is a voluntary one, not requiring a 
tapping by present members of the group. The 
Arnold Air Society members select the sponsors 
at various functions in the fall of each year. 



OFFICERS—ROW 1: Bob Roetcisoender, Max Starkel, 
John Price, Glenn Aldrich. ROW 2: Robert Mackechney, 
Robert Ganson, Gary Nelson. 


101 






























Camp 

Home 








104 



















MARRIED STUDENTS 


















Studying Books, 
Romping Children 
and Endless Moves 
Mean Married Life 


A FENCED YARD and swing is mom's best friend. 


NO FIDO WON'T BITE—not even if he does have a bone. 



LATE AFTERNOON . . . the sun still warm . . . parents, kids and pets on the back porch . . . that's married life. 



106 



























IT WAS TIME FOR POP to sell back his books and check on a few final grades. 




ENTERTAINING the pre-schoolers takes 
much of mom's time . 


A LIFE OF PACKING boxes 
and suitcases . . . 



WORKING MOTHERS all over the campus 
help husbands through. 



WHEN JUNIORS' SICK the joys of married 
life fade. 



AND MOVING VANS are integral part 
of married student's life. 


107 




















Wives Create 
Fine Atmosphere 


The wives of married students were often glad 
they had close neighbors, for while husbands 
studied and children slept, it was fun to get 
together with the other temporarily "deserted" 
wives. The quiet hours in the homes could be long 
ones, but the women decided they wouldn't 
trade it for any other life in the whole world. 



VERN LARSON AND HIS WIFE, RUBY, enjoy an evening 
playing "Clue, the Mystery Game" with 
Grace and Art Filion. 



GERALD AND JOAN STAIRS pose on a corner daveno in their home with their 
boy, Kevin, and girl, Karen. 



MIKE ALMAN IS INTERESTED in the family parakeet , Dickie Bird, as parents Jack and Betty Almon supervise. They are visiting with 
neighbors, Dick and Polly Perkins, who are seated at the left of the picture. 

















THE MEN HELD THE CHILDREN ON THE FLOOR while the 
wives relaxed on the couch. Pictured are Michael, Michall 
John and Barbara Hander; David, Greg, and 
Ellen Sundberg. 



THE JOHN CRAMBLIT FAMILY, children Doug and Jeff, wife 
Phyllis and John have a good time in their 
Fairway apartment. 



SEATED ON THE TRAILER HOUSE SOFA are Jim, Donna, and Kenny David¬ 
son, Barbara and Everett Bottemiller. Mike Davidson and Jack Bottemiller play 
with blocks on the floor of the trailer. 



THE JAROS AND HUMPHREYS get together for a picture-taking session. Left to right are DeAnn, Bruce, Joyce, and Mark Jaros, Mary, 
Kathleen, and Alvin Humphrey. 

109 


















WHO OWNS THE NORTONS' '57 MG? Looks as if it may be Kim who 
claims it, with Lou and Dee taking a back seat. Not so for neighbors 
Mooney and Dick Curtis, who have their '57 Austin-Healey all 
to themselves. 

Informal Get-togethers 
Give Welcome Break 
in Everyday Routine 



THE LOVELYS AND FISHERS are pictured with their respective off¬ 
spring: Bob and Mardel Lovely with Debra; Janice, Wayne, and 
Paris Fisher. 



KAREN MAUGHAN HAS BURNED HERS, but Judy and Will Law- 
ton, and Paul Maughan have kept their marshmallows the 
right color! 



MR. AND MRS. LEE BENNETT entertain the Wards one evening . Pictured from left to right are Della Ward, Lee, Chris , and Gail Bennett , 
Jack and Giz Ward . 


no 


















THE JONASES AND SANDBERGS enjoy a gome of Srabble. Pictured ore 
Doug and Janette Jonas and Lee and Joann Sandberg, whose daughter 
Cindy was born in February. 



TWO COUPLES enjoy putting snapshots in a scrapbook. They are Keith 
and Ralene Wilson, Donna and Dave Jones. 



A COFFEE TABLE served as a base for a jig-saw puzzle as Joan and Tom 
Opstad assisted young Tommy. 



AN APARTMENT ON MYRTLE STREET was busy with activity 
as the Swains and Liptacs spent an evening together. Pictured 
are Jerry and Janice Swain, with their baby Debbie, and the 
Liptacs, Larry and Joyce. 



THE WILLIAM BROWNS, William and Denise, Terrie and Sherry, 
spend a quiet evening in their South Fairway home. 


Ill 

















608 AND SHIRLEY GROSSMAN join Dick and Marilyn Thompson 
with Admiraletta very much in the pic. 



SCOTT, DON, ANNE, JANE and Bobby Kissenger enjoy a joke 
put over by little Bobby. 



TED AND FRANCES FILER entertain Joe and Jay Russell in 
their trailer home. 



BILL AND BEV DOBLER are opponents at bridge, but join to entertain 
Charlotte and Paul Homes. 


112 


RALPH AND DELORES HOSELEY gather with Pat Nelson, baby Loma Sue, Bernie and Larry Kobe and John Nelson for Chinook picture. 















THE BURKE AND MAGORTY BABIES SEEM TO BE THE TALKERS of the families, to the amusement of their parents. On the left are John, Marilyn 
and Cameron Burke. Their visitors are Anne, Jerry and Sheila Magorty. 


These Students 
Studied, Kept House 
in Fairway, New 
Terrace and Off- 
Campus Apartments 



THE FRASIERS AND THE CLEVELANDS LOOK OVER A 1957 CHINOOK 
at the Clevelands' homey basement apartment. At left are Cline and 
Gretchen Frasier, at right, Phil and Sandy Cleveland. 


A UKELELE, COFFEE AND COOKIES seem to be the entertainment and refreshments for an informal get-together for three married couples. 
From left to right are Bob and Celesta Beardslee, Virg and Pat Weld, and Jo, Dick and Ricki Anderson, who seems enthralled by his dad's 
talent. 











REMINISCING OVER A WEDDING ALBUM are Chuck and Jo Klarich and Mona and Lynn Fleming. The two couples occupy apartments in 
the new married students' buildings, located north of campus and noted for their modern decor. 



Baby Buggies, Tricycles 



THE UPTAGRAFFTS ENJOY THEIR EVENING MEAL in their Fairway 
apartment. From left to right are Sandie Lynn, Shirley, Burnell and 
Debbie Ann. 


TELEVISION AND AN INFORMAL GET-TOGETHER on a Sunday 
evening are a pleasant time for Hal and Evelyn Bertilson, Barbara 
and "Cook" Bradford. 


THE CHAMBERLAINS , ROBISONS AND DARTS GET TOGETHER FOR COFFEE at the Dart home. Jim and Anne Chamberlain bring their 
daughter , Shari, to visit with Judy and Ernie Robison and Betty and Elwood Dart. They agree that Betty's coffee is just right. 
















WOMEN STUDENTS 



115 







Coeds Remember 
Lengthy Phone Chats, 
Social Affairs, Informal 
Rough-housing 



SENIOR GIRLS FROM ALL OVER CAMPUS were invited to the annual 
Rose Breakfast given by the girls of the AGD sorority. 



THE LAMBDA CHI WATERMELON BUST provided excitement and 
prizes for all who attended. 



HAPPILY BRAVING THE WIND, the girls of Gamma Phi Beta join their president and a prominent alumnae in the first step to a new house. 




WITH SENIOR TESTS BARELY OVER, she 
found it was time to start final packing. 


THIS WAS HER REWARD for being late 
last Thursday night. Darn social campusesI 

116 



















SOMETIMES IT'S HARD TO HEAR WHAT THE 
around and offer advise and gems of wisdom. 



DADS AND DAUGHTERS enjoy dinner on 
Dads' Day Weekend. 


BOYFRIEND SAYS when the girls gather 



"I GOT ALL THIS IN coming over? It seems 
as if cars are getting smaller. 


117 



SPRING SUN brought forth ambitions for 
tennis and wearing Burmudas. 



f j 

EACH RUFFLE must be pressed just right 
for that all important dance date. 



A SNAP OF THE FINGERS seems to give 
the right feeling for this record break. 
































Alpha Chi Omega 

Under the guidance of a "real wonderful" new 
housemother, the teamwork of the women of 
Alpha Chi Omega again paid real dividends as 
they walked off with another place in the Home¬ 
coming float contest. With such a fine start it 
seemed nothing could go wrong for these gals 
as things continued their way in the form of a 
rapid succession of honors, parties, exchanges 
and dances. 



•HM 


PRESIDENT CHERYL REMLEY chats for a minute with her officers after chapter. 


ROW 1: 

Joan Bare 
Elaine Bartels 
Ann Blake 
Laura Cheatham 
Pattie Chishalm 
Jane Church 


ROW 2: 

Anne Carliss 
Elizabeth Crady 
Sue Fairbanks 
Kris Felber 
Bobby Greenlee 
Mary Ellen Hardenberg 


ROW 3: 
Nancy Haworth 
Sharan Hickey 
Georgia Horley 
Sandra Leyda 
Judy Miller 
Dana Noble 


ROW 4: 

Judy Noble 
Danna Olsen 
Edra Olson 
Anita Pinkerton 
Betsy Prince 
Mari-jean Purcell 


ROW 5: 
Carolyn Quaife 
Margy Quaife 
Cheryl Remley 
Bonnie Ross 
Brenda Soderquist 
Tanis Sonstelie 


ROW 6: 

Jan Tegler 
Sue Terry 
Marjorie Werkau 
Barbara Westby 
Sharon Woerner 
Gail Woodward 



118 




























PRESIDENT JACKIE DOXON watches girls match wits in bridge game. 


Alpha Delta Pi 

"Hold on!" "Don't hang up!" These were familiar 
words to those calling the Alpha Delta Pi house 
at the beginning of the year. The problem was 
solved by the pledges, however, as they pre¬ 
sented the members with a new, workable door¬ 
knob for the phone booth as a Christmas gift. 
The members retaliated by giving the pledges 
nightgowns, and a party was held for all 
concerned. 



ROW 1: 

Mrs. Mel Rutherford 
Aaren Agee 
Lexie Atkinson 
Alice Auvil 
Gail Barrett 


ROW 2: 
Hazel Bourgett 
Donna Braaten 
Florence Braun 
Dixie Davis 
Jackie Doxon 


ROW 3: 

Betty Ehrig 
Elizabeth Harris 
Susan Hooper 
Jane Hutchinson 
Ann Kaylor 


ROW 4: 

Joy Keeney 
Mary Lu Livesay 
Caryl Mattson 
Marlene Mitchell 
Elizobeth Perry 


ROW 5: 

Marjean Reid 
Beatrice N. Riggins 
Myrna Roberts 
Janyce Treadwell 
Donna Welch 


119 


















Alpha Gamma Delta 

Performing their version of "Jack and the Water¬ 
melon Seed / 7 the AGD pledges won the skit 
trophy for the second year in the Lambda Chi 
Watermelon contest. Highlights of the Christmas 
season were the annual fireside and the kiddies 7 
party at which Santa Claus was present. The 
oddest meeting was held on Turnabout Day 
when members became pledges. 



THESE GIRLS SEEM PLEASED with snack being served by President Jean Hedman. 


ROW 1: 
Joyce Aamot 
Mary Adams 
Kathy Barbo 
Virginia Brown 
Noel Dalgardno 
Marilyn Daly 
Elsie Dawson 


ROW 2: 
Dixie Drake 
Marilyn Evans 
Caapi Ferrand 
Connie Ferro 
Glenda Geib 
Gayle Griffin 
Carol Hadley 


ROW 3: 

Dee Ann Hanford 
Jean Hedman 
Carol Henrie 
Charlotte Hublou 
Doris Jacklin 
Pat Knowles 
Jonette Margaretich 


ROW 4: 

Gloria Mathewson 
Janice McBride 
Denis McCormick 
Angeline Moore 
Monica Moore 
Charene Pauley 
Bea Peterson 


ROW 5: 
Katherine Pettit 
Mary Pettit 
Judy Repp 
Ruth Rudd 
Linda Scheldt 
Sharon Schmick 
Sharon Simpson 


ROW 6: 

Judy Snowberger 
Salli Soderberg 
Mary Suhadolnick 
Marilyn Tuten 
Annette Vandeveer 
Annette Weissenborn 
Nancy Williams 


ROW 7: 
Barbara Wilson 



120 
































PRESIDENT BEV DALSTONE enjoys a before-bedtime coffee break 
with other Alpha Phis. 


Alpha Phi 

The Alpha Phi house was honored this year to 
have two queen finalists. One, Janine Fike, was 
a Homecoming finalist and the other, Kathy 
Janes, was a runner up in the Phi Sig's Moon¬ 
light Girl contest. The pledge dance, which fea¬ 
tured the theme "Go Native," was a big success. 



ROW 1: 

Kari Benterud 
Sylvia Blair 
Barbara Boye 
Janet Cams 
Virginia Casperson 
Jicki Castle 
Sharon Courrier 


ROW 2: 
Jaunita Cronin 
Beverly Dalstone 
Judy Dodge 
Nikki Edwards 
Ellen Elterich 
Roberta Faithful 
Janine Fike 


ROW 3: 
Sharon Fritts 
Marie Gawne 
Sheila Gawne 
Toni Harig 
Claudia Hartley 
Mary Hathorn 
Patty Hofer 


ROW 4 : 

Kathy Janes 
Jonelyn Johnson 
Cathy Johnson 
Marilyn Larsen 
Barbara Lawson 
Jeanne Lindgren 
Marilyn Mason 


ROW 5: 

Virginia Ann Nelson 
Alayne Beach Noble 
Pat O'Dell 
Edith Olds 
Betty Plymale 
Sue Powell 
Dorothy Reese 


ROW 6 : 

Faye Rigsby 
Barbara Roberts 
Floring Rothrock 
Linda Scheldrup 
Jean Siegenthaler 
Arlene Stack 
Jan Thompson 


ROW 7: 
Marcia Travis 
Dorothy Weke 
Carolyn Werner 


121 




































Chi Omega 

The Chi O's started the year by having two Queen 
finalists, Pat Nordquist, Harvest Ball and Judy 
Hanson, Pi Kappa Alpha, with Lynn Van Doren 
Queen of the Engineer's Ball. In Activities the Chi 
O's held the Intermural Debate trophy and Sandi 
Whitney was elected G-PAR vice president. The 
climax of the year was a spring formal, "Club 
Flamingo." 



WITH CHRISTMAS COMING , President Linda Root and others get prepared. 


ROW 1: 

Mary Actor 
Marilyn Andersen 
Carolyn Bailey 
Pauline Bodell 
Lois Botting 
Janet Bowler 


ROW 2: 

Judy Burns 
Rosemary Burns 
Margery Carpenter 
Elaine Crossland 
Rosemary Dahlquist 
Joy Davidson 


ROW 3: 
Jackie Deering 
Judy Elmquist 
Sue Falk 
Jo Ann Gettles 
Diana Giles 
Barbara Girsh 


ROW 4: 

Judy Hanson 
Judy Hohannesen 
Darlene Jones 
Margaret Jones 
Sue Larsen 
Gail Leeright 


ROW 5: 

Linda Lindstrom 
Shirley Morris 
Pat Nordquist 
Barbara Nyberg 
Judy Osborn 
Georgia Porter 


ROW 6: 
Linda Root 
Sue Ryan 
Sharon Sievers 
Betty Lou Toth 
Lynn Van Doren 
Lynn Walden 


ROW 7: 

Jan Weber 
Sandra Whitney 


122 























COMMUNITY'S PRESIDENT, VIRGINIA MILLER, takes a book from the hall's case. 


Community 

Proud were the girls when they learned that 
lovely Toula Karaioannoglou, an exchange stu¬ 
dent from Greece, was to be a Homecoming 
princess. December brought still another finalist 
when Diane Poppe was selected as one of the 
five for Sweetheart of Sigma Chi. These dances 
were followed by their own successful "Crystal 
Cotillion." 



ROW 1: 

Anna Ajirogi 
Charlotte Aucutt 
Larraine Bayless 
Claud ia Bibbi ns 
Margaret Bloam 
Jean Common 


ROW 2: 

Sharan Campbell 
Marilyn Carstens 
Judy Champlin 
Carlene Combs 
Judy Egan 
Colleen Eisner 


ROW 3: 
Barbara Fair 
Gretchen Gaiser 
Grace Ganey 
Judy Griswold 
Joy Grotepas 
Mary Hedges 


ROW 4: 

Jean Helland 
Janice Hewitt 
Dorothy Hibben 
Winona Hurford 
Carol Jacklin 
Sally Jensen 


ROW 5: 

Elizabeth Johnson 
Laureen Johnson 
Sandra Kann 
Toula Karaioannoglou 
Mona Lake 
Gale Lamberson 


ROW 6; 
Kay Lane 
Inez La Rue 


123 




























Community 

In the spring. Community girls held the tradi¬ 
tional scholarship dinner and honored all those 
with a three point and over with flowers. Special 
recognition was given to those receving campus 
honors through offices and activities. This year 
Rosemarie VanWinkle served ably as their Spur 
to complete their year with honors. 



A GROUP OF GIRLS takes a break from studying to view the favorite of TV shows. 


ROW 1: 

Dorothy Lentes 
Marlys Lindquist 
Nancy Litchfield 
Carol Anne May 
Virginia Miller 
Mona Joyce Monroe 


ROW 2: 
Phyllis Moore 
Gail Morgan 
Louise Morse 
Evelyn Mull 
Jeannie Nelson 
Judy Nelson 


ROW 3: 
Sandra Nichols 
Noncy Nye 
Karen Pickett 
Arlene Prince 
Terry Riley 
Kay Ringo 


ROW 4: 

Jean Rollo 
Diane Ross 
Donna Ross 
Barbara Scheibner 
Carol Schmedding 
Carol Schuster 


ROW 5: 

Carol Sheffels 
Mary Smasne 
Marilyn Stauffer 
Pat Swanson 
Jerri Temples 
Maureen Tilley 


ROW 6: 

Rose Marie VanWinkle 
Sandra Wilcox 



124 


























DAVIS HALL'S PRESIDENT , SANDI SCHOLL , goes over the council's agenda . 


Davis 

Highlighting the Davis hall activity calendar for 
this year were the all-campus coffee hours held 
after each of the home games. The popular 
Christmas season was climaxed by a pajama 
breakfast, and to finish off the year, the girls 
presented their annual spring formal, a most 
wonderful dance for all. 



ROW 1: 

Dorothy Anderson 
Sally Anderson 
Susan Anderson 
Gail Applegate 
Nancy Bagott 
Donna Balcom 
Freddy Bates 


ROW 2; 

Caro! Bergstresser 
Bonnie Blossom 
Mary Alice Brewer 
Carolyn Burrows 
Dawn Cairncross 
Carol Clark 
Nancy Clayberg 


ROW 3: 

Barbara Comfort 
Louise Conant 
Karen Condy 
Paula Corcoran 
Nancy Cotton 
Hellon Davis 
Francis de Jong 


ROW 4: 

Kay Delany 
Luellen De Moise 
Janneke de Vos 
Sandra Donohue 
Barbara Doty 
Janet Dragoo 
Beverly Durand 


ROW 5: 
Harriet Durand 
Kathy Everham 
Margo Fitts 
Virginia Franklin 
Willa Franzen 
Kay Frederickson 
Karen Freter 


ROW 6: 
Barbara Fry 
Judy Gilbert 
Nancy Gradwohl 
Laura Greene 
Anne Gyllenberg 
June Hannah 
Barbara Hansen 


ROW 7: 

Mary Ellen Harvey 
Janet Hawkins 
Kay Hawks 


125 
































Davis 

The girls of Davis hall were especially proud 
of several of their girls this year, among them 
Vickie Ball, a Harvest Ball finalist. Chris Heath 
was another girl of honor. She was selected as 
one of the representatives to the model U.N., 
while Carolyn Koeppen served on Sophomore 
Executive Council. 



TELEVISION AND STUDYING is combined by Davis girls, as they view Jerry Lewis . 


ROW 1: 
Christine Heath 
Marilyn Hodgson 
Frances Hrdina 
Erna Humes 
Betty Johnson 
Beverly Johnson 
Linda Johnson 


ROW 2: 

Lois Johnston 
Jane Kennedy 
Carolyn Koeppen 
Leanne Korsgaard 
Eunice Larson 
Orene Little 
Laura Lofgren 


ROW 3: 

Peggy Long 
Andrea Lorer 
Jerry Losk 
Lois McCasland 
Anita Mercier 
Layne Miller 
Lois Montgomery 


ROW 4: 

Barbara Nainmy 
Nancy Paup 
Jo Ann Petersen 
Nancy Pierson 
Janice Poage 
Lorilee Powers 
Janet Reardon 


ROW 5: 

Helen Reilly 
Janice Reinbald 
Dolores Richard 
Virginia Roberts 
Mary Jane Rogers 
Joanne Rufener 
Carol Stevens 


ROW 6: 

Judy Streib 
Lorna Taylor 
Ann Tennant 
Pat Tomazin 
Sue Utterback 
Nancy Wingfield 
Nancy Ziegler 



OFF CAMPUS GIRLS 
Annette Bienek 
Shirlee Bostic 
Karen Cass 
Margaret Jacquat 
Lorene Larsen 
Deanna Miller 
Ruth Yates 

126 































THE HOLIDAY SEASON brought many attractive cards for 
Ann Shepherd , president. 


Delta Delta Delta 

This year, which is a custom at Christmas, the 
Tri-Delts had a "Pine Tree Party" for the chil¬ 
dren of the alums. The annual Pansy breakfast 
in the spring honoring graduating seniors is 
another traditional function sponsored by the 
Tri-Delt house. They hope to make a habit of 
winning the Dad's Day sign contest as they did 
this year. 



ROW 1: 
Dana Alsworth 
Kathy Argano 
Linda Brandt 
Sherry Brandt 
Judy Burton 
Judy Cain 


ROW 2: 
Sharon Christy 
Carolyn Crews 
Deanna Dillon 
Carin Fenton 
Jan Ficke 
Susan Flottman 


ROW 3: 

Pat Ganson 
Nancy Geloneck 
Melinda Harmon 
Marilyn Harris 
Nancy Henrickson 
Pat Kadow 


ROW 4: 

Nancy Livesay 
Billie Jo Lusk 
Phyllis Marcy 
Ann Mason 
Sally Matilla 
Roberto Michlitch 


ROW 5 : 

Betty Nelsen 
Camille Nelson 
Nola Nold 
Mary Kay Patterson 
Patty Pirkey 
Mary Schutzman 


ROW 6: 

Ann Shepherd 
Linda Stroud 
Barrie Sulgrove 
Margie Swanson 
Jerrie Valen 
Mary Vatnsdal 


ROW 7: 
Elizabeth Wentz 
Mary Wigen 
Melisse Wilcox 
Agnes Zimmerman 


127 





















Delta Gamma 

Delta Gamma was fortunate this year, as 
several girls held important campus offices. 
Among these were ASSCW secretary. Mortar 
Board president, YWCA treasurer and Panhel- 
lenic vice-president. The year was completed 
socially with the "Mardi Gras" pledge dance, 
the barn-dance and the annual Rose Debut 
Formal. 



A GROUP OF DG'S TALK over a forthcoming dance with their 
president , Marilyn Jenkins. 


ROW 1: 

Jeanette Anderson 
Erlene Barnes 
Connie Bauer 
Linda Beckett 
Judy Blount 
Lois Boleraski 
Jane Booker 


ROW 2: 

Tekla Brady 
Sharon Brandt 
Carolyn Burke 
Janet Cochrane 
Dianne Crosby 
Dahleen Dahl 
Barbara Doutrich 


ROW 3: 

Sonia Fraki 
Judy Fraser 
Marilyn Fry 
Deanna Hawker 
Sally Holcomb 
Judy Humphrey 
Sue Jacobson 


ROW 4: 
Marilyn Jenkins 
Carmen Johnson 
Wendy Joy 
Janet Knutsen 
Connie Le Gore 
Anita Marshall 
Marilyn Marshall 


ROW 5: 

Suzanne Metcalf 
Nancy Nugent 
Karen Olsen 
Colleen Pflugmacher 
Lill Piene 
Alice Richardson 
B. J. Rohrer 


ROW 6: 

Janet Schneider 
Dixie Shaffer 
Sherran Simmons 
Sally Sparks 
Carol Swanson 
Nancy Thomas 
Pat Trueblood 


ROW 7: 
Sally Weeks 



















128 


























Delta Zeta 

Due to the lack of snow, from Pullman's extra- 
mild winter, the Delta Zeta's had to call off their 
annual snowball fight with the Delta Sigma Phi 
men. However, the winter season did hold some 
special moments for the women of Phi chapter, 
as they presented their annual pledge and 
winter formal. 



ROW It 

Alberta Andrews 
Judy Bogan 
Virginia Buch 
Kathy Crowford 
Sharon Glover 


ROW 2: 

Pat Hamma 
Pat Hogarty 
Janet Murken 
Phyllis Pattison 
Luree Romain 


ROW 3: 

Sonia Sager 
Kaye St. Germain 
Rusty Shepherd 
Mildred Shields 


PICTURED HERE ARE THE DELTA ZETA MEMBERS who got together to label and sort their house records. 


129 















Duncan Dunn 

This year the Duncan Dunn girls tried something 
different when they built their float —they built 
it in their living room. It proved to be successful. 
The faculty was honored at the annual faculty- 
guest dinner. An array of stars glistened in Dun¬ 
can Dunn to lend atmosphere for their winter 
formal, "Christmas Dream." 



MUSICALLY INCLINED IS PAT WESTBROOK, president, who plays for other girls. 


ROW 1: 

Joan Ankeny 
Loretta Anderson 
Marilyn Andrews 
Edith Arnold 
Georgia Backus 
Louina Belaire 
Patricia Bell 


ROW 2: 

Pat Berg 
Donna Braun 
Linda Bruce 
Merlie Burton 
Annetta Cordes 
Patricia Deal 
Carol Douglass 


ROW 3: 

Mary Drake 
Harriet Dressier 
Virginia Evons 
Judy Gaffney 
Margie Gill 
Gloria Goodwin 
Wilma Goossen 


ROW 4: 

Jane Graef 
Carolyn Granston 
Melvena Hair 
Sally Halsey 
Pat Hanning 
Joan Hansen 
Polly Hartman 


ROW 5: 

Judy Hattenburg 
Mary Hennessy 
Janice Henry 
Sandra Holbein 
Rose Ann Hosier 
Judy Hurley 
Key Jaekel 


ROW 6: 
Karen Johnson 
Dareatha Jones 
Naomi Kainu 
Alberta Kary 
Joan Kingston 
Sandra Kirby 
Greta Kyle 


ROW 7: 

Linda Lazzar 
Janet Leman 
Marilyn Landsley 



130 


not? 




































DESKS SEEM TO HAVE OTHER PURPOSES than studying—playing cards, 
for example. 


Duncan Dunn 

Mom's Weekend was the scene of gaiety as 
moms and daughters enjoyed a rolicking paja¬ 
ma party. Japanese lanterns glowing on the 
Duncan Dunn terrace helped bring the year to 
a close as they announced the girls' spring dance, 
"Spring Fever." All helped to make a wonder¬ 
ful year for the girls and their new house mother, 
Mrs. Lucille Nelson. 



ROW 1: 
Maureen Lipsett 
Wilma Loudon 
Mary Louis 
Margie Martini 
Betty Matheson 
Camilla Matthiesen 
Nancy Mattison 


ROW 2: 

Kitty McDonald 
Rosemary McDonald 
Mary Me Peak 
Laura McVicker 
Phylis Meyer 
Margo Miller 
Charlotte Montgomery 


ROW 3: 
Doris Nelson 
Maria Nelson 
Kiyoko Nishi 
Susie Olson 
Arlene Pehrson 
Billie Pope 
Ellen Reimann 


ROW 4: 
Marie Ribanyi 
Marta Riddell 
Doris Ridpath 
Roberta Roberts 
Janet Ruud 
Alice Saari 
Joyce Schell 


ROW 5: 

Margie Schmidt 
Suzy Shen 
Joyce Sherwood 
Dixie Smith 
Jean Smith 
Georgene Steigner 
Karen Sorgenfrei 


ROW 6: 

Betty Tegner 
Karolyn Unger 
Joanne Viele 
Kathleen Walton 
Mary Weiss 
Pat Westbrook 
Lucille Whitten 


ROW 7: 

Barbara Wiswall 
Elaine Widmer 


131 
























Gamma Phi Beta 

The Gamma Phi's started the year with a Hallo¬ 
ween fireside and pledge dance. Besides social 
activities, they were happy to hear that the Spur 
president. Yell Queen, and three queen finalists 
were among them. They ended their successful 
year with the annual Pink Carnation Formal. 



ARRANGING HOLIDAY DECORATIONS is fun for Carolyn Nelson, president, 
and others. 


ROW 1: 

Ann Aldrich 
Ann Bradford 
Dorothy Cameron 
Janet Chisholm 
Diane Douglas 
Jane Elder 


ROW 2: 
Judith Pelch 
Pat Feltis 
Paula Findley 
Martha Gorrill 
Twila Hokanson 
Janet Keene 


ROW 3: 
Helen Krook 
Sue LeFor 
Amy Lombard 
Corinne Lyle 
Sue Marsh 
Betty McCorkle 


ROW 4: 

Sharon McGinnis 
Sylvia Morse 
Carolyn Nelson 
Karen Newby 
Patricia Osborn 
Judy Partington 


ROW 5: 
Carol Pavlic 
Ann Pickard 
Myrna Pierson 
Patricia Purdon 
Ann Regan 
Beverly Roberts 


ROW 6: 

Mary Ann Rygg 
Ann Schulthess 
Martha Shefhamer 
Vesta Gayle Simanton 
Sue Slater 
Eileen Stoneroad 


ROW 7: 

Judy Stoneroad 
Margaret Strachan 
Jean Svinth 
Donna Wieland 
Evelyn Wiles 


132 






























PRESIDENT NATALIE JOHNSON and others going to do practice teaching in 
Spokane and Moses Lake enjoy a going-away party given by members. 


Kappa Alpha Theta 

Out of fairyland and into the hearts of the 
Homecoming crowd came a huge orange pump¬ 
kin coach drawn by nine lovely Theta pledges 
in white formals. Each held a wooden horse's 
head and galloped along in precise rhythm. Led 
by two royal coachmen in black, they accepted 
the first place trophy, to prove "Victory with the 
Golden Coach." 



ROW 1: 
Elaine Billings 
Lynn Brislawn 
Barbara Brunton 
Joanne Bury 
Karen Coffin 
Linda Coffin 


ROW 2: 

Nancy Corcoran 
Annabelle Dizmang 
Joan Eckles 
Sandra Gillette 
Joane Henning 
Jane Henry 


ROW 3: 
Joanne Henry 
Kay Henry 
Marilyn Horton 
Natalie Johnson 
Eleanor Katterle 
Arlys Landerholm 


ROW 4: 

Audrey Lane 
Carol Lemon 
Annie Claire Malingre 
Marilyn Mashburn 
Catherine Mattson 
Mary Lou McGee 


ROW 5: 

Catherine Monroe 
Barbara Morgan 
Jean Oestreich 
Mary Oestreich 
Jean Parsons 
Ann Rebillard 


ROW 6: 
Gene Rebillard 
Becky Sieveke 
Susan Sieveke 
Janet Schuster 
Shannon Silzel 
Leona Skinner 


ROW 7: 

Susan Stoffel 
Shirley Van Dusen 
Lynne Wagener 
Jeanne Whitehouse 


133 
























Kappa Delta 

The KD's started their year with a sock hop fire¬ 
side. They knew it was Halloween when trophies 
disappeared, but felt better after winning the 
Sophomore Tolo trophy for the second consecu¬ 
tive year. Sea Dreams was the theme of the 
winter pledge dance, and the year was rounded 
off with the spring formal. 



A PIANO IS ENJOYED BY JOAN ANDERSON , president , as well as the 
Kappa Delta singers. 


ROW 1: 
Betty Ackert 
Marcelle Ames 
Joan Anderson 
Carol Armitage 
Gwen Bendele 
Virginia Biddle 


ROW 2: 

Sharon Burwell 
Pat Clement 
Joanne Daugherty 
Charlotte Fray 
Marylyn Gaiser 
Karen Getschmann 


ROW 3: 
Nancy Horschel 
Betsy Jones 
Sharon Konicek 
Karen Lindblom 
Judith Long 
Carol Lucas 


ROW 4: 
Cecile Mech 
Morge Mount 
Jackie Olmsted 
Sandra Payne 
Susan Pederson 
Judy Price 


ROW 5: 
Peggy Raun 
Marylu Ross 
Linda Russell 
Marilyn St. Clair 
Betty Schiller 
Betta Sharp 


ROW 6: 
Marcia Shelby 
Ingrid Smids 
Pat Smith 
Barbara Soley 
Priscilla Stanton 
Doris Vollmer 


ROW 7: 

Helen Williamson 
Pat Woody 


134 

























STUDENT TEACHING IN SPOKANE are Kappa president , Betty Me Lean, and 
roomie , Carol Anderson. 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 


The golden key this year opened more doors 
of opportunity for the Kappas. They again took 
highest scholastic honors on campus. Carol 
Smith, selected Phi Sig Moonlight Girl, and 
Libby Rodgers, elected Spur of the Moment, led 
their list of queen candidates. 



ROW 1: 

Anne Adams 
Carol Anderson 
Judy Anderson 
Dorothy Bergh 
Marilyn Brown 
Betsy Colburn 
Mercedes Crabb 


ROW 2: 

Rena Dixon 
Ann Faulkner 
Astrid Dunlap 
Jeanne Fitzgerald 
Mary Forslund 
Nancy Freitag 
Martha Funk 


ROW 3: 

Radell Gadd 
Sandra Grant 
Sara Harris 
Mary Hasbrouck 
Ruth Hazlet 
Linda Hughbanks 
Lee Hutton 


ROW 4: 

Karen Kastberg 
Jaanne Kauzlarich 
Karen Kennedy 
Joanne Knutson 
Sherry Leonard 
Particia Linden 
Joan Lunnum 


ROW 5: 
Betty McLean 
Nancy Nalder 
Gloria Payne 
Barbara Pemerl 
Patty Pence 
Claudia Perring 
Janice Perry 


ROW 6: 
Nancy Petersan 
Sue Robbins 
Libby Rogers 
Kay Ruark 
Virginia Saiter 
Nancy Sheldrup 
Carol Smith 


ROW 7: 
Carla Troeh 
Diane Wegner 
Lorene White 
Carol Winslett 


135 

























McCroskey 

McCroskey girls this year were proud of Arlene 
Knauss, who held the coveted office of freshman 
class secretary. At the spring Independent rally 
for ASSCW candidates, McCroskey finally had 
to part with the Kangaroo trophy for largest 
dorm representation, after having held it for 
three years. 



McCROSKEY PRESIDENT, GEORGIA LARIMORE, meets informally with 
some of the girls. 


ROW 1: 

Delores Bartelheimer 
Bonnie Bartlett 
Joanne Bernave 
Dolores Bettys 
Sue Bjornstad 
Mary Jo Boning 


ROW 2: 

Joyce Bronson 
Diane Castagno 
Marie Churney 
Lois Clemans 
Judy Comstock 
Susan Crampton 


ROW 3: 
Chris Deliganis 
Rosalie Dirkson 
Bonnie Dishman 
Delora Dunn 
Ernestine Egge 
Frankie Ells 


ROW 4: 

Denise Fisher 
Judy Flynn 
Sheila Fraser 
Kay Frydenberg 
La Verne Greenwald 
Jalna Gyllenberg 


ROW 5: 

Janet Hanson 
Jan Hartling 
Sandy Holmberg 
Venita Houk 
Diana Hughes 
Miriam Jeswine 


ROW 6: 

Judy Johansen 
Darleen Johnson 
Dianne Jolin 
Olga Jones 


136 


























WE LOOK IN ON McCROSKEY girls in an informal dormitory activity. 


McCroskey 

The cooperation among the dorm members was 
demonstrated well in the product of their annual 
winter formal. The girls were looking to the fall 
semester with some regret and excitement, as 
they were scheduled to move into the new dorms 
over the hill . . . not nearly as handy to campus. 



ROW 1: 

Marybelle Kellogg 
Arlene Knauss 
Judy Lone 

Jeanette Langsather 
Georgia Larimore 
Caroline Lennart 


ROW 2: 

Sally McCague 
Suzanne McDaniel 
Carolyn Misner 
Carole Mullen 
Sally Nickell 
Walyne Niemczyk 


ROW 3: 
Bonnie Olson 
Marilyn Ott 
Mildred Pitzer 
Sherry Platt 
Mikie Porter 
Ann Ragle 


ROW 4: 
Vineta Rensink 
Nancy Rigg 
Frances Smasne 
Karma Sowers 
Sandee Strand 
Joanne Thomas 


ROW 5 : 

Janet Thomson 
Nancy Treider 
Carolyn Watson 
Kim Winiecki 
Marlene Widmann 
Gerene Wilcox 


ROW 6: 

Jan Wolter 
Sandra Womack 
Kathleen Young 


137 





























Pi Beta Phi 


The Pi Beta Phi's definitely were heard this year, 
particularly when they placed first among the 
women's division in the noise rally. They also 
received the Dad of the Year trophy for Mr. 
Troy Lindley. The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi as 
well as the Junior class secretary call Pi Beta Phi 
home. 



GLANCING OVER CHRISTMAS CARDS are President Sharon Justice, 
left , and Judy Tucker . 


ROW 1: 

Barbara Allen 
Joan Baken 
Suzie Bates 
Jean Bergersen 
Janice Bushnell 
Marianne Bussanich 
Alice Camp 


ROW 2: 

Joan Coart 
Vicki Cragin 
Margaret Dodd 
Sandra Easterly 
Lynne Ellingson 
Lucy Englund 
Judy Evans 


ROW 3: 
Harrie Frost 
Diana Gibson 
Judy Greenup 
Nancy Harkness 
Patty Haven 
Nancy Heglar 
Ellen Hougland 


ROW 4: 
Sharon Justice 
Mary Jett 
Barbara Lindley 
Janet McBride 
Marilyn Melin 
Betty Nelson 
Christel Olsson 


ROW 5: 

Beth Patterson 
Delight Richardson 
Sue Richey 
Carol Roundtree 
Marijo Shannon 
Peggy Simpson 
Judy Tucker 


ROW 6: 

Rochelle Walling 
Mary Weber 
Gayle Williams 
Marilyn Wolfe 
Leanne Wood 
Pat Yenter 
Gwen Zediker 


ROW 7: 
Audrey Ziegler 



138 

































REGENTS HILL'S PRESIDENT , Barbara Ullman and girls prepare the table 
for a ping pong game. 


Regents Hill 

The girls of Regents looked forward to Pixie week 
with much enthusiasm. After drawing names, 
they did little favors and left treats. Much 
laughter was heard as they sneaked around 
trying not to get caught. A Christmas party, with 
their Pixies' names revealed on the gift, brought 
the week to a fun-filled end. 



ROW 1: 

Jeannie Adams 
Karen Aim 
Bev Anderson 
Ellen Anderson 
Judi Lynn Anderson 
Karen Arlt 
Karen Arnold 

ROW 2: 

Betty Ash mu n 
Lillian Ashworth 
Sharon Bacon 
Cherri Baker 
Anita Barbre 
Vergie Borcus 
Sandy Barker 

ROW 3: 

Shirley Barkley 
Mary Ann Barlow 
Barbara Barrett 
Claudia Barrow 
Arlene Bartles 
Nancy Bauer 
Glendo Bean 

ROW 4: 

Jackie Beard 
Johanna Benson 
Carol Bianchi 
Dena Biehn 
Barbara Bjornson 
Margaret Blanton 
Carol Blomquist 

ROW 5: 

Joan Bohlke 
Betty Bornholt 
Sylvia Brislawn 
Marcia Brown 
Peggy Buckmaster 
Sally Buechel 
Susan Burkhart 

ROW 6: 

Brenda Button 
Diane Button 
Shirley Cannon 
Joanne Carlson 
Cecile Carpenter 
Lorraine Carstensen 
Jean Chambers 

ROW 7: 

Sharon Chapman 
J'Ana Chew 
Anita Christiansen 
Mary Ann Cockerline 
Bonnie Conkling 
Estelle Cooksey 
Demaris Copp 

ROW 8: 

Barbara Cottrell 
Jeannette Coury 
Adrienne Cowell 
Jackie Craig 

139 























Regents Hill 

The many laboring hours spent in the field house 
were justly rewarded as Regents Hill received 
second place for their successful Homecoming 
float. It was a golden football coach with a cou¬ 
gar holding reins attached to several ducks. Pat 
Lewis, reading to small children, completed the 
Cougarella theme. 



REGENTS GIRLS SOMETIMES FIND THEIR WAIT for the phone a long one. 


ROW 1; 

Joan Dade 
Donna Davidson 
Carol Davis 
Roberta Delaurenti 
Patricia Denny 
Susanna De Visser 
Ann Dunham 


ROW 2: 

Pat Durkin 
Nellie Dykstra 
Sandra Ebert 
Doris Eckhart 
Darlene Estep 
Christine Fagerstrom 
Carol Fisher 

ROW 3: 

Florence Forder 
Margaret Forrester 
Kay Foxton 
Yvonne Foy 
Viola Mae Frahm 
Janis Frank 
Carolyn Frantz 

ROW 4: 

Karin Fritzberg 
Jeanette Frostad 
Nancy Funk 
Mary Jo Gallagher 
Gwen Ganus 
Gaile Gallwas 
Carol Gardner 

ROW 5: 

Elizabeth Giedt 
Barbara Good 
Betty Gotham 
Marjorie Gould 
Kathleen Gowler 
Elaine Grant 
Pat Green 

ROW 6: 

Karen Gudmundson 
Marie Gustafson 
Deanne Haggardt 
Vivian Hamilton 
Mary Lou Hander 
Loretta Hansen 
Sandra Harkema 

ROW 7: 

Katie Harrop 
Mary Haslam 
Linda Hayes 
Kay Hauser 
Margo Heiling 
Marsha Herman 
Judie Hill 

ROW 8: 

Nancy Hogarty 
Betsy Holmberg 
Beverly Holmes 
Elaine Hopp 

140 



















Regents Hill 

Recent history wove itself into the decorations 
of Regent's winter formal, "Sno-Ball." The girls 
had fun making different spiked-shaped Sput¬ 
niks out of spider foam and metallic straws. The 
decorations were all in red and white. The fin¬ 
ishing touches were added with a Christmas tree 
in the Velvet room. 



ROW 1: 

Beth Houston 
Marilynn Howard 
Nancy Howard 
Judy Husbyn 
Bette Hutton 
Marsha Ickes 
Lee Isaksen 

ROW 2: 
llene Jacobson 
Betty Jansen 
Ann Jarvis 
Bernice Jerrow 
Nancy Jewell 
Sharon Jiencke 
Janette Witkowski Jonas 

ROW 3: 

Elaine Johnson 
Janette Johnson 
Jotina Johnson 
Lorraine Johnson 
Roberta Johnson 
Sandra Johnson 
Janet Johnston 

ROW 4: 

Barbara Karnis 
Jeanette Kelly 
Diane Kelso 
Toni Kemp 
Margie Kestle 
Sharon Kinder 
Rosalind King 

ROW 5: 

Leeanne Kinzer 
Beverly Kirkwood 
Barbara Kloth 
Bernadine Kluge 
Marilyn Knowles 
Gail Kochen 
Rosalee Komp 

ROW 6: 
lllene Koreis 
Toni Kralevich 
Karen Krause 
Gaynol Kuelper 
Charlotte Kuppler 
Bonnie Kylen 
Mildren Ladwig 

ROW 7: 

Sharon LaLiberte 
Karen Larson 
Susan Larson 
Mary Kay Lauer 
Donna Lawrence 
Joanne Layman 
Sue Leming 

ROW 8: 

Louisa Liddell 
Nell Lilley 

Joyce Schaub Liptack 
Emajean Little 

141 


































Regents Hill 

The annual Installation dinner was held early in 
January for the new officers. A special part of 
this dinner was having the foreign students de¬ 
scribe the flags of their countries. Just before this 
the seniors and old officers had taken their sneak 
and had hidden all the furniture and silverware 
for the new officers to find. 



EACH SECTION AT REGENTS eats in its own dining room. 


ROW 1: 

Jane Livesay 
Val Lochbaum 
Barbara Lothrop 
Susan Lovelace 
Linda Lovitt 
Judy Lowary 
JudiLungdahl 

ROW 2: 

Nancy Maloney 
Jill Manring 
Barbara Maresh 
Bonnie Martin 
Linda Mathewson 
JoAnn Mathisen 
Paula Maurer 

ROW 3: 

Karen Maxfield 
Priscilla McBride 
Trudi McCoy 
Alice McDonald 
Donna McGinnis 
Janice McKail 
Joann McKail 



ROW 4: 

Louise McLenegan 
Molly McRayde 
Celia Meeks 
Marian Melhus 
Marcia Mettler 
Suzanne Mickens 
Barbara Middleton 

ROW 5: 

Janice Mileski 
Judi Miller 
Margaret Moilanen 
Gerry Moore 
Myrna Moore 
Margaret Moores 
Janice Morgan 

ROW 6: 

Marilyn Mork 
Shirley Morrow 
Doris Mottau 
Diana Mounts 
Lee Anne Murphy 
Elizabeth Ness 
Sherry Nicholson 

ROW 7: 

Rei Nielsen 
Joanne Nisbet 
Nancy Noble 
Arlene Noel 
Elda Nordhei m 
Berit Nyberg 
Sunny Ogston 

ROW 8: 

Doris Oldenburg 
JoAnn Olson 
Jeannine Ott 
Sandra Pauley 



142 











4 
































DURING THE EVENING , Regents girls man the switchboard and intercom. 


Regents Hill 

Every Friday night the girls eagerly awaited the 
raunch dinner —that is, they dressed according 
to the theme of the week. One time they went 
as their favorite movie stars and at Christmas as 
their favorite gifts. Weekends also brought fun- 
filled exchanges with their brother dorm, Stim- 
son, including their annual joint street dance. 



ROW 1: 

Tiblene Peace 
Adrean Pelczar 
Kay Persson 
Barbara Peters 
Beverly Peterson 
Carole Peterson 
JoAnne Peterson 

ROW 2: 

Karen Peterson 
Marilyn Petter 
Helen Phillips 
Warrene Phillips 
Priscilla Pipe 
Lauretta Plant 
Willean Pledger 

ROW 3: 
Marlene Plewa 
Jane Popkema 
Sandra Portin 
Marie Powell 
Marlene Prelwitz 
Millicent Pue 
Faye Ramsey 

ROW 4: 

Joan Raney 
Margaret Raupp 
Sherrie Rawlings 
Jill Reed 
Nancy Reiter 
Rose Renshaw 
Christine Ritland 

ROW 5: 

Marilyn Rogel 
Judith Ross 
Linda Ross 
Sue Roth 

Gwen Rounsaville 
Kay Ruble 
Marilyn Rupp 

ROW 6: 

Nadia Saiegh 
Teress Salazar 
Marilyn Sanford 
Lorena Scharer 
Ellen Schmella 
Toni Schomaker 
Diane Schulberg 

ROW 7: 

Dianne Scott 
Helen Jane Setters 
Gloria Shepherd 
Marian Shull 
Dalene Simpson 
Sherrill Slichter 
Ann Smith 

ROW 8: 
Gretchen Smith 
Marcia Smith 
Mary Lee Smith 
Shiela Smith 

143 






























Regents Hill 

Thursday afternoons were set aside for teas or 
coffee hours. The four sections took turns spon¬ 
soring them and they invited their own guests. 
Usually, they honored a campus dignitary. Be¬ 
fore Christmas they chose a favorite house 
among them and had the fellows over for 
carolling and refreshments. 



A ROOM IS HARDLY BIG ENOUGH when a corridor gets together for a meeting 


ROW 1: 

Luann Smythe 
Deeana Soholt 
Diane Soiberg 
Judith Soiberg 
Ann Sprow 
Nancy Lee Stafford 
Patty Stalder 

ROW 2: 

Linda Staley 
Jeannette Stein 
Doris Steinmetz 
Bev Sterba 
Karen Stickley 
Sue Stoddard 
Sheila Strauss 

ROW 3: 

Mary Lou Stredwick 
Irene Sturza 
Janice Swart 
Marilyn Sweeney 
Ann Tampien 
Kay Tarpenning 
Rosalie L. Taylor 

ROW 4: 

Jeanette Thomas 
Pat Thomas 
Joan Thompson 
Judy Thompson 
Becky Thorson 
Marilyn Trolson 
Barbara Turner 

ROW 5: 

Barbara Ullman 
Carol Ullock 
Kay Van Ausdle 
Janet Van Bevers 
June VandeBrake 
Louise Vik 
Janice Wagner 

ROW 6: 

Gladys Wahl 
Donna Mae Wallace 
Diane Warwick 
Nancy Webster 
Judy Weller 
Susan Westcott 
Carol White 

ROW 7: 

Doris Whitmore 
Martha Wicker 
Ann Widman 
Audrey Williams 
Barbara Williams 
Karen Winther 
Carol Witkowski 

ROW 8: 

Kathy Wood 
Mary Anne Wood 
Sandy Wood 
Ruth Young 

144 
































SIGMA KAPPAS ENJOY THEIR COSTUME PARTY, directed by President Marilyn 
Sloan, where they each represent some phase of Christmas. 


Sigma Kappa 

The Sigma Kappa's began a successful year by 
winning third place in the Dad's Day sign con¬ 
test and taking first place in the women's intra¬ 
mural swimming meet. An inspirational trophy 
was presented to the most outstanding girl at the 
traditional "Lilac Time" formal. 



ROW 1: 

Gail Adams 
Venice Aulerich 
Janet Baker 
Linda Bartlett 
Eleanor Berg 
Barbara Burgess 
Nancy Courson 


ROW 2: 
Barbara Curtis 
Carol DeLapp 
Barbara Eyre 
Joni Falkner 
Lynn Fulton 
Joyce Greve 
Ann Haglund 


ROW 3: 
Sandra Hayes 
Janet Hougen 
Anita Howard 
Donna Hultstrom 
Gloria Jennings 
Helen Judge 
Joan Knutson 


ROW 4: 

Maradel Krummel 
Shoron Lancaster 
Pat Laurance 
Sharon Link 
Effie Lowary 
Sheryl McClintick 
Cathey McCoun 


ROW 5: 
Shirley Morberg 
Gail Moyer 
Toni Murdoch 
Shirlee Newell 
Geri Olson 
Anita Parrott 
Barbara Petricek 


ROW 6: 

Ann Prater 
Judy Schoeff 
Marilyn Sloan 
Karen Smith 
Gunilla Svenson 
Lynn Swaim 
Bonnie Sweet 


ROW 7: 
Janet Wakin 
Betsy Wieland 
Sharon Wilber 
Betty Yost 




145 























Stevens 

During 1956-1957 school year, Stevens hall 
housed only 50 girls; however, the membership 
has increased to approximately 85. Mrs. Jack- 
son, head resident, spear-headed this year's 
activities, which included the annual Snowball 
winter formal following, in the spring, with the 
lively Circus dance. A rounded program of ex¬ 
changes, teas and studies kept the girls at 
Stevens hall busy. 



STEVENS' PRESIDENT, SANDRA WADE, holds some of the Christmas cards sent to 
the dorm this year from other living groups. 


ROW 1: 

Joan Bagott 
Patsy Banta 
Joan Bryant 
Marcia Cass 
Bonnie Chisholm 
Nancy Clarke 
Betsy Crosley 

ROW 2: 

Joyce Demco 
Norma Doty 
Beverly Dreisow 
Judy Erdahl 
Delona Fassero 
Sally Franklin 
Janine Gratton 

ROW 3: 

June Hastings 
Sylvia Jenrich 
Judy Johnson 
Maecell Johnson 
Yvonne Johnson 
Cynthia Layman 
Joanne Legaz 

ROW 4: 

Audrey Lindberg 
Marilyn Lipscomb 
Carol MacPherson 
Janis Maylor 
Loretta McPeek 
June Mihara 
Shirley Moore 

ROW 5: 

Ann Murphy 
Marlene Nelson 
Colleen O'Hara 
Sherry Oliver 
Linda Pearson 
Betty Jane Pridham 
Lois Rennilson 

ROW 6: 

Vicki Rojan 
Rose Marie Rufener 
Janice Scriven 
Sandra Shurtleff 
Florian Sjolund 
Marilee Smith 
Rogene Smith 

ROW 7: 

Pearl Sobota 
Marilyn Spray 
Danette Stetler 
Joanne Trimble 
Marie Weiss 
Mary Welsh 
Sue White 


146 



ROW 8: 
Janet Wynne 





































BOBBIE MARTIN , PRESIDENT OF WILMER, seated center , /oolcs at scrapbook of 
Ingrid's pictures during an executive council meeting. 


Wilmer 

The 127 girls of Wilmer hall suffered a fire scare 
this year when reports of "fire on first floor" 
proved to be only a smoking incinerator. The 
beginning of the fall term brought the girls a 
new housemother, Mrs. Ord Chrisman, orginally 
of Moscow, and Santa Claus provided the hall 
with a new hi-fi phonograph. 



ROW 1: 

Helen Absher 
Mary Asher 
Joyce Asimus 
Myrna Ball 
Carol Barnes 
Barbara Bassett 
Marcella Bevaart 


ROW 2: 
Jam's Brake 
Anne Barsel 
Zana Carden 
Carol Cheney 
Carol Clerf 
Deanna Dahl 
Gail Dorge 


ROW 3: 

Joyce Dullea 
Carol Emerson 
Monita Engvall 
Joan Eriandson 
Janice Giese 
Sally Graff 
Antoinette Graham 


ROW 4: 

Darien Grosse 
Mary Lee Hamilton 
Sharon Harlow 
Sharon Harms 
Zeola Harris 
Judy Hatch 
Judy Hayes 


ROW 5: 

Alice Ann Herres 
Connie Hill 
Mary Hillstron 
Jean Hofiand 
Kay Huson 
Nancy Jordan 
Kay Kaldenberg 


ROW 6: 
Kathy Kanouse 
Anita Kanzler 
Ja Ann Lacey 
Ann Larsen 
Judy Lavender 
Velma Love 
Barbara Martin 


ROW 7: 

Jean Martin 
Virginia McIntyre 


147 


























Wilmer 

Social activities have been an important part of 
the lives of Wilmer hall girls. They presented a 
winter formal set to the theme "Crystal Moon". 
Wilmer this year was blessed with the presence 
of two royal queens. Ingrid Oretorp reigned as 
the 1957-58 Homecoming Queen and Bonnie 
Noe was selected queen of the annual Harvest 
Ball. 



WILMER GIRLS ENJOY THEIR PHONOGRAPH and new high-fi records 
while leafing through the '57 Chinook. 


ROW 1: 

Marian McKeirnan 
Patti Meves 
Sue Michaelsen 
Barbara Miller 
Darlene Mills 
Mary Marrison 
Carol Nelson 


ROW 2: 

Pam Nelson 
Jo Ann Palmer 
Virginia Pauley 
Betty Pearson 
Bonnie Pearson 
Susan Pleines 
Claudette Potter 


ROW 3: 

Frankque Remington 
Pat Roberts 
Kathy Robinson 
Leslie Ann Rohlf 
Loretta Russell 
Barbara Schmidt 
Betty Schreiber 


ROW 4: 
Linda Schultz 
Jackie Shaw 
Jessie Shiratori 
Danise Simons 
Jeannie Smith 
Linda Smith 
Judy Sorensen 


ROW 5: 
Karen Spane 
Jeanne Springer 
Beverly Stolp 
Judy Syck 
Susan Toepel 
Janet Toney 
Marilyn Trefren 


ROW 6: 

Sylvia Vander Griend 
Katie Wagner 
Diane Wakefield 
Carol Weitz 
Joan Wilkins 
Janet Williamson 
Billie Wilts 


ROW 7: 
Jan Zeller 


148 


































MEN STUDENTS 





















Intramurals, Girls, 
Fads and Traditions 
Make Campus Houses 
Home to WSC Men 



CHI O, SWEEP MY FLOOR . . . the Chi O's were sold info slavery af 
the Cougar Campus Chest auction. 



WINNER OF THE TURKEY TROT closes in the space to the frustrated 
fowl through the lane of onlookers and timers. 



THIS D.U. OWL IS UNPERTURBED by the pillow fight that broke out in dorm sleeping quarters just before breakfast. 



TRANSPORTATION for the sorority frosh 
to the Lambda Chi Alpha 
Watermelon Bust! 



INFORMAL GET-TOGETHERS of guitar 
enthusiasts often spark life in the Kruegel 
lounge. 


150 



















PRACTICING HOLDING A HOOP for a simulated jump is all part of living at the College 
Fire Station—the most unusual living group on campus. 


"BORROWED" COMMON'S PROPER¬ 
TY is returned before leaving at the end 
of the year. 

151 


A FLICK OF THE WRIST and the Frisby's 
gone quicker than a flying saucer . . . 





A LATE NIGHT TYPIST momentarily falls 
asleep with his theme unfinished. 



THE COUG is a stopping off place for 
many fraternity men before and 
after classes. 



INTO THE HANDS of a fraternity brother 
waiting across the yard. 













Acacia 

The men of Acacia fell into the swing of activi¬ 
ties this fall as they and their dates headed for 
Spalding Park, Idaho, for a wonderful picnic. 
Acacia brought to a close their busy year with 
their annual Black and Gold Formal, held at the 
Country Club. 



ACACIA PRESIDENT, VERL WHEELER, wins the game! 


ROW Is 
Gary Baines 
Richard Blonden 
Robert Corlew 
Richard Dague 
Gerald Gilbert 


ROW 2: 

Don Gilman 
Richard Gunderson 
Anders Henriksson 
Lee Henry 
Lynn Johnson 


ROW 3: 

Leif Karlsen 
Larry Manly 
Rodger Maynard 
William Morrisson 
Paul Olsen 


ROW 4: 
Michael Parris 
Dan Robertson 
Dan Rowley 
Verl Sackett 
David Schorzman 


ROW 5: 

Alan Sjolander 
Mike Stewart 
Donald Stoebner 
William Stuart 
Frank Weldin 


ROW 6: 
Verl Wheeler 
Walter Windus 
Lyle Wulff 


152 






































Alpha Gamma Rho 

"Swing your partner round and round!" and 
other familiar sounds were heard issuing forth 
from the Alpha Gamma Rho house last spring. 
The occassion was the annual barn dance, which 
was preceded by a barbecue. Another highlight 
of the year was the pledge dance, "Wake Up 
Little Suzie." 


CATCHING UP ON READING are Bob Vostrel, president, and AGR brothers. 



ROW 1: 

Franklin Anderson 
Jim Beamer 
James Belshe 
Ira Branson 
Emory Clapp 
Kenneth Clapp 


ROW 2: 

Larry Coppock 
Dan Davis 
Robert Dean 
Melvin Dennis 
David Dickson 
Jerome Draggoo 


ROW 3: 

Dale Erdelbrock 
James Fletcher 
Dwight Fullerton 
Keith George 
Ken Graygeal 
Gary Grimlund 


ROW 4: 
Robert Guerin 
Dick Hinchliff 
Allen Hood 
Merle Jensen 
Leroy Kawaguchi 
Roger Kvamme 


ROW 5: 
Stanley Loreen 
Paul Osgood 
Bob Penney 
Ron Power 
Jack Prince 
William Reinke 


ROW 6: 

Monte Ring 
Dick Rubenser 
Stephen Smith 
Fred Stormshak 
James Swartwood 
Warren Talbott 


ROW 7: 

Ed Veenhuizen 
Hank Vostral 
Van Youngquist 
Robert Zeller 
Fred Zobrist 

153 





















Alpha Kappa Lambda 

The AKL's started the year with their traditional 
pledge-member football game. The members 
upheld the tradition by defeating the pledges. 
The fellows welcomed back the Blue Moun¬ 
taineers, an AKL western band which was 
popular on the campus in the '30s. A new house 
is in store for the group in the near future. Plans 
are now being drawn up. 



PRESIDENT HAL TYE and AKL brothers relax before dinner. 


ROW 1: 
Karl Allgeier 
Neal Brown 
Gary Feldman 
Sam Haon 


ROW 2: 
Louis Lake 
Haley Lake 
Wendell Love 



THE MEN OF ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA enjoyed a little bit of relaxation after a fine meal. 




















A LETTER CONCERNING PROVINCE CONCLAVE interests President Jim Lust 
and members. 


Alpha Tau Omega 

The ATO's gained two members on the Board of 
Control after spring elections. They were Joe 
Brand, junior Greek man and Ralph Ostheller, 
senior Greek man. During Greek week the 
house offered a trophy to the fraternity that 
had the most outstanding project for "help 
week." 



ROW 1: 
Charles Actor 
Lyle Bachmann 
Joe Brand 
Larry Bundy 
Burle Burkher 
Roy Carriker 
Steve Clinehens 


ROW 2: 
Clifford Collins 
Joe Davis 
Gary Dodge 
Bill Doric 
John Forehand 
Jim Hays 
Bill Henry 


ROW 3: 

Clark Henry 
Dick Howard 
Frank Hughes 
Bill Hundley 
Allen Immel 
Gordon Kauffman 
Ernie Kevin 


ROW 4: 

Don Kleweno 

Lynn Loudenback 

Carl Lust 

Mike Lust 

John Lynn 

Dan Mac Quarrie 

Douglas Me Donald 


ROW 5: 
Ralph Ostheller 
Leo Perros 
John Pettersen 
Thomas Purkett 
Jerry Quam 
Lowell Roberts 
Tom Rolfs 


ROW 6 : 
Gordon Sanders 
Wesley Schierman 
John Shuttee 
Dan Tompkins 
Don Trunkey 
Duane Tye 
Jim Usher 


ROW 7: 
Glen Vannoy 
Ben Wood 


155 
























Beta Theta Pi 

The Beta's traditional "Daffodil Dance" saw a 
large dragon of 8,000 daffodils as one of the 
daffodil murals transforming the house to a 
fantasy of flowers. Their Sweetheart dinner was 
the following day. This year the Beta's treaked 
to Vancouver, B. C., for their songfest. 



PRESIDENT PAT O'BRYAN relaxes with his Beta brothers. 


ROW 1: 

Tom Allen 
Bill Berry 
John Bjorn 
Bruce Buchanan 
Bill Bugge 
Larry Dickinson 


ROW 2: 
John Eddy 
Don Ellingsen 
Jack Fanning 
Guy Fisher 
Bob Hackney 
Fred Harkness 


ROW 3: 
Dwight Hawkes 
Pat Link 
John Losee 
Kerman Love 
John Madsen 
Mike Mansfield 


ROW 4: 

Phil Mast 
Jerry McGlade 
Dave Mielke 
Harold Mielke 
Ronald Millard 
Bob Miller 


ROW 5: 
Pat O'Bryan 
Gary Osborn 
Alan Peter 
Paul Peterson 
Ross Richards 
Frank Rider 


ROW 6: 

Les Rudy 
Lee Schroeder 
Mark Shuman 
Jack Simpson 
Ernie Smith 
Ray Taipale 


ROW 7: 

Ray Webb 
Ernest Whatley 
Dwight Wilson 


156 















PRESIDENT MARVIN E. NELSON surveys the rest of the 
firemen as they eat. 


College Firehouse 

Eleven student firemen leave their classes when 
a fire call sounds on the WSC campus. These 
students and three troubleshooters, answer both 
fire and ambulance calls on campus and work 
with the Pullman fire department if needed. New 
members are chosen by old members on a basis 
of qualification and need. 



ROW 1: 

Dewade Creveling 
Jim Fields 
Richard Gordon 
William Lehmann 


ROW 2: 

Ben Macomber 
Marvin Nelson 
Floyd Whyatt 


COLLEGE FIREMEN AND THEIR COOK pose in uniform by their truck. 



157 












Delta Chi 

Proud engineers turned out a hydroplane built 
to scale for the Delta Chi Homecoming entry. 
Then, despite ghouls and ghosts the annual 
pledge dance was held on Hallowe'en. As win¬ 
ter approached, lovely girls in sarongs were 
seen swaying among the live palm tree decora¬ 
tions of their costume dance, "Tropicana." 



ROW 1: 

Joe Coombs 
Roger Doebke 
Jerry Eaton 
Leslie Gallaugher 
Lyle Jones 


ROW 2: 
Charles Keltch 
Richard Lauri 
Donald Lemon 
James Loss 
John Mansperger 


ROW 3: 
Mike McDonald 
Robert Miller 
Donald Moe 
Joel Opsahl 
Tam Paddock 


ROW 4: 
Nicholas Popoff 
Richard Robinson 
Alfred Schy 
Wayne Stockdale 
Harry Thruston 


ROW 5: 
Joe Wilson 


158 





















PREX Y DICK STEINER and brothers inspect the chapter scrapbook. 


Delta Sigma Phi 

As usual, the Delta Sigma Phi's Green Garter 
pledge dance and formal were successful. These 
functions, coupled with an extensive program of 
exchanges, occasioned a great number of tree- 
ings from pinnings and engagements. More was 
in store with their spring formal. Sailor's Ball. 
This year the Delta Sig's also began a program 
of engineered leadership. 



ROW 1: 
Robert Bailey 
Erwin Bliesner 
Dale Buchanan 
Clare Bungay 
Paul Bunnell 


ROW 2: 

Bill Frost 
Robert Frost 
Larry Garrison 
Neil Greenwalt 
John Haldi 


ROW 3: 
John Helphrey 
Gerald Hillier 
Lyle Holt 
John Larson 
Richard Loomis 


ROW 4: 

John Martin 
Don Merriam 
Dean Narancich 
George Osborn 
Dick Steiner 


ROW 5: 
Ed Vang 
Mark Welch 


159 



























The Delt's began their second year on campus 
with a pledge-member football game with 
members completely wiping out the pledges. 
However, the pledges came back with a suc¬ 
cessful dance, "Skid Row". On December 1 they 
celebrated their first anniversary with a Founders 
Day banquet. 


ROW 1: 
John Abelson 
Tom Askew 
Bruce Cailey 
Terry Bech 
Robert Brunton 


ROW 2: 

Mike Callaghan 
Ted Carratt 
Terry Cook 
Bill Davies 
Douglas Hipp 


ROW 3: 
Dan Homan 
James Johnson 
Ray Kronquist 
Bill Lind 
Charlie Lucas 


ROW 4: 
Roger Milnes 
Russell Muth 
Stell Newman 
Donald Nichols 
Bill Priest 


ROW 5: 

Roger Richer! 

Le Roy Roach 
Karl Romaneschi 
Geoffrey Stillman 
Leonard Swanson 


PRESIDENT LE ROY ROACH practices with his trio dance band. 


Delta Tau Delta 












" ENTERTAINMENT" FOR PRESIDENTS STEVE MECK and Paul Richardson 
and brothers. 


Delta Upsilon 

The DU's favorite pastime this year was their 
new color TV set. Many were the Saturday 
evenings when they invited their dates over to 
watch the Perry Como show. The annual Spring 
Roundup proved to be the highlight of the year. 
It was held both indoors and outdoors and be¬ 
gan at five o'clock in the afternoon, featuring 
a barbecue. 



ROW 1: 

Kazi Ain Uddin 
Steve Bergman 
Allen Brothers 
Tom Collins 
Michael Edgmand 


ROW 2: 

Jay Eliason 
Mason Emanuels 
William Gillis 
Stan Granberg 
Hans Hickstein 


ROW 3: 

Paul Kruesel 
Ken Laird 
Earl Marble 
Robert McGillivray 
Scott McKinstry 


ROW 4: 
Steve Mech 
Jack Meenach 
Ted Miller 
Pat Merten 
Mike Owen 


ROW 5: 

Gary Reed 
Paul Richardson 
Tom Schroedel 
Ed Sharman 
Dick Sherwood 


ROW 6; 

Bob Sturmer 
Gilbert Swanson 
Gene Trapp 
Robert Warwick 
Doug Weeks 


161 









Farmhouse 

For the fifth consecutive semester this group main¬ 
tained the top men's gradepoint on campus. 
However, their social life was as busy as their 
scholastic life. A spring fireside was decorated 
with a shipwreck theme. Their formal, held in 
April, was entitled "Star and Crescent." 



PRESIDENT JERRY BRYAN , right, and members relax after dinner. 


ROW 1: 
Glenn Aldrich 
Frederic Blauert 
Gene Bodily 
Gary Bryan 
Milton David 
Mike Duncan 


ROW 2: 

Ray Landes 
Allen Lewis 
Mike McMackin 
John Reitmeier 
Douglas Richmond 
David Rosenquist 


ROW 3: 
Norm Scott 
Jim Thomsen 
Bob Wiesen 
Larry Zehm 



FARMHOUSE MEN WERE HOSTS TO SORORITY WOMEN during Creek Week dinner. 




























PRESIDENT BILL ACHESON enjoys a gome of chess as kibitzers look on. 


Ferry 

Fall semester's social activities were climaxed by 
Ferry's Christmas semi-formal "Ferry Winter." 
Decorated in blue and white and completed with 
a Christmas tree, it was acclaimed by many as 
one of year's best dances. Working on their 
Homecoming float provided much enjoyment 
and helped acquaint the new and old members. 



ROW 1: 

Bill Acheson 
Deri Allen 
Ken Bajema 
Jay Booth 
Gordon Burkher 


ROW 2: 
Bill Duchie 
Alan Hattrup 
Ward Helms 
Woody Hirzel 
Irwin Klundt 


ROW 3: 

Bob Kuvera 
John Malik 
Roger McCann 
Walter McCamish 
Dan Mclntree 


ROW 4: 

Robert Moehring 
James Nakasone 
Abdul Naqib 
Glenn Rodeman 
Ron Rowell 


ROW 5: 
Dave Vadnais 
Jiri Vanourek 


163 











Sigma Kappa 

The men of Kappa Sig said "goodbye" to Mokey, 
their wandering Great Dane. It seems that he 
wandered far enough to get into a scrap with the 
law one evening. Now he occupies an apartment 
near Seattle, and it is assumed his neighborhood 
there is as aware of Mokey's presence as Greek 
row was until this fall. 



KAPPA SIG PRESIDENTS, KING KIRK AND RALEIGH DAVIS, place the traditional 
skin for our 1957 football win over U. of W. 


ROW 1: 

Kelly Arnold 
Larry Barclay 
Thomas Barksdale 
Barry Blaker 
Gilbert Blinn 
Leonard Blinn 


ROW 2: 
Peter Buchet 
Paul Carlson 
Jack Cody 
Randy Cripe 
Raleigh Davis 
Bill Delaney 


ROW 3: 
James De Phelps 
Ted Drake 
Jim Fletcher 
John Friel 
Bob Gifford 
Fred Hoffman 


ROW 4: 
Robert Johnson 
King Kirk 
Gerald Knapp 
Conrad Knopf 
Len Krazynski 
Steve Lightle 


ROW 5: 
Mike Lowry 
Wayne Millsap 
James More 
Gary Morgan 
Gary Oldham 
Dick Parkhill 


ROW 6: 

Richard Poole 
Roger Reed 
Chester Slack 
Gifford Thomas 
Robert Lee Thornton 
Bob Tinsman 


ROW 7: 

Jim Veenhuizen 
Pete Wallbridge 
Pete Wiedemann 
Terry Yeager 



164 



































PRESIDENT BOB WYNECOOP LOOKS OVER SCRAPBOOK of 
dedication ceremony of last year. 


Kruegel 

Kruegel hall last fall received one fourth of the 
nominations at the Independent class caucus. 
During the year, George Simchuk presided as 
president of the Freshman class. Hugh Tinling, 
freshman; Jack May, junior; and Stan Easton, 
senior; served as vice-presidents of their classes 



ROW 1: 

Gene Alberts 
Dave Allmendinger 
David Austin 
John Bates 
Dudley Brown 


ROW 2: 
Norman Burke 
William Coheely 
Jim Coulter 
Charles Cox 
Donald Craft 


ROW 3: 

Roy Davis 
Gordon Dean 
Kirk Dimmitt 
Wallace Duchateau 
Stanley Easton 


ROW 4: 
Larry Ekstrom 
Paul Engstrom 
Don Fellows 
Glen Fishel 
Gary Flannery 


ROW 5: 

Jim Geil 
Matthew Grieve 
Alvin Griggs 
Gerald Grumwald 
Darrell Hathaway 


ROW 6: 
Ted Hayes 


165 











Kruegel 

Other campus leaders residing at Kruegel are 
David Allmendinger, Sophomore Independent 
Man on Board of Control; LeRoy Jones and Gene 
Alberts, president and historian of IBR, re¬ 
spectively; Dudley Brown, Chinook editor; and 
Bradley Munn, associate editor of the Evergreen. 



A BABY GRAND PIANO is the answer to a players dreams. 


ROW 1: 

Rich Hembree 
James Hottott 
Eero Jaaska 
Soren Jensen 
Robert Johnson 


ROW 2: 
David Jones 
LeRoy Jones 
Richard Keltner 
Jim Kimura 
Wayne King 


ROW 3: 
Richard Kirihara 
Ron Laande 
Merlin Lane 
Robert Langill 
Jack LeWarne 


ROW 4: 

Larry Lipp 
Leo Long 
Jack May 
Gene McDonald 
Dan McGuire 


ROW 5: 
Robert Monarch 
Sterling Monroe 
Dewaine Moore 
James Moore 
Darrell Morrison 


ROW 6: 
Bradley Munn 
Verne Naught 


166 











Kruegel 

The social life at Kruegel is also a busy one. 
Their winter formal was followed by a spring 
raunch dance. Accompanied by their house¬ 
mother, Mrs. Poage, and their dates, the fellows 
of Kruegel were found spending a day in May 
cruising on Lake Coeur d'Alene. 


THE FORMAL LOUNGE is a favorite gathering spot. 



ROW 1: 
William Nelson 
Rex Newburn 
Dale Newland 
Richard O'Day 
Gene Osborn 


ROW 2: 

Stan Panko 
Harold Pazer 
Larry Petershagen 
Jean Pierini 
Frank Rains 


ROW 3: 

Larry Rippe 
George Simchuk 
John Stackpole 
De Lee Strong 
Allen Struthers 


ROW 4: 
Frank Swanson 
Charles Tandy 
Steve Trout 
Leo Vandervort 
Richard Wagner 


ROW 5: 

Jim Watson 
William Watt 
Dwight Weber 
John Welch 
John Woods 















Lambda Chi Alpha 

The first semester found the Lambda Chi's hav¬ 
ing won the first place trophy in intramurals and 
Dale Wunderlich a finalist for Tolo King. Spring 
brought the annual Fireman's Ball when all the 
dates were picked up on the Lambda Chi fire- 
truck. Left at the fire escape, all had to climb 
to the third floor dorm to dance. 



PRESIDENT DELMAR SISLER and brothers reminisce via the scrapbook. 


ROW 1: 

Roger Amundson 
Rodger Anderson 
William Aylor 
Phil Baker 
Richard Blomberg 
Bill Brownson 


ROW 2: 
David Burgess 
Bill Coffee 
Bill Colwell 
Denny Duskin 
Gary Duskin 
Bob Ganson 


ROW 3: 

Ted Goslow 
John Grant 
Dave Gunderson 
Richard Hanner 
David Kapp 
Fritz Kohne 


ROW 4: 

Bill Lilliquist 
Jack Mac Phee 
Larry Me Ginnis 
Glyde Meek 
James Miller 
John Nielsen 


ROW 5: 
Allan Purdon 
Bob Richard 
Richard Rivenes 
Joe Schomer 
Delmar Sisler 
Bill Smiley 


ROW 6: 

Gene Start 
Dave Stecher 
Myron Swanson 
Dave Turkington 
Clayton Viebrock 
Arnold Virtue 


ROW 7: 
Kenneth Watt 
Bert Weinrick 
Dale Wonderlick 
Roger Wyrick 
Bob Yoder 


168 
















MRS. MILLER, HEAD RESIDENT, CONFERS WITH WAYNE STARTUP, president, 
and the new incoming president. 


McAllister 

McAllister hall, which is one of the newest men's 
living quarters, is furnished in a Scotch theme. 
An appropriate Scotch crest is found on their 
front door. To further their theme, the various 
floors have adopted Scotch names. 



ROW 1: 

Lauren Aimonetto 
Gerald Albers 
Eugene Alby 
Robert Anderson 
Marvin Anderson 
Jim Ayling 
Jerome Babcock 


ROW 2: 

Dave Barclay 
Charles Beeman 
Duane Brehm 
Roger Briscoe 
Bobert Bruce 
Larry Burch 
Darrell Burton 


ROW 3: 

Gary Buryginyon 
Louis Caldwell 
Leonard Campbell 
Verne Compbell 
Tom Carey 
Richard Carlson 
Jim Carstens 


ROW 4: 

Clyde Clark 
Dyan Cooper 
Arthur Cutler 
Neil Dohmen 
Rowland Davis 
Woodward Davis 
Bob Hodge 


ROW 5: 

Art Eaton 
Ralph Fairbanks 
Lyle Fenske 
Marvin Franz 
John Gerth 
Dennis Goodman 
Richard Grace 


ROW 6: 

James Halverson 
Robert Heaton 
Lloyd Henning 
Eugene Hokanson 
Parker Holden 
Paul Holm 
John Holtorf 


ROW 7: 
John Hughes 
Dick Janssen 
Ron Johnson 
Farouk Kayali 
Duane Keranen 
Michael Kiehn 


169 


















McAllister 

Social activities with various womens' living 
groups were a regular feature on the McAllister 
calendar. Highlighting the season was a taffy 
pull "stretching from McAllister to Davis Hall." 
In addition, forty energetic Scotsmen eagerly 
cleaned house for the Davis women. 



MRS. MILLER AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE of McAllister hall plan together for the 
first annual open house, a joint affair with Kruegel hall. 


ROW 1: 

Walter King 
Marvin Kirkeby 
Dave Koller 
Sten Larkin 
Henry Lammers 
Ray Loescher 
George Lund 

ROW 2: 

Jim Manring 
Harry Masterson 
Judson Melton 
Lloyd Mercer 
Gary Minetti 
Maurice Moneymaker 
Dave Moore 

ROW 3: 

Karl Nilsen 
Dick Noren 
Ed Olson 
Lloyd Osborn 
Pat O'Shaughnessy 
Boyce Penninger 
Bill Potter 

ROW 4: 

Lee Pritchard 
Floyd Roberson 
Ronald Ross 
Bob Saunders 
Ernie Schick 
Larry Schick 
Gene Schultz 



ROW 5: 

Jim Seeley 
Fred Segrest 
Don Slezak 
Roger Smith 
Steve Springer 
Wayne Startup 
Ed Stearns 

ROW 6: 

Kenneth Stedman 
Roger Stroud 
Paul Sunich 
Lynn Tower 
Bill Van Gelder 
Bob Van Leuven 
Jerry Vessey 

ROW 7: 

Bob Vogelman 
John Wacker 
Don Walter 
Richard Weiss 
Tom Widdows 
Roger Wing 
Ranee Williams 

ROW 8: 

David Willms 
Pryor Wood 
Douglas Young 
Leon Young 



170 



























PRESIDENT BILL BOETCHER looks over coming meeting's agenda. 


Neill 

A new tradition in Neill this year was a stag 
dinner held the Sunday night before Christmas 
vacation. Not all the men get in on the social 
activities, such as women's exchanges, and since 
they eat out on Sundays anyway, they arranged 
a dress dinner to include the whole dorm. It 
proved successful, as 175 of the 207 men 
attended. 



ROW 1: 
Carl Allen 
Gordon Allen 
Fred Allington 
Larry Alton 
Dave Annibal 
John Bagott 
Issac Baggit 


ROW 2: 
Ronald Baker 
Alan Barr 
John Bauman 
Thomas Bean 
Dave Billeter 
Keith Birkenfeld 
Bob Blount 


ROW 3: 

Bill Boettcher 
Garrith Bogor 
George Borsheim 
James Boyce 
Mike Brooks 
Bill Buchan 
Neil Buhman 


ROW 4: 

Ken Burnham 
Gary Campbell 
George Carpenter 
Charles Cheung 
Bill Clemons 
Brian Conant 
Gary Craig 


ROW 5: 
Tim Dugan 
Dovid Durham 
Richard Eller 
Mel Espe 
Larry Foster 
Ron Fragner 
Kenley Gard 


ROW 6: 

Larry Goedde 
Douglas Gorden 
Neil Grace 
Wiard Groeneveld 
Charles Gregory 
Newton Hamon 
James Harris 


ROW 7: 

Kenneth Hensley 
Bill Holway 
Bob Hollister 
Jim Huff 
Clinton Hurd 
Dave Hylton 
Mike Jewell 


171 










Neill 

One of the outstanding projects of the men at 
Neill was the awarding of house scholarships on 
the basis of scholarship and leadership records. 
Among the outstanding men at Neill were Gor¬ 
don Allen, who was elected sophomore vice- 
president and George Borsheim, who won the 
top scholastic honors in chemical engineering. 


I 

THE STUDENT ASSISTANT always welcomes conferences. 



ROW 1: 
Ray Johnson 
David Jones 
Dave Kalamar 
Zahi Kamal 
David Kelley 
Richard Keyes 


ROW 2: 
Howard Kipp 
Kerwin Knight 
Bob Koch 
Leo Kolb 
Richard Koppe 
John Kumpula 


ROW 3- 
Don Kurtz 
Bob Large 
Jake Lautenbach 
Charles Lewis 
Gary Lobe 
Robert Mahn 


ROW 4: 

Jim Malinowski 
Warren McCormick 
Gordon McDougall 
Don McKenzie 
Richard Mielke 
Curtis Mohr 


ROW 5: 
Gary Moser 
David Mawat 
Vernon Nathe 
Charles Nesbit 
Gary Nickel! 
Herman Nicolet 


ROW 6: 

Taro Ogawa 
Lawrence Olsen 
Don Olson 
Willis Osbakken 
Lloyd Osborn 
Jack Otterson 


ROW 7: 
Judson Parsons 
John Prescott 
Glen Puterbaugh 



172 































THE CONFERENCE ROOMS come in handy for group studying. 


Neill 

After winning an honorable mention for their 
Homecoming float, "Cougars Chop Conference 
Candy Canes," they began decorations for the 
first winter formal to be held in the new dorm. 
Evergreens and blue lighting were used in co¬ 
ordination with the theme "Rustic Blue." The 
Esquires, a house band, played for the occasion. 



ROW 1: 

Bill Rasmussen 
Frank Rasmussen 
Myron Rasmussen 
Bob Rauch 
Ed Rosland 
Les Rider 


ROW 2: 

Walt Rulffes 
Herman Schroeder 
Dick Schutler 
Tim Seth 
Merle Siegel 
Charles Smart 


ROW 3: 
Wallace Smith 
Gerald Sollie 
Rudy Soriano 
Jack Spille 
John Srail 
Alan Stoller 


ROW 4: 
Donald Swanson 
Eorl Taylor 
Ross Taylor 
Michael Timpe 
Dave Tozer 
Don Trotter 


ROW 5: 
Herb Tutty 
Armin Vogt 
Jacob Weber 
John Weldon 
Lee Wesen 
Bill Williams 


ROW 6: 

Earl Wineck 
Philip Wong 
Ron Wood 
Neil Wrospar 
Wesley Yates 
George Young 


ROW 7: 
Walter Zabel 
George Ziegwied 
John Zilar 


173 












Phi Delta Theta 

Sheiks and shebas danced in Ali Baba's den at 
the Phi Delt Hallowe'en dance. A few weeks 
later this room became a ski lodge for the "Tow 
For Two" dance. Posed in his ski sweater, Arnie 
Pleasant was selected as a Tolo King finalist. In 
February the room was again transformed — 
this time into a Klondike dance, with Yukon 
atmosphere. 



PRESIDENT CLAYTON UDELL entertains for the brothers. 


ROW 1: 

Larry Aho 
Larry Anderson 
Jim Andrew 
Gary Banks 
Jim Bell 
Bill Bergsten 
Neil Bloom 

ROW 2: 

Bob Bolingbooke 
Lewis Brunhover 
Claude Canfield 
Dick Capple 
Bill Ctaphom 
Ken Cooper 
Johnny Dixon 

ROW 3: 

Robert Early 

Don Easton 

Jan Engstrom 

Charles Gildersleeve 

Bob Grady 

John Gray 

Jim Greig 

ROW 4: 

Eiwood Hahn 
Walter Jellum 
Arley Kangas 
Rodney Lendstrom 
Terry Lonneker 
Jim Lord 
Mike Masterson 

ROW 5: 

Tom Me Cutchan 
Dennis Me Junkin 
Charles Mellinger 
Ralph Moffitt 
Dick Montee 
Ken Myklebust 
Buzz Nelson 

ROW 6: 

Gus Noyd 
Paul Olsen 
Arnold Pleasant 
Gary Ratzlaff 
Bob Rich 
Merle Sande 
Dave Schink 

ROW 7: 

Art Schmidt 
Roland Schoonover 
Ron Scott 
William Snow 
Dave Swendsen 
Kenneth Underwood 
John White 

ROW 8: 

Mike Yambra 


174 



















A NEW HOUSE is the highlight of the year for the Fiji's. 


Phi Gamma Delta 

This spring, as is traditional, black Fiji men with 
torches invaded women's living groups with in¬ 
vitations to their annual "Fiji Island" dance. The 
men made grass skirts for their dates, with the 
theme further carried out with coconuts, pine¬ 
apples and palm trees. They still had time to 
study, though, and received the scholarship im¬ 
provement cup. 





ROW 1: 
Jerry Abbarat 
Newton Clark 
Dan Clem 
Hohn Combes 
Jim Crutchfield 


ROW 2: 
Gerald Davis 
Pete Dawson 
Jim Donley 
Grant Emigh 
Jerry Fox 


ROW 3: 

Jim Fray 
Don Geidt 
Ronald Gilbert 
Dick Gingrich 
Tom Graedel 


ROW 4: 

Don Hurlock 
Leigh Huseby 
Richard Jensen 
Gary Kellard 
Don Labberton 


ROW 5: 
Robert Lean 
Jim Mock 
Neal Prater 
Doug Shaul 
Richard Slocum 


ROW 6: 
Gene Sutton 
Ron Thue 
Dick Wright 
John Yost 
Chris Upper 


175 











Phi Kappa 

A noteworthy honor for the Phi Kappas this year 
was the award of the scholarship improvement 
trophy to their house. Eight of their men were 
also active in campus honoraries. "Jailhouse 
Rock" was the theme of the pledge dance held 
in the winter and the annual spring formal and 
picnic filled out a good year for the Phi Kappas. 



PRESIDENT NORTON CARLSON sits with John Schultz 
after a chapter meeting. 


ROW Is 
Norton Carlson 
Mike Clift 
Perry Dahlquist 
Jon Danielson 
Lloyd Freudenstein 
John Jacobson 


ROW 2: 

Dan Jones 
Tim Lang 
Bob Marx 
Robert McFarland 
Larry Schmidt 
John Schultz 


ROW 3: 

Tom Schultz 
Dennis Schumacher 
Stephen Spak 
James Thummel 
Alan Walby 



KEEPING THE SCRAPBOOK UP TO DATE is quite a job for house members. 
















PRESIDENT DAVE ANACKER and Phi Tau members relax in the knotty pine 
chapter room and admire their enlarged crest. 


Phi Kappa Tau 

The year was highlighted with many events for 
the Phi Tau's. Two pledge dances and the annual 
Rose Formal were the primary social functions. 
In the spring, a cruise on Lake Coeur d'Alene 
was greatly enjoyed. Scholastic honors were 
achieved by winning the regional Phi Kappa Tau 
scholarship trophy. 




ROW 1: 
Fred Blackwell 
Ted Cano 
Bob Chariot 
Ken Dueker 
Ron Durkee 
Lance Erie 


ROW 2: 
Fabius 
Larry Fisher 
Jim Fox 
David Franklin 
Robert Franklin 
Bill Geist 


ROW 3: 
Eugene Gribben 
Robert Guard 
Robert Guenther 
Fletcher Hahn 
Karl Hermanson 
Gary Higgins 


ROW 4: 
Anton Johansen 
Tom Johnston 
Dewayne Lebow 
Hank Legge 
Robert Lemeke 
Clinton Leonard 



ROW 5: 

Roy Me Intosh 
Bill McMechan 
Jack Morice 
James Muller 
Gary Nelson 
Edward Stevens 


ROW 6: 

Gail Strait 
Dave Turner 
Michel Van Ackere 
Dirk Van Woerden 
Jim Wininger 


177 


























Phi Sigma Kappa 

Early in the fall, Gary Delles and Dave Roberts 
were tapped by Crimson Circle, the house's 
Homecoming float won second place and pledges 
won the Dry Run from the TKE's. After many par¬ 
ties and costume dinners, Carol Smith was se¬ 
lected as the new Moonlight Girl to reign for 
two years. A most successful year closed with 
their Sweetheart dinner. 



DAVE ROBERTS AND JIM POPE , presidents , play some ' 45 ' records for Phi Sig 
brothers. 


ROW 1: 

Dorman Anderson 
Pat Beckley 
Dave Bible 

Raymond Blumenschein 
Ted Brown 
Boyd Carlson 
James Clark 


ROW 2: 

David Cleave 
Don Dansby 
Tom Davis 
Ken Delk 
Gary Delles 
Don Ellis 

Robert Fitzsimmons 


ROW 3: 
Larry Flodin 
Charles Fry 
Bill Galbraith 
Bob Galbraith 
Jim Gies 
Jessy Hammond 
John Holmquist 



ROW 4 : 

Gary Isaacson 
Ron Jorgenson 
Noel Kane 
Jay Kene 
Al Lawson 
Boyd Lisle 
Ronald McClellan 


ROW 5: 

Bill Me Keever 
Dean Pope 
James Pope 
Leonard Ralston 
David Roberts 
Roger Schildt 
Stanley Schmick 


ROW 6: 

Herman Sebening 
Ray Seitz 
Frank Stuart 
Boyd Swent 
Curt Thomson 
Randy Thomson 
Glenn Utzman 


ROW 7: 

John Wiltse 
Skip Woodward 
Ron Worley 
Dick Zemp 

















PRESIDENT DON BURNS POINTS OUT WHAT YARD WORK needs to be done 
by Pi Kappa Alpha pledges. They don't seem to be taking Don too seriously! 


Pi Kappa Alpha 

The Pike's Dream Girl functions kept the members 
busy from March through April, when their an¬ 
nual dance was held. It was here that the Dream 
Girl of Pi Kappa Alpha was crowned. At their 
pajama dance, the house was filled with its 
members and their night-shirt clad dates. It was 
certainly an interesting spring for these men! 



ROW 1: 
Lowell Bamford 
Richard Boone 
Don Burns 
Dale Carlson 
Ray Crowder 
Balint Denes 
Gene Edwards 


ROW 2: 
Ralph Ferguson 
Carl Fetzer 
Gary Fisker 
Dave Ford 
Ken Frandsen 
Roger Frichette 
John Galley 


ROW 3: 

Jerry Glendenning 
Doug Gwinn 
Fred Hinden 
Mike Horne 
Don Howlett 
John Humphreys 
John Irwin 


ROW 4: 

Mike James 
Leonard Johnson 
Erwin Jones 
Larry Jones 
Jim Kent 
Gene Kicha 
Howard Krohn 


ROW 5: 

Jerry Look 
Jack Marler 
Dick McConnell 
Larry McPherson 
Howard Moe 
John Nettleton 
Arley Olson 


ROW 6: 

Henry Pederson 
Mike Pennachi 
Kenneth Ponti 
Donald Raistakka 
John Remington 
David Ringler 
John Ringler 

ROW 7: 

Ted Ripley 
George Scott 
Mike Snelson 
Norman Stephenson 
Gene Teal 
Charles Tidwell 
Vern Wagar 

179 









Pine Manor 

The ninety-two men of Pine Manor and their 
housemother, Mrs. McCaig, received special 
service at meals and enjoyed entertainment 
given by the girls of Stevens hall one day this 
year. They purchased the services of the girls at 
the Campus Cougar Chest auction held early in 
the spring. 












PRESIDENTS LOUIS NOTHWANG AND DICK HONSINGER enjoy a coffee hour . 


ROW 1: 
Robert Atheran 
Frank Backus 
Dave Boss6 
Jack Blain 
Willian Brandner 
Larry Calvin 
Jim Corliss 


ROW 2: 

Kermit Delzer 
David Ellis 
Roy Emtmon 
Kenny Eng 
Norman Eng 
Daryl Freter 
Ole Hoffman-Fiseher 


ROW 3: 
Wayne Fredeen 
Richard Gray 
Cleo Hendricks 
Dick Honsinger 
Dan Jerimiah 
Roy Jerimiah 
Sid Kinoshita 


ROW 4: 

Earl Knapp 
Larry Koller 
Jay Kuhn 
Bob Laughlan 
Ted Lopuszynski 
La Verne Moore 
Tom Morrill 



“COLLEGE MEN DO THE CRAZIEST THINGSI" seems to be the opinion of these three on-lookers. They are observ¬ 
ing a typical Pine Manor treeing , the product of love in the springtime. 






























Pine Manor 

Pine Manor's winter formal "Sous Le Tour Eiffel" 
was effectively carried out to actually give the 
illusion of being on the first floor of the Eiffel 
tower. A flower vender's cart contained cor¬ 
sages of sweet peas for the girls and French 
menus were found in the cafe. Despite the menus, 
the waiters served only cookies. 


TV AND CARDS provide relaxation for the Pine Manor boys. 



ROW 1: 

Charlie Munroe 
Louis Nathwang 
Rod O'Connor 
Charles Oldenburg 
Gary Owens 
Larry Owens 
Louis Palmer 


ROW 2: 
Irwin Pedersen 
Lyle Rare- 
Torn Rettig 
Ron Spangler 
Jerry Stickney 
Ron Stoffer 
Ronald Strong 


ROW 3: 
Terry Strong 
Richard Teel 
Gary Whiting 
Barry Woo 
Glen Gee Woo 
Tim Young 


A HOMECOMING FLOAT TAKES WIRE , NAPKINS, NAILS and such and oh so much patience as the boys from Pine 
Manor are finding out. 















Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

The spring was eventful for the SAE's. First they 
had their annual Gardenia formal and then 
their Sig Alph Olympics. An exciting cruise on 
Lake Coeur d'Alene and their social life came 
to a close with their traditional Woman Haters 
Week closing with a Masquerade dance. Ex¬ 
changes and studies filled the year for these men. 



ROW 1: 

Jon Anderson 
Dave Arend 
Jim Ariel! 

Len Aspinwall 
Gordon Bartol 
Don Bennett 
Ed Bliss 

ROW 2: 

Ed Bryant 
Ted Boydston 
Jim Cairns 
Ted Carlson 
Kent Christensen 
Phil Clark 
Bob Corless 

ROW 3: 

Mike Corless 
Glen Fansler 
John Gettles 
Tor Grobstok 
Gerald Gunter 
Edward Hanson 
John Hansen 

ROW 4: 

Bill Harrison 
Bob Hay 
Roy Hilliard 
Hollis Jamison 
Mert Kennedy 
Matt Kjelstad 
Bill Koidol 


ROW 5: 

Bill Lee 

Michael Mason 
Mike McLeod 
Richard Milner 
Dave Myers 
Virgil Myers 
Larry Nielsen 

ROW 6: 

Albert Osborne 
Don Peterson 
Dick Rail 

Bob Roetcisoender 
Dave Sheldon 
Chuck Shoemaker 
Jon Silvernail 

ROW 7: 

Richard Stephan 
John Stroda 
George Sybrant 
PaulTanzer 
Jack Tonkin 
Orville Trapp 
Vince Trapp 

ROW 8: 

Tom VanWell 
Al Welle 
Gary Zwicker 



182 

















SIGMA CHI'S HEAD OFFICER JACK OLSON is pictured in front of the mural in 
the living room; a group of brothers has joined him. 


Sigma Chi 

Among the achievements of the men of Sigma 
Chi this year were the raising of their scholastic 
standing, placing in the turkey trot, and third 
place in the Dads 7 Day sign contest. Their main 
social event was the selection of Alice Camp, 
Pi Beta Phi, as their new sweetheart at their 
annual formal dance in the CUB. 



ROW 1: 

Jim Baker 
Al Cromer 
Rod Dodge 
Vee Dee Drummond 
Bob Gliden 
Petter Grytness 


ROW 2: 
William Hatch 
William Hoehne 
John Holmstrom 
Jerry Lose 
Jim Lose 

Charles Mackdanz 


ROW 3: 

Larry Martin 
Philip Mathison 
Barry McConnell 
Paul McKay 
Gary Miller 
John Mitchell 


ROW 4: 

Jack Olson 
Nicholas Parrott 
Jerry Perrin 
William Pike 
James Possinger 
Dick Putnam 


ROW 5: 

Tom Russell 
Delroy Schwisow 
Jack Sibole 
Bob Steil 

Donald Thompson 
Robert Wellington 


ROW 6: 
Jon Wulff 
Robert Zuppe 


183 



































Sigma Nu 

First place in the men's division with their Home¬ 
coming float started the Sigma Nus off to a good 
year. They were also mighty proud of junior 
Dick Axelson, who was one of the starting five 
on the WSC basketball team. Their annual 
Waterfront Brawl, White Rose formal and 
Country Club dances rounded out the year's 
activities for the Sigma Nu's. 



HERBERT ARMSTRONG , PRESIDENT OF SIGMA NU f has one of the members 
point out a portion of the crest to other members. 


ROW 1: 

Ronald Adams 
Kenneth Andrews 
Herbert Armstrong 
Richard Axelson 
Barry Barrett 
Donald Bea 
Bob Burdick 


ROW 2: 
Jerry Cecchi 
Gary Costner 
Don Daniels 
Darold Doell 
Bob Driskill 
Louis Druehl 
Cal Fankhauser 


ROW 3: 

Ian Fraser 
John Gilleland 
Don Gordon 
Guy Granger 
Mike Gustin 
Stan Haase 
Jim Heckman 


ROW 4: 

Jim Heidenreich 
Deane Hilt 
Jerry Hook 
Bill Huntington 
Dick James 
Bob Kimball 
Gary Larson 


ROW 5: 
Myke Lindsay 
Don Miles 
John Novell 
Doug Parr 
Dave Paulon 
Ed Pool 
Stan Pratt 


ROW 6 : 
John Sandifer 
Dick Schaefer 
Walter Schmidt 
Les Schuller 
Bob Shaw 
Jerry Standal 
Kaye Straight 


ROW 7: 

David Stuhr 
Edward Tahmazian 
Robert Turnbow 
Lee Veith 
Fred Wexler 


184 






















AN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING MAJOR, President Mamie Hood, is assisted 
with his slide rule studying by two helpful Sig Ep members. 


Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Football season found the "House of the Red 
Door" well-represented. Socially, the year was 
a busy one. Paramount was the re-establish¬ 
ment of annual Queen of Hearts. The Sigma 
Phi Epsilon house was invaded with men from 
other campuses at the Leadership Training 
School in April. The annual pajama dance ended 
the year. 



ROW 1: 

Kay Aker 
Kirk Bardwell 
Melvin Carlson 
Bob Colwell 
Richard Corteau 


ROW 2: 
Roger Duprel 
Pat Gill 
Per Grobstok 
Chuck Heino 
Maurie Haod 


ROW 3: 
Chuck Johnson 
Don Johnston 
Dave Kuenzi 
Don Lehman 
Charles Maki 


ROW 4: 
Mike Manring 
Hale Me Phee 
Bill Newman 
Don Nieland 
Bob Noel 


ROW 5 : 

Ken Ormiston 
Ken Pettichord 
Richard Smith 
Dale Stockman 
Thorne Tibbitts 


ROW 6: 

Don Tranum 
Jack Tranum 
Dan Walther 
Harley Widmark 


185 

















Stimson 

The men of Stimson went quite political with 
Jerry Hanson on the board of control; Gerald 
Wilson, Larry Esvelt and Chuck Potter on the 
senior, sophomore and freshman executive 
councils, respectively; and Don Breitenfeldt as 
junior class president. In the spring a tea 
honored Mrs. Blake, housemother from 1923 
to 1943. 



PRESIDENT BOB FIELDS joins friends for some before-dinner refreshment. 


ROW 1: 
Perry Adkison 
Clifford Aken 
Daue Allison 
Jerry Anderson 
Mike Anglea 
David Appel 


ROW 2: 
Richard Appel 
Richard Aslakson 
Lloyd Axtell 
Ron Bailey 
Ron Bailor 
Norm Baird 


ROW 3: 

Cliff Bedell 
Wayne Belles 
Pete Benville 
Richard Bernhardt 
John Block 
Richard Braithwaite 


ROW 4: 

Don Breitenfeldt 
Arthur Brown 
Bob Burnett 
Theodore Burton 
Bruce Cameron 
Ted Capps 


ROW 5: 

Paul Carstens 
Charles Coddington 
Dick Cowin 
Zone Davis 
Tom Doan 
Norm Dornblaser 


ROW 6: 

Richard Dreger 
Larry Ernst 
Don Farr 
Roberts Fields 
Donald Filion 
Douglas Fitzpatrick 


ROW 7: 

Glen Franklin 
Don Fronek 
Dan Gadman 
Charles Goemmer 
Robert Gribben 



186 





















Stimson 

During the winter, Friday night firesides kept 
these men busy socially; but with the arrival 
of spring, water fights distracted from study time. 
The winter formal, "Sno Ball", was presented in 
December, while the spring was filled with pre¬ 
parations for the annual spring formal, the 
Bowery Ball. 


VARIOUS LITERATURE PROVIDES the Stimson boys with relaxation. 



ROW 1: 

Jay Grinnell 
Gary Grunewald 
Bruce Henry 
Richard Hosking 
Ray Hunter 
Lean Indahl 


ROW 2: 

Dick Jamar 
Brian Johnson 
Norm Johnson 
Ron Jonas 
Darrell Kassens 
Donald Kestle 


ROW 3: 
Stan Keldow 
Arvids Kiperst 
John Krogh 
Robert Krusel 
Larry Larson 
John Lawrence 


ROW 4: 

Erwin Lewis 
Don Lybecker 
Elwin Manicke 
Simon Martinez 
Michael Me Bride 
David Me Clure 


ROW 5: 

Ken Me Clure 
Jack Molsness 
George Mondick 
Don Moore 
John Mowery 
Garry Muller 


ROW 6: 
George Muie 
Denny Murback 
Gory Onstot 
Gordon Page 
Gerry Pollies 
Jerry Parlet 


ROW 7: 

Dan Pederson 
George Pederson 
Richard Pehl 
Ralph Pehrson 
Sig Petersen 


187 












Stimson 

In the spring, Bermuda class Stimsonites are 
seen in the courts behind the hall. By utilizing 
them to their fullest extent they copped the 
Class A volleyball championship two years 
straight, placed second in the Class B basketball 
finals and won the bowling trophy last spring. 



ONE O'CLOCK CLASSES INTERRUPTED the noon volleyball game , so the three 
remaining men resorted to basketball. 


ROW 1: 

Don Phillips 
Tom Plakinger 
Richard Polenske 
Owen Purser 
Tarry Rader 
Garry Ratliff 


ROW 2: 

John Repanich 
Rawlee Ridgeway 
Joe Rockom 
Robert Roffier 
Carl Rosenkilde 
Douglas Russell 



ROW 3: 

Don Schilling 
Paul Schmeil 
Norman Seilstad 
Clark Sheridan 
Allen Shockley 
Chuck Simpson 


ROW 4: 
Dick Simpson 
Duane Skeen 
Mike Skylstad 
Brent Smith 
Douglas Smith 
Ken Speegle 


ROW 5 : 

Richard Stevens 
Jon Stoneman 
George Straalsund 
Bob Strick 
Jerry Taylor 
John Thompson 


ROW 6: 
Jerome Tierney 
Duane Tolonen 
John Tonnes 
Lee Tower 
Ernest Vogel 
Don Volkman 


ROW 7: 

Paul Weintraub 
Gary Wilgus 
Bruce Wilkins 
Marvin Witherow 
Pat Wood 


188 
















Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The TKE chapter at WSC won high honor by be¬ 
ing named the most outstanding chapter by their 
national fraternity. In the fall, the TKE's won first 
place in the noise rally sponsored on Dad's Day 
weekend and concluded a busy year with their 
traditional "Little Kids' Party," a most fun dance. 


JIM ROSS , TKE PRESIDENT LAUGHING , points at a replica of his house pin. 
Maybe it's an alum. 



ROW 1: 

Tore Aaberg 
Les Aspaas 
Bill Bearse 
Fred Bendix 
Rod Dills 
Wayne Dixon 
Roger Emblen 

ROW 2: 

Dick Farrar 
Ray Foley 
Mike Fothergill 
Jim Fox 

Gordon Freeman 
John Gallagher 
Don Guilliams 

ROW 3: 

Herb Harmon 
Parke Hinman 
John Hipke 
Bill Hutsinpiller 
Tom Jackson 
Bob Johnson 
Vern Kondra 

ROW 4: 

Lowell Lancaster 
Jim Lapsley 
Mike Lemmon 
Dave Leonard 
Robert Lewis 
Wilbur Linn 
Rich Loughlin 

ROW 5: 

Robert Martin 
Mickey McDonald 
Dee Meek 
George Mundell 
Kay Norman 
Perry Overstreet 
Robert Overstreet 

ROW 6: 

Dave Parry 
Larry Phelps 
James Phipps 
Sterling Pickering 
Glen Richards 
Jerry Roslund 
James Ross 

ROW 7: 

David Rusho 
Douglas Starbuck 
Kick Steen 
Gordon Stennes 
Tom Tomtan 
Roger Torgerson 
Russ Tromley 

ROW 8: 

Mike Upshaw 
Kenneth VanBeek 
Valdis Vitums 
Vitolds Vitums 
Richard Vogel 
Tony Walter 
Mike Worth 

189 












Theta Chi 

Receiving honorable mention for their Home¬ 
coming float, "Pinocchio," was a successful way 
to start out the new year. In the spring, the an¬ 
nual dance "Limehouse Lurch," was held. The 
house was decorated as an Engilsh waterfront 
town and the costume affair was a success, as 
usual, for Theta Chi's and their dates. 



PRESIDENT BOB JENSEN HOLDS THE SKULL of an "old pledge" much to the 
amusement of the members. 


ROW 1: 

Jack Alexander 
Bob Anderson 
Allan Avery 
Blaine Barron 
Roger Blue 
Bill Carpenter 
Don Coates 


ROW 2: 
George Cooper 
Dave Gordon 
Gary Gainer 
Glo 

Jim Guard 
Jim Guess 
Denton Hanford 


ROW 3: 
Leon Jaussaud 
Robert Jensen 
Robert Kaiser 
Jerry Komp 
Brad Kuiper 
Andras Kun 
Ken Leinweber 


ROW 4: 

Jack Lillywhite 
Terry Ustello 
John Maas 
Manny Mankowski 
Jerry Me Farlane 
Gene Morehouse 
Mike Murphy 


ROW 5: 

Jim O'Neil 
Don Owens 
Greg Perry 
Norman Prewitt 
Rick Pryor 
Dave Ranger 
Doug Robison 

ROW 6: 

John Russel 
James Schaff 
Ed Sotka 
Jerry Stambaugh 
Ralph Stambaugh 
Bob Strane 
Fred Suckow 

ROW 7: 

Don Svinth 
Alan Vickery 
Ken Webster 
Jay Widby 
Richard Wojt 
Jim Woodward 
Emil Zurcher 



190 




































PRESIDENT LARRY BUTTS looks in on brothers' card game. 


Theta Xi 

Fleur-de-lis, the French lily, is both the name of 
Theta Xi's annual formal and the flower used 
for decoration. The "Dry Gulch Drag" pledge 
dance was decorated informally in western 
style, with everyone attending receiving a keg 
program. Also to be remembered is the early 
morning send-off of the football team—paired 
with Gamma Phis. 



ROW 1: 

Penny Barber 
Jerry Baugh 
Jim Birkland 
Bruce Breitenbach 
Bruce Brunton 
Larry Butts 


ROW 2: 
Mike Caldwell 
Bill Cannon 
Dick Childs 
John Clinton 
Dave Clumpner 
Greg Dibble 


ROW 3: 

Don Ellersick 
Tom Haggarty 
Dick Hankinson 
John Hibben 
Tom Hibben 
John Holzberger 


ROW 4: 
Terry Larson 
Wes LeBlanc 
Keith Miller 
Gary Neal 
Tom Nicolino 
Cliff Nopp 


ROW 5: 

Wally Sowers 
Roland Stahl 
Murray Tate 
Evan VanAntwerp 
Dave VanHersett 
Dick Ward 


ROW 6: 
Jerry Wicks 


191 


















ROW 2: 

Dick Bertholf 
Steve Blomgren 
Joe Breitenbauch 
John Bruntlett 
Robert Borns 
Fred Cornfield 


ROW 3: 

Larry Charlton 
Gerald Coffman 
Donald Cooper 
Gordon Craig 
Don Criswell 
Ed Deaton 


ROW 4: 

Monte Drummond 
Eugen Fisher 
Ed Goakey 
Bill Green 
Rod Hanneman 
Donald Hedman 


ROW 5: 

Dave Holman 
Fred Horschel 
Robert Jayne 
Al Koch 
Jack Larson 
John Ledgerwood 


ROW 6: 
Kun Lee 
Dan Martin 


Waller 


ROW It 
Ali Abbas 
Ron Ahlf 
Jim Anderson 
Juli Arinzeh 
Steve Aust 
James Breitinger 


Waller hall held its traditional fall Hog Stomp 
at the Pullman Country Club where western 
garb, square dancing, and hay bales created a 
true western atmosphere. Dick Woods gained 
fame for the hall by winning the senior elections 
to become class president and was greeted by 
a hay fight when he returned from Watchnight. 


THE RULE BOOK IS CONSULTED at the poker game between President Robert 
Burns and friends. 

















































THE WALLER HALL BOYS ENJOY AN EXCHANGE with the Alpha Delta Pi's. 


Waller 

The Christmas season brought both an open 
house and the winter semi-formal "Windsor 
Wonderland" to the dorm. Couples passed 
through a bower of evergreen to enter the 
/y warming hut" for punch and later posed be¬ 
side the corner Christmas tree for pictures. Win¬ 
ter also found the Wallerites active on "the hill" 
in campus activities. 



ROW 1: 
Michall McBride 
Doug McEwan 
Bruce McGrew 
Fred Michel 
Dave Mitchell 
Barry Mozes 


ROW 2: 

Earl Nettnin 
Douglas Nevins 
Gordon Odell 
Roy Percival 
David Pettit 
Guy Priest 


ROW 3: 

James Rhodes 
Randy Roberts 
Harold Rolph 
BarnhardtRufener 
Jack Rucker 
Fred Schillinger 


ROW 4: 
Mario Schmidt 
Myron Schmidt 
Edward Shinn 
Donald Smith 
Jim Smith 
Robert Stalder 


ROW 5: 
Charles Stocker 
Gary Sundquist 
Arthur Tucker 
Dave VanTrease 
Dennis Wolf 
Dick Woods 


ROW 6: 
Warren Yeend 
Clark Zehnder 


193 











Intramurals Build 
Good Sportsmanship 

From early fall till late spring WSCs intramural program 
provides an opportunity for over 2,000 men students to 
participate in a sport of their chosing. Under the direction 
of Bill Tomaras, campus living groups and organizations 
rival in all the traditional sports as well as a few newer 
ones as water basketball. Through this program the spirit 
of good sportsmanship is built with every male student 
having a chance to participate outside of the "big league." 
The athletics department provides the equipment and di¬ 
rection for the program while the Dads' Association do¬ 
nates trophies for team, individual and overall winners. 




WATER SPLASHES AND THE BALL SPINS OUT OF GRASP as the black caps meet the white caps in an energetic water basketball game. It 
looks easy , but oh! the aching muscles the next day. 


ACCEPTING THE INTRAMURAL WINNERS' TROPHY , Dwight Hawkes 
shakes hands with Bill Tomaras , intramural director . Beta brothers 
Pat O'Bryan and Paul Peterson stand ready to take the coveted 
trophy home. 



INTRAMURAL WRESTLERS GRAPPLE , neither seeming able to throw 
the other to the mat for that important pin. 


UP INTO THE AIR he goes for an attempted smash shot during a close 
contest with a rival house. 



194 














WITH STRIPED FLAGS ON HIPS, these flog football players show this intramural sport to be a rough and ready one. The blocking, passing 
and rushing proves a good outlet for pent up steam from the week's classes. 








k 



THE CATCHER'S READY. The batter swings as the intramural 
softball game gets underway on the field by the golf course. 



FORM IS ESSENTIAL on the flying rings, for the judge misses little in rating FAST SHUTTLE-COCK ACTION is provided in intramural bad- 

intramural gymnastic participants. minton doubles matches. 


195 



















THE CROWD'S 
end of another 



SPILLING ONTO THE TRACK after a fine and tensely fought football game marks the 
campus event the result of cooperation and hard work on the part of many. 


196 







































ATHLETICS 




























Throughout the Year, 
Rallies and Games 
Kept the 12th Man 
Spirit High 



WEARING SKIRTS IN LATE SPRING helped make up for the heavy 
sweaters required for Crimson W pledges. 



FOOTBALL CAPTAIN GAIL STRAIT was chosen "Athlete of the Year" 
for his academic and athletic activities. 



A MOST UNDIGNIFIED POSITION for a referee and members of the Idaho varsity squad. Amused spectators sang loudly , "Three Blind Mice" 
until the Idaho player's contact lens was discovered. It popped out during the game —was finally spotted by a spectator. Time lost: five minutes. 



BUTCH V SNARLED his defiance of the LED BY THE YELL LEADERS , the students 

Cougars' opponents from his cage. held rallies as the team returned. 


200 


















THE VANDALS WALKED AGAIN, trudging the nine miles to be hosted by the Cougs in the 
CUB and to receive the traditional foot washing. 



AFTER THE GAME and victory, the yell THE STANFORD RALLY was quite late, 

leaders are tired but happy. but everybody waited for the team. 

201 




PAJAMA RALLIES wound about the cam¬ 
pus streets during the fall. 



ALONG THE ROAD, hundreds of students 
waited in a huge car rally. 



THE MARCHING BAND lent color and 
spark to the half-time shows. 











GRAY W—ROW 1: Gail Strait, Jack Fanning, Larry Aho, Mike Agee. ROW 
2: Tom Tiede, Angelo Brovelli, Jim Ross, Gene English. ROW 3: Glyde 
Meek, Dick Windham, Carl Ketchie, Ivan Clemons. ROW 4: Chuck Morrell, 
Marv Nelson, Dick Rask, Lee Hall. ROW 5: Don Nelson, Gene Baker, Dick 
Rivenes, Allan Jenkins. ROW 6: Roger Duprel, Bob Newman, Ted Gray, 
Jack Eliason. ROW 7: Dick Axelson, Hollis Jamison, Chuck Hunt, Gary 
Whiting. ROW 8: Duane Ranninger, Bruce Baker, Jack Nagle, Mert Ken¬ 
nedy. ROW 9: Gary Baines, Tom McCutchan, Myke Lindsay, Dave Jones. 
ROW 10: Gene Gribbin, Phil Mast, Jim Miles, Bob Yoder. ROW 11: Don 
Ellingsen, LaRoy Rath, Allen Stout, Thorne Tibbitts. 

Posters appeared around campus announcing 
the Booster Dance sponsored by Gray W dur¬ 
ing Christmas Vacation. The annual function 
was held at the Spanish Castle to introduce the 
WSC spirit to friends. Twice during the year. 

Gray W initiates were seen around campus 
wearing plaid skirts and Gray W sweaters and 
sporting boney knees. 


Gray W Initiates 
Sport Plaid Skirts 


202 








"Suds" and the Cougars provided thrilling action during the season. Aerial passes and spec¬ 
tacular receiving combined with last quarter drives provided one of WSC's best football sea¬ 
sons in years. Exuberant crowds jammed the stands with 12th Man spirit. 


FOOTBALL 

203 











Captain Gail Strait Coaches Dan Stavely, Bob Gambold, Lloyd Torchio, Managers Jack Tranum, Bob 

Jim Lounsberry and Jim Sutherland Weller, Pat Gill 



VARSITY FOOTBALL—ROW 1: Brovelli, Farrar, Ellingsen, Rath, Verhey, Aldrich, Newman, Strait, Stevens, Morrell, Ketchie. ROW 2: Jones, 
Morrell, Agee, Fanning, Windham, Nelson, Somnis, Gray, Lindsay, West, Allerdice. ROW 3: Torchio, Lounsberry, Mast, Millsap, Johnston, 
Ellersick, Duprel, Nelson, Keech, Riyenes, Hawkes, Wilson, Gambold, Sutherland. ROW 4: Wolf, Crowell, Renfro, Kievit, Powers, Williamson, 
Smart, Morton, Stewart, Blier, Maw, Weller. 


’57 Football Year Proved 
To Be Best Season in Years 


The Cougars, emerging with their best season since 1951, powered to fourth place in 
the 9-team PCC. 

Coach Jim Sutherland's offense-minded stars won 5 and lost 3 in league play and took 
6 out of 10 starts altogether, playing before 277,149 fans for an all-time Cougar 
attendance record. 

Quarterback Bob Newman led the nation in total offense. Ends Don Ellingsen and 
Jack Fanning shared pass receiving honors on U. S. and PCC levels. Bob and Elly 
made PCC first team places, with Jack getting honorable mention. 


WSC's BOB NEWMAN prepares 
to pass to Don Ellingsen— 
both named "All American." 



204 












BOB NEWMAN BUNNY ALDRICH DAVE WILSON EDDIE STEVENS 

Quarterback Quarterback Quarterback Fullback 



LAROY RATH, Cougar halfback, twists up field across the Nebraska thirty, as his teammates run interference. 


RALLY SQUAD, PEP BAND, AND STUDENTS all formed the Stanford 
welcoming rally, and listened to Sud's words of wisdom. 



Nebraska Win, 34-12, 
Starts WSC Season 


The Cougars start the season with a bang by running over 
the Nebraska Cornhuskers, 34-12. The first game shows a 
well rounded Cougar attack combined with a stout defense. 
Verhey, Strait, and Baker are standouts in the line, while 
Newman keeps the backfield popping with passes to Fan¬ 
ning and Ellingsen. Although the dazzling WSC aerial 
circus scores four of the Cougars' TD's, the steady running 
attack grinds out more yardage, 215 to 165 yards. 

205 











Cougs Take Cal’s 
Golden Bears 13-7 


"Rose Bowl flu," spreads over the Inland Empire 
as the Cougs take Cal's Golden Bears 13 to 7. 
A crowd of 17,000 watches the Cougs march 74 
yards following the kickoff only to fumble with 
Cal recovering. Later in the first quarter. Fan¬ 
ning is all alone in the end zone to receive 
Aldrich's pass for the first TD. In the second 
quarter, Ketchie plunges over for the second 
TD. With the final gun. Suds is carried off the 
field on the team's shoulders. 



RACING DOWNF/ELD , JACK FANNING , Cougar end , leaps into the end zone, 
snagging another touchdown pass for the Cougars. 



CHUCK MORRELL AND DICK FARRAR put the stopper on Cal's fullback , Art Forbes , as he churns downfield. 


DICK WINDHAM 
Fullback 


LEE POWERS 
Fullback 


JIM RENFRO 
Halfback 


LAROY RATH 
Halfback 



206 









BEFORE THE CAL GAME—Suds 
bowed with the team 
in silent prayer. 



DURING THE GAME—Sutherland 
reviewed the Cougars' strategy. 




BOB NEWMAN, quarterback, fires another aerial as fullback Eddie Stevens blocks. 


Hawkeyes In 20-13 


AND AFTER THE GAME? Suds was 
shouldered along with victory! 


Win Over Cougars 



Although WSC comes out on the short end of the score, 
the Cougars win a tremendous moral victory in the game 
with the University of Iowa. The Hawkeyes start the game 
like the powerhouse they were reputed to be, grabbing an 
early 13-0 lead. Then WSC springs to life with an 88 yard 
drive climaxed by a TD pass. In the fourth quarter, the 
Cougs tie the score at 13-13. Late in the final period, Iowa 
recovers a fumble and punches over the winning TD. 







DON ELLERSICK 

MIKE AGEE 

PHIL MAST 

GAIL STRAIT 

Halfback 

Halfback 

Halfback 

Center 


PILOTING THE COUGARS through two touchdowns in four minutes , Newman 
fades back and throws again. 



fto sz 


ALL AFTERNOON there was wild excitement , climaxing 
Saturday night with a welcome-back rally. 


Cougars Sparkle 
in Comeback Win 


The Cougars do the impossible by scoring two 
TDs in four minutes to stun the Stanford Indians 
21-18. During most of the game the Indians have 
WSC well in hand, leading at halftime, 18-0. 
Then, with a few minutes left in the last quarter, 
things start jumping. A Newman to Fanning pass 
play goes 87 yards for a TD. Next, Baker's 
beautifully performed on-side kick is snatched 
up by Mast and the Cougs are rolling again. 
Striking through the air, Newman hits Ellingsen 
who scoots into the end zone for the winning tally. 



208 








THE NIGHT BEFORE THE GAME , a Homecoming rally was led 
by fhe enthusiastic yell squad on a sound truck. 


Ducks Sneak Past 
Butchmen, 14-13 

The Rose Bowl bound University of Oregon team, staving 
off a last quarter drive, squeezes out a 14-13 victory over 
the Crimson and Gray. The Cougars, unable to score for 
three quarters against a diligent Duck defense, try a 
gallant last period offensive. Spurred by the relentless 
running of Stevens and the potent passing of Newman the 
drive just misses by inches tieing the game as the kick for 
the try bounces off the uprights. 



WSC'S GREAT OFFENSIVE PASSER , BOB NEWMAN , hurtles a bullet pass downfield while the referee watches with a ready whistle. 


TED GRAY 
Center 


DICK FARRAR 
Guard 


MARVIN NELSON 
Center 


PERRY MORTON 
Center 






Hard Battle Fought 
With USC, 13-12 

The Cougars pull out a 13-12 win over USC when guard 
George Somnis breaks up a Trojan field goal attempt with 
20 seconds left in the game. WSCs first score comes on a 
pass in the first quarter. Brovelli makes the conversion that 
is later to win the contest. Then, after SC has pulled up 
to a 7-6 score, the highlight of the game occurs. On an 
electrifying kickoff return, Ellingsen runs 89 yards for a 
touchdown. 



WEARING WHITE SHIRTS, the card section did colored stunts. 



EDDY "THE BULL" STEVENS plunges over the USC line as the Cougs drive for yardage in this hard fought victory over Southern Cal's Trojans. 



ANGELO BROVELLI 
Guard 


RAY BLIER 
Guard 


ROGER DUPREL 
Guard 


ED KEECH 
Guard 















GEORGE SOMNIS MYKE LINDSAY DAN VERHEY GENE BAKER 

Guard Guard Tackle Tackle 



NEWMAN, (24) SWEEPING RIGHT, pitches downfield to El/ingsen, (87), os Ketchie, (26), darts forward to throw a block into an Oregon 
State lineman. 



INTENTLY WATCHING THE PLAY, the referee is close to the action, 
ready with his red flag for any penalty. 


Beavers Outscore 
Cougars, 39-25 

WSC plays a bang up offensive game but not one good 
enough to keep up with the 1957 Rose Bowl Oregon State 
team. The Cougars outgain the Beavers in net yardage, 
but a lax defense hurts them. Newman, sensational, as 
usual, racks up the aerial yardage while Ketchie pounds 
out yardage on the ground. The Cougars pulled to a 13-12 
score just before the half but never can quite catch the 
Beavers. 


211 








BEN STEWART 
Tackle 


AL WILLIAMSON 
Tackle 


LELAND WOLF 
Tackle 


VEL WEST 
Tackle 



AN ALDRICH TO FANNING AERIAL gave the capacity crowd at Spokane a thrill as Jack fell but still caught the ball. 


Cougars Lose 
to Bruins, 19-13 

WSC loses a heartbreaker to UCLA as the Bruins 
roar back in the second half to win, 19-13. The 
Bruins take an early 6-0 lead but the Cougs 
zoom back to lead at halftime, 13-6. Having 
their passing game bottled up by an alert UCLAN 
defense, the Cougars rely on an improved 
running game headed by Ketchie and Ellersick. 
The winning TD comes in the dying minutes. 



RESTING IN THE LOCKER ROOM IN SPOKANE, fhe Cougs wait for game time. 
Outside, 27,000 fans are assembling in the grandstands. 






Cougars Take 
Vandals, 21-13 

Thrills, chills, one yard stands are highlights as 
WSCs aerial attack, sparked by Newman, de¬ 
feats Idaho on Dad's Day. The first TD is set up 
by Newman to Cogdill on a 47 yard pass. Ket- 
chie dives over for the touchdown. Fanning stabs 
a 34 yard pass from Newman for the second TD. 
The Vandals' sceond try is blocked, their next 
TD attempt is held at the goal line, then New¬ 
man rolls to the right, hits Rath for the third TD. 



HAIL POUNDED DOWN during the action against the Vandals , but Newman successfully piloted the Cougs to victory. 



JONES , MAW AND MORRELL FOLLOW the gridiron battle with the Vandals. 



213 













Cougars Humiliate 
Husky Rivals, 27-7 

In what Suds terms "a terrific game" the Cougars, by 
smooth passing and running attacks, befuddles a shaky 
Husky pass defense and crippled their split-T offense. 
Supported by a powerful Cougar line. Rath and Aldrich 
score the first two TDs. In the fourth quarter, piloted by 
Newman, Ellingsen and Fanning each receive TD passes. 
Victoriously carrying Suds shoulder-high, the team leaves 
the field and a satisfying season. 



SUDS CONGRATULATES HIS FINE TEAM at one of the welcoming- 
back rallies and emphasises the value of team support for the Cougs. 



A HUSKY BACK TWISTS UPFIELD as his teammates clear Cougar interference. Elly heads off the ball-carrier . 


DWIGHT HAWKES 
End 


DON ELLINGSEN 
End 


JACK FANNING 
End 


GARY MORREL 
End 


214 


GAIL COGDILL 
End 





















MAJORETTES SHARON WILBUR and Dorothy Berg pro¬ 
vided half-time entertainment with flaming, twirling batons 
and acrobatic routines. 


FOOTBALL RALLIES ON FRIDAY evenings before a home 
game brought enthusiastic supporters flocking to the stands 
with their noise-makers. 




THE ACTIVE YELL SQUAD kept the rallies alive and spirited. Verl Wheeler ran 
the megaphone which was used to reach even the furtherest rooter at rallies. 



TWELFTH MAN SPIRIT WAS BEHIND THE COUGARS all the way during the 
football season. With each away game, the team was given a send-off rally 
of signs and chants. 



LEADING THE SPIRITED ROOTING SECTIONS as yell leaders were Amy 
Lombard, Judy DePree, Janet McBride, Sue Marsh, Sara Jo Belles, Irene 
Sfurnza, Thorne Tibbifts, Verl Wheeler and Woody Davis. 


215 








FROSH FOOTBALL COACH DAN STAVELY works 
with a Coubabe. 


Frosh Expected 
to Bring Depth 

Varsity Coach Jim Sutherland expects much in¬ 
dividual help from the '57 Frosh football squad 
despite their record of only one win in three 
starts. Coubabes trounced Idaho 27-0 after losing 
a 7-20 struggle to Washington and a 19-26 
Donnybrook to OSC. Seventeen of the frosh 
team were high school all-stars. 



A FROSH GRIDDER tucks the ball in and scoots around end. 


216 


FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM—ROW 1: Gordon Thompson, John Bass, Todd Parker, Norm Harding, Bill Berry. ROW 2: John Madsen, Jim 
Greig, Garner Ekstran, Bob Henderson, Lee Schroeder. ROW 3: Dick Copple, Denny Martin, Walter Altobelli, Denny LeMaster, Colin Perry. 
ROW 4: Barry Barrett, Rich Loughlin, Ernie Smith, Jr., Valdis Vitums, Harley Widmark. 







SENIOR NOEL BROWN , a leading scorer , performs on the flying rings 
during a dual meet with U of W. 


217 



PRECISION FORM IS SHOWN by side horse specialist , Jack 
Smith , as he competes in Bohler. 


Gymnasts Have 
Successful Season 


Coach Hubie Dunn turned out his usual gym¬ 
nastics team of top talent, holding a dual meet 
record of 3 wins and one loss, winning against 
U of BC and U of W thrice, and losing once to 
Washington. Rated as favorites to win the Pa¬ 
cific AAU Championships, they placed second, 
four and one-half points behind U of W. 


GYMNASTICS TEAM—ROW Is Jay Eliason, Allan Jenkins, Ivan Clemons, Thorne Tibbitts, Jerry Storie, Bill Hammond. ROW 2: Noel Brown, 
Jack Otterson, Van Vurris, Charles Hunt, Bob Booth, Jack Smith, Coach Hubie Dunn. 

















ii 

Ml* 




1 i L A ■ . J^\ 



M 



BOXING TEAM—ROW 1: Le Roy Hannas, Dick Rail, Bob Cornwall. ROW 2: Bill 
Maloney, Jim Blomness, Jess Klinkenberg, Darrell Whitmore, Larry Largent. 
ROW 3: Ike Deeter, Tom O'hara, Fred Snodgrass, Gale Palmquist, Don Borozan, 
Lee Powers, Jim Kimura. 


WARILY EYEING one another, PETE INGRAM, equipment man , checks 
they watch for an opening. Cornwall's headgear before a bout. 



A CO UG ADVANCES on his opponent in Bolher. 


Boxers Have 
Competitive Year 

Ike's leatherthrowers wind up their season with 
a four to one win-loss record and with a tie 
to Wisconsin. Travelling to Reno, the boxers 
place second in the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate 
Tournament, with Dick Rail and Jim Keys taking 
championships. Two weeks later, the sophomore 
laden team places third in the NCAA Tourna¬ 
ment. Rail cops his third National Crown while 
Klinkenberg takes his first. With the loss of only 
Rail and with good frosh replacements, Ike warns, 
"Wail 'till next year." 



WHAM! A WSC boxer finds an opening and lands a 
staggering left hook . 


218 





















BASKETBALL 

219 


END OF A THIRTY YEAR ERA OF COACHING at WSC found Jack Friel's last season as basketball mentor full of tense action on the backboards 
and court. Crowds packed the gym for each home game . 
















ALL AGES JAMMED BOHLER GYM to watch intensely fought 
basketball games. 



BILL GALBRAITH JIM "PEANUTS" ROSS 

Forward Guard 



A USC PLAYER LEAPS HIGH into the air to intercept a Cougar pass. Maras and Galbraith spring forward to check him. 


USC 

67 

54 

Stanford 

57 

58 

WSC 

65 

49 

WSC 

64 

53 


WSC nearly upsets the Trojans. The first game is a bitter 
loss for the Cougars who fight back twice during the second 
half after trailing by as much as ten points. Bill Galbraith 
leads the scoring as the Cougs tie it up with 14 seconds left. 
WSC, suffering from inaccuracy on the foul line, improves 
its free-throw average in the second game but scores only 
29 per cent from the field. Maras is high scorer for WSC. 


The Cougars shock Stanford in the PCC opener. Led by 
Jim Ross scoring 21 points and John Maras adding 17, 
WSC makes a runaway of the game in the second half. 
They play a controlled game and keep adding to the score 
as the over eager Indians try to get the ball. It doesn't seem 
to be the same ball club that loses to the Indians in the 
second game. 


220 








DICK AXELSON JOHN MARAS MERT KENNEDY DICK RASK 

Forward Center Guard Guard 



THE PHI SIGS BROUGHT A SIGN to honor Gailbraith on his lost 
night on the Cougar basketball court. 



COACH FRIEL YELLS encouragement to the hard fought Cougar 
offense, struggling to get the rebound. 



COUGAR CENTER , John Maras grapples with a UCLAN player 
for the ball. 


California 57 59 
WSC 32 48 

California, the PCC champs, show WSC their heels as they 
convincingly win both contests. The Bears are not in top 
form for either contest, but the Cougars are not able to 
take advantage. In the first game, California hits 27 per 
cent from the floor while WSC hits only 23 per cent. After 
intermission, the Bears are never threatened as a stout 
defense and sharp rebounding sews up the Cougars. In 
the second game Maras takes high point honors with 11 
points. 


221 











COACH FRIEL AND A LINE OF SHOOTSTERS intently follow 
the Cougar defeat. 


PAUL RONHAAR 
Center 


JOHN NIELSON 
Center 



UNDAUNTED BY HIS OREGON CHECKER , Moras lays a hook shot. Paul Ronhaar darts toward the backboard to get the rebound. 


Idaho 85 67 Oregon 63 51 

WSC 67~~58 WSC 45 65 


A polished Idaho team rolls over WSC twice to drop the 
team into the PCC cellar. Mert Kennedy in the first game 
and Paul Ronhaar in the second game are Cougar high 
point men as they each score 16 counters. Gary Simmons 
is the Vandal's big gun as he swished in 25 points each 
night. The Cougars are cold on the foul line, particularly 
in the second game. 


The Cougars lose the first game to the University of Oregon 
in Pullman but turn around to pull an upset victory in Eu¬ 
gene. Dick Axelson with 19 points leads the victory quin¬ 
tet. The Cougar squad leads at intermission 29-27, but 
then get underway in the second half as they pull away 
from the the surpised Ducks. 


222 








COME ON! Moke that free throw. 


UCLA 72 64 
WSC 64 44 

The UCLA Bruins take the Cougars in both con¬ 
tests. The first game in Los Angeles is close until 
the last quarter. At half time the score is tied 
at 31-31. The final tally is 72-64. The second 
game in Pullman gets off to an exceedingly slow 
start but ends with the Bruins pulling away. The 
slow moving game is exemplified by the seven- 
five score after 10 minutes of play. Despite the 
low scoring, Maras takes high point honors with 
16 points. 




TOM JACKSON BRUCE BAKER DUANE RANNIGER MIKE AGEE JIM MILES 

Forward Forward Guard Guard Guard 


223 

















DECKED WITH LEIS, the Friels are presented with vacation tickets to Hawaii 
by players of the past 30 years. 


uw 

68 

41 

WSC 

62 

58 


The Cougs drop the first contest to the Huskies 
but rebound to celebrate the "Jack Friel Night" 
in Seattle with a win. WSC is off on shots from 
the floor in the first game. They hit 27 per cent 
compared with the Husky's 42 per cent. Again 
Maras tops all scorers with 16. A tough Cougar 
defense does the trick in the second game. The 
Huskies never get close in the second half as 
Ross, the high point man with 16, is the tiger 
of the WSC attack. 


224 



RECAPS OF THE BASKETBALL SEASON show fast action on the court and off the backboards as the Cougs battle for victory. 


NA §ilHGT0H 














osc 

wsc 


69 67 

31 62 

The title hungry Oregon State Beavers run rough 
shod over the Cougars in the first game and win 
a tough battle in the second. The Cougs hit their 
lowest mark of the season in their tally of 31 
points as they are outclassed all the way by 
OSC. In the wild and fast second game, the 
aroused WSC quintet almost wins the final game 
for retiring Coach Jack Friel; Dick Rask and Jim 
Ross are a real worry to OSC while Maras pours 
in 16 points for high man honors. 

225 



GUARDS MIKE AGEE AND JIM MILES slip out of their warm-up suits and 
prepare to enter the game. 


THE TALLEST PLAYERS FOR THE COUGARS , Galbraith , Ronhaar and Maras demonstrate their ability as ball handlers. 










WSC'S GEORGE S/MCHUK whips around TORE AABERG displays the excellent jumping form which won him national recognition in the 
the poles in the icy Slalom course. NCAA meet. 




SKIING TEAM—ROW Is Tore Aaberg, Donald Wells, Bruno Reichter. ROW 
2: Phil Clark, George Simchuk, Ed Keech, Chuck McKillop, Ron Demaray, 
Roger Emblen, Herman Sebening. 


Skiers Traveled 
to Find Snow 

Lack of snow on the campus brought the skiing 
season unherald to all but the skiing team. While 
the campus wondered where the snow was, the 
slat-men were skimming over its surface at Banff, 
Rossland, Kimberly and Snoqualmie Pass. 
Averaging about second place in most of the 
meets, the highlights of the team were the in¬ 
dividuals. Simchuk did well as a freshman while 
Tore Aaberg topped the honors by gaining three 
firsts and two seconds in intercollegiate meets 
and placed second in the nation for his specta¬ 
cular jumping. Also skiing for WSC was Herman 
Sebening, German cross-country champ. 

226 















SPRINGING FROM RACING STANDS , splashers leap into action. COACH DOUG GIBB speaks to Emory Hayworth , Cougar star. 


Splashers Rebuild 
For Comeback 

Swim mentor Doug Gibb began a gigantic 
building program with eleven sophomores after 
his poor season of last year. His splashers, rated 
as dark horses, proved they were in the running 
as they won four and lost two dual meets against 
UW, OSC, Idaho, Western and U of BC. Tra¬ 
veling to the Northern Division meet, the squad 
placed third. Lead by Captain Tom Tomtan, and 
sparked by Emory Hayworth (All ND Team and 
NCAA finalist), the Cougs started an excellent 
comeback. 



SWIMMING TEAM—ROW 1: Del Chase, Tom Tomtan, Jack Gubrud, 
Bill Bennet, Emory Hayworth. ROW 2: Dave Cleave, Dan Woodward, 
John Maas, Dennis Twibel, Karl Fetzer, Ernie Schick. 


227 

























VARSITY RIFLE TEAM MEMBERS sight in on a 
forget in the rifle range while another peers 
through a spotting scope. 



VARSITY RIFLE TEAM—ROW 1: Harry Banan, Robert Grossman, Larry Garrison, Lawarence 
Coppock, Henry Bocella. ROW 2: Edward Bryant, Jerry Jensen, Richard Gibford. 


Cyrano Club 


Varsity Rifle Team 


Zoro's counterparts on the WSC campus lack his flowing 
black cape, plumed hat and mask but zealously don torso 
jackets and face guards to fence on Wednesday nights. 
The club takes its name from Cyrano de Bergerac, the 
long-nosed Don Juan of French Literature. Fencing addicts 
meet with their adviser. Dr. Charles Drake, to practice 
"engarde" with the romanticism of old French dueling 
swords, the epee, foil and saber. 


Cougar sharp shooters won 14 of their 18 postal matches 
fired during the year. Coached by Master Sargent, Harry 
Banan, and advised by Captain Henry Boccella, the team 
fired in national competition at the NRA meet, placing 94th 
against 230 other colleges. Composed mostly of members 
of the Army and Air Force rifle teams, the team is con¬ 
sidered a varsity sport and its members are eligible for 
Grey W and a varsity letter. 



FENCING TEAM—ROW 1: David Jenkins, 
Charles Drake. ROW 2: Jim Ayling, Ted Lopus- 
zynski, Niell Johnson. 


IN THIS MODERN ERA , a tinge of romanticism still appears at WSC as members of the 
Cyrano club plunge and parry like modern Zoros. Sw/t , swish , fly the foils as the two 
combatants retreat and advance. 


228 

























WRESTLNG TEAM—ROW 1: Tom McCutchan, Jack Nagle, Bill Randall, Jim Chapman, 
Cash Stone, Bill Tomaras. ROW 2: Tom Tiede, Phil Mast, Hollis Jamison, Jack May, Dick 
Rivenes, Mike Meek. 



A COUGAR WRESTLER has his head tucked 
under and his shoulders nearing the mat for 
a pin . 


Tomaras Builds Team 

Returning from doctoral studies. Coach Bill Tomaras be¬ 
gan rebuilding the wrestling team. Training hard, the squad 
lost it first two matches, then won the next five matches 
straight in a row. The grapplers then traveled to the PCI 
tournament where Cash Stone took the Championship at 
130 pounds. Placing sixth on the coast, the wrestlers had 
a good season for a rebuilding year and promise a po¬ 
tential threat with their up and coming frosh prospects. 



TWO STRUGGLING MAT-MEN try to force each other down as the 
refreee intently watches the straining wrestlers. 



COUGAR GRAPPLER MIKE MEEK straddles an opposing wrestler 
and prepares to drop his kneeling opponent to the mat to gain 
a quick decision. 



CAPTAIN BILL RANDAL up-ends his Oregon opponent with a quick 
jerk and leg trip. The University of Oregon wrestlers , however, 
won the match. 


229 




















GARY WHITING ARNIE PLEASANT DAVE JONES FLOYD DAMON 

Catcher Infielder Infieider Infielder 



VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM—ROW Is Jack Nagle, Dick Windham, Dave Jones, George Van Horn, Elwood Hahn, Bob Bolingbroke, Dick 
Montee. ROW 2: Gary Whiting, Oscar Undeberg, Jerry Beck, Arnie Pleasant, Larry Green, Kick Ketchel, Larry Aho. ROW 3: Buck Bailey, 
Floyd Damon, Joe Schomer, Jim Cline, Arley Kangas, Bob Noel, Marvin Kirkeby. 


MEMBERS OF THE FROSH BASEBALL TEAM are shown just before 
game time. The frosh displayed good ball handling talent during 
their games. 



From the ND Cellar 
to Second Place Tie 

With no place to go but up, Bailey's team did just that. 
The sophomore-studded team came within one game of 
winning the northern division baseball championship. Be¬ 
ing in the cellar last spring, fine pitching and good hitting 
brought WSC's baseballers to a nine-five conference re¬ 
cord and a second place tie with Oregon. With all three 
hurling aces back next year, WSC will be a pennant threat 
all the way. 

230 














Cougs Outplay OSC 
Throughout Season 


Baileymen Down UW 
Early In Season 

Playing a busy road schedule, the Cougars downed Wash¬ 
ington 5-3, 9-6 to place themselves at the top of the young 
Northern division. Two home runs won for WSC as Wind¬ 
ham clouted one in the seventh with two men on, and 
Damon later came through with another round tripper. 
Montee and Hahn were credited with Friday and Saturday 
victories. 



"WHAT DO YOU WANT FROM ME? A hand-out". I'm doing every¬ 
thing t can to get his game going" Coach Buck Bailey seems to say. 


In home and road competition, the Cougars took a three 
win, one loss series from Northern Division champion OSC. 
Smashing the Beavers 20-5 in the opener, the Cougs lost 
the second game 3-2, dropping to second place. Later, in 
final competition, the Baileymen blast OSC 14-5 and 3-2, 
moving the Cougs to a second place tie with OSC in 
Northern division play. 



FIRST BASEMAN FLOYD DAMON catches a runner off-base and 
darts forward to tag him out. 



LARRY AHO 
Infielder 


BOB BOLINGBROKE 
Pitcher 


ARLEY KANGAS 
Catcher 


BOB NOEL 
Infielder 


JACK NAGLE 
Outfielder 


231 











Oregon Victory 
Puts WSC in Tie 



A RUNNER GALLOPS TOWARDS FIRST as the first baseman plants his foot on 
the sack and reaches forward to snag the ball. 


Traveling to Eugene for a clash with the Oregon 
Ducks the Cougs bowed to the heavy bats of 
Oregon in both games, six-two, eight-one. This 
dropped WSC to third place. In the next series, 
the Cougs gunned for double victory and a crack 
at the ND title. Winning both games, 14-8, 16-9, 
the Baileymen were tied with first place OSC. 



REMINISCING before their final college games are 
seniors Dick Windham , Gary Whiting , George Van Horn. 


Homerun Kills 
Title Chances 

In action against the Vandals WSC won two and 
lost two, but the final series was the paradox 
of ND play. Idaho was fighting to stay out of 
the cellar and WSC was gunning for the title. A 
tenth inning homer in the last game by Idaho 
killed title hopes for the Cougars. Had WSC 
won they would have been the northern division 
champs. 



ELWOOD HAHN 
Pitcher 


DICK WINDHAM 
Outfielder 


MARVIN KIRKEBY 
Catcher 


GEORGE VAN HORN 
Pitcher 


DICK MONTEE 
Pitcher 


232 












JOE SCHOMER 
Outfielder 


BILL LEBOW 
Infielder 


JERRY BECK 
Pitcher 


JIM CLINE DICK KITCHEL 

Infielder Pitcher 


« 



DICK WINDHAM, center fielder for the Cougars, completes another COUGAR CATCHER GARY WHITING connects again. Gary batted 
run as team mate Larry Aho waves him in. third in the Northern Division at .404. 



Young Ball Club Had Fine Playing Season 


Buck Bailey's sophomore-strengthened diamond crew 
played the most dramatic Cougar baseball of all time. 
After an early road string of wins, the nine finished strong 
to come within one pitched ball of taking the bunting, los¬ 
ing Northern division honors at Idaho. Over the season, 
WSC whipped champion OSC in three out of four starts. 


Northern Division Baseball Standings 



w 

L 

Pet. 

Oregon State .... 

. . . 10 

4 

.714 

Washington State . 

... 9 

5 

.643 

Oregon. 

... 9 

5 

.643 

Idaho. 

... 4 

11 

.267 

Washington. 

... 3 

10 

.231 


233 






















AL BUSH, ONE OF THE SOPHOMORE STRENGTHS, leans into to serve, ready 
to smash the ball across the net. 


Net Men Gain 
Wide Experience 

Tennis gained new stature as a conference sport 
under Coach John Woods. Rebuilding the dying 
sport on the campus proved to be no easy chore, 
but under Wood's guidance the all sophomore 
team gained valuable experience with their sea¬ 
son record of four wins, six losses. The team also 
entered the first annual PCC tennis champion¬ 
ships in Seattle. The frosh proved to be the out¬ 
standing netmen as they racked up a record of 
seven wins to one loss. High-flying and potent, 
the frosh even beat the varsity teams of Seattle 
U and Cheney. 



TENNIS TEAM— ROW 1: Phil Mathison, John Woods, 
Gary Ratzlaff. ROW 2: Douglas Smith, George Zieg- 
wied, Allen Bush. 


234 
















TEAM CAPTAIN ROGER BOYD checks out a new iron 
with Coach Jack Friel. 


Linksters Liked 
Palouse Spring 

Early spring weather arrived in Pullman and the 
campus broke out in a rash of bermudas and 
sunbathers. As the days grew even warmer, the 
golf team began to practice under the direction 
of Coach Jack Friel. The Cougar links-men 
played northern division schools compiling a 
record of four wins, six losses. Only two team 
members were lettermen, the rest of the team 
were new to the squad. At the end of the sea¬ 
son, the golfers traveled to Palo Alto to compete 
in the PCC tournament and fell 10 points behind 
OSC and 8 points behind the U of W. 



GOLF TEAM—Coach Friel, Len Johnson, Ron Sanders, 
Roger Boyd, Perry Overstreet, Charles Gildersleeve. 



THE GOLF COURSE SPORTS ONLY TWO SANDTRAPS but inevitably ... Len 
Johnson blasts his ball out in a burst of Palouse sand. 


235 













Track Season Is 
Record Setting Year 

Rated second in pre-season line-ups. Coach Jack Moo- 
berry's thinclads proved this to be a fair prediction. Taking 
second at the Northern division Relays and strongly over¬ 
running Idaho, the tracksters fell to Oregon but retaliated in 
crushing OSC and U of W. Traveling to the coast and the 
Northern division meet, the squad placed third, then, Arlt 
took first, Rubenser second, and Ellingsen third, in the 
PCC tournament placing WSC sixth on the coast. It was 
a good season as Frye, Fanning, Arlt and Maw set new 
records, it was hampered only by the injuries of Maw, 
Keranen and Caldwell. 



DURING A TRACK MEET UNDER PERFECT SKIES , Track Coach Jack 


Mooberry discusses the events with Jack Fanning. 



TRACK TEAM—ROW 1: Don Walters, Niel Dahmen, Lee Hall, Bob Yoder, Jay Booth, Ken Delk, Larry Flodin, Floyd Richmond. ROW 2: Gene 
Hokanson, Don Ellingsen, Jim Malinowski, Gene English, Dave Rich, Duane Keranen, Jack Fanning, Don Maw. ROW 3: Jim Ayling, Jim 
Seely, Gene Gribbon, Vel West, Steve Fry, Don Nelson, Duane Ranniger, Walter Arlt, Dick Rubenser, Don Cresswell, Jack Mooberry. 



WSC'S "SPIKE" ARLT and "Flowing" Flodin leap out over the high hurdles in the dual meet against Washington. 


236 










DUANE KERANEN , last year's point getter for the Cougars , saw 
limited action due to a pulled ham string. 



SPIKE ARLT BREAKS THE STRING in the 220-yard dash as team mates 
Dave Rice and Floyd Richmond place second and third. 


Cougar Thinclads 
Blast Vandals 97-34 

Showing astonishing strength, the track squad overran 
Idaho in the first northern division meet. Frye placed first 
in the shot put; Spike Arlt won the high and low hurdles; 
Maw took both the 100 and 220-yard dashes; and Ru- 
benser copped first in the javelin throw while Booth, 
running the mile for the first time, placed a strong third. 





STEVE FRYE, SHOT PUT RECORD BREAKER, puts one out there. 


Cougars Crush 
Beavers 94V2 to 35 

Cleanly sweeping the event on the windy and wet track, 
the Cougar tracksters lost only one event, the half mile, to 
Oregon State. Winners included English, Arlt, Yoder, Fan¬ 
ning, Frye, Nelson, Rubenser, Hall, Gresswell and Maw. 
Fanning, Arlt and Maw smashed the old OSC-WSC dual 
records in their respective events. 


237 








POLE VAULTER, JACK FANNING , clearing the bar at 14 feet sets 
an all-time Rogers field record. 


Cindermen Tromp 
UW Trackmen 71-60 


A hot day under perfect skies saw several records fall 
as WSC scalped Washington. Jack Fanning set a time re¬ 
cord for Rogers field in the pole vault while Steve Frye 
set a new dual meet record. Taking firsts were: Arlt, in 
the high and low hurdles and the 220-yard dash; Keranen, 
high jump; Rubenser, javelin; Rich, 100-yard dash. 



IN THE MILE RELAY , Gene English hands off to Gene Gribbon who 
digs in his cleats and spurts forward. 


DON MAW WAS THE POINT GAINER IN THE SPRINTS for the WSC thinclads until the U of W dual meet. In the 100 yard dash 
Mow led all the way until he pulled a hamstring which kept him from the northern division meet. 
















BEVERLY ANDERSON 
WRA President 


DORIAN HARRIS 
WRA Vice-President 



JOAN COART 
WRA Secretary 



JO BURY 
WRA Treasurer 



HELEN SMITH 
WRA Adviser 

239 


WRA Sponsors Fun for Coeds 
In Areas That Follow Seasons 

Just about everybody benefits from Women's Recreation association. This happy con¬ 
dition stems from an organization with some five hundred members and representa¬ 
tives of all women's groups that is so de-centralized that its many component units 
provide opportunity for almost any physical activity any girl could want. In fact 
through weekly co-recreation WRA even does a casual bit of direct service to men. 
But it is the health and fun and comradeship of girls that is the real concern of the 
key group of the officers, whose adviser is the chairman of the department of physi¬ 
cal education for women—Miss Helen G. Smith. Divisions include Fish Fans, Orchesis, 
Do-si-do, Sports club. Bowling club, and Crimson-W for girls active in two or more 
areas. 

Year-round intramural competition rolls on through the changing seasons to keep the 
girls sharp and active and to stimulate purposeful, fun-loaded play indoors and out in 
the great athletic plant that WSC provides. No team ever sets out to lose, but WRA girls 
are equally concerned with sportsmanship and how the game is played as they are 
with the distinct honor attached to each trophy or title that is won. Opportunity also 
comes in several sports for the best of the co-ed athletes to compete against teams 
from other colleges and universities. This intercollegiate competition, though, is a far 
cry from that in men's sports, with its lack of crowds or much public notice and with 
short seasons and deliberate de-emphasis on most everything but fair play and each 
girl giving her very best efforts. Much WRA activity is non-competitive. 


WRA COUNCIL—ROW 1: Pat Smith, Dorian Harris, Beverly Anderson, Joan Coart, Joanne Bury, Shi Rains. ROW 2: Helen Smith, Gloria 
Bassett, Edith Arnold, Arlene Bartles, Nancy Williams. 



















Lively Sports Club 
Attended Many 
Pacific Northwest 
Play Day Battles 


WRA SPORTS CLUB MEMBERS PRACTICE fo gei in 
shape for the hectic UBC playday. 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS CLUB—ROW 1: Helen Burgess, Janet Hawkins 
Kay Selde, Arlene Bartles. ROW 2: Gerri Moore, Mary Hammer, Sharon Kinder. 
Gertie Burton, Pat Hagen. 



M/SS COLEMAN INSTRUCTS SPORTS CLUB GIRLS in the finer arts of defending 
the bases against heavy hitters. 



VOLLEYBALL GIVES LOTS OF ACTION to Sports Club members—at least when 
the ball comes their way. 



SPORTS CLUB HOCKEY PLAYERS EAGERLY LOOK FORWARD to the exciting 
playday in Eugene, Oregon , most exciting event of the Sports Club year. 




















GIRLS FROM MANY LIVING GROUPS have participated this year in WRA's intramural program. A total of eight sports are offered, both 
for individuals and for teams. Turning out for these activities gives the girls healthful exercise and a lot of fun besides. 


241 



















SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING ON MOTHERS' WEEKEND 
climaxed Fish Fans' eventful year. 




FISH FANS MOTHER'S DAY PERFORMANCE was livened up by the 
clowning of Fish Fans' favorite scarecrow. 


Girls Honor Mothers 
With Entertainments 
In Pool and by Dance 


FISH FANS—ROW 1: Leona Skinner, Dana Alsworth, Jonelyn Johnson, Nancy Hegler. Jo Bury, Sharon Simpson. ROW 2: Marilyn Spray, 
Carol Armitage, Sharon Wilber, Joan Coart, Sharon Justice, Molly Melcher. ROW 3: Mary Lee Smith, Edith Arnold, Anita Parrott, Janet 
Hougen, Doris Ridpath, Kathy Barbo, Agnes McQuarrie, Mary Wiggins, Gerry Valen, Billy Jo Lusk, Sue Wescott, Marilyn Sanford, Donna 
Lawrence, Carol MacPherson, Mary Welsch, Gerry Moore, Arlene Pehrson, Judy Goffrey, Camille Nelson, Marietta Parrish, Sue Lovelace, 
Judy Flynn, Aaren Agee, Marcelle Bevaart, Sandi Pauley, Martha Wicker, Kay Huson, Judy Webster, Marcelle Ames, Jean Goller, Marylyn 
Gaiser. 













"LAST ONE IN THE POOL is a Dirty GertieI" BOWLING CLUB MEMBERS BOWL THOSE PINS OVER getting 

ready for the intercollegiate telegraphic meets. 


Telegraphic Competition 
Thrills Girl Bowlers; 
Dancers with Do-Si-Do 
Do Intricate Squares 



"SWING YOUR PARTNER IN A RIGHT HAND STAR" 
is executed with precision by members of Do-Si-Do. 



243 
















SPLASHING, DIVING, RACING, STUNTING, all these are featured on Friday nights as fellows and gals take advantage of the swimming fun 
offered at Co-Rec. 


Co-Rec Gives 
Fun and Frolic 
to Men, Coeds 

COMBINING SKILL AND FUN, these four play badminton at Co-Rec to get in shape for 
badminton intramurals . Looks like fun! 



244 


CRIMSON W—ROW 1: Marilyn Ott, Marilyn Gaiser, Dorian Harris, Gloria Bassett. ROW 2: Shi Rains, Edith Arnold, 
Sandra Barker, Beverly Anderson. 















LIMELIGHT 












The Limelight Falls 
As Curtains Rise 
Or Bands Pause 
for Entering Queen 



THE HI LO'S stop for coffee break in the Cub lounge after 
their performance. 



THE QUEEN MOTHER is crowned by Handsome Harry at May Day 
festivities as May court looks on. 



NOT ALL GUEST SPEAKERS ARRIVE ON THE WSC CAMPUS so illustriously as by hellicopter. 



CAMPUS BANDS provide music for 
a multitude of events — 3-D dance here. 



THEE I DUB "Knight of Night" 
goes the ceremony. 


246 













WAITING BACKSTAGE, some faces are intent but others relax enough to play a 
few hands of cards. 



NOT ALL IS GLAMOR in 
running for queen. 



A JAM SESSION STARTS and students 
are intent only on the music. 



THE JUNIOR PROM COURT arrived on 
an oriental trailer. 



FIRST, GREASE PAINT and the 
start of a dark beard . . . 


A FINISHED FACE—a different 
personality emerges. 



247 















IN THE STRANGELY HAUNTING "RAIN-MAKER " Donna McManis has her belief 
in her womanhood restored as Robert Turnbow, in the title role, becomes all 
things to this stricken farm family. 



THE DROUGHT BELT FARM FAMILY sits spellbound as 
"The Rain-Maker" demonstrates. 


Theater Goers See 
Comedy, Tragedy 

The curtain parts on Bryan stage and the audi¬ 
ence warms to the "Rain-Maker," directed by 
Charles Jones. Later, another audience is capti¬ 
vated by "The Playboy of the Western World," 
a rollicking Irish satire. Still later some of these 
once happy faces in the audience turn to grief 
as the tragedy, "Hedda Gabler," is presented 
under the directing skill of Joseph Wigley. Again 
in a lighter moment, Bryan theater goers see 
"The Happy Time." This play, as was "Playboy" 
was directed by Raymond Jones. 


248 
















JUDY JOHNSON IN "PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD " plots to 
advance from widow's weeds to bridal clothes. 





MARLO SCHMIDT AS THE INTOXICATED UNCLE in "The 
Happy Time" gives concern to the rest of the family. 

"The Happy Time” 
Ends Bryan Stage 
Dramatic Plays 


IN THE TITLE ROLE, Sally Nickel in an early scene of "Hedda 
Gabler' y revolts from aunt's kiss. 


BROODING TRAGEDY and two imminent suicides darken this quiet 
scene from "Hedda Gabler." 


















CAL FANKHOUSER, PROSECUTING ATTORNEY, DOES THE GRUELLING OF THE CAPTAIN that leads to his breakdown before "The Cain 
Mutiny" court martial is finished. 


Arena Plays Hits 

Arena Theater productions of the "Cain Mutiny" 
and "The Circle" were sought by campus theater 
goers. Cal Watson directed the former which 
ran December 4th to 7th to crowded houses and 
then picked up two more "command perfor¬ 
mances" December 13th and 14th. C. A. Jones 
directed the performances of the later, given in 
late February. 



THE DEFENSE ATTORNEY, BOB KELLOGG, soberly contemplates the hopeless 
task assigned him in "The Cain Mutiny" while Jim Olson, in the key role, turns 
deeply disturbed. 



JUDY HATCH, playing a mother returning THE CLOSE OF THE FIRST ACT OF "THE CIRCLE" sees Lady Kitty in company of the husband, 
after 30 years, becomes re-acquainted John Dudley, that she deserted 30 years before, 

with her son. 



250 





















WSC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—ROW 1: Grace Filion, Joyce Schell, Sandra Gillette, Barbara Haing, Marian Fife, Wesley Yates, Terry Beck, Richard Keyes, Celia Meeks. 
ROW 2: Hazel Crowder, Elinore Howlette, Leanne Korsgaard, Verne Wagar, Woody Freer, Betty Barnholt, Don Schilling, Gorgene Steigner, Mary Pettit, Grant LaTurner, 
Pat Deal, Jeff Stillman, Linda Mathewson, Annabelle Dizmang. ROW 3: Gary Craig, Tom Askew, Doris Walters, Sheila Gawne, Harold Mielke, Clyde Boggan, Susan 
Hooper, John Wacker, Curtis Mohr, LeRoy Roach, Dave Arend, Bill Harrison, Bob Ludwig, Tom Gates, ROW 4, Ron Wildey, Mary Jo Nesbitt, Mickie Fenske, Darlene Jones, 
Roger Torgerson, Ron Mellom, John Zilar, Orville Trapp. 


WSC Orchestra 
Has Eventful Year 

The Washington State College Symphony Or¬ 
chestra, conducted and directed by Alfred Boy- 
ington, again had a busy year. Practicing 
throughout the year, spring proved to be its 
eventful time. In conjunction with the rest of the 
music department, the orchestra gave a spring 
concert. President this year for the orchestra was 
Wesley Yates. He was ably assisted by Joyce 
Schell, Mary Pettit and Grant LaTurner, Other ORCHESTRA BRASS get together for a little practice, "jazzing it up" of course! 

officers. 




A BREAK DURING REHEARSAL gives time for this instrumentalist to file her fingernails . 


ALFRED BOYINGTON conducts the 
orchestra. 


251 














WSC CONCERT BAND—CENTER FRONT ROW: Ruth Ann Crowe, Jeannette Stein, Donald Schilling. ROW 2: Betty Lou Toth, Betty Bornholt, Janice Poage, Grant LaTurner, 
James Johnson, Georgene Steigner, Harvey Freer, Pat Deal, William Schink, Mary Smith, Nancy Howard, Diane Warwick, Gail Miller, Dorothy Hibben, John Srail, Wesley 
Yates, Annetta Cordes, Mary Pettit. ROW 3: Marcia Mulock, Neil Buhman, Ross Richards, Nancy Webster, Ellsworth Dow, Mary Asher, Tanis Sonstelie, Linda Mathewson, 
Mike Worth, Roger Milnes, Geoffrey Stillman, Mildred Shields, Richard Uthmann, Lorene Larsen, Russell Irwin, Carl Kepner, Roger Briscoe, Mike Caldwell, John Wacker, 
Curtis Mohr. ROW 4: Gilbert Blinn, Mike McDonald, Harriet Durand, Joan Reynolds, Beverly Kirkwood, Mary Hillstrom, David Arend, William Harrison, Leroy Roach, David 
Stephenson, Jean Common, Ronald Shields, David Durham, Laura Clark, Dean Whitney, Larry Burch, Larry Coppock, Richard Batdorf, Deanna Miller, Jack Pemberton, Ellwod 
Hirzel, Richard Maore, Joanna Castle, Lloyd Osborne, Tom Hibben. ROW 5: Lyle Fenske, Roger Torgerson, Ronald Wildey, Darlene Jones, Joan Bagott, Joyce Schell, John 
Gould, Paul Holm, Roger Wing, Sandra Senne, Tom Nicalino, Verne Campbell, Victor Jowders, Daug Beckstrom, John Haldi, Stan Pratt, Tom Gates. 

WSC Concert Band 
Makes Spring Tour 

Under the direction of Randall Spicer, the WSC Concert 
Band had a busy year. Getting underway after the foot¬ 
ball season, many of the marching band joined to form 
the concert band. Taking a spring tour, the band gave 
many concerts to Inland Empire schools. Returning the 
band took part in commencement—Pomp and Circum¬ 
stance, you know! A special clap went up each time a 
band member received his diploma. 



252 
























WITH FAST MOVING LEGS AND KICKING TURNS, the Washington State College Marching Band fakes to the field. For each home game a 
different routine is worked out, as well as for some of the away games. This crimson and gray band with flying capes has made a national 
reputation for itself as being one of the outstanding college bands today. 



HOWARD DEMING directs the WSC Marching Band. 
253 


WSC Marching Band 
Among Nation's Best 

Every performance of the WSC Marching Band is not as 
finished as the one the football spectator sees on Home¬ 
coming or Dads' Day. There are other performances in 
bleaker weather, without uniform, that are less stirring. 
But these practices, come rain or shine, are the backbone 
of one of the nation's finest marching bands. With near a 
hundred marching members, the band has a distinctive 
style and marching precision that is scarcely matched. 















WSC A CAPPELLA CHOIR—ROW 1: Norma Doty, Rosalie Taylor, Virginia Barnett, Kay Ruark, Arlene Prince, Ann Brasel, Darlene Grasse, Florine Rothrock, Marilyn 
Hadgsen, Diane Wegner, Barbara Barrett, Barbara Curtis, Margaret Forrester, Greta Kyle, Nancy Jewell, Linda Johnson, Judy Hatch, Carol Clerf. ROW 2: Margaret 
Puette, Nancy Webster, Janet Johnston, Mary Weiss, Lorene Larsen, Katie Harrop, Lynda Smith, Carol Lemon, Mary Actor, Linda Coffin, Diane Solberg, Kathryn Manroe, 
Joanne lies, Patricia Bell, Ann Regan, Jean Parsons, Ann Smith, Susie Olson. ROW 3: Donald Craft, Robert Burnett, Ronald Sanders, Don Me Mannis, Michael Caldwell, 
James Stevens, Paul Engstrom, Gilbert Badrak, Neil Grace, Glen Franklin, Donald Calbick, Roger Briscoe, Allen Boyer. ROW 4: Don Ellsworth, David Hylten, Vance Va'.- 
Icrndigham, Keith Birkenfeld, Terry Clark, Frank Shaver, Neil Wraspir, Roger Emblen, Larry Ernst, Scott Stovin, Vernon Nathe, Carl Sagerser, Richard Jensen, Robert 
Chariot, Edward Lippert, William Venema. 



CHARLES DAVIS directs the WSC A Cappella Choir. 


More Than 65 Voices 
Blend to Form Choir 

With style and competence the WSC A Cappella choir 
gave many campus and state-wide performances. Of 
special interest to the campus were performances at the 
Cub Christmas party and at the choir's spring concert. 
This year's choir was composed of more than 65 blended 
voices under the direction of Charles Davis. Some mem¬ 
bers of the choir also found time to join the Madrigal 
Singers, a growing tradition at WSC. 



THE MADRIGAL SINGERS POSE in their eighteenth century dress. At any moment they will start singing in traditional "madrigal" style. 


254 



















VARSITY DEBATE—Dave Hill, Larry Jones, Dick Steiner, Ken Frandsen, Margie Martini, Diana Gibson, Julie Tomlinson, John Junker. 


Men Debaters 
Fly to Nationals 

Both varsity and junior varsity debate squads 
were active and successful this year. Entering 
several tournaments, the climax of the year came 
when the men's team was invited to the Nationals 
at West Point. After repeated invitations, Ken 
Frandsen, Dick Steiner and Coach Bill Veatch 
flew back. The squads were sorry to see Veatch 
retire to accept a job at a mid-western college. 



JUNIOR VARSITY DEBATE—Margie Martini, Janice Weber, Jay Kent, John 
Junker, Ray Kronquist, Bill Priest, Judy Elmquist, Diana Gibson. 



WILLIAM VEATCH ended his coaching stay at WSC 
with a good year. 



THE ONE MINUTE CARD is held up, and Ken Frandsen races to finish the 
second affirmative in a practice session for West Point. 


255 




























Guest Performers 
Give WSC Culture 


Many guest speakers and performers arrived at 
WSC and gave of themselves to Pullman college 
goers and townspeople. A wide range of topics 
were under discussion—semantics, the study of 
cells, physics and the Suez crisis. In addition 
Shakespearean music, colored pictures of Rus¬ 
sia, the Lincoln-Douglas debate and a series of 
musical performances in arrangement with the 
community concert series were made available. 
Such intellectual engagements added much to 
WSC cultural life. 


The wonderful era of Shake¬ 
spearean music marched into 
Bryan December 3rd as Sus- 
anne Block played the lute, 
the recorder and virginals. 


Dr. Samuel Hayakawa or 
"Mr. Semantics" told how all 
troubles from individual ex¬ 
pression to the world's future 
could be solved by saying 
what we mean. 


Neil Douglas' films spoke for 
themselves upon his return 
from Russia. A crowded Todd 
auditorium learned about 
"Russia—The New Face." 


A University of Texas cytolo- 
gist, just prior to spring vaca¬ 
tion, told about the study of 
cells. Dr. C. M. Pomerat also 
addressed a vet conference 
over vacation. 


A man with conviction enough 
to drop his post in England 
over the Suez crisis was Sir 
Anthony Nutting, minister of 
foreign affairs under Eden. 
We cheered him in Todd 
October 31st. 

The coveted Nobel Prize was 
deservedly awarded to Dr. 
Harold Urey, great physicist. 
Todd was jammed January 
15th as he spoke enroute 
from the University of Chicago 
to the University of Cal. 




RAYMOND MASSEY AS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Martin Gabel as Senator Douglas 
and Agnes Moorhead as Douglas' wife were well received in the early fall 
presentation of the Lincoln-Douglas debate. 



DOUGLAS TURNS TO LINCOLN and gestures as having proven his point while 
Lincoln sits with folded arms and puckered lips, not so sure of this. 


2 56 














DORIS VOLLMER, CUB MUSIC COMMITTEE , greets the famed Hi-Lo quartet as they warmed up for their March ninth performance. 
The warmup took longer than the concert, remembered as the briefest full-evening concert in WSC history. 



PHYLLIS CURTIN sang soprano for 
community concert series. 



THEODORE UPPMAN, also with 
community concerts , was a baritone. 



W J! 

VERA FRANCESCHI, a finished 
pianist , was with the community 
concert series. 



THE HUNGARIAN quartet 
was well received here and 
throughout the nation. 


257 































ROYALTY 


HARVEST BALL QUEEN 

Bonnie Noe 


WILMER HALL 





















WILMER HALL 


259 














ENGINEERS’ BALL QUEEN 

Lynn Van Doren 

CHI OMEGA 






















TOLO KING 

Roger 

Emblen 

TAU KAPPA 
EPSILON 

261 






1 


















KNIGHT OF NIGHTS 

Don Gordon 

SIGMA NU 


263 











SIGMA PHI EPSILON QUEEN OF HEARTS 

Barbara Henry 

KAPPA ALPHA THETA 


264 



































♦ SWEETHEART OF SIGMA CHI 

Alice Camp 

PI BETA PHI 


266 











































HANDSOME HARRY 

Sterling 

Robbins 

SOUTH HOUSE 


268 











INDEPENDENT QUEEN 

Nancy Cotton 

DAVIS HALL 









MAY QUEEN 

Kathy Kanouse 

WILMER HALL 


270 



































LITTLE INTERNATIONAL QUEEN 

Jean Nelson 

COMMUNITY HALL 
























PI KAPPA ALPHA DREAM GIRL 
FINALISTS—Joan Eckles, Judy Hanson, 
Karen Olsen, Barbara Hanson. 


JUNIOR PROM QUEEN FINALISTS— 
Sandy Shurtleff, Janet Chisholm, 
Joanne Henry, Sandy Grant. 


HOMECOMING QUEEN FINALISTS— 
Janine Fike, Gwen Zediker, 

Amy Lombard, Toula Karaaioannoglou. 


KNIGHT OF NIGHTS FINALISTS— 
Mike Horne, Pete Dawson, 

Jim Heirich, Bob Richard. 


Royalty 


Finalists 


SIG EP QUEEN OF HEARTS 
FINALISTS—DeeAnn Hanford, Jill 
Manring, Dorothy Campbell, 
Sherry Leonard. 



SPUR OF THE MOMENT FINALISTS— 
Mary Ellen Hardenbergh, Janet 
Van Bevers, Joanne Peterson, 

Dianne Crosby. 


INDEPENDENT QUEEN FINALISTS— 
Grace Ganey, Susie Olson. 


HANDSOME HARRY FINALISTS— 

Bill Galbraith, Maurie Hood, Mike Agee. 


SWEETHEART OF SIGMA CHI 
FINALISTS—Gloria Payne, Deanne 
Haggardt, Louise Vik, Diane Poppe. 


HARVEST BALL QUEEN FINALISTS— 
Karen Newby, Vickie Ball, Kay 
Henry, Pat Nordquist. 


PHI SIG MOONLIGHT GIRL 
FINALISTS—Linda Hayes, 
Dana Noble, Judy Rogers. 


TOLO KING FINALISTS— 

Dale Wunderlich, Jack Fanning, 
Gail Strait, Arnie Pleasant. 


ENGINEERS' BALL QUEEN 
FINALISTS—Sharon Simpson, Marilyn 
Brown, Sharon Woener, Layne Miller. 


273 



























Campus 

Activities 














276 




















GOVERNMENT 













Stirring Elections 
Resulted in Largest 
Voting Percentage 
at Landgrant Colleges 



AND I SAY TO YOU Independent Ralley-goers, it's a joke, now laugh! 




NEAR THE END OF ASSCW CAMPAIGNING, candidates and party members take down multitude of signs. 




DICK WOODS, SENIOR PRESIDENT, in¬ 
troduces President French at Senior Con. 


JUNIOR IFC CAR WASH—sounds great if 
you're not on the washing end. 


278 



















VIEWERS OF THE HUMAN CHARIOT RACE wore white togas at climax of the second 
annual Greek Week. 



IRATE STUDENTS STAGE RALLY in 
protest to traffic control 
board recommendations. 



EXPERIENCED HANDS ready a student 
donor for the annual junior class 
"blood letting." 



GAMMA PHI'S ROLL PAPER home left 
over from the Junior Prom—later 
used for signs. 



PRESIDENT BILL STUART cleans 
megaphone to kid Idaho walkers. 



SUE STOFFEL CHATS with guest speaker 
at the regional AWS convention luncheon. 


279 
















ASSCW PRESIDENT—Bill Stuart ... a Southern drawl from down Florida way 
... a fine public relations expert . . . led the Mock Political Convention as a 
sophomore . . . graduated in Animal Science . . . amazed us with his friendliness 
and sincerity . . . gained national respect in NSA work. 



ASSCW VICE PRESIDENT—Bob Overstreet . . . led the junior class as president 
before stepping into this office . . . graduated as a Big Ten member . . . wore 
the Crimson Circle sweater . . . lived at TKE. 



ASSCW SECRETARY—Carol Swanson ... a Delta Gamma . . . Phi Kappa Phi, 
Mortar Board, and Pi Lambda Theta member . . . graduated with honors . . . was 
Sweetheart of Sigma Chi as a frosh ... Spur as sophomore . .. choirmaned Cougar 
Campus Chest as a junior . . . was sophomore Greek woman. 


Top Three Officers 
Coordinate Board 

Each top ASSCW officer has specific duties to 
fulfill in addition to the traditional role of cam¬ 
pus leader. In the setup the president's job is 
coordination, planning and executing weekly 
board meetings. While all three officers act as 
ASSCW hosts, this job mainly falls on the presi¬ 
dent. 

The whole complex student government at 
WSC is organized into a committee structure. 
There are four types of committees and a com¬ 
mission system established. Supervision of these 
committees is the responsibility of the ASSCW 
veep. Breakdown of the fifty some odd com¬ 
mittees is systematic with "student committees" 
dealing with student functions, as Homecoming. 
Then "student-faculty" committees deal with 
matters of dual concern to faculty and students 
as the naming of "outstanding seniors." Next, 
there are "faculty-student" committees that are 
appointed ultimately by President C. Clement 
French. 

The title secretary is somewhat a misnomer. Per¬ 
haps, the title "executive secretary" would be 
more fitting as the secretary has administrative 
duties to carry out. In fact, the supervision of all 
commissions is her job. Commissions are for 
matters of a more temporary nature than com¬ 
mittees. 

Board of Control 
Scope Is Unusual 

The board of control for the first time this year 
had both a sophomore man and woman of each 
party in place of a single representative. These 
four sophomores and eight more upperclass 
board members carry on the functions and "busy 
work" of the ASSCW. They serve as links to 
various key committees by being laison mem¬ 
bers to them. However, their prime responsibility 
is different. It is to investigate, discuss and bring 
to action problems and questions of short and 
long run nature that are important to the stu¬ 
dent body. This unlimited scope makes the WSC 
board of control unusual. 


280 






















■■ 




BOARD OF CONTROL EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS—Fred Whitney, 
Sue Stoffel, Jim McElhaney, Thomas Barksdale. 



BOARD OF CONTROL TAKES A BREAK to have an informal 
picture taken. 




ALICE SAARI 

Senior 

Independent Woman 

JICKI CASTLE 

Senior 

Greek Woman 

BETSY COLBURN 
Junior 

Greek Woman 

JANIS BRAKE 

Junior 

Independent Woman 

SANDEE STRAND 
Sophomore 
Independent Woman 

KAREN NEWBY 
Sopohomore 
Greek Woman 

JERRY HANSON 

Senior 

Independent Man 

STAN PRATT 

Senior 

Greek Man 

MIKE MASTERSON 
Junior 

Greek Man 

JACK PEMBERTON 
Juniar 

Independent Man 

DAVE ALLMENDINGER 
Sophomore 
Independent Man 

LEN HUDSON 
Sophomore 
Independent Man 


281 

























STUDENT ACTIVITIES BOARD—ROW 1: Mike Manring, Frances Sadoff, Marvin Swenson. ROW 2: Catherine Northrup, Antoinette Poulsen, 
Dixie Smith, Mike Olds, Clayton Udell, Elvin Ericson, Oliver Johnson, Susie Bjornstad. ROW 3: Frank Noffke, Dale Wunderlich, Kaye Straight, 
M. J. Morgan, Stan Pratt, Stan Rheiner, Ed Veenhuizen. 


Two Type Committees 
Work for Better WSC 

Two types of committees work with ASSCW in making WSC 
a better school. "Faculty-student" committees are chair¬ 
maned by a faculty member and have some student mem¬ 
bers on them. Members of these committees are nominated 
by the board of control and appointed by President 
French. Most important among such committees is Activi¬ 
ties Board, which is vital to any organization. It recog¬ 
nizes, sets rules for meeting times and disciplines student 
organizations. In addition to this type of committee, there 
are six improvement of instruction committees, where a 
student from a given department meets with faculty mem¬ 
bers trying to improve instruction. 



IMPROVEMENT OF INSTRUCTION COMMITTEE MEMBERS—Don 
Trunkey, Dwight Hawkes, Rose Renshaw Peterson. 



STUDENTS ON FACULTY-STUDENT COMMITTEES—Dick Axelson, Marijo Shannon, Betty McLean, Marlene Mitchell, Camilla Matthiesen, Kitty 
McDonald, Larry Ernst, Anita Delaurenti, Franklin Anderson. 


282 
















Commissions Solve 
Two Diverse Problems 


COMMISSION ON IDAHO RELATIONS—Beth Houston, Len Hudson, 
Dick Asimus. 


During the 1954 football season WSC lost to Idaho after 
27 years's victory. Some harmless rough housing occurred 
after the game. By the end of the third year, it took police 
and tear gas to break up the milling crowd and fights on 
the Vandal field. To counteract future action, the ASSCW 
established an Idaho Commission to improve Idaho rela¬ 
tions. No outbreak occurred this year. This type of situa¬ 
tion is the basis for establishing a commission. Also of im¬ 
portance this year was the commission that evaluated 
ASSCW committees to eliminate deadwood. 


WASHINGTON STATE'S CHEERLEADERS wash the feet of Idaho 
leaders following the Idaho walk to Pullman. This promoted better 
U of I friendship. 


THE WORK OF IMPROVEMENT OF INSTRUCTION COMMITTEES is 
shown in the faculty taking to heart the suggestion that informality 
should be maintained in a class situation. 


COMMISSION ON EVALUATION OF COMMITTEES—ROW 1: June 
Mihara, Betty McCorkle, Norm Scott, Betty McLean. ROW 2: Ron 
Bailey, Gerald Wilson, Raleigh Davis, Dick Schaefer, 

Alan Bahrenburg. 


283 













Students and Faculty 
Work Together 

There are many ASSCW student-faculty committees that 
deal with a wide area of interest to students primarily, 
and faculty secondarily. Three of these important com¬ 
mittees are Bookstore Board and Frosh Faculty Weekend 
and Foreign Films committees. Each of these groups car¬ 
ries out a job that needs faculty cooperation or guidance. 
Naturally there would be no Frosh Faculty Weekend if 
the faculty did not cooperate. Faculty members on the 
other two committees are important for their guidance in 
financial matters and as giving continuity to the various 
committees over a period of years. 


PICTURED IS A GIRL putting up one of the colorful posters advertising 
a foreign film, in the this case, "Dark River", 




BOOKSTORE BOARD—Mike Masterson, T. H. Blosser, John Doo¬ 
little, Tom Purkett, Carl Rosenkilde, Carl Pettibone, Joe Tarbet, 
Merl Simmons. 



FOREIGN FILMS COMMITTEE—Kenneth Kennedy, Hugh Rundell, 
Keith Monaghan, Verna Duncan, Don McManis, Wilfred Barnes, 
Evan VanAntwerp. 



FROSH-FACULTY WEEKEND COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Norm Scott, 
Eunice Larson, Jim Andrew, Marilyn Melin, Edie Olds. ROW 2: 
Jan Jonas, Bill Gillis, Ron Jonas, Grace Sweatt, H. H. Batey, 

P. J. Rempel. 


284 

















Posters Announce 


Festival Week 


THE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL COMMITTEE INSPECTS POSTERS 
for International Week. 

285 


Announcing this year's International Festival 
Week were many attractive travel posters in 
the CUB fountain area. The purpose of this week 
is to promote a better understanding between 
the foreign students and the students of the 
United States on the WSC campus. The week was 
highlighted by foreign menus served in the CUB 
dining room and an international revue. The 
CUB was also filled with exhibits from various 
countries. 


PREPARING FOR HER CUE , a Siamese dancer 
adjusts her earring for the 
International Revue. 


PARTICIPATING IN THE COLORFUL REVUE , 
the attitude of an Indian prayer is assumed 
by dancers. 


INTERPRETIVE DANCING was a part of the 
program , in this case a snake dance. 


INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL COMMITTEE—Lynn Brislawn, Judy Tucker, Pat Trueblood, Karen Anderson, Virginia Caspersen, Bev Holmes, 
Bonnie Ross, Ann Kaylor, Annabelle Dizmang, Ann Smith, Marilyn Mork, Elsie Dawson, Gail Moyer, Judy Repp, Brian Johnson, Steve 
Clinehens, Roy Jeremiah. 






























HEADS TURN as an outstanding 
senior's name is called. 


THE AUDIENCE WATCHES an outstanding 
senior , little knowing they may be next. 


AND NOW IT WAS HER TURN to negotiate 
the narrow aisles leading to the stage. 


Three Last Groups 
Finish Category 

The Selection of Outstanding Seniors commit¬ 
tee and Student Production and Union boards 
complete the roster of student-faculty commit¬ 
tees. Each, although different, strengthens 
ASSCW. Student Production board arranges for 
entertainment on the campus and elsewhere. 
The Outstanding Senior committee adds to the 
completeness of Senior Week by choosing out¬ 
standing seniors for recognition. Finally, Union 
board works toward a better managed and 
operated student union building. 



A CAN CAN DANCER ACT exemplifies the type of 
service the Student Production board offers. 



OUTSTANDING SENIOR COMMITTEE—Roger Yoshino, David Seamans, Tim 
Seth, Hubert Dunn, Pete Wallbridge, Jerry Johnson, Velma Phillips, Sue 
Marsh, Jean Parsons, Audrey Williams, William Ackley, Verna Duncan, Shi 
Rains, Tom Graedel. 



STUDENT PRODUCTION BOARD—Arlene Pehrson, Bill Hoehne, John Friel, 
Mike Olds, Robert Vogelsang, Betty Lou Toth, Verna Duncan, Sally Franklin. 



UNION BOARD—ROW 1: Anne Corcoran, Frank Noflfke, Joseph Bradley, 
Bill Stuart, C. L. Hix. ROW 2: Bill Bierbaum, Andrew Hofmeister, Norton 
Carlson, Ralph Pehrson, J. C. Clevenger, Ron Sanders. 


286 


























A COUGAR RODEO CLUB FAN seemed quite interested in the saddle displayed at the Activities Roundup. 



ACTIVITIES ROUNDUP COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Barbara Burnton, Bill Bearse, 
Ann Aldrich, Vivian Hamilton. ROW 2: JoAnne Peterson, Tanis Sonstelie, 
Kiyoko Nishi, Harrie Frost, Verna Duncan. ROW 3: John Thomsen, Bill Buchan, 
Mike McMackin, Gordon McDougall, Gordon Page. 



4-H Mctnb«>« 
Wrv* Ihmir 
Communki**. 


TWO INTERESTED STUDENTS EXAMINED THE 4-H SET-UP, also looked at the 
pictures of International Farm Youth Exchange Students. 


Activities Roundup 
Crowd Gathers 


"Galaxy of Activities" set the pace for the Activi¬ 
ties Roundup this fall and was in keeping with 
the sputnik excitement that hit our world. The 
Esquires furnished music for dancing and nearly 
sixty booths were set up by organizations to dis¬ 
play their purposes to interested students. Our 
CUB was overrun from the ground floor to the 
second floor with the normal buzzing of a giant 
"Roundup". 



COSMO CLUB'S ORIENTAL BOOTH attracted large 
auidences of onlookers near fountain area doors. 


287 










ASSCW CARNIVAL COMMITTEE—SEATED: Mary 
Kay Suhadolnik, Karen Coffin, Dick James, Nancy Heglar, 
Ron Gilbert, Mercedes Crabb. STANDING: John Snor- 
tum, Charles Arkorn, Reiden Nielsen, Gary Allen, Dixie 
Drake, Myke Lindsay. 

Active Committee 
Produced Carnival 


Our CUB was again transformed for the CUB 
Carnival and this time by the theme "Fiesta". As 
special attractions, door prizes were given away; 
special ones for women and also men. For those 
who were hungry, they could pay $5,000 (car¬ 
nival money) and take a chance on the cake 
walk or visit Hernando's Hidaway and, for a 
small fee, be fed tortillas and tiquila. Laying 
bets on white mice was the clever novelty booth; 
and for those who liked to throw things, there 
were plenty of chances. If facial expressions are 
any evidence, wonderful time was had by every¬ 
one who attended. 



THERE IS NOT A SINGLE REASON why they could not be married , is the 
argument from the Mexican proxy parson , after alb it is not a bit on the level. 



THE OBJECT WAS TO SHAVE THE BALLOON face com- THREE PRODUCTION BOARD MEMBERS WERE WET-FACED at their booth , 

pletely clean , without the bang! for they were aimed at more than the candles . 



288 





















TWO COUGAR CODE MEMBERS DITTO MATERIAL to be discussed 
at the next committee meeting. 


Frosh Allowed to Join 
Cougar Booster Club 

Three student committees work for better school spirit and 
relationship with the community. Cougar Code committee 
prepares a booklet about WSC that goes to incoming 
freshman in an attempt to orient them to the school's 
spirit and way of doing things before they arrive. Com¬ 
munity Relations committee works toward better relations 
between the town and college. Cougar Boosters is a 
newly organized pep club, being the only ASSCW com¬ 
mittee allowing frosh membership. 




COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE—Kay Ruark, Sherm Stephens, 
Jerry Hite, Norman Staeber, Pat Link, Betsy Jones, Marlene Mitchell. 



WITH CLOSED EYES AND FLIPPING HANDS, the Cougar Booster 
drill team gave its first performance at "Hats Off to Friel Night 


FRED BENDIX AND JUDY BLOUNT, two loyal Cougar Coders, meet 
to go over the dummy for Cougar Code, soon to be printed. 



DRESSED IN WHITE SHIRTS, members of Cougar Boosters gather to have their pics taken. In like manner they grouped together 
at foolball and basketball games to fill the card section and give vocal support to WSC'S teams. 


289 
















ASSCW Committees 
See Personal Growth 


Social Skills and Intramural committees. Rally Squad and 
Cougar Coordinating Council are organized to work with 
related, yet different areas. All try to build the individual. 
Social Skills sponsors discussion groups in campus living 
groups to improve manners and dating skills. This is to 
strengthen the individual's social acceptability. Intramural 
committee helps regulate and plan for a better intramural 
program, intended to build the body and relieve the stu¬ 
dents tension through wholesome sports. Rally Squad and 
Cougar Coordinating Council work together to maintain 
the individual's school spirit and loyalty. The latter has 
the job of coordinating all pep and rally functions. 



BOUNDING JOYFULLY UP THE SPOKANE STREET , the yell and rally 
squads lead a football rally . 



RALLY SQUAD—ROW 1: Sharron McGinnis, Carol Ann Berg, Jo 
Klarich, Sharon Justice. ROW 2: Alice Richardson, Dick Petragallo, 
John Lynn. Ron Spangler, Bob Roetcisender, Jo Thomas, 

Dale Wunderlich, Dot Cameron. 



MEMBERS OF THE SOCIAL SKILLS COMMITTEE informally drink 
tea with the Chi O's while discussing social problems . 



SOCIAL SKILLS COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Dan Tompkins, Joanne 
Daugherty, Coleen O'Brien, Margey Carpenter, Arlene Glover, 
Gene Sutton. ROW 2: Louise Maas, Sue Falk, Joyce Demco. 



INTRAMURAL COMMITTEE—Bill Tomaras, John McClane, 
Perry Triplett, Don Miles. 



COUGAR COORDINATING COUNCIL—Edith Celette, Dorothy 
Cameron, Roger Torgerson, Sue Marsh, Barbara Lindley, Marcia 
Travis, Al Watts, Delight Richardson, Jicki Castle. 


290 
























Three Committees 
Inform WSC Students 


The ASSCW realizes the importance of having a well in¬ 
formed student body. Therefore, the members of the 
Public Relations committee and board of control visit the 
various living groups to interpret and relate the functions 
of the ASSCW to the student body. The students may also 
become acquainted with the functions, services and pro¬ 
grams of the National Student Association. This com¬ 
mittee works through the ASSCW officers, board of con¬ 
trol and NSA as a source of information to all campus 
organziations and committees. The Traffic Safety com¬ 
mittee is essential for our welfare. They suggest ideas for 
improving safety on the campus, and by making it safe, 
we can better enjoy our stay here. 



NATIONAL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION COMMISSION—Marilyn 
Sloan, Bev Roberts, Bob Wendt, Dianne Crosby, James Fox, 
Perry Overstreet, Judy Greenup. 



TRAFFIC SAFETY COMMITTEE—Dave Rusho, Bill Bugge, 
Stan Haase. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE—ROW 1: June Hastings, Roger Wyrick, Joan Anderson, Bob Corlew, Karen Lindblom, Nancy Sell, Fred 
Whitney, Pat Feltis, Skippi Skinner, Charles Shoemaker, Patsy Linden. ROW 2: Marylu Ross, Colleen Pflugmacher, Frank Ellis, Lori McPeek, 
Larry Coppock, Joan Skouge, John Reitmeier. 



THE LIBRARY CORNER AT CLASS TIME BREAK becomes crowded with traffic, and five o'clock is hardly safe —so says Traffic Safety committee . 


291 



















THE CUB ART COMMITTEE SPONSORED THE CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL where Laisner's sculpturing exhibit proved on interesting focal point. 


Cub Program Council 
Links Cub Committees 

To coordinate all the Cub committees into a presentation of 
a recreational, cultural, and social program for the students 
is the primary function of Cub Program Council. A few com¬ 
mittees with which they work are the Cub Games, Arts, and 
Crafts. Leather, ceramics and art metal work are encouraged 
by the Cub Crafts committee. The Cub Games committee sets 
up programs and tournaments in billiards, bowling and table 
tennis. The Creative Arts Festival as well as providing artis¬ 
tic settings around the Cub, is the main functions of Cub Art. 



SITTING WITH CROSSED LEGS on the floor , Co ugorites enjoy the carols 
sung by the choir at the Cub Chrismas party. 



CUB PROGRAM COUNCIL—ROW 1: Barbara Boye, Gwen Ganua, 
Lynn Wagener, Sylvia Ormsby, Dixie Davis. ROW 2: Jim Watson, 
Alice Saari, Marilyn Marshall, Ralph Ostheller, Marv Swenson. 



CUB ART COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Katherine Crawford, Peggy 
Germeau, Kathleen Walton, Cheryl Eilert. ROW 2: John Wacker, 
Pat Wood, Paul Heald, Janet Van Vleck, Joanne Henry. 



CUB CRAFT COMMITTEE—John White, Doris Ridpath, Sylvia 
Jenrich, Lynn Wagener, Ronnie Adams. 



CUB GAMES COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Buzz Christiansen, Margy 
Quaife, Sue Fairbands, Carolyn Quaife. ROW 2: Elwood Hahn, 
Don Kachinsky, Dave Standley, Jim Huff, LeRoy Jones, Dave Myers. 


292 
































"SANTA, YOU BEARDED DEVIL , who/ will you bring me for Christmas," 
seems to be this little girl's question while on Santa's knee at the Cub 
Christmas party. 

293 



CUB DANCE COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Janice Swart, Ralph Ost- 
heller, Jean Smith, Diane Luft, Bill Watts, Barbara Bassett, Earl 
Taylor, Nancy Corcoran. ROW 2: Gail Adams, Nancy Henrichsen, 
Bill Hundley, Sharon Ireland. 



CUB MUSIC COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Ron Mellom, Mike Yambra, 
Jeanne Springer, Verna Duncan, Gary Rebholz, Carol Pavlic, 
Patti Osborn, Allen Boyer, David Arend, Skip Engstrom, Judy Fos¬ 
ter, Becky Sieveke, Dorie Vollmer, Sally Holcomb, Melisse Wilcox. 
ROW 2: Jerry Standal, Jim Watson. 



CUB PUBLICITY COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Joyce Aamot, Sylvia 
Ormsby, Joan Eckles, Anne Gyllenberg, Barbara Eyre. ROW 2: 
Beryl Roberts, Connie Bauer, Kelley Arnold, Cecile Wildin, Richard 
Dreger, Bob Tinsman. 



CUB SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Lois Rennilson, Jim 
Lapsley, Ellen Houghland, Nancy Nugent, Carol Bernsten, Jerry 
Glendenning, Pat Stalder, Gwen Ganus, Harley Otis. ROW 2: 
Jim Heidenreich, King Kirk, Al Brothers, John Maas, 

Charles Mellinger. 



CUB HOUSE COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Carolyn Werner, Barbara 
Girsch, Judy Johannesen, Barbara Boye, Marilyn Evans. ROW 2: 
Judy Hatch, Earl Marble, Bill Bierbaum, Elaine Widmer. 


























Spirited Campaigning 
Ended with IPAC Wins 
As Student Elections 
Reached New Heights 



ELECTION BOARD—Gay Cox, Edra Olson, Glen Aldrich, Roy Dorn- 
blaser, Agnes Zimmerman, Idalee Hutton, Marv Swenson, Janice 
Brake, Audrey Lindberg, Charlie Cox, Dudley Brown, 

Gary Grunewald. 


MR. CHAIRMAN! May I 
nominate ... 



THE GREEK RALLY ENDED with 
much noise in the CUB parking lot. 



A RECORD BREAKING NUMBER of THE RIGHT STUB AND BALLOT had 
voters filed into the polls. to be put in the correct box. 



ADMIRING FRIENDS SHOWED THEIR EMOTION 
afterwards in congratulating the winners. 



GLAD THAT THE ANXIETY IS OVER , Spud Hanson steps forward to accept victory 
for the Independent ASSCW candidates at Watchnight's climax. 


THE WINNING CLASS PRESIDENTS CLASP HANDS 
in a victory handshake at fall watchnighf. 



SUPPORTERS SOON BOOSTED winning Breitenfeldt 
onto eager shoulders. 















Students Sponsor 
Whirlwind of Contests, 
Sport, Entertainment 







For Dads’ Weekend 


DADS' DAY COMMITTEE—ROW 1: B. J. Rohrer, Margie Martini, Jan 
Ficke, Annette Bienek, Lorraine Johnson, Sandy Womack. ROW 2: 
Diana Gibson, Bev Johnson, Linda Coffin. ROW 3: Bill MacBoyle, 
Jerry McGlade, Dick Bertholf, Don Gordon, Virgil Meyers, 

John Snortum. 


TOP—fans and grads gather at Dads' luncheon. TOP CENTER—son pins welcoming ribbon on father as he arrives. CENTER TOP—Tri Delfs 
took women's first in sign contest. CENTER BOTTOM — Beta's walk off with first place men's honors. RIGHT—gymnastic members perform at 
Dad's Day smoker. BOTTOM—two various singers from variety show ham it up. 
































QUEEN INGRID ORETORP PRESENTS A TOKEN of W SC's welcome 
to Governor Albert Rosellini. 



HOMECOMING COMMITTEE—Dave Annibal, Berit Nyberg, Carol 
Clark, Sterling Pickering, Janet Knufsen, Charles Stocker, Mike 
Johnston, Barbara Doutrich, Gordy Stennes, JoAnne Knutson, 
Virginia Roberts. 


Homecoming Viewers 
See Ingrid Crowned 

School spirit at WSC is tops and much of the credit goes 
to our Rally committee. This group of students plan and 
conduct our rallies, serpentines and half-time entertain¬ 
ment such as card stunts during football season. Many 
Friday nights or Saturday mornings we can find them hard 
at work completing last minute details before a game. 
Homecoming this year was highlighted with the crowning 
of Ingrid Oretorp as queen. The Homecoming Committee 
worked diligently on the parade, dance and half-time en¬ 
tertainment. Combined efforts of Rally and Homecoming 
committee helped make Homecoming 1957 successful. 



NOT TOO COLD I Say these AGD's and Lambda Chi's as they wait for pajama serpentine to pass by. 


296 
























MlUftrt 


THE WINNING SIGMA NU FLOAT , UNABLE TO MAKE A HALFTIME DEBUT , waited outside Roger's field for inspection. 



THE THETAS SAW VICTORY with their float led 
by eight pretty girls in white. 


PHI SIGMA KAPPA'S LITTLE RED SCHOOLHOUSE 
took second place in the men's float competition. 


REGENTS HILL COPPED SECOND 
place with this fairy football coach. 





IN THE WEE HOURS OF THE MORNING homecoming floats start to take shape in the field house. 


297 








BETTY JANSEN ... led AWS as president ... resided at Regents . . . collected her Phi Kappa 
Phi and Phi Beta Kappa pins . . . sorry to see AWS prexy dropped from the board of 
control . 




JANET CHISHOLM 
AWS Secretary 




ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS GATHER for a congratulatory coffee hour to honor next year's newly elected AWS officers. 


298 





























AWS FULL COUNCIL—ROW 1: Carol Swanson, Pattie Chisholm, Janet Chisholm, Barbara Pemerl. ROW 2: Betsy Harris, Catherine Northrup, 
Betty Jansen, Bev Anderson, Estelle Cooksey, Susan Stoffel. ROW 3: Pat Stalder, Deanna Hawker, Beth Houston, Marilyn Jenkins, Gail 
Barrett, Marcelle Ames. 


AWS Organization Parallels ASSCW Structure 


The organization of Associated Women Students carries 
out many beneficial projects to the campus and to WSC 
women in particular. The Organization this year was re¬ 
organized to parallel the structure of the Associated Stu¬ 
dent of the State College of Washington. Now representa¬ 
tives are elected from the classes to be on AWS full council, 
termed class representatives. 


Organization of AWS is centered around several com¬ 
mittees. Some of these, as Big Little Sis and Campus Cur¬ 
rents, are a day to day matter. Others, as Woman's Day, 
Mom's Weekend or Convention committee, are set up to 
prepare and execute the functions reflected in their names. 
Through these committees women develop their person¬ 
alities and serve the campus. 




















MAY QUEEN AND COURT—Beverley Anderson, Susan Stoffel, 

Toula Karaioannoglou, Kathy Kanouse, Betty Jansen, Carol Swanson. 


Mo ms’ Weekend 
Mad Preparation 

If you think Mothers' Weekend is a busy time, 
you should see the preparation that goes into 
this successful weekend just beforehand. AWS 
cooperates with two other womens organiza¬ 
tions to fill the weekend with lots of excitement 
and entertainment. The May Queen contest is 
carried out by AWS itself as May queen is the 
women's choice. The hustle bustle of voting is 
mixed with practicing for the songfest for many. 
Elimination hearings and final practices take 
time, and the guidance of many Spurs means 
more busy work for some. Although Fish Fans 
perform at other times throughout the year, 
their graceful Mothers' Weekend performance 
is their grand finale. Last minute rehearsals must 
be wedged in between regular activities, meals 
and studies. 


KAPPA ALPHA THETA TEAMED with Beta Theta 
Pi to cop first place in the mixed division of 
Spur's Song Fest. They sang, "I Wish I Was." 



"HALLEJAH CHORUS" sung by the Vets again 
brought victory to the male students of vetinary 
medicine. 




300 











WOMEN'S DAY FEATURED A NOONTIME STYLE SHOW OF FASHIONS FROM AROUND THE WORLD. A takeoff on the recent movie, 
"Around the World in 80 Days," was the motif with elaborate staging and music furnished by an off-stage piano player. 


WSC Women Students 
Enjoy Their Own Day 

Each spring. Associated Women Students present Womens' 
Day, for the enjoyment and pleasure of all women students 
at the State College of Washington. It is handled mainly 
by the efforts of the Women's Day committee of AWS. 
The group works all the year to plan and schedule the 
big day, honoring all women students. A speaker must be 
scheduled, and a hundred and one "little things" cared for. 

The special day began with a unique issue of the Ever¬ 
green, with nearly all the information and news relayed 
in it of special interest to the feminine mind. Styles, voca¬ 
tional information, and advertising pertaining to the fair 
sex were evident in the issue. The men felt less important 
that day, and were glad when the Evergreen returned to 
sports news and other really vital information. A sack 
luncheon, style show, and interesting convocation all 
appealed to the WSC women students on Womens' Day, 
1958. But, the glory and concern for them only lasted one 
day. A few days later they discovered they were in the 
middle of SAE's Women Haters' Week. 



SOME STUDENT MODELS SEEMED PROFESSIONAL as they presented 
currently fashionable dress styles at the annual AWS style show . 


301 



























PERSONAL-VOCATIONAL COMMITTEE—Barbee Scheibner, Pat 
Stalder, Sharon Burwell, Joy Davidson. 


THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS conven¬ 
tion included a luncheon for representatives , who enjoyed getting 
to know each other. 



CAMPUS CURRENTS COMMITTEE—Judy Johannesen, Jo 
Klarich, June Hastings. 


AWS Committees 
Keep Busy All Year 

The women of Associated Women Students activities were 
volunteers for the specified committees. The women stayed 
within the reign of "A woman's place is in activities", and 
were kept busy on such active committees as Personal-Vo¬ 
cational committee and Campus Currents committee, which 
worked for the betterment of the woman students and 
their relationship to the community. The women who were 
lucky enough to chairman the AWS committees with the 
most work involved often worked into officers' positions 
in the organization. The officers were selected by all the 
women of the student body, with the nominees having been 
appointed by the previous AWS Full Council. This year, 
AWS was host to the regional IAWS convention, and the 
WSC campus was invaded by women leaders from the 
entire Northwest. 




WOMENS' DAY COMMITTEE—Joanne Henry, Ann Faulkner, Sherry 
Leonard, Janet Knutsen, Jean Parsons, Janet McBride, Kathy Kanouse, 
Karen Lindblom, Delight Richardson, Jeanne Lindgren, Ginger Biddle. 


AWS CONVENTION COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Joanne Daugherty, 
Katie Monroe, JoAnne Knutson. ROW 2: Audrey Williams, Carolyn 
Burke, Betty McLean, Gail Woodward, Sue StoefFel, Marilyn Still, 
Mary Jett, Jean Bergersen. 


302 













BIG-LIL SIS COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Monnie Moore, Dixie Drake. COLLEGE DAY COMMITTEE—Marcelle Ames, Nancy Corcoran, Barbara 

ROW 2: Marilyn Evans, Mary Vatnsdal, Melisse Wilcox. Brunton, Gail Morgan, Lorraine Almy. 


MOTHERS 7 WEEKEND COMMITTEE—ROW 1: Jeannette Coury, Pat Kadow, Karen Coffin, Maradel Krummel, Carol Lemon, Inez Thompson, 
Becky Sieveke. ROW 2: Georgene Steigner, Liz Wentz, Marge Swanson, Lexie Atkinson, Ann Kaylor, Ellen Hougland, Janet Schuster, 

Brenda Hewitt. 


303 












G-PAR OFFICERS—Agnes Zimmerman, Kay Straight, 
Marilyn Brown, Jerry Hook. 


G-PAR Members 
Strove for Unity 

The Greek Political Actions Representatives, better 
known as G-PAR were representative of all the 
varied opinions and ideas of the Greek living 
groups. The representatives numbered two from 
each living group, and has as their purpose unit¬ 
ing of the Greek forces to strengthen campaigning 
procedures and successes. The group met twice a 
month for planning and discussion. The main bulk 
of the work for the organization came in the spring 
of the year, with the ever-important ASSCW elec¬ 
tions in the offing. They planned the campaigns 
carefully, and backed their candidates faithfully. 
The caucus was the first big step to the campaign, 
and they breathed a sigh of relief when it was all 
over. 



Kay Aker Franklin Anderson Tom Askew Joe Brand 

Barbara Burgess Bill Clapham Joan Coart Dahieen Dahl 


ROW 1; 
Richard Dague 
Mike Edgmand 


ROW 2: 
Marilyn Evans 
Sue Falk 
Nancy Heglar 


ROW 3: 

Fred Hinden 
Claudia Hartley 
Sally Holcomb 


ROW 4: 
Jerry Hook 
Idalee Hutton 
Doris Jacklin 


ROW 5: 
Gary Kellard 
Pot Laurance 
Wesley LeBlanc 


ROW 6: 

Robert McFarland 
Katie Monroe 
Monica Moore 


ROW 7: 
Paul Olson 
Patti Osborn 
Tom Paddock 


ROW 8: 

John Reitmeier 
Luree Romain 
Sharon Simpson 


ROW 9: 
Kaye Straight 
Gene Sutton 
Sandy Whitney 



304 



















ROW 1: 

Joyce Asimus 
Freddy Bates 
Richard Bernhardt 
Susie Bjornstad 


ROW 2: 
Dudley Brown 
Linda Bruce 
Lois Ciemans 
Carol Clerf 


ROW 3: 

Dick Cowin 
Monte Drummond 
Christine Heath 
Dave Hylton 


ROW 4: 
Yvonne Johnson 
Ron Jonas 
Bob Kuvara 
Ray Loescher 


ROW 5: 

Darrell Morrison 
Kitty McDonald 
Larry Petershagen 
Priscilla Pipe 


ROW 6: 
Nancy Rigg 
Lorena Scharer 
Fred Segrest 
Sherrill Slichter 


ROW 7: 

Pat Stalder 
Don Trotter 
Janet Van Bevers 
Nancy Ziegler 



IPAC Sees Victory 
At the Polls 


The Independent Political Actions Council, common¬ 
ly known on campus as IPAC, this year selected and 
supported excellent candidates who carried the 
IPAC banner to victory by sweeping the top three 
positions in ASSCW elections. 


IBR OFFICERS—Barry Woo, Billie Wills, June VandeBrake. 



IBR Honors 
Dorm Dwellers 

The Independent Board of Representatives, again 
resumed the responsibility of coordinating activi¬ 
ties of the independent living groups. The annual 
IBR Banquet honored outstanding workers in the 
dorms and ended another year's work. 



INDEPENDENT BOARD OF REPRESENTATIVES-ROW 1: Susie Bjornstad, Kay Foxton, Christine 
Heath, LeRoy Jones, Larry Koller, Bob Kuvara. ROW 2: Virginia Miller, Mona Joyce Monroe, 
Sandee Strand, Nancy Treider, Barbara Ullman, Barry Woo. 


305 





















SUE STOFFEL—Panhellenic President. 


Panhellenic 

The Panhellenic coordinating council this year plannee 
carefully and carried out well two successful Rush periods 
The organization is composed of the presidents and Pan¬ 
hellenic delegates from all thirteen sororities. The purpose 
of the organization is to promote unity among the Greek 
women on the WSC campus. Another practice begun this 
year was to have a set of "grandparents" residing at the 
Memorial Hospital assigned to each sorority. The group 
then sent visitors to see them every week, and made their 
lives cheerier with Christmas and birthday cards. 



ROW 1: 

Joan Anderson 
Alberta Andrews 
Jacque Doxon 
Pat Hamma 


ROW 2: 

Jean Hedman 
Marilyn Jenkins 
Natalie Johnson 
Sue Marsh 


ROW 3: 
Caryl Mattson 
Janice McBride 
Betty McLean 
Marilyn Melin 


ROW 4: 
Shirley Morris 
Gail Moyer 
Carolyn Nelson 
Jackie Olmsted 


ROW 5: 

Patsy Pirkey 
Ann Rebillard 
Cheryl Remley 
Alice Richardson 


ROW 6: 

Sonia Sager 
Jan Schneider 
Mary Schutzman 
Marilyn Sloan 



306 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—ROW 1: Mrs. Hilmer Axling, Miss 
Catherine Northrup, Sue Stoffel, Mary Schutzman, Janice Mc¬ 
Bride. ROW 2: Marilyn Melin, Jan Schneider, Sonia Sager. 


KAPPA DELTA GIRLS sell tickets to DU members of the Greek 
Week nickel hop; who will dance with the owl? 































Junior Panhellenic 

The organization of Junior Panhellenic is composed of two 
representatives from each sorority's pledge class. The pur¬ 
pose of the group is to inform each other on the details of 
each house's history and background on the WSC campus 
and to create an atmosphere of cooperation and interest 
among the younger sorority women. Each year the group 
undertakes Hello Day in the spring, a fashion show and 
convocation in the fall for rushees, and a Jr. Pan luncheon 
for all sorority pledges. One of the most enjoyable func¬ 
tions of the group is an exchange with Junior IFC in the 
spring plus a get-acquainted breakfast in the fall. 



JEAN PARSONS—Junior Panhellenic President. 





JUNIOR PANHELLENIC EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—Ann Pickard, 
Mrs. Betty Manring, Jean Parsons, Caapi Ferrand. 



CHAIRMEN OF HELLO DAY , sponsored by Junior Panhellenic, 
start out the day right with hellos for all on Hello Walk. 


ROW 1: 
Anne Adams 
Barbara Allen 
Virginia Buch 


ROW 2: 
Joanne Falkner 
Kris Felber 
Caopi Ferrand 


ROW 3: 
Charlotte Fray 
Lynn Fulton 
Diana Giles 


ROW 4: 
Nancy Haworth 
Susi Hooper 
Joy Keeney 


ROW 5: 
Carol Lucas 
Anito Marshall 
Phyllis Pattison 


ROW 6: 
Linda Scheldt 
Sue Sieveke 
Carol Smith 



















DON ADAMS—IFC President. 


IFC 

The Inter-Fraternity Council is composed of one membei 
from each fraternity on campus. This council met almos 
every two weeks to discuss the problems relating to the 
welfare of the fraternities. This year the council has strivec 
to discourage the rigorous "Hell Week" activities and pro 
moted a more mature "Help Week". Emphasis was placec 
on helping the new pledge understand and adjust to fra¬ 
ternity living. The Inter-Fraternity Council co-sponsorec 
the second annual Greek Week with the Panhellenic, the 
women's sorority council. Such activities as exchange din¬ 
ners, novelty exchanges, and a track meet, with Chariol 
races (no less) were planned. 



ROW 1: 

Herbert Armstrong 
Tom Askew 
Alan Bahrenburg 
Ira Bronson 
Gary Bryan 


ROW 2: 
Lorry Butts 
John Combes 
Joe Coombs 
Jon Danielson 
Jerry Fox 


ROW 3: 

Larry Garrison 
Don Giedt 
Stan Granberg 
Richard Hankinson 
Sam Haun 


ROW 4: 
Maurie Hood 
Mike Horne 
Dan Jones 
King Kirk 
Ray Kronquist 



ROW 5: 
Bill Lind 
Jim Lord 
Wendell Love 
Jim Lust 
Bill MacBoyle 


ROW 6: 

Hale McPhee 
Donald Mae 
Stan Pratt 
Paul Richardson 
David Roberts 


ROW 7: 

Jas Ross 
John Schultz 
Henry Vostral 
Frank Weldin 
Dick Worthington 

308 



IFC EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—Jerry Fox, Dave 
Parry, Bill Lind, Gordy Stennes, Don Adams. 


THE TAU KAPPA EPSILON HOUSE was the place chosen for 
an informal planning and discussion session by IFC 
tribunal members. 
















Junior IFC 

The Jr. IFC is the Junior Intrafraternity Council, which con¬ 
sists of representatives from each of the fraternity pledge 
classes on campus. This group is a coordinator for all the 
freshman boys who are new initiates in the fraternities. They 
not only discuss and analyze the problems of the pledge 



is an annual Christmas party for all Pullman first and se¬ 
cond grade boys. The boys ate at the various fraternity 
houses and also met Santa! The Jr. IFC also undertook a 
car wash, and helped with the registration on senior 
visitation weekend. 



KEITH ALLERDICE—Junior IFC President 



JUNIOR IFC EXECUTIVES—Merle Sande, Ron 
Scott, Keith Allerdice, Hallie Lake, 

Blaine Barron. 



Blaine Barron 
Bill Coffee 
Denny Duskin 


John Clinton 
Roger Doebke 
John Humphreys 


Bruce Brunton 
Jim Crutchfield 
Mason Emanuels 


ROW 1: 
Chuck Johnson 
Jerry Look 
Mike McDonald 


ROW 2: 

Jerry McFarlane 
Dave Paulon 
John Petterson 


ROW 3: 
Roger Reed 
Merle Sande 
Les Schuller 



ROW 4: 
Ron Scott 
David Sheldon 
Pep Smith 


ROW 5: 

Dick Steen 
Norman Stephenson 
Curt Thomson 


ROW 6: 

Glenn Vannoy 
Mark Welch 
Fred Wexler 

309 












WSC’s Neophytes’ 
Year Successful 



GEORGE SIMCHUK . . . served the freshman class as president , going on to be 
elected Sophomore Independent Man during spring elections . . . lived at Kruegel 
and spent winter months on ski team. 


The members of the Freshman class selected their 
officers early in the fall and eagerly awaited an 
eventful year of activities. The class officers met 
regularly with their expanded exec council, a 
group of representatives from every living group 
on campus, to plan their various class activities. 
The freshman dance, which is planned every 
year to correspond with International Festival 
Week, was highlighted by its International 
theme, "Pot Pourri". In the spring, the Freshmen 
presented their third annual recognition assem¬ 
bly. During this convocation the outstanding 
members of the class were recognized for their 
high grades, participation in campus activities, 
and their accomplishments in athletics. 



FRESHMAN EXPANDED EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—ROW 1: Nikki Edwards, Betty Nelson, Betty Johnson, Donna Wieland, Donna Lawrence, 
Sally Weeks, Lois Clemans, Lexie Atkinson, Marilyn Andersen, Barbara Soley. ROW 2: Donna Davidson, Patty Pence, Maradel Krummel, 
David Dickson, Jim Fletcher, John Mitchell, Jim Flynn, Barry Mozes, Billie Jo Lusk, Joanne Trimble, Marcia Herman, Sharon Hichey, Dean Pope, 
Walter Windus. ROW 3: Michael Callaghan, John Yates, Jerry McFarlane, Gary Larson, Owen Purser, Louis Lake, Terry Listello, Dave Mielke, 
Bill Coffee, Pep Smith, Pete Wiedemann, Farley Gimp, Jerry Crutchfield, Dick Sherwood, Dick Thurston, Paul Olson. 


310 













FRESHMAN EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—ROW 1: 
Janis Maylor, Peggy Simpson. ROW 2: John 
Gallagher, Mary Ann Rygg. ROW 3: Guy 
Priest. 



HUGH TINLING . . . elected frosh vice-president in 
fall campaign . . . aslo resided at Kruegel . . . debate 
and speech his specialties. 


ARLENE KNAUSS . . . completed the Independent 
sweep of frosh offices as secretary . . . active at Mc- 
Croskey hall. . . served the Army ROTC as a sponsor . 


311 

















JOHN STEWART . . . ably filled the position of president . . . lived at Kappa 
Sigma . . . but spent some time at Kappa house . . . successfully worked at 
Arch E major . . . known for friendliness . 


Sophomore Class 
Worked, Played 

Highlighting the Sophomore activities for this 
year was the Sophomore Tolo, /, Pantasmagoria // . 
Posters were made and distributed around the 
entire campus, decorations were planned, and 
programs were designed. In the meantime, the 
telephones were crowded with girls calling for 
dates. When the programs were distributed, the 
upperclassmen began to wonder if the Sopho¬ 
mores had made some kind of mistake. Red and 
orange programs? But they soon learned this 
was no mistake. They were for real! The sopho¬ 
mores also planned the student leadership con¬ 
ference, and sponsored a booth for the ASSCW 
Carnival. It was named "Choke the Coke". The 
class is also working on a sign for the entrance 
to the college. 



SOPHOMORE EXPANDED EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—ROW 1: Marilyn Evans, Jay Eliason, Dorothy Wehe, Bev Holmes, Gretchen Smith, Becky 
Sieveke, Bev Roberts, Molly Melcher. ROW 2: Leo Kolb, Milton David, Dick Boettcher, Mike Gustin, Virginia Roberts, Linda Lovitt, Nola Nold. 
ROW 3: Emory Clapp, Keith Birkenfeld, John Block, Doug McDonald, Roger Wyrick, Roy Dornblaser. 


312 











SOPHOMORE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—Left to 
right: Tom Gates, Richard Dingle, Larry Esvelt, 
Linda Coffin, Marijo Shannon, Carolyn Koeppin. 



MEMBERS OF THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 
spent many long hours planning and decora¬ 
ting for the Soph Tolo. 



MANY STUDENTS enjoyed the Soph 
Tolo with replicas of "sputniks" hang¬ 
ing from the ceiling. 



GORDON ALLEN . . . narrowly won the sophomore 
vice-presidency . . . resides at Neill hall . . . spends 
spare time in electrical engineering labs. 



JANET VAN BEVERS . . . filled the sophomore secre¬ 
tarial job . . . represented Regents at IP AC and as a 
Spur officer . . . elected as next year's Junior Indepen¬ 
dent Woman. 


313 




















Juniors Had Year 
of Varied Events 


rl 



DON BREITENFELDT . . 
ASSCW vice-president . 
in Spokane . 



. served as junior class president and later elected 
. . a vet living at Stimson, he did his practice teaching 


The Junior Class anxiously selected their officers 
in the fall of the year. The newly elected officers 
began to plan their Junior Prom immediately. 
They soon learned that the planning of the 
biggest all-college dance was an endless job. 
Ernie Fields' well-known band was contracted 
for the event which was to be held in Bohler 
Gym. Committees were chosen, programs 
planned, and posters were hung everywhere to 
publicize the event. Then, before the Juniors 
realized it, it was the night of the prom. During 
intermission, Sandy Wilcox, the prom queen, 
entered the gym with her attendents, JoAnn 
Henry, Sandy Shurtleff, Sandy Grant, and Janet 
Chisholm. The queen was crowned by Ernie 
Fields. In addition to the Prom, the class also 
sponsored the campus blood drive. The juniors 
ended their year, anxiously waiting to become 
seniors. 



EXPANDED EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—ROW 1: Betty Ackert, Jonette Margaretich # Louise Morse. ROW 2: Carol Gardner, Barbara Doutrich, 
Idalee Hutton, Sue Flottman, Sue LaFor, Kay Hawkes, Eleanor Ambrose, Harrie Frost, JoAnn Viele, Marietta Parish. ROW 3: Lowell Lancaster, 
Jerry Carson, Ken Frandsen, Jon Danielson, Ken Myklebust, Al Cordell, Ira Branson, Bill Buchan, Mike McMackin. 


314 



















HONORING QUEEN SANDRA at the prom is 
junior class prexy Don Breitenfeldt. 



JUNIOR EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—ROW 1: 
June Mihoro, Pattie Chisholm. ROW 2: Floyd 
Damon, LeRoy Jones. ROW 3: Dick Worth¬ 
ington, Dick Smith. 



NEILL HALL MEN BID FAST and furious¬ 


ly at the Cougar Campus Chest auc¬ 
tion . . . fake money , of course. 



JACK MAY . . . elected junior veep . . . resides at 
Kruegel while on campus . . . plans to spend the 
summer in Florida. 



SHARON JUSTICE ... Jed the Pi Phi's . . . stilJ had 
time for junior class secretary . . . swam in Fish Fans 
. . . sported a Kappa Sig pin and sparkling diamond. 


315 































DICK WOODS ... finished his term as Waller president in time to carry out major 
spring functions of senior class president . . . got his degree in forestry at 
spring commencement. 


Grads Departed 
Facing Futures 

The senior class of 1958 will ever remember their 
four colorful years at WSC. Looking through the 
mirror of time they see the closing of the Half- 
and-Half, the very famous walk to Idaho when 
the road was packed with singing, laughing 
people, the phenomenal rise of the Cougar Par¬ 
ty, and the arrival of our new football coach, 
Jim Sutherland. Graduation time nearing, they 
staged their senior ball, "Magic Moments", and 
a portable band shell was contributed as a final 
farewell and memory to their alma mater. 



SENIOR EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—ROW 1: Colleen O'Hara, Kathy Kanouse, Eulah Munns, Dick Woods. ROW 2: Gerald Wilson, Nancy Sheldrup, 
Pat Link, Stan Easton. 


316 















SENIOR CLASS COMMITTEE HEADS were Nat 
Johnson, Stan Easton, Liz Stackhouse, and 
Hellon Davis. 


ENTERTAINMENT AT THE SENIOR BALL was 
provided by two peppy students at the 
intermission time. 



SENIORS WORKED with graduation 
committee for a smooth commence¬ 
ment , including returning of robes. 





STAN EASTON . . . officiated as senior and YMCA 
vice-president . . . also called Kruegel his home . . . 
plans to teach political science next year. 



KATHY KANOUSE . . . ended two years as ASCA 
secretary to become senior class secretary . . . later 
named Aggie of the Year and one of Top Ten . . . 
lived at Wilmer. 


317 
























GRADUATE STUDENT OFFICERS—SEATED: James Kelsaw, Marjorie Kruse. 
STANDING: Peter Hansen, Robert Swanson. 


Graduates Mixed 
Fun With Studies 


This select group of individuals did not consider 
their education complete with the passing of 
their graduation last spring or in previous years. 
Striving still for further education, unity and so¬ 
cial life, the graduate students selected their cap¬ 
able, yet still busy, officers, who led them in ob¬ 
taining the above objectives. They planned a 
dinner dance, which radiated an interesting at¬ 
mosphere, for the fall season. It was a fine suc¬ 
cess, and it was considered to establish it as an 
annual event to undertake. Another dinner 
dance, in the spring, rounded out the social pro¬ 
gram of the year for the graduate students of 
the State College of Washington. They are a 
most unique group. 




LOOKING IN ON THE DANCE, we find three 
couples who seem to be having a very fine time. 


THE ANNUAL GRAD STUDENTS' WINTER DANCE found the group at the Pullman 
Country Club, some dancing, while others enjoyed sitting, talking, and swapping 
jokes. 


318 












COMMUNICATIONS 


















Student Publications 
Lead to Learning 
Through Busy Work, 
Constant Problems 



EFFIE LOWERY RECEIVES PLAQUE at the annual Chinook banquet 
for being the outstanding upperclassman on Chinook. 



THE PHOTOGRAPHER'S JOB LEADS TO MANY STRANGE SPOTS as 
shown by this "Fearless Fastus" from WSC Photo in the midst 
of inspection. 



THIS WAS THEIR REWARD for a year of service to Chinook; Chinook masthead and guests joyfully devour a steak banquet. 



JEAN , BUSINESS MANAGER , SMILES at 
award handed back so that . . . 



THE PHOTOGRAPHER CAN SHOOT a 
good picture at the Chinook banquet. 


320 
















THE PAPER MUST GO OUT and this bag of Evergreens for mailing is no small chore for 
mail wrappers. 




ANDERS HENDRIKKSON added to 'Green 
ad staff before sailing for Sweden. 


THROUGH THE DOOR waited Pub board , 
which would pick the next editor. 



"MR. HICKS, THEE I PRESENT—so that 
your spelling worries will be over / 7 



A 'GREEN WORKER trys to explain a con¬ 
fusing head to a Herald employee. 



AN OPENED WINDOW on a warm night 
is often used as a door by " 'Greeners." 


321 























Daily Evergreen 
Nabs " 1st” Rating 


All things to all readers. That is the fantastic 
assignment that the WSC Daily Evergreen at¬ 
tempts. Fall semester a rusty and green staff 
faces this daring goal, trying desperately to 
train professionals in every complex operation, 
while racing breathlessly day and night to fill 
yawning columns of giant papers that eager 
advertising salesmen provide. This year's edi¬ 
torial staff worked so effectively that a big jump 
was achieved in national rating to bring the 
'Green to "first class" honors. 



DEE NORTON ... an active journalism major , he headed the 'Green the first 
semester as well as Delta Sigma Chi , men's journalism honorary ... a married 
student whose passion was his MG sports car. 



ANNE GYLLENBERG—Evergreen Managing Editor, 
first semester. 


BILL PALMER—Evergreen Associate 
Editor, first semester. 


BARRIE HARTMAN—Evergreen Sports 
Editor, first semester. 






DEE NORTON AND BEN COOK, head photographers , EVERGREEN NEWS EDITORS—SEATED: Ed Perdue, Shirlee Newell. STANDING: 
inspect new equipment. Mary Lu Livesay, Anne Gyllenberg, Jim Gies, Freddy Bates, Al Watts. 


322 























Lengthy Beat List 
Digs Local News 

Spring semester turns the campus daily into a 
publication which can scarcely find the news 
space to record all happenings of a campus 
ablaze with action and activities. The 'Green's 
biggest beat list ran five feet long and kept busy 
five reporting classes, plus volunteer writers. Re¬ 
porters "buried the desk" in news. Editors, proof¬ 
readers, photographers and all other hands de¬ 
fied the distractions of a tantalizing spring to 
wind up a year of proud progress. An Idaho 
picnic added closing fun. 


SUE STOFFEL . . . chosen as a member of senior class "Top Ten" at Senior Con 
.. . handled AWS convention . . . finished her term as Panhe/lenic president in 
February . . . lived at Kappa Alpha Theta, second semester editor . 



AL WATTS—Evergreen Sports Editor, 
second semester. 



i 



BRAD MUNN—Evergreen Associate BARRIE HARTMAN—Evergreen Managing Editor, 
Editor, second semester. second semester. 



EVERGREEN REPORTERS AND PROOF READERS—ROW 1: Fred Hinden, Dahleen Dahl, Marcia Cass, Deanne Haggardt, Jean Common, Virginia 
Pauley, Shirley Cannon, Mary Hillstrom, Larry Drury. ROW 2: Camilla Matthiesen, Susan Pedersen, Jeanne Whitehouse, Kathy Wood, Mona 
Schmalbeck, Jeanette Frostad, Janae Parker. 


323 
























Specialists Labor 
To Create ’Green 


A newspaper staff must include many loyal 
specialists, especially in serving groups with 
widely and often violently differing tastes. 
Every writer must always be right and wise. 
Each editor must always be impartial and 
lightning-quick with the justifiable answer 
for every production puzzle. Advisers must 
be constantly available but never road¬ 
blocks to freedom or initiative. And news 
editors must wrap up all staff action one 
day each week. 



EVERGREEN ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS AND SPORTS ISSUE EDITORS—ROW 1: 
Fred Hinden. ROW 2: Susan Pedersen, Brad Munn, Shirlee Newell, Mary Hillstrom, 
Jean Common, Marcia Cass. ROW 3: Ed Perdue, David Brown. 



MAYNARD HICKS—Evergreen 
Editorial Adviser. 


"THE" TOM TIEDE PAUSES WHILE REMOVING PUNCH TAPE from the linotypes on 
his Tuesdy night's news editing job for the daily Evergreen. 


324 
























KENT WOLD . . . combined marriage with heading the 'Green busi¬ 
ness staff first semester . . . graduated in February, holding a 
journalism certificate . . . one of few who worked on editorial and 
business side . 


BARBARA WILSON . . . called AGD home during school year and 
Kalispell, Montana, home in summer . . . elected president of her 
sorority and Phi Chi Theta, women's B.A. honorary. 



Business Staff 
Does Many Jobs 

There is often scarcely an hour of the 24 but 
what somewhere, someone is toiling to bring the 
Evergreen to its thousands of readers. Students 
are selling and preparing advertisements. Stu¬ 
dents are wrapping papers for the heavy off- 
campus circulation. Late at night, lights burn 
downtown at the Pullman Herald plant as stu¬ 
dent pressmen turn out the nightly run. In early 
hours of each publication day student-delivered 
bundles of papers are distributed. "Business" is 
busy. 


KEEPING NATIONAL AD MATS SORTED is a major task, and takes up a whole 
filing cabinet. 




LINDA PARDEE—Evergreen Assistant 
Business Manager, second semester. 



JUSTIN VON GORTLER—Evergreen 
Office Manager, first semester. 



JOAN SKOUGE—Evergreen Office 
Manager, second semester. 


325 

















EVERGREEN ADVERTISING MANAGERS—Mari-jean Purcell, Fred 
Whitney, Linda Pardee. 



Ad and Office 
Staff Members 
Sell Space/ Ads 
and Bill Buyers 



THE AD SALESMAN'S JOB FOR THE 'GREEN brings familiarity with Herald mat 
service ... so the enthusiastic salesman can enter a store with confidence . . . selling 
an ad for the paper. 


EVERGREEN OFFICE STAFF—ROW 1: Virginia Pauley, Kathie Pettit, 
Mary Upham. ROW 2: Kathleen Young, Kathy Barbo, Gale Griffin, 
Sheryl McClintick. 


EVERGREEN ADVERTISING STAFF—SEATED: Mary Adams. 
STANDING: Joan Skouge, Jan Thomson, Mari-jean Purcell, 
Robert Beardslee, Kermit Delzer. 



















JEAN HEDMAN, BUSINESS MANAGER ... a beauteous blonde 
operated the largest student-controlled budget on campus ... a 
calm, smiling administrator , Jean hails from Auburn majoring in 
home economics . 


DUDLEY BROWN, EDITOR . . . whirling fireball of personal action, 
he has made Chinook production his consuming passion for 15 months 
... a B.A. graduate with honors, he saved time for organizations 
and bridge . 


Chinook Staffers Crystallize Wonderful Year 


That wonderful college year of 1957-58 is crystallized in 
this volume which will serve all the people whose hearts 
are with WSC for all future time. It was in this year that 
strong pressures began to change the institution's name 
to Washington State University, but Chinook workers were 
still toiling for "WSC" and for the book you hold. The 
staff began its labors for this annual long before the first 
starry-eyed freshman wandered curiously past Chinook's 
crowded little home in CUB B-29 that Sunday of new stu¬ 
dent con, September 15, 1957. 


Some "Chinookers" were hard at work for Chinook every 
day of the college year, and even while the seniors were col¬ 
lecting their degrees in a mad race across Rogers field on 
another Sunday, some were still at work. Time was 
sneaked from final examinations to rush closing items to 
the printers. A handful of staffers stayed over long after 
everyone else had gone to make this a complete record 
of a ne'er-to-be-forgotten year. The staff that toiled that 
you might read and remember this year hopes to have 
been worthy of your trust. 



JANICE McBRIDE BARBARA KARNIS BARBARA DOUTRICH JUDY BLOUNT 

Divisions Manager Mounting Manager Layout Manager Copy Manager 


327 













EFFIE LOWERY, JEAN HEDMAN, JOYCE AAMOT worked hard 
to coordinate and direct Chinook business staffs. 



Campus Support Aids 
Business Side Morale 

Washington State each year is found among the nation's 
leading institutions in the percentage of undergraduates 
purchasing yearbooks. This trust which is renewed each 
fall registration day—when nearly all students order 
Chinooks—means that the Chinook business staff has at 
the same time, both a harder and an easier job. The busi¬ 
ness job is made harder by the complexity and the volume 
of items and transactions that have to be made and fol¬ 
lowed to their eventual disposition—sometimes in far cor¬ 
ners of the globe and sometimes only years later. The staff 
is kept busy sending contracts, balancing books, handling 
financial affairs and planning budgets. Still the pride that 
the business workers on Chinook have grows as they revel 
in the trust that the campus gives its book. This feeling 
makes it easier to find the hours for the sheer drudgery 
of totaling and checkling long columns of figures. It helps 
to ease the daily strains that come from making and en¬ 
forcing budgets. The business workers feel happy in being 
an indispensable unit of an indispensable book. 


MAYNARD HICKS , editorial adviser , pauses 
from his paper-laden desk to answer a question 
of a staff member. 




CHINOOK BUSINESS STAFF—STANDING: Effie Lowery, Sherry Brandt, Cathy Johnson, 
Joyce Aamont. SEATED: Gloria Mathewson, Malinda Harmon, Judy Lowery, Pat Bell, 
Linda Bruce, Georgia Backus. 


328 

















Creating Annual 
Is Supreme Puzzle 


Thousands of individual pictures and copy blocks and head¬ 
lines are required to be planned and prepared and 
checked through all of the stages of production to make 
possible the four hundred pages that will reflect the 
life of a great campus during a great year. Workers in 
layout and copy feel the responsibility of the permanence 
of their work. Such familiar words as "I'm sorry to bother 
you today, but the deadline for this copy is next Friday" 
are heard. Many false starts are made before the printer 
gets his final copy and the completing pages sail into the 
home port. 


LAYOUT EDITORS AND MANAGER—Norm Eng, Dave Annibal, 
Barbara Doutrich, Marlene Mitchell. 


COPY EDITORS AND MANAGERS—Pat Laurance, Judy Blount, Pat 
Lewis, Anne Corlis. 


CHINOOK LAYOUT STAFF—Zana Carden, Barbara Good, Janet 
Leman, Ruth Rudd. 


CHINOOK COPY STAFF—ROW 1: Janet Dragoo, Pat Laurance, 
Marilyn Andersen. ROW 2: Kathy Everham, Marilyn Sinclair, 
Erlene Barnes. 


329 













MOUNTING MANAGER AND EDITORS—Sharon Lancaster, 
Mildred Shields, Barbara Karnis, Don Hyden. 



THROWING DARTS AT AN OLD ECLIPSE PICTURE gives 
momentary relief to busy Chinookers as well as a means for 
blowing off steam by irate complainers who come charging 
into the office to find no one there to hear their story. 

330 


Mountains of Work 
Face Toiling Crews 

In the mounting division everyone learned what precision 
meant when it came time to proportion pictures to just the 
right dimensions. Sticky glue on hands, clothes, the mount¬ 
ing table and innocent pictures was no novelty in B-29. The 
Division Staff added to the confusion by scheduling and 
rescheduling picture appointments. Still that welcoming 
atmosphere in that hurricane swept office of papers, pen¬ 
cils and pop bottles draws students back year after year. 



MOUNTING STAFF—Ralph Drengson, Don Hyden, Brenda Button, Barb 
Karnis, Margaret Forrester, Mary Johnson, Helen Reilley, Zana Carden, 
Joan Hansen, Sharon Lancaster, Wilma Loudon, Marjorie Swanson. 


DIVISION MANAGERS AND EDITORS—SEATED: Janice McBride. STAND¬ 
ING: Lorraine Almy, Jeanie Fitzgerald, Peggy Germeau, Dixie Drake, Dick 
Zemp, Karen Getschmann, Janice Henry. 

















GOVERNMENT STAFF—Marilyn Evans, Judy Repp, Dixie Drake, Caapi Ferrand, 
Kathy Barbo. 



SPORTS, SENIORS AND COMMUNICATIONS STAFFS—Fletcher Hahn, Charlotte 
Fray, Curt Thomson, Gwen Bendele, Dick Zemp. 


ORGANIZATIONS AND LIVING GROUPS STAFFS— Jeanie Fitzgerald, Jackie Jay, 
Susie Olson, Peggy Germeau, Janie Graef, Sharon Burnwell. 




MILITARY, ADMINISTRATION AND SCHOOLS 
STAFFS—Gwen Bendele, Dee Ann Hanford, Sharon 
McChesney, Carol Johnson, Janice Henry, Karen 
Johnson, Vicki Kotecki. 



ASCA AND LIMELIGHT STAFFS—Sue Hicks, Toni 
Harig, Karen Getschmann, Susan Pedersen, 

Kathy Johnson. 


331 












SHERRY OLIVER . . . this quite brunette led a campus magazine 
rapidly growing in prestige . . . Stevens hall junior in journalism 
from Anchorage, Alaska . . . recognized by Theta Sigs as their 
new president. 


MARLENE MITCHELL, Spark business manager . . . Alpha Delta Pi 
activities girl who became an "outstanding senior" . . . worked on 
Chinook and AWS regional convention ... A history graduate, she 
trained for teaching. 


Spark Celebrates 
Second Birthday 

The Spark celebrated its second birthday this year and 
a successful one it was. Under the direction of Sharon 
Oliver, four editions were published and the little maga¬ 
zine, self-supporting though it is, stayed out of the red. 
Sparks' home was moved into a new office, enabling the 
editors more freedom to work. Many all day and night 
stretches were spent to complete each issue but everyone 
agreed . . . it's worth it! 


SPARK STAFF—Charles Cole, Diana Luft, Jackie Olmsted, Susan Pedersen, Judy 
Erdahl, Dudley Brown, Mary Welsh, Yvonne Johnson, Flo Nakama, Dick Zemp. 




AN OLD HAND INKER and manual feeding press is 
the foundation of Spark production work. 


332 








BILL ACHESON . . . editor for five issues of the Technometer . . . Bill 
was rated an outstanding senior, graduating in mechanical 
engineering in '58. 


DENTON HANFORD . . . business manager of the Technometer . . . 
Denton was one of the married clan . . . collected his degree in 
civil engineering. 



THAT LAST WORK NIGHT before the magazine goes 
to press finds most of the staff huddled around the large 
table in the Technology building office. 


333 


Largest Campus Mag 
Tells Industry Story 


Boasting a national circulation to people in its field, the 
Technometer serves as the student voice of the college of 
engineering and mineral technology. Each of the maga¬ 
zine's four yearly issues spotlights a different branch of 
engineering and has extensive circulation in industry and 
among science students in high schools. Staff members of 
this publication proudly refer to it as the largest of maga¬ 
zines on campus. 


TECHNOMETER STAFF—ROW 1: Vernon Andrews, Mike Horne, Dee Ann Han¬ 
ford, Vern Wagar, Charlie Lucas. ROW 2: Don Coates, Ray Crowder, Bob Strane, 
Gerry Pollies, Terry Kelly. They are listening to editor Bill Acheson and Busi¬ 
ness Manager Denton Hanford. 







ASSCW BOARD OF PUBLICATIONS—LEFT TO RIGHT: Susan Stoffel, Bert Alward, Roger Stroud, H. W. Barlow, Dee Norton, Dudley Brown, 
Joan Lunnum, June Bierbower, Jean Hedman, Barbara Wilson, Beryl Roberts. 


Three Diverse Areas 
Further Publications 

Three areas on the campus that further student publica¬ 
tions are Publications Board, WSC Photo Staff, and the 
Agriculturist Staff. Pub Board approves recommended 
budgets of Chinook, Evergreen and Spark and estab¬ 
lishes policies for these publications. WSC Photo is the 
main backbone of Chinook, yet also serves the college 
and faculty with photography service. The Agriculturist 
magazine offers ideas and assistance to those in the fields 
of agriculture and journalism. 



COLLEGE PHOTO STAFF — SEATED: Jack Martin, Thelma 
Brannon, Marilyn Farley. STANDING: Bob Bullis, 

Chuck Painter, Ed Neil. 



AGRICULTURIST STAFF—ROW 1: Ed Wicker, Ralph Wheeler, Marcia Cass, Carol Voegtlin, Larry 
Larson. ROW 2: Dennis Adams, Terry Brady, Ollie Click, Jim Stroh, Chuck Cole, Ed Lippert. 



AGRICULTURIST EDITOR— 
Ed Wicker 


334 










Radio-TV Operations 
Train and Broadcast 

Since its beginning in 1922, the Radio Service of the State 
College of Washington has grown into the Radio-Television 
Services. Under this is KUGR—the local campus station. 
Next the WSC Radio Transcription Service prepares, du¬ 
plicates, and distributes 295 programs each week. These 
programs, distributed by tape recordings, are heard on 72 
Washington radio stations. Three-fourths of the station's 
programs are classified as informational or cultural in na¬ 
ture. The remaining hours are programmed from KWSC's 
record library, one of the largest in the entire West. Almost 
all of the actual broadcasting activities at KWSC are car¬ 
ried on by WSC students in coordination with classes and 
under faculty supervision. 



KWSC MANAGERS—Allen Miller, station manager, Burt Harrison, 
program manager. 



KWSC FACULTY—ROW 1: Allen Miller. ROW 2: Bob Mott, news editor; Glen Southworth, chief engineer; Cal Watson, production supervisor; 
Terry Ellmore, writer-producer; Hugh Rundell, announcing supervisor; Elmer Erickson, music librarian; Burt Harrison; Clarence Buse, engineer. 


335 














KWSC ENGINEERS—Clarence Buse, Glen Southworth, Dick SPORTS STAFF—ROW 1: Jim Olson, Jim Blossey. ROW 2: George Cooper, 

McDonald, Art Brown, William Watt. Ron Barber, Bill Huntington. 


Students Carry 
KWSC to Empire 

The television production center at WSC serves 
as a facility for training students for a career in 
television and offers closed-circuit or "wired" TV 
service to the campus. The students in televison 
produce a variety of live TV programs. This year's 
agenda included a hour and a half adaptation 
of "The Bad Seed" which was broadcast over 
closed circuit. The play was presented for the 
Washington State Association of Broadcasters as 
well as to the campus. Also WSC televison be¬ 
gan making kinescope recordings for release 
throughout the Inland Empire and state on com¬ 
mercial televison stations, most of which are of 
educational value. 



CHIEF ANNOUNCERS—Cal Fankhauser, Ben Cook. 



KWSC ANNOUNCERS—ROW 1: Cal Fankhauser, Verl Wheeler, Gordon Sanders, Larry White, Bob Turnbow, Jim MacElhaney, Bill Hunting- 
ton, Dave Law. ROW 2: Stan Haase, John Gilleland, Jim Olson, George Cooper, Jim Blossey, Dick MacDonald, Bob Young. ROW 3: Ben Cook, 
Jim O'Neil, Ed Sharman. 


336 

























KWSC MUSIC AND TRAFFIC STAFF—Sally Holcomb, Beth Patterson, Nancy 
Hopf, Pat Young, Melisse Wilcox. 


KWSC NEWS AND SPECIAL EVENTS—Jerry Standal, Stan 
Haase, Ken Swerin. 



Specialists Aid 
In Programming 


KWSC TV CAMERAS ARE TRAINED ON THE SMOKER while the crowd 
divides its attention between watching the fight or the fight on TV. 


Specialists are developed in all directions where 
professional stations need them by the process of 
training in Arts hall. Starting in the classroom with 
theory, the student is then directed to the use of 
the complex and modern facilities available 
through the radio-TV units. Music, news, traffic, 
station management and production are covered 
by student staffs. From several instructional areas 
come interested students who develop outlets 
toward their chosen fields of interest. Yet not all is 
work. Radio fields developed a basketball team 
that this year edged the WSC Daily Evergreen 
quintett in a tilt replete with color. Honoraries, 
honors and after-program breaks pep up the 
crowded life of student learners and doers. 


MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF PROGRAMS are prepared and televised by 
students in television talent and production classes. 

















KUGR ANNOUNCERS AND STAFF—ROW 1: Verl Wheeler, Dick Smith, Sylvia Ormsby, Larry White, Jim MacElhaney, Bill Cannon, Margaret 
Strachan, Jim Blossey. ROW 2: Dee Norton, Bob Lamborn, Bob Marks, Gordy Sanders, Ed Sharman, Bill Brubaker, George Cooper. ROW 3: 
Bill Watt, Jim O'Neil, Ron Barber, Stan Haase. 


RADIO-TV SERVICES CELEBRATED THEIR 35TH ANNIVERSARY 



Carrier-Current Unit 
Offers KUGR Staff 
Widely Varied Posts 
to Listener Benefit 


KUGR MANAGERS—Larry White, Jim MacElhaney, Sylvia Ormsby. 


with an open house; a youngster is enthralled at hearing 
his own voice. 


338 












AS CA 



339 












Associated Students, 
College of Agriculture, 
Sponsored Lively and 
Interesting Events 



HATCHING OF CHICKS proved to be most fascinating to youngsters 
at the Little International. 



COMPETING FOR THE TITLE OF QUEEN of the Little International 
involved extensive milking, timed, of course. 



MANY INTERESTED SPECTATORS ventured into areas that they had never taken time to view before. 



340 
























HARVEST BALL QUEEN , Bonnie Noe , found a minute to take a breath of fresh air on the 
balcony of the Cub ballroom. 


INCLUDED IN THE REALM OF ASCA is 
flower-arranging . . . work and 
fun combined. 



A HAPPY MOMENT for this girl came 
when she was crowned queen of the 
Little International. 



FOR SUPERIOR HORSEMANSHIP this girl 
received a Navajo blanket at the horse 
show banquet. 



MANY STUDENTS took part in the horse 
show in May; costumes and ceremony 
were enjoyed. 


341 











ASCA ’s Five Officers 
Spearhead Ag Events 


The Associated Students, College of Agriculture, are some 
of the most highly organized on campus. Each separate 
club in the field of agriculture is drawn together, keeping 
its identity but having its president on ASCA council. The 
central ASCA body is led by five student officers. In addi¬ 
tion to coordination, these officers have ultimate charge 
of several functions spearheaded by ASCA itself. Such 
events include the Ag Faculty mixer at the first of the 
year where faculty get better acquainted with students. 
Next the Harvest Ball is undertaken. Still later in the year 
the Little International and Ag Recognition assembly take 
more of these officers 7 time. 



GLENN ALDRICH . . . took the reins of ASCA . . . lives at Farm house, 
majoring in ag education . . . saved time for ASSCW 
Election board too . 



ASCA COUNCIL—ROW 1: Evan Purser, Kathy Kanouse, Jeannie Nelson, Diana Kelso, Fred Stormshak, Glenn Aldrich. ROW 2: Ray Landes, 
Jim Swartwood, Roger Kvamme, Jim Stroh, Ron Stoffer. ROW 3: Ken Milholland, Michael Brookes, Jake Lautenback, Robert Boyden, Norris 
Barber, Donald Raistakka. 



THE BIGGEST LAUGH OF THE YEAR 
—the Ag Mixer—not all on 
students , either. 



AGGIE OF THE YEAR, Kathy Kanouse, chats PEOPLE MINGLE during coffee break at the 
after the honor is bestowed. Ag Recognition Assembly. 














FRED STORMSHAK 
ASCA Vice-president 


KATHY KANOUSE 
ASCA Secretary 



ASCA EXEC COUNCIL—ROW 1: Evan Purser, Kathy Kanouse, Fred Stormshak. ROW 2: Ray 
Landes, Jim Swartwood, Norm Scott, Glenn Aldrich. 



NORM SCOTT 
ASCA Historian 



RAY LANDES 
ASCA Treasurer 



LARGE DISCS WITH PAINTED DIRECTIONS were used for the Ag Engineering skit at the Ag Faculty Mixer. 


343 






















International Queen 
From 'Riches to Rags’ 


The doors to the fieldhouse swing open, and another ex¬ 
citing exposition is underway. Annually the Little Interna¬ 
tional climaxes the activity year for many students in the 
college of agriculture. Most agricultural clubs enter booths; 
many students enter animals in the various judging con¬ 
tests. Each club booth depicts some area of agriculture 
related to the club's activities. The booth judged most out¬ 
standing this year was the Horticulture booth consisting of 
a large red apple with "picture" windows. Under the 
general chairmanship of Jim Swartwood, the excitement 
was heighthened by the milking contest that saw Jean Nel¬ 
son selected "Queen of the Little International." It was 
from "riches to rags" for Jean as she climbed out of her 
queen's garb after the crowning ceremony to show her 
animal. It proved to be best of its class too. 



THE LITTLE INTERNATIONAL SIGN PROCLAIMS THAT A GRs 



THE "HAWG" HERDING contest is about to 
be underway. 



A QUICK LUNCH is grabbed before the 
next showing starts. 



THE BEST HORSE is judged 
by sweepstake judges. 



AND THERE THEY SIT, QUEENS ON MILKING STOOLS, squeezing for all they're worth. And this was the path to glory? 


344 



















DANA NOBLE, Dairy club's queen hopeful 
pauses in booth. 


PIM FLETCHER'S LAMB was judged best 
of the show. 


JEAN NELSON grooms her bull 
for sweepstake entry. 




QUEEN CANDIDATES line up just before the crowning. 


JIM SWARTWOOD, general chairman, 
kneels with MC of show. 







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\\ \ 


kV ' 

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345 


















KAREN KENNEDY , club Little Interna- THE AGRONOMY BOOTH DREW MANY VIEWERS at the annual Little International 

tional queen candidate , enjoys riding. in the fieldhouse. 



CROP JUDGING TEAM—ROW 1: Warren Mallory, Beverly 
Dreisow, Norval Johanson. ROW 2: Evan Purser, Bob Lofgren, 
Mike Gray. 


Agronomy Club 

Students actively interested in agronomy—soils, farm 
crops and closely allied lines—make up the membership 
of Agronomy club. In addition to belonging to the local 
college club each member is designated a student affiliate 
of the American Society of Agronomy. An important pro¬ 
ject for this year's club was their Little International booth, 
which depicted various types of grains and seeds. 



AGRONOMY CLUB—ROW 1: David Miller, Evan Purser, Wayne Belles, Delroy Schwisow, Gary Storment, Beverly Dreisow, Richard Dreger, 
Joe Coombs, Ron Stoffer. ROW 2: J. K. Pallerso, John Reitmeier, Henry Vostral, Allan Koch, Myron Swanson, Oliver Click, Jim Stroh, Alan 
Hattrup, Warren Mallory. ROW 3: B. R. Gregg, Clinton Leonard, Michael Gray, Bob Lofgren, Dave Rosenquist, Norval Johanson, Lloyd 
Dechenne, Mike McMackin, Marv Remillard. 


346 
















ALPHA ZETA INITIATION is a blind-folded matter full of ceremony. 


Alpha Zeta 

The agricultural honorary. Alpha Zeta, bestows member¬ 
ship on outstanding students in all phases of agriculture. 
Old members select the new on the basis of scholarship 
and leadership. Active in every state in the union. Alpha 
Zeta is best known locally for its colorful initiations. Before 
initiations, prospective members are seen about campus 
in bibbed overalls, holding shovels or other agricultural 
implements. 



DURING FALL AND SPRING INITIATIONS new members don the 
garb of their profession. 



ALPHA ZETA—ROW 1: B. R. Gregg, Roger Kvamme, Raymond Bay, James Swartwood, James Stroh, Evan Purser, Terry Chase, Virgil Myers, 
Robert Sjoboen. ROW 2: Bob Lofgren, Glenn Aldrich, Henry Vostral, Allan Koch, Donald Lee, Jim Chamberlain, Noel Brown, Dale Petersen, 
Jim Manring. ROW 3: Elwood Dart, John Reitmeier, Robert Rose, Daryl Freter, Ed Veenhuizen, Franklin Leitz, Norval Johanson, Dave Rosen- 
quist. Norm Scott, Larry King. 


347 



































A FAKE COW spurted real milk through the channels of 
distribution that milk follows. 



A JUDGING TEAM learns the finer points of judging. 



BOSSY SEEMED UNAWARE that she was the center of attention. 



DAIRY SCIENCE MEMBERS are avid samplers of ice cream at pro¬ 
duction center in Troy hall. 


Dairy Science Club 

The American Dairy Science Association, more commonly 
called the Dairy Science club on campus, strives to create 
interest and keep people informed on what is going on in 
the dairy world. This is done through a booth at the Little 
International and by sending judging teams to several 
different shows. Membership is limited to dairy science 
majors. 




AMERICAN DAIRY SCIENCE ASSOCIATION—ROW 1: David Dickson, Jon Hatt, Wallace Vog, Tom Carey, S. S. Wahid-ul-hamid, Ray Blaisdell, 
Raymond Bay. ROW 2: Kay Aker, Van Youngquist, Dave Stecher, Bob Gromko, Olson Arleg, Donald Olson. ROW 3: Wayne Halvorson, 
Stanley Marugg, Ed Veenhuesen, Ronald Power, Sid Pollack, Bob Roffler, Fred Stormshak, Donald Raistakka. 


348 










AG ENGINEERING MAJORS LEARN THE PROCESS of bending and gluing wood for farm structures. 


ASAE 

Members of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers 
have a dual interest—agriculture and engineering. Thus 
the club participates in ASCA activities as the Little Inter¬ 
national and also in the Engineering Open House. Majors 
in agricultural engineering or farm mechanics make up 
the membership of this group. The club strives to keep its 
members aware and interested in current happenings of 
the specific fields of their interests. 



WORK ON A HAY BAILING MACHINE takes the attention 
of these students. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS—ROW 1: Charles Boning, Franklin Leitz, Gordon Johnson, Willard George, David 
Appel, Leslie Stone. ROW 2: Guy Fisher, Harvey Williams, Richard Appel, Bill Bleasner, Norm Scott, John Mansperger. ROW 3: June Roberts, 
Vance Hurt, Duane Bergevin, Ralph Schmidt, Dyan Cooper, Don Van Leuven, John George. 


349 










ALPHA TAU ALPHA—ROW 1: Rodney Hahn, Ray Landes, Jim Swartwood, Ron McClellan, Bob Sjoboen, Terry Chase, Bob Root, Bill Venema. 
ROW 2: Oscar Loreen, Ken Milholland, Richard Passage, Jim Stroh, Glenn Aldrich, Robert Boyden, Shirley Henrickson. ROW 3: Fred Blauert, 
George Cathey, John Gray, Kerman Love, Ronald Routson, Fred Stormshak, Dave Myers, Paul Killian, Evan Brooks. 


Alpha Tau Alpha 


Forestry Club 


Alpha Tau Alpha—national honorary for agricultural 
education majors—takes second semester sophomores, 
juniors and seniors holding an overall 2.5 grade point 
average. Members of this organization help with the 
state FFA convention that engulfs the campus yearly. In 
fact, they make their money through a "farm store" main¬ 
tained in the convention goers' dormitory. Initiation ban¬ 
quets, faculty speakers and a booth at the Little Interna¬ 
tional are other activities carried out by the club. 


The WSC Forestry club is organized to weld the students 
majoring in forestry together. Not satisfied with just meet¬ 
ings, the club's normal yearly events take in such diverse 
activities as a Fall Round-up, spring dance and conclave. 
Chopping, sawing and log rolling contests provide excite¬ 
ment at these events. The club puts on display yearly a 
miniature lookout during national forest week or similiar 
occasions. 



FORESTRY CLUB—ROW 1: Jack Rucker, Vergil Lindsey, Gerald Stairs, Bill Dugger, Joe Hosch, Thomas Schroedel, Cliff Nopp, Dennis Adams. 
ROW 2: Milton Mosher, Jim Abbot, Dale Erdelbrock, Ted Gray, Bruce Malcom, Jim Brickell, Ed Wicker, Wayne Fisher, Larry Charlton. ROW 
3: Ray Taipale, Bill Steiger, Troy Moore, John Nielsen, Clyde Barthol, Jim Davidson, Ralph Wheeler, John Nagle. 


350 













MU BETA BETA—ROW 1: Annette Bienek, Frankie Ells, Gail Hakola, Jean Berney. ROW 2: 
Clinton Leonard, Simon Martinez, John Thomsen. 



COLLEGE 4-H MEMBERS act as councilors 
at 4-H convention , holding many 
gab sessions. 


Mu Beta Beta College 4-H Club 


Mu Beta Beta is an integral part of the College 4-H set 
up. It is in fact the 4-H college honorary. College 4-H 
students that have achieved this honor can be proud of 
the service and work they put into 4-H prior to being 
named a member of Mu Beta Beta. New pledges can 
justly wear their green pledge ribbons as they are the 
recognized leaders of the college 4-H movement, spark¬ 
ing the state 4-H convention early in summer. 


The WSC College 4-H Club each year sends delegates to 
the national 4-H Congress in the Midwest. Such delegates 
are given a send-off party just before Thanksgiving vaca¬ 
tion. College 4-H is also active in the Harvest Ball and Little 
International. In addition, displays of International Farm 
Youth Exchange students from Washington are displayed 
prominently in the Cub whenever a 4-H convention or 
convocation approaches. 



COLLEGE 4-H CLUB—ROW Is Bea Riggins, Mary Hillstrom, Carolyn Watson, Barbara Fry, Janet Olsen, Jean Berney, Cherri Baker, Betty 
Schreiber. ROW 2: Carole Peterson, Susan Pleines, Bernice DeLano, Ruth Young, Leeanne Kinzer, Barbara Turner, Gail Hakola, Mary 
McGreevy, Irene Sturza. ROW 3: Doreatha Jones, Janice Reinbold, Carole Schuster, Darlene Mills, Barbara Wiswall, Kay Delany, Erna 
Humes, Nancy Conrady, Annette Bienek, Guy Priest. ROW 4: Clinton Leonard, Dan Wallenmeyer, Bob Roffler, Sandy Rogers, Chuck Robbins, 
Virg Rayton, Simon Martinez, Jim Fletcher, David Dickson. 


351 











FIVE FFA MEN learn proper use of glue from their adviser. 



"THE WORLD IS LOOKING at National FFA Week" says this 
FFA bulletin board. 


College FFA 

College Future Farmers of America club is open to men 
that were in FFA in high school or that are majoring in 
agricultural education in college. The state FFA conven¬ 
tion is held in Pullman annually. Playing hosts to several 
hundred high schoolers that swarm over campus in late 
spring is the club's major project. Setting up meeting 
rooms, arranging campus tours, handling the sale of pic¬ 
tures and giving a final banquet all take time and 
patience. 



COLLEGE FFA—ROW 1: John Humphrey, Roland Schoonover, Richard Dreger, Jack Blain, Glenn Aldrich, Milt David. ROW 2: Bob Brown, 
Larry Koller, Ron McClellan, Mike Blakely, E. J. Stritzke, Paul Killian. ROW 3: Frederic Blauert, Bob Root, Kerman Love, Ralph Schmidt, Bob 
Boyden, Dan Birdsell. 


352 





















NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE FLOWER JUDGING TEAM—Jerry 
Taylor, Jake Lautenbach, Kathy Kanouse, Jim Manring, Bill Swedberg. 


Horticulture Club 

The Horticulture Club at Washington State College is one 
of the most active organizations on the campus, and it 
seems they have their share of real fun, too. In the fall they 
make their own cider, and drink it at Hallowe'en, to cele¬ 
brate that special autumnal holiday. There are flower 
shows regularly at the State College of Washington, when 
the CUB lobby is perfumed by the mightly displays. The 
Horticulture Club works hard to produce a successful and 
pleasant flower show, and the campus recognizes their 
interesting product. 



HORTICULTURE CLUB MEMBERS enjoy drinking their own apple 
cider, as well as making it. 



HORTICULTURE CLUB—ROW 1: W. S. Summers, Kathy Kanouse, Roger Kvamme, Charlotte Kuppler, Jim Manring, C. G. Woodbridge. ROW 
2: Franklin Anderson, Michael Brookes, Elwood Dart, Louis Palmer, Charles Steiner. ROW 3: Dave Schink, Norm Webber, Jake Lautenbach, 
Carl Luhn, Jim Corliss, Karl Nilsen. 


353 










LARIAT CLUB—ROW 1: Diane Kelso, Jeannie Nelson, Pat Lesiak, Pat Berg, Frances Hrdina, Diane Leschner. ROW 2: Bob Dean, Jim Fletcher, 
Simon Martinez, Jacob Weber. ROW 3: Ira Branson, Jim Belske, M. W. Galgan, Bruce Clark. 


Lariat Club 


Poultry Science Club 


The Lariat Club is for students interested in animal hus¬ 
bandry. They begin the year with a student-faculty bar¬ 
becue and western dance. Each spring they take an active 
part in preparing the annual horse show and participate 
in the intramural livestock judging contest. The Student- 
Stockman Banquet is given as a part of the stockman short 
course to round out their year's activities. 


Chickens, feathers, eggs, nests ... all maintain the deep 
concern of the members of Poultry Science Club. New de¬ 
velopments in this field are the extreme interest of this 
group. All are Poultry Science majors, and many have 
raised poultry long before attending college. Their meet¬ 
ings are often planning sessions, with the Little Interna¬ 
tional in view, and informal chatting sessions involving ex¬ 
changing new ideas and information in this field of interest. 




POULTRY SCIENCE CLUB—ROW 1: William Reinke, Peter Martin, Paul Carlson, Dick Rappuhn. 
ROW 2: Frank Swanson, Jim Swartwood, Don McGillivray, Robert Lean, Robert Fitzsimmons. 
ROW 3: George Cathey, Donald Frasier, Pete Dawson, Jim Nelson. 


354 







ORGANIZATIONS 




Special Interest Clubs, 
Honoraries Carry Out 
Array of Initiations, 
Money Making Events 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ARE WELCOMED by reception at the 
Frenches, sponsored jointly by Cosmo Club and the YMCA. 



TAPPING FOR SPURS took most of one spring dinner and was an 
enjoyable surprise for those honored. 



AS THE CRIMSON CIRCLE RANKS THIN at the Senior Con, many people wonder, "Will they all get taken as outstanding seniors?" 



356 















t 


DEFTLY TWISTING WIRE AND SHAPING FLOWERS , the Hawaiian club members make 
orchid corsages for Mothers' Weekend ; proceeds go to Hawaiian student scholarships. 




THE MAN FROM BOEINGS stayed after 
the clinic to explain a point. 



ONCE TAPPEDy it becomes the Spur's duty 
to wear her "spur of distinction." 



THE HAND OF GREETING is extended by 
the doorman for the annual Bell Hop. 



CRUNCH! MUNCH! A mouthful of pop¬ 
corn set the mood for the forum speaker. 


357 
















MORTAR BOARD—ROW 1: Bev Anderson, Beth Houston, Betty Jansen, Marilyn Jenkins, Natalie Johnson. ROW 2: Ann McClure, Betty McLean, 
Joan Raney, Sue Stoffel, Carol Swanson. 



MARILYN JENKINS . . . ably led Mortar Board as she did the D.G. 
house too . . . graduated in home economics with honors. 


Mortar Board Initiates 
Taken During Night 

Mortar Board is a senior women's honorary, tapping in 
late spring. Old members select the new ones on the 
basis of grades, activities and character. Then late one 
spring night, members don their gowns and mortar boards 
to wander around campus tapping new members. Their 
wandering this year even led them to Hill Top Stables in 
search of a new member that was waiting for a colt to be 
born. New members are then presented at Senior Con, and 
the next year sees them carrying out such Mortar Board 
activities as the group's annual Christmas candy cane sale. 



AT THE SENIOR CONVOCATION in the spring of the year , newly-tapped Mortar Board women were introduced. 


358 














CRIMSON CIRCLE—ROW 1: Gary Delles, Keith George, Robert Grossman, Maurie Hood, Len Krazynski, Paul Maughan. ROW 2: Robert 
Overstreet, Sterling Pickering, David Roberts, Norman Scott, James Swartwood, Clayton Udell, Henry Vostral. 


Crimson Circle Backs 
Cougar Booster Dance 

A white sweater with a winged emblem denotes a mem¬ 
ber of the senior men's honorary. Crimson Circle. New 
members are tapped twice yearly—once at Senior Con in 
the spring and again at Watchnight in the fall. And tapped 
they are, nearly being squashed by two pouncing mem¬ 
bers in black robes! This spring the group's activities were 
climaxed by sponsoring a spring vacation WSC Booster 
dance. The affair was held at Spanish Castle on the Seattle- 
Tacoma highway. In addition to seniors, the group gives 
honorary membership to deserving faculty members. 



CRIMSON CIRCLE OFFICERS—Gary Delles, Paul Maughan, 
Norm Scott, Henry Vostral. 



AT THE BETA HOUSE, Crimson Circle men work on the invitations to the Spring Vacation Booster Dance. 


359 











INTERCOLLEGIATE KNIGHTS OFFICERS—ROW 1: Jerry Hook, John 
Fishback, Jerry Standal, Bob Burdick, Karl Allgeier. ROW 2: Don 
Trotter, Mike McMackin, Jerry Fox, James Short, Dick Jensen. 


Intercollegiate Knights 

Washington State college's Intercollegiate Knights is the 
sophomore men's honorary. The members are chosen by 
the previous year's group on the basis of scholarship, 
leadership, and activities. Each year the group is led by 
officers who were members the year before. The members 
sport white sweaters with crimson and gray emblems and 
are often seen ushering at convocations and campus ac¬ 
tivities and programs. The tappees are selected in the 
spring of their freshman year, and if they desire to be 
active, may purchase sweaters and start to work in the fall. 



JERRY HOOK 

Duke of Intercollegiate Knights 



INTERCOLLEGIATE KNIGHTS—ROW 1: Mike Horne, Lowell Bamford, Alan Bahrenburg, Gilbert Blinn, Kay Aker, Don Daniels, Ray Fossum, John 
Thomsen, John Irwin, Dave Leonard. ROW 2: Roy McIntosh, Pete Holm, Gary Craig, Don Walter, Frank Weldin, Dick Honsinger, Richard Gregg, 
Bob Richard, Chuck Mackdanz, Tom Graedel. ROW 3: James Fox, Don Gordon, Dick James, Pete Dawson, Dan Pederson, John Abelson, Jim 
Heidenreich, Hale McPhee, Stuart Grant, Wayne Stockdale. 


360 













Mill* 

in"',, L 

mi annum® 11 



CORRINE LYLE 
President of Spurs 



SPUR OFFICERS—Libby Rodgers, Janet Van Bevers, Corrine Lyle, 
Bonnie Noe, Marilyn Mashburn, Barbara Barrett. 


Spurs 

The sophomore women's honorary on the WSC campus is 
Spurs. It is a branch of the active national organization, 
and are recognized by their white outfits and red dots in 
the center of sweaters, bearing the traditional spur. The 
girls are tapped in the spring of their freshman year, and 
are selected on the basis of first semester's grades and 
year-round activities. The girls are tapped at dinner, 
and it is an exciting moment for all in the living group 
when the costumed Spurs pour into the room from the kit¬ 
chen, stamping their spurs and singing, "Spurs are we . . /' 



SPURS—ROW 1: Jane Church, Sue Terry, Dianne Crosby, Sherry Leonard, Judy Foster, Claudia Perring, Joan Eckles, Marijo Shannon, Mary 
Jett. ROW 2: Margie Martini, Donna Olsen, Barbara Barrett, Marilyn Mashburn, Ruth Warnke, Corrine Lyle, Libby Rodgers, Janet VanBevers, 
Doris Vollmer, Sue Carstens. ROW 3: Mary Kay Patterson, Joanne lies, Joyce Aamot, Judy Repp, Sally Sparks, Janet Baker, Marilyn Trefren, 
Jean Parsons, Diana Gibson, Virginia Roberts, Pat Hogarty, Joanne Peterson, Janet Knutsen. ROW 4: Patti Osborn, Janice Perry, Lee Powers, 
Mary Ellen Hardenbergh, Marjean Reid, Sheila Smith, Jean Smith, Barbara Nyberg, Hazel Bourgett, Edith Olds, Molly Melcher, Rose Marie 
Van Winkle. 

361 












ANN McCLURE 
YWCA President 



Y-Dub Leaders at WSC 
Plan Year’s Busy Agenda 



A GIRL TAKES THE MIKE to explain the functions of 
the YWCA through charts on the stage to moms and 
guests at the Y Dub breakfast. 


One of the most active organizations on the Washington State College 
campus is the Young Women's Christian Association. Led by five cap¬ 
able officers; the group is one of the largest in membership on the 
campus. The Y-dub, as it has come to be called, is divided into several 
areas. One of the most active of these is the freshman commission groups. 
The freshman girls are shown very well the advantages of Christian 
life and the fine work the YWCA and the campus can offer the women 
during their stay on the WSC campus. The YWCA executive council meets 
every year in the spring and the fall for their retreats. They often 
meet with the YMCA leaders at Camp Seabeck for an enjoyable 
retreat, and an advantageous time for exchanging ideas for their 
Christian work. The two highest officers of the YWCA spend an en¬ 
joyable summer at the annual Christian workshop located at the Col¬ 
lege of the Pacific on the California coast. There they work with the 
Christian student leaders from all over the United States. 



FRESHMAN ADVISERS—ROW 1: Sue Roth, Delight Richardson, Sonja Fraki. ROW 
2: Mary Jett, Doris Vollmer, Audrey Williams, Ann Blake, Nancy Hogarty. 


362 





















YWCA CABINET—ROW 1: Karen Olsen, Carolita Carter, Ann McClure, Betta Sharp, Harriet Cady. ROW 2: Bernie Schmitt, Janice Teglar, 
Pat Deal, Nancy Nugent, Julie Tomlinson, Dixie Shaffer, Jane Henry. 


KAREN OLSEN 
YWCA Treasurer 


LYNNE JORGENSEN 
YWCA Regional Representative 


HARRIET CADY 
YWCA Executive Secretary 


YWCA SOPHOMORE COUNCILORS—ROW 1: Betsy Jones, Sharon Glover, Joy Davidson, Joyce Asimus, Ginny Nelson, Jean Smith, Virginia 
Brown. ROW 2: Tanis Sonstelie, Gretchen Smith, Nancy Nugent, Sylvia Jenrich, Martha Funk, Nancy Hegler. ROW 3: Sandra Donohue, 
Jerrie Valen, Sharon Fritts, Peggy Wills, Joan Knutson, Barbara Wiswall. 


363 


















DAN CLEM 
YMCA President 



STAN EASTON 
YMCA First Vice-president 


DICK JENSEN 
YMCA Second Vice-president 


The YMCA Serves Campus 
Through Varied Projects 



PAUL BUTLER , national chairman of the Democratic 
party, speaks at a May Popcorn Forum; the speech 
was quite one sided—Democratic sided that is! 


The YMCA primarily searches for improvements in campus life. The 
Sophomore Leadership Training Program originally started by the 
YM has nearly been turned over to the sophomore class. This program 
is one where sophomore men are invited to take part in a series 
of talks, discussions and conferences which are aimed at making the 
participant capable of taking a leading role in his living group and on 
campus. Also of service to the campus are the Popcorn Forums that 
are usually sponsored by the Y on Wednesday afternoons. This idea 
started with the Y years ago and since that time has become a tradition. 
Now, the Y cooperates with many other groups in presenting these 
forums. The YMCA Friday night movies at Todd hall remain the group's 
way of bringing inexpensive movies to the campus and money for the 
Y program. Several retreats, summer camps, compiling Fusser's Guide 
and affairs for younger children round out the Y's yearly activities of 
service to the individual, campus and town. 



LAMBDA TAU GAMMA OFFICERS—SEATED: John Yates. STANDING: Jim Crutch¬ 
field, Roger Amundson, Hossien Kamaley. 


364 





































CHRIS COMSTOCK 
YMCA Secretary 



JERRY DAVIS 
YMCA Associate Secretary 



STAN RHEINER 
YMCA Director 



YMCA CABINET—ROW 1: Paul Peterson, Dan Clem, Tom Tiede, Gene Sutton, John Holzberger, Dick Hanner. ROW 2: Stan Rheiner, Tom 
Graedel, Roy Macintosh, Richard Gray, Chris Comstock, Jerry Davis. ROW 3: Paul Fitzsimmons, Pete Dawson, Scott Stovins, Bob Anderson, 
Jerry Fox, Dick Jensen. 



STUDENT BODY OFFICERS EXPLAIN what to expect at WSC to 
incoming frosh men attending YMCA New Student Camp 
at Camp Reed. 



"FOREST CHAPEL" is held at the June '57 YM-YWCA retreat at 
Camp Seabeck, Washington 


365 











ALPHA KAPPA PSI—ROW Is Justin von Gortler, Gerald Sovereign, Andy Henriksson, Jerry Schillinger, Jack Smith, Fred Whitney, Fred Schill- 
inger. Bob Ganson, Samuel Wene, Stan Bailey, Thomas Harbour, Ron Webber. ROW 2: Robert Guenther, Anton Johansen, Roy McIntosh, 
Tom Purkett, John Weldin, George Bradshaw, Joseph Breitenbauch, Al Welle, Dave Slothower, Jr., Gordon Kauffman. ROW 3: Harley Otis, 
Ronald Wood, Don Nieland, Richard Jansen, Don Cooper, Al Cordell, Bill MacBoyle, Brian Johnson, Lynn Loudenback, Norton Carlson. ROW 
4: T. R. Saldin, Gary Higgins, Charlie Mills, Charles Bouse, Merle Braun, Gary Steer, Alfred Casali, Harold Bucholz, Ron Keolker, Dick Curtis. 


Alpha Kappa Psi 

The honorary Alpha Kappa Psi is the national business fra¬ 
ternity on the WSC campus. Members of this organization 
are majors in business administration. Meetings are held 
every other Wednesday with speakers who discuss sub¬ 
jects such as accounting and publishing, plus many other 
topics that are of interest to people in the business field. 
One of the big projects of this group is the publishing and 
passing out of campus desk blotters, on which are adver¬ 
tisements of Pullman firms. 


"MR. SPEAKER!" And a hand is raised to question the speaker at 
A.K. Psi's last meeting of the school year. 


ALPHA KAPPA PSI OFFICERS—ROW 1: John Weldin, Tom Purkett, 
Gerald Sovereign. ROW 2: Justin von Gortler, Richard Jansen. 


366 










ALPHA PHI SIGMA—ROW 1: Keun Ho Lee, Norman Prewitt, Gwen Ronsonville, John Shuttee, ALPHA PHI SIGMA OFFICERS. 
Wallace Duchateau, Octavio Tocchio. ROW 2: William Nelson, Burnell Uptagraft, Dale 
Wunderlich, Dean N. Ray, Mike Harvey. 


Alpha Phi Sigma AIA 


Students majoring in police science may join Alpha Phi 
Sigma honorary. They investigate job opportunities avail¬ 
able to persons in this field. They encourage persons in¬ 
terested in people, society and research to enter this broad 
and interesting field. Around campus they are jokingly 
referred to as "dirty cops" but are respected for their 
helpful work to society. 


The American Institute of Architects is an organization 
open to all majors in architectural engineering at the State 
College. With Spokane architects to speak at some of the 
meetings of the WSC chapter, the group also sponsored a 
banquet at which the outstanding students in architecture 
were given awards. Active within the department, they 
also helped to plan and assemble the exhibit for the de¬ 
partment, which appeared as a part of the annual En¬ 
gineering Open House. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS—ROW 1: Bill Goodfellow; Doug Lindley, Jim Fox, Harry Weller, Raleigh Davis, Harry Muraobayashi, 
Ron Pyeatt, Jon Danielson. ROW 2: Don Trotter, Ralph Konu, Issac Godonorich, Wayne Singleton, Jerry Stickney, Phil Fleming, Tekla Brady. 
ROW 3: Walter Miller, Nicholas Popoff, Boyce Penninger, Ron Rowe, Donald Peterson, Eero Jaaska, Druery Clark. 


367 











AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS—ROW 1: Robert Luedenking, Douglas Smith, Richard Kilgore, Raymond Webb, Donald 
White, Duane Christensen, Rom Graedel, Wendell Love, Robert Monarch. ROW 2: Larry Petershagen, William Buchan, Philip Mathison, Warren 
Villaescusa, Richard Pehl, Charles Mackdanz, Don Moore, Jerry Fox. 


AICE 


AIEE and IRE 


The American Institute of Chemical Engineering is an 
organization for the majors in chemical engineering at 
WSC. These students have combined majors of math and 
chemistry, and seem to spend most of their days down in 
Carpenter hall or in Fulmer, intent on producing weird 
colors and solutions. These students got together to dis¬ 
cuss the newest developments in the field of chemistry, at 
their AICE meetings. 


The American Institute of Electrical Engineers and Radio 
Engineers is a joint student branch of both the national or¬ 
ganizations. Members must be enrolled in the schools of 
electrical engineering or radio. The organization sponsors 
speakers from industry to give the members an idea what 
is being done professionally. The members of these two 
groups also participate in the Engineering Open House. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS and INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS-ROW 1: Denny R. Horn, Barry B. Woo, Donald E. Taylor, Sam Haun, 
William Anderson, Tim Young, Ted S. Brown, John Bruntlett, James D. Rhodes, Richard E. Gilbert, O. E. Osburn. ROW 2: John Dougherty, Fred Guyer, Kerry Green, 
Theodore V. Hougland, Norman Scestad, Bennie Macomber, Richard Stevens, Don Ware, Dick Weiss, A. L. Betts, Al Flechsig, Wayne Mobley. ROW 3: Kenneth Pearson, John 
Hipke, Roymond Lorenz, Joel Tate, Arthur Culter, Alan Bentz, Dick Berthaolt, Bruce Tramm, Jim Allemandi, Shelby Bly, Mahmoud Dillsi. ROW 4: Don Mirriam, Ned Baxter, 
Glenn A. Rodeman, Stanley Cottrell, Jack Wioppelt, Janis Ikstrums, Robert E. Johnson, Robert G. Oliver, Donald J. Hoiland, Charlie F. Bowls, Don Labberton. 


368 










AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERS—ROW 1: John Williams, William F. Boore, David Stiefbold, William 
L. Johnson, Jim D. Pierson, N. Orr, Dennis Goodman, Kenneth Davidson. ROW 2: J. M. Beeston, Ray Wolfork, A. D. Reese, H. O. Miller, Rod 
Hanneman, Del McKinley, Carl Fetzer, Artell J. Lovell. ROW 3: Rick Briggs, Garry Pittman, Mark Welch, Ron Strong, Lyle Jones, Garnett 
Falconbury, Lou Nothwang, K. W. Richardson. 


AIMME APA 


The American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical En¬ 
gineers is a national society for majors in geology and for 
majors in mining and metals. One highlight of the year is 
the annual joint meeting with the Idaho chapter, which 
includes the presentation of student papers, followed by 
a banquet. The society also participates in the Engineering 
Open House, which is an annual spring function. 


The prime reason for the founding of the American Phar¬ 
maceutical Association was to bring together all the stu¬ 
dents in the school of pharmacy. This organization is the 
student branch of the nation-wide group. Throughout the 
year, the group holds monthly meetings and panel dis¬ 
cussions. Films are seen and speakers are often invited 
to talk on subjects of interest to the members. Together 
with the other pharmacy groups on campus, they sponsor 
the annual Pharmacy mixer. 



AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION—ROW 1: John Fosberg, Beverly Stolp, Haakon Bang, Carolyn Bethmann, Marilyn Evans, Gary Akers, Joyce Sherwood, Doris 
Jacklin, Nancy Bailey, Dave Churness, Jerry Tierney, Jan Ficke. ROW 2 : John McCluskey, Ronald Gilbert, Bud Moore, C. Dahmen, Maurice Bottemiller, Betta Sharp, 
Maradel Krummel, John Spear, Donald Farr, Ken Scott, John Benson, Gary Bailey. ROW 3: Gary Grunewald, Marjie Gill, Elwin Blair, Milton Ranta, Thomas Garred, 
John Block, Don Kurtr, Richard Bruya, Charles Tidwell, Deri Allen, Jerry Hook, Donald Putnam. 


369 










Jr. American Veterinary Medical Association 


Those students in the school of Veterinary Medicine com¬ 
pose the membership of the Junior American Veterinary 
Medical Association. The main purpose of the organiza¬ 
tion is to unite and acquaint the students in this field, with 
the exchange of knowledge and ideas about their major. 
An annual event of the organization is the highly-disputed 
Vet-Pharmic football game, when the Pharmacy majors 
and the Vet Medicine men clash. Most of the rivalry is dis¬ 
solved, however, in the function held the evening of the 


big game sponsored by the Vet students. After that func¬ 
tion, the spoils of the game were forgotten. 

Each year, which has become nearly a tradition, the 
Vet students unite the best of their voices to conquer the 
coveted first place trophy in Songfest. It is generally felt 
that men that work as hard and long as the Vet students, 
and yet still find time to work on perfecting two songs, 
well-deserve their trophies. 


SENIORS—ROW 1: Frank Shackelford, Conrad Donovan, L. P. Jones, Wes Marshall, Jody Marshall, M. W. Perry, Robert Dolphin, Clyde 
Whiteaker, David P. Olney. ROW 2: James Ward, Robert Mohr, Vernon Reitan, Charles Gardner, Donald Jenkins, William Noble, Dean Miller, 
Erv Ericksen. ROW 3: Gerald Gardner, Jack Carkeek, John Peterson, Ford Ebner, Douglas Philips, DeVon Terry, Richard Hall, Jack Ward, 
Lee Bennett. ROW 4: John Duff, Clay Burnum, James Williams, Allen Schauffler, Lloyd Lauerman, Jr., Robert Lunger, George Klavano, 
Frederick Stump, Garner Harston. 





JUNIORS—ROW 1: Jim Ferrell, Chuck Kruger, Dale Tibbitts, Tats Matsuoka, Connie Orr, June Marie Kuzma, Lynn McKinney, Charles Garrett, 
George Passmore, Bob Syvrud, Robert Nakamura. ROW 2: Owen Thompson, V. G. Leavitt, R. L. Chesterfield, Perry Dahlquist, William Prichard, 
Richard Wagner, Randy Valentine, Birger Sather, Allen Stout, Charles Barth. ROW 3: Mark Keyes, Durk McLean, Chub Mayer, Chuck Hunt, 
Berge Berg, III, Roger Jones, Thair Carver, Mike Stedham, Bob Goodwin, Howard Wagner. 


370 








SOPHOMORES—ROW 1: William Porter, Keith Whitener, Art Staudt, Joe Bergevin, Gary Bryan, William Albro, William Brown, James Locke. 
ROW 2: Richard Fussell, Robert Yates, Jim Berry, Rodger Blue, Alfred Bailey, Charles Capen, Bruce Belshaw. ROW 3: Douglas Campbell, 
Jerry LaFollette, Thomas Weiger, M. M. Young, Elmer Sniff, Denny O'Callaghan, William Morton. ROW 4: Art Fulkerson, Roger Gardner, 
Roger McClellan, Bob Painter, Phil Shipley, Bill Henderson, John Alman. 



VET STUDENTS LEARN while dog 
patiently suffers. 



JUNIOR AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICINE ASSOCIATION OFFICERS: Jim Ferrell, Perry Dahl- 
quist. Dr. R. E. Watts, Tats Matsuoka, Jerry LaFollette, Mark Wells, Phil Shipley. 



FRESHMEN— ROW 1: W. G. Nelson, T. T. Migaki, J. R. Spry, G. A. Bodily, L. R. Miller, W. E. Vockert, Duffy Dauggh, G. G. Duskin, R. L. 
Darlington, K. K. Kellogg, T. S. Christie, Gene Shortlidge. ROW 2: Issac Rosencrants, Paul Bissonette, Emory Bull, Mike Lemmon, Ray John¬ 
ston, William Baldwin, Jim Farrish, Jim Murphy, Robert Lewis, Art Brown, Ken Larson. ROW 3: Dick Miller, Linda Nygard, Carrie Corvin, 
Donald Webert, Bill Barry, Ronald Streeter, Gary Zwicker, Loren Evans, Charles Lange, Russell Moyes, Ray Ediger, Richard Guthrie. ROW 4: 
Bill Moffat, Edward Kearley, Roger Harder, Jim Perry, Dee Meek, Bob Miller, Mel Dennis, Robert Haskell, Kenneth MacRae, Everrett Hill, 
Kenneth Davis, Robert Wilson. 


371 












sT| 





AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS—ROW 1: Duane Carson, Ronald Fleming, Suhaii Hanna, Edward Tahmazian, Virgil Weld, Wayne 
Fredeen, Marvin Kirkeby, Tom Plakinger, Mike Anglea, Harlan Moore, Richard Darnell. ROW 2: R. G. Quinn, R. A. Salmon, Tom Haggarty, 
Gerald Wilson, Gordon Dugan, Frank Zahniser, Willard Tissue, John Bemis, Don Erickson, Ed Goakey. ROW 3: Jim Bell, Hassan Shatila, 
Edmund Nassar, Richard Albertson, Herb Kennon, Gene Nelson, Richard Guhlke, Clyde Jump, Karl Allgeier, David Kelley. ROW 4: Robert 
MacNeil, Stanley Loreen, Lloyd Henning, Eugene Fisher, Charles Beeman, Fred Cornfield, Ronald Johanson, Leonard Krazynski, Richard 
Simpson, Roger Nelson. 


ASCE 


ASME 


Uniting the forces of the students of civil engineering is 
the American Society of Civil Engineering. The members 
of the organization need not be tapped, but are invited 
to join if majoring in civil engineering. The men work to¬ 
gether on their portion of the annual engineering open 
house in the spring of the school term. They produce 
several scientific and civil engineering feats for the open 
house, to the enjoyment of all. Bridge building, dams and 
other civil engineering projects are displayed. 


Similar in function to the American Society of Civil En¬ 
gineering is the American Society of Mechanical Engineer¬ 
ing. The members are the mechanical engineering majors 
and the organization works mainly on the displays and 
projects for the annual engineering open house. The 
members also construct displays for the activities round-up 
in the fall, with the purpose being to interest more men 
and women in this ever-expanding and more popular field. 
The campus recognizes the group's work and respects 
these men. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS—ROW 1: Darrell Theige, Dave Rusho, Lloyd Axtell, Roger McCann, Eugene Pare, Gilbert 
Wick. ROW 2: John Cramblit, David Pettit, Lynn Fleming, Alan Russell, Kenneth Watt, Donald Roth. ROW 3: Dwight Paxton, Dennis McJunkin, 
Larry Flodin, Charles Goddard, Donald Kronholm, David Mitchell. ROW 4: Don Mathews, Bruce Hughes, Duane Deonigi, Cline Frasier, Wayne 
Funk, David Vadnais. 


372 











BETA GAMMA SIGMA—ROW 1: Dudley Brown, Karen Olsen, Pat Link, Richard Maxson, Mary Bailey, Joseph Tarbet, R. Dean Tousley. ROW 
2: Kenneth Marshall, Gary Steer, Eldon Hendriksen, Willis Norwood, Joseph Breitenbauch, John Weldon, William Dobler. 


Beta Gamma Sigma Cosmopolitan Club 


Beta Gamma Sigma is a national scholastic honorary com¬ 
parable to Phi Beta Kappa and is for the top ten per cent of 
the senior class in business administration. Following initi¬ 
ation in the spring a Business Administration and Economics 
Honors Convocation banquet is held and various awards 
are given. Members of the honorary receive an exchange 
magazine during the year with news of other chapters. 


The Cosmopolitan Club meets every Friday evening to 
learn about different countries. Each of the countries repre¬ 
sented provides entertainment on the program to teach 
customs of their native land. Many times the Cosmo Club 
from the University of Idaho has held joint meetings with 
the Cougar Cosmo Clubbers. 



COSMOPOLITAN CLUB—ROW 1: Khalida Shah, Hossein Kamaly, Ruth Crowe, Adnan Kamal, Lorraine McIntyre, Fa-Lee Chen, Saroja 
Murthy, Juli Arinzeh. ROW 2: Issac Bhagat, A. Vasudev, Annie-Claire Malingre, Dieter Burger, Edward Tahmazian, Suhail Hanna, Marilyn 
Mansfield, Mahmoud Dillsi, Aaren Agee. ROW 3: Soren Nielsen, Martin Jay Crowe, Stilopoulos Evangelos, K. Narayanan, Hassan Shatila, 
S. W. Hamid, R. E. Jackman, C. P. Collins. 


373 










AND WHAT AM I OFFERED for this fine picture DELTA PHI DELTA—ROW 1: Amy Lombard, Sharron McGinnis, Virginia Saiter, Janet 

— the auctioneer wore Burmudas. Keene. ROW 2: W. D. Griffin, J. M. Swain, Shari Richmond, Roberta Faithfull, Geneva 

Topping. ROW 3: James Chapman, Arlo Acton, Ted Miller, Bob Rae, Norman Eng. 


Delta Phi Delta 


Epsilon Phi Tau 


The big project of Delta Phi Delta, campus fine arts honor¬ 
ary, was to hold an auction in the CUB during the spring 
semester. Members put their work on sale and bids were 
opened to students and townspeople interested in buying 
it. This honorary is made up of students in the field of fine 
arts. New members were tapped in the fall. One of the 
aims of the group is to interest other students in the fine 
arts field. 


Members of Epsilon Phi Tau, the Industrial Arts Club are 
chosen on a basis of scholarship and skills. They must have 
at least Sophomore academic standing and must be in 
the top quarter of their class. The club stresses the ideals 
of skill in work, social efficiency, and research in Industrial 
Arts. Members of this honorary must show promise in their 
field in order to become a member of the group. 



EPSILON PHI TAU—ROW 1: Rual Tigner, George Thompson, Richard Lang, Bruce Jaros, Gary Moser, Richard Blonden. ROW 2: Robert Kuhl, 
Roger Wing, Armin Vogt, Elmer Messenger, William Bakamis, Bill Ogilvie. ROW 3: Bill Brandner, Wallace Smith, Jean Pierini, Richard 
Kirihara, Stan Murphy. 


374 















GAMMA THETA UPSILON—ROW 1: Irvin Magin, Shirley Morrow, Rosal Orpilla, Anne Gyllenberg, C. G. Fader. ROW 2: Larry Smith, Willis 
Merriam, Dale Newland. SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON—ROW 1: Joe Dixon, Arnold Wood, Gerald Haddock, Bill Richardson, Gordon Stephen¬ 
son, Roald Fryxell. ROW 2: Jim Phipps, Bruce Reed, Peter Hansen, Henry Eyrich, U. N. Orr. ROW 3: Warren Yeend, Tom Ore, Dave Kuenzi, 
Willis Osbakken, Ron Strong. 


Geology, Geography IC F 


Gamma Theta Upsilon, the campus geography honorary, 
and Sigma Gamma Epsilon, the geology honorary, are 
grouped together due to their mutual interests. The two 
honoraries are composed of students who have high grade 
points and are majoring or minoring in geology and ge¬ 
ography. These groups hold meetings at which they discuss 
topics of interest, and invite guest speakers. At various 
times they have taken field trips to areas in the state. 


All students are welcome to come to Intervarsity Christian 
Fellowship, which is a non-denominational Christian group 
open to everyone. This organization meets every Friday 
night throughout the year. The varied program consists of 
panel discussion groups, special guest speakers, special 
music, and general group get togethers. ICF has been pro¬ 
moting Bible study programs in the dorms, which have 
become a popular activity in many living groups. 



INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP—ROW 1: Nancy Bagott, Janet Hawkins, Judy Kennon, Sue Carstens, Marybelle Kellogg, Maureen 
Lipsett, Betty Ackert, Joan Anderson, Janis Brake. ROW 2: Chuck Lewis, Linda Perrine, Mina Wold, Jane Allison, Elsie Gordon, Sylvia Jenrick, 
Nancy Conrady. ROW 3: Larry Rippe, Soren Jensen, Herb Kennon, Mike Kidder, Anita Kanzler, Vineta Rensink, Kay Foxton, Marjorie Sire, 
James Sire. ROW 4: Richard Gregg, Bill Acheson, Ed Rosland, Paul Doepke, Randy Roberts, John Stewart. 


375 











Hill HAUOU O'HAWAII—ROW 1: Howard Morishige, Walter Hendrix, Jim Kimura, Sandi Pauley, Al Wong, Judith Masuda, Florence Nakama. 
ROW 2: Paul Togawa, Charles Fritemma, Ralph Sasaki, Stanley Saski, James Nakasone, Jessie Shiratori, Patrick Murakami. ROW 3: Donald 
Lee, William Bennett, Dennis Ward, Oi Wun Young, Jack Lee, Harry Murabayashi, Henry Oshiro. 


Hui Hauoli O’Hawaii 

This year, members of the Hawaiian Club offered two $250 
scholarships to students from the Hawaiian Islands in¬ 
terested in attending WSC. The annual Luau, featuring 
food directly from Hawaii, was held, along with several 
picnics and get togethers. As a money making project, they 
sold orchid corsages during Mothers 7 Weekend. Hawaiian 
Club's purpose is to let students know about Hawaii, and 
to keep Hawaiian students on campus informed about 
their home. 



LOOKING IN ON THE ANNUAL LUAU, we find Hawaiian native 
costumes and the guests enjoying their dinner on the floor . 



A HAWAIIAN DANCER entertains those at the luau with a hula in¬ 
volving rattles and feathers. Another entertainer awaits her turn . 


376 










JUNIOR AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION—ROW 1: Ann Faulkner, Audrey Lindberg, Judy Erdahl, Doris Johnson, Virginia 
Nelson, Leeanne Kinzer. ROW 2: Janet Williamson, Dixie Davis, Elda Nordheim, Sue White, Betty Schreiber, Twila Hokanson. ROW 3: Carol 
Cheney, Carol Schuster, Mary Smasne, Laura McVickers, Vera Snyder. 


JAHEA Kappa Psi 


The Junior American Home Economics Association is an 
organization which instills upon home economics majors 
the objectives and purposes of their field. These girls are 
mainly occupied with learning the principles of cooking 
and sewing, so that they will be able to teach the material 
to future homemakers. On campus, their white dresses are 
a badge of office, and occasionally they will find pins 
stuck on their collar where they were put in a hasty moment. 


Each year two scholarships are presented to deserving 
pharmacy students by Kappa Psi, national professional 
pharmacy fraternity. This group acts as a service organ¬ 
ization for the school of pharmacy, but its members find 
time for many other functions like the very controversial 
Vet-Pharmic football game held every fall, after football 
season. They also hold dances, mixers, and other small 
group functions. Friendship, fun, and fellowship seems to 
be their motto. 



KAPPA PSI—ROW 1: Elwin Blair, Thomas E. Garred, Charles Tidwell, Donald R. Rench. ROW 2: Earl Marble, Tom Keithley, Larry Schmidt, 
Herman Bahler, Deri Allen. ROW 3: Roy Hammarlund, John Fosberg, Roy Tiegs, John Parks, Iraj Soroushian, Paul Scott. 


377 







TWO MEMBERS OF LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA 
stopped in to see their adviser to discuss sale of lab 
jackets. 



LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA—ROW Is Nancy Bailey, Beverly Stalp, Bev Holmes, Claudia 
Perring, Joanne Kauzlarich, Sheila Smith. ROW 2: Marjorie Gill, Marilyn Evans, Carol 
Cochran, Lucile Bang, Suzanne Metcalf, Carol Wojt. 


Lambda Kappa Sigma Lutheran Students 


Lambda Kappa Sigma, the women's professional pharmacy 
honorary on campus, sponsors a banquet every spring to 
honor their new officers. They also hold a party for new 
girls in the school of pharmacy. Members of this group 
must maintain a high gradepoint, be a sophomore in 
pharmacy, and be interested in the group. Their main 
money making project for the year is selling laboratory 
jackets to the students. 


One of the most active student church groups on campus 
is the Lutheran Students Association. They hold regular 
Sunday night supper meetings where they stress fellow¬ 
ship and worship. During nice weather, they have picnics 
at Kamiak Butte and retreats at Lutherhaven. Co-meetings 
with other student church groups are also a part of the 
program. These students are active in church work, es¬ 
pecially in the student choir which sings at the regular 
worship service each Sunday. 



LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION—ROW 1: Pastor Ufer, Jackie Craig, Janet Knutsen, John Reay, Dave Churness, Lorene Larsen, Laureen Johnson, Margie Haselton, 
Phyllis Meyer, John Benson. ROW 2: Mrs. Urdahl, Ken Hedglin, Elaine Johnson, Betty Ann Mann, Christine Fagerstrom, Barbara Doty, Norma Knutzen, Diane Wakefield, 
Mrs. Ufer. ROW 3: Dori Lentes, Christine Ritland, Dena Biehn, Judy Solberg, Carol White, Kay Delany, Lois Ladderud, Janice Giese. ROW 4: Dr. Urdahl, Sue Roth, Gary 
Neal, John Wacker, Ron Ahlf, Eldon Magnuson, Alf Ladderud, Bill Bleasner, Wayne Stockdale, Claudia Perring, Lyle Tostenrude, Viola Frahm. ROW 5: Carol Armitage, 
Paul Carstens, Arvids Kiperts, Ernest Weiss, Janette Johnson, Richard Dregar, Delroy Schwisow, Leif Karlsen, Walter Hed, Tom Bradel. 


378 























MU PHI EPSILON—ROW 1: Rosalie Taylor, Nancy Webster, Grace Filion, Georgene Steigner, Mary Pettit, Linda Mathewson, Mildred Shields. 
ROW 2: Joyce Schell, Diane Wegner, Coralee Lorenz, Hazel Crowder, Elaine Crossland, Wilma Strague, Pat Deal. ROW 3: Betty Bornholdt, 
Doris Vollmer, Audrey Williams, Nancy Litchfield, Mary Actor, Betty Lou Toth, Lillie Carter. 


Mu Phi Epsilon Radio, TV Guild 


This year's Silver Recital Tea given at Bryan hall by Mu Phi 
Epsilon, national music sorority, raised enough money to 
provide scholarships to two outstanding freshman girls in 
music. Their activities range from sending music to Japan 
and the Philippines, to serenading the hospital. This year 
members of the sorority won awards in the Spokane music 
festival and also held leads in the opera. These active girls 
must have a 3.0 G.P.A. in music and a 2.5 G.P.A. in other 
college work to become members. 


The National Collegiate Radio and TV Guild is a group of 
students interested in drama and speech work. The members 
of the group are chosen from the drama and speech depart¬ 
ments. They must be interested in the advancement of 
speech work. This year the Inland Empire Broadcasters' 
Convention was held at WSC. One of the events during this 
convention was the presentation of the TV play, "The Bad 
Seed." A banquet to honor members active in dramatic 
presentations was also held at this time. 



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NATIONAL COLLEGIATE RADIO AND TELEVISION GUILD—ROW 1: Bill Huntington, Sally Holcomb, Barbara Burgess, Pat Young, Annette 
Weissenborn, Sylvia Ormsby, RoxAlee Palmer. ROW 2: Ken Serin, Gordon Sanders, Jerry Standal, Dick McDonald, Larry White, Gary Kellard, 
Jim McElhaney, Cal Fankhauser. ROW 3: Bob Young, Dick Ragan, John Gilleland, Ed Sharman, Don Burns, Verl Wheeler, Bob Turnbow, 
George Cooper, Ben Cook, Jim Olson, Dale Wile, Hugh Rundell. 


379 










OMICRON NU—ROW 1: Nancy Scheldrup, Margaret Jacquot, Mary Haslam, Jan Bowler. ROW 2: Addreen Nichols, Marilyn Jenkins, Mary 
Ellen Harvey, Helen Krook, Arlean Pattison. 


Omicron Nu 

The top ten per cent of women in home economics make 
up the membership of Omicron Nu, the national women's 
home economics honorary. Each year, this organization 
holds a sophomore recognition hour for outstanding sopho¬ 
more women. The honorary has been sponsoring a research 
program at which faculty members have been presenting 
the results of their research projects to a group of interested 
faculty members and other guests. 


Off Campus Girls 

The Off-Campus Girls are affiliated with Davis Hall and 
take part in many of the functions of the dorm. They helped 
in the decoration of the homecoming float, and also at¬ 
tended some of the dorm meetings so that they would be 
more a part of the campus. Their special project is an 
annual tea for the senior girls of Colton and Pullman high 
schools. They can meet the girls in this way, and can give 
them some idea of the things that they may meet in college. 



PRESIDENT OF 
OFF-CAMPUS WOMEN 
Margaret Jacquot 



OFF-CAMPUS GIRLS—ROW 1: Virginia Downing, Shirlee Bostie, Mary Hammar, Jan Lee. ROW 2: 
Carol Cox, Margaret Jacquot, Laura Clark. ROW 3: Martha Hammar, Lorene Larsen, Deanna Miller, 
Marjory Brooks, Judy Ann Hilton, Vera Snyder, Velda Siple. 


380 











MANY MEMBERS VENTURED TO RED MOUNTAIN , in Canada , be¬ 
tween semesters. The skiing was beautiful , and tension from just-over 
finals dissolved. 


Outing Club 

This year. Outing club covered a wide variety of activities 
because of the interests held by its large membership. 
Skiing enthusiasts took a between semester overnight ski 
trip to Red Mountain and another trip to British Columbia. 
The hikers in the group enjoyed several hikes and picnics, 
including the hike to the garnet mine in Idaho and the 
spring hike to Palouse Falls. All members were treated to 
showings of slides taken on various trips, and movies 
ordered by the club. 



AN OUTING CLUB MEMBER willingly put himself in a precarious 
position while climbing cliffs at Granite Point on the Snake River. 



OUTING CLUB—ROW Is Joanne Trimble, Pat Bell, Lauretta Plant, Gary Snell, Anita Christiansen, Judy Syck, Marcella Beraart, Jane Graef, Mary Anne Wood, Barbara 
Petricok. ROW 2: Janis Maylor, Dan Mclntee, Marjorie Childress, Nancee Stafford, Susie Olson, Carol Clerf, Deanna Dahl, Donna Lawrence, Gordon Dean. ROW 3: John H. 
Hibben, Clark Zehnder, David Pettit, Worner Childress, Karl Nilsen, Bob Junell, Norman Eng, Wayne Fredeen, Bill Richardson. ROW 4: Lou Nathwang, Parker Nalden, 
Barry Woo, Gary Burke, Ron Strong, Doug McEwan, Sheldon Eafema, John Malik, Chuck Trainer. 


381 











SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS—ROW 1: Gordon Sargent, Charles Swanson, Richard Keyes, Dennis McJunkin, William Hill. ROW 
2: Charles Goddard, Gary Haynes, R. M. Halleen, Ray Johnson, Jack Alexander, Tim Seth. 


SAE Phi Chi Theta 


The mechanical and agricultural engineers of WSC make 
up the Society of Automotive Engineers. These men parti¬ 
cipated in the engineering open house this year, and took 
part in a contest held in Spokane, at which papers written 
by students of Gonzaga and the University of Idaho were 
read. They also sponsor an annual showing of the movie 
of the Indianapolis 500 mile race, which is open to the 
entire campus. 


Phi Chi Theta, the national women's business honorary, 
is a group made up of third semester women in business 
who have maintained a 2.5 grade point average and have 
shown good citizenship. Each year they award a foreign 
scholarship to some outstanding woman. They have also 
participated in the Activities Round-up and have enter¬ 
tained professional speakers. Their annual project is the 
sale of Christmas cards on campus. 



PHI CHI THETA—ROW 1: Gail Hakola, Rose Marie Van Winkle, Mary Haslam, Pat Feltis, Elizabeth Ann Prater, Carole Coffin, Karen Anderson, 
Joan Coart. ROW 2: Caroline Pedersen, Janet Baker, Rochelle Walling, Marianne Bussanich, Pat Stalder, Karen Olsen, Marilyn Trolson. ROW 
3: Janet Schneider, Bette Hutton, Mary Bailey, Joyce Bronson, Margaret Linnan, Barbara Wilson, Janet Hougen, Ellie Prichard. 


382 


















PHI DELTA KAPPA—ROW 1: Del Peterson, Tom Carmody, Saleem Farani, Bruce Jaros, Glenn Aldrich, Don Duncan, Toshio Akamine, Carl 
Stegman. ROW 2: Earl Stanford, Donald Guinouard, Alvin Humphrey, Jesse Hartman, G. G. Faden, C. A. Frickso, Gordon Lindeen. 


Phi Delta Kappa Phi Eta Sigma 


Phi Delta Kappa is the men's educational honorary on the 
WSC campus. Membership is made up of seniors, graduate 
students and faculty that have a vocational interest in 
education. Notifying prospective new members through 
mail in early spring, the group later holds an initiation. 
Participation in this honorary gives valuable professional 
experience and contacts of benefit to members in their 
later professional lives. 


Each year, members of Phi Eta Sigma publish a pamphlet 
entitled "How to Study". This freshman honorary is com¬ 
posed of Freshman men who have earned a 3.5 grade 
point average their first semester of college. The honorary 
holds regular meetings at which faculty guests speak to 
the group on topics of interest. In the spring, Phi Eta 
Sigma holds an initiation banquet as another of its activities. 



PHI ETA SIGMA—ROW 1: C. M. Thompson, Jerome Tierney, Don Piele, John Mudd, James Thummel, Robert Armstrong, James Miller, Pete 
Dawson, Don Hyden, John McDonald, Phil Morrison, John Gould, Pete Larson, Leo Kolb, D. Bushaw, Harold Karr. ROW 2: John Heathman, 
Howard Emerson, Gerald Gibson, Leonard Swanson, Richard Bumgarner, Gary Lucas, Conrad Knopf, Pete Wiedemann, Merle Sande, Bob 
Bolingbroke, Bill Pike, John Repanich, Michael Worth, Roger Moore, Howard Mount, Richard Ackerman. 


383 






























ALPHA PHI OMEGA—ROW 1: Stan Sanders, William Bennett, John Nielsen, Dennis Adams, Verne Campbell, Rodger Maynard, Louis 
Palmer. ROW 2: Wayne Fisher, O. E. Osburn, Tom Schroedel, Lyle Rorey, John Clinton, Kent Nixon, Dan Mclntee. ROW 3: Leonard Young, 
Ray Bowman, Vance Vallandigham, Walt Schmidt, Bill Smiley, Dick Zemp, Joe Pedersen, Dick Honsinger. 


Alpha Phi Omega Pi Lambda Theta 


Alpha Phi Omega, the Boy Scout Honorary, sponsored the 
Handsome Harry Contest this spring. Men from many cam¬ 
pus living groups were elected to run, and a Handsome 
Harry was chosen by the women of the campus. This 
honorary is responsible for many kinds of service work, 
including putting up campus direction signs. They sponsor 
the black and white State College of Washington signs 
found at various roads leading to the campus. 


The Education Honorary on the campus is Pi Lambda 
Theta. Its members are composed of graduate and under¬ 
graduate women and teachers. They must have a grade 
point average of 3.0 or above to be tapped for this group 
and must be at least juniors if they are still in school. 
Further research can be done by the girls since the Na¬ 
tional Education organization gives scholarships for that 
purpose. Sophomore girls in education attend a tea given 
by the group annually. 



PI LAMBDA THETA—ROW 1: Arlyn Horton, Millicent Pue, Claudia Hartley, Peggy Baker, Deanna Demarco. ROW 2: Bette Hutton, Grace 
Holsapple, Carol Swanson, Gretchen Fraiser, Jo Hendrickson, Mary Jo Boning, JoAnne Knutson. ROW 3: Dixie Lee Drake, Beverly Dobler, 
Marjorie Childress, Peggy Raun, Joanne Daugherty, Ellen Anderson. 


384 








PI TAU IOTA—ROW 1: Dave Gunderson, Frank Backus, Lynn Brislawn, Ron Millard, Bill Boett¬ 
cher. ROW 2: Len Hudson, Dick Honsigner, Don Kestle, Ross Taylor. 


PRE-MED MAJORS spend lots of time on 
chemistry and, incidentally, in the 
Chem Libe. 


Pi Tau lota Rho Chi 


Pi Tau lota is the honorary for pre-dental and pre-medical 
majors. These students are chosen for membership on the 
basis of high scholarship and interest. This organization 
brings together men interested in the field of medicine 
and acquaints them with the opportunity to be found in 
various professions. They are also introduced to different 
fields to be found within the field of medicine. Trips are 
also held by this group. 


Rho Chi, national pharmacy honorary, is an organization 
which promotes high scholarship in the field of pharmacy. 
This group works to help its members achieve their goal 
of passing the state board pharmacy examination, in 
addition to holding many other activities, including a new 
seminar group begun this year. The club meetings include 
outside speakers, films on outstanding subjects, and discus¬ 
sions. A spring banquet was held this year to initiate new 
members. 




RHO CHI—Richard Subra, Richard Collins, John McDuskey, Beta Sharp, Jerry Sobotta, Iraj RHO CHI PREPARES its members to be 
Soroushian, Roy Hammarlund. "better pill pushers." 


385 















SCARAB—ROW 1: Harry Weller, Bill Goodfellow, Ron Pyeatt, Harry Murabayashi, Jon Danielson. ROW 2: Walter Miller, Ferrin Shibble, 
Wayne Singleton, Jerry Stickney, Druery Clark. ROW 3: Nicholas Popoff, Boyce Penninger, Ron Rowe, Donald Peterson. 


Scarab 

The scholastic honorary for architects and landscape 
architects is Scarab. During the year they investigate job 
opportunities for graduating seniors in their field. They 
also study newly developed styles and methods of archi¬ 
tecture. This spring they honored the top man in archi¬ 
tecture at the newly organized engineering recognition 
con. 


Sigma Delta Chi 

Spring semester kept the members of Sigma Delta Chi 
busy. They held a regional convention on campus with 
five schools participating. Fun-filled hours were spent se¬ 
lecting and tapping sixteen lovely girls to appear on next 
year's activity calendar. Each will depict a special event 
of the month for which she appears. New members were 
introduced at the Matrix Table banquet in May. 



NEWLY SELECTED MEMBERS CLOWN over 
coffee and doughnuts after Sigma Delta Chi 
initiation ceremonies end. 



SIGMA DELTA CHI—ROW 1: Brad Munn, Maynard Hicks, Bert Alward, Dee Norton, Barrie 
Hartman, Al Watts, Ken Gilbert. ROW 2: Bill Palmer, Chuck Cole, Jim Gies, Tom Tiedie, 
Dick Zemp. 


386 
















SIGMA KAPPA PHI—ROW 1: Ann McClure, Ann Dunham. ROW 2: 
Dick Gordon, Annabelle Dizmang. 



ANN MC CLURE, an active married student , served Sigma Kappa 
Phi as president. 



Sigma Kappa Phi Sigma Tau 


The honorary for foreign language majors is Sigma Kappa 
Phi. The group is small in number on the Washington 
State College campus and is united in its purpose of striv¬ 
ing for a better relationship between the faculty and 
students on the campus. A fine cooperation and workable 
friendship between these two groups is necessary for an 
effective higher education system, it is felt by the group. 
To carry out their purpose, a joint breakfast is held with 
the professors of Arts and Sciences and members. 


All engineers in the top thirty of their class are eligible for 
Sigma Tau. Members are chosen on the basis of character, 
leadership and scholarship. New members are honored in 
the spring at a joint banquet held with Tau Beta Pi, an¬ 
other engineering honorary. This year Sigma Tau helped 
the other engineering honoraries plan a recognition as¬ 
sembly for outstanding seniors in their field. The group 
also enters an exhibit in the annual Engineers' Openhouse. 



SIGMA TAU—ROW 1: Gary Cooper, Paul Ashley, Ronald Fleming, Edward Tahmazian, Fritz Kohne, Jerry Johnson, Jon Danielson, Ted Brown, 
Barry Woo, Richard Daniel. ROW 2: Richard Thompson, William Purcell, William Acheson, Leonard Krazynski, Shelby Bly, James Rhodes, 
Dave Stephenson, George Borsheim, Tim Seth. ROW 3: Fred Guyer, Richard Pehl, Lynn Fleming, Robert Clem, David Vadnais, Fred Cornfield, 
Larry King, David Kelley, Phillip Erdmann, David Stiefbold. ROW 4: Franklin Leitz, Norman Seilstad, Ron Strong, Rod Hanneman, Janis 
Ikstrums, Norm Scott, Hassan Shatila, Stanley Loreen, Frank Rasmussen, Cline Frasier. 

387 














SIGMA IOTA—ROW 1: Pat Link, Sam Wong, Gary Leckie, Jack LeWarne, Caroline Pedersen, Bill Doric, Evan VanAntwerp, Pat Feltis, John 
Irwin, Rod Rhodes, Sharon Link, Terry Yeager, Joseph Bradley. ROW 2: Dick Johnston, Tim Dugan, Richard Overgard, Pat Merten, Chuck 
Quinn, Frank Hughes, Robert Mackechney, Larry Longewin, Charles Cox, Robert Burnett, Gene Sutton, Dixon Poole, Darrell Westove. ROW 
3: Pat O'Bryan, Chuck Herrin, Joseph Morgan, Phillip Berg, William Clower, Jerry Glendenning, James Berry, Jerry McFarlane, Larry Phelps, 
Jerry Roslund, Vernon Nathe, Larry Cornelison, Robert Langill, Bruce Lloyd. 



THE BELLMAN OF THE YEAR is presented with lighter and smokes 
by a cigarette girl. 


Sigma lota 

Senior members of Sigma lota, society of innkeepers, took 
an extensive tour of the West Coast during spring vaca¬ 
tion with stopovers at Las Vegas, Los Angeles and San 
Francisco. Other members of the hotel administration 
honorary were included in the planning of their big event, 
the Bell Hop. At this time they honored an outstanding 
bellman from San Francisco. The dance was very success¬ 
ful, packing the ballroom two nights in a row. 



THREE HAPPY COUPLES INSPECT MENUS from all over the nation at the annual Bell Hop dance , held in a night club atmosphere. 


388 










SIGMA TAU ALPHA—ROW 1: Chris Heath, Susan Larson, Pat Hogarty, Nancy Hogarty, Bette Hutton, Joanne Layman, Janice Perry, Sandy 
Ebert, Jeannette Coury, Carolyn Watson. ROW 2: Barbara Doty, Marie Churney, Diane Castagne, Janet Johnston, Marie Gustafson, Diane 
Giles, Kristie Felber, Toni Kemp, Yvonne Foy, Brenda Button. ROW 3: Jean Helland, Kay Persson, Pat Swanson, Carol Douglass, Helen Reilly, 
Luellen DuMoise, Mary Lou Stredwick, Mary Forslund, Barbara Middleton, Nancy Reiter. ROW 4: Judy Hurley, Margaret Jones, Jickie Derring, 
Betty Nelson, Irene Little, Carolyn Frantz, Janice Reinbold, Colleen Bates, Judy Erdahl. 


Sigma Tau Alpha SAM 


When a girl who has been active in Rainbow in high school 
comes to college, she has the opportunity of becoming a 
member of Sigma Tau Alpha, the honorary for such girls. 
The purpose of the group is to keep the girls who dedi¬ 
cated so much of their time and received such enjoyment 
from Rainbow for several years in close contact and sis¬ 
terhood. They have an annual election of officers, who 
attempt to carry out the goals of the group throughout 
the year. 


The Society for the Advancement of Management ended 
its first full year with a management clinic in May. Five 
speakers from prominent firms carried on discussion 
groups. After the morning meetings, the club entertained 
their guests and the faculty of the B.A. department at a 
luncheon. The afternoon was completed with a final dis¬ 
cussion group and a round table discussion led by Dean 
Eugene Clark on "Today's Economic Picture of Tomorrow." 



SOCIETY FOR ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT—ROW 1: Gerald Sovereign, John Bruntlett, Michael Harris, Jerry Shillinger, Ralph 
Ostheller, Gerald Copenhaver, Thomas Harbour, Ron Webber. ROW 2: Harley Otis, Doug Brown, Joseph Breitenbauch, Norm Hickey, Stan 
Bailey, Dave Sundberg. ROW 3: Dudley Brown, Wayne Startup, Bill Galbraith, Bill Shaffner, Hugh Rehberg, Willis Norwood, Tom Morrell. 


389 









STIMSON SENATE—ROW 1: Dick Simpson, Bob Fields, Dan Pedersen, Bud Kemp, Glenn Franklin, Bob Carlson, Ken Speegle, Perry Triplett. 
ROW 2: Bob Gribbin, Dick Cowan, Don Fronek, Clark Sheridan, Ron Bailor, Larry Esvelt, Simon Martinez, Leo Chandler, Bill Baldwin. 


Stimson Senate 


Tau Beta Pi 


Originating as an upperclassmen's counseling group, Stim¬ 
son Senate first appeared in 1924. Today it is still going 
strong and included among the many activities in this 
year's schedule were the publishing of a hall magazine, 
a Christmas party, planning dinner and entertainment for 
Wilmer hall, who bought them in the Cougar Campus 
Chest auction and reestablishing a dorm library. 


The top engineering honorary composed of the upper 
fifth of the senior and upper eighth of the junior engineer¬ 
ing student is Tau Beta Pi. Members are chosen from all 
fields of engineering and one of the requirements is a 
four hour comprehensive exam on all phases of engineer¬ 
ing. Its main purpose is to honor all the top students. In 
the spring they hold a joint banquet with Sigma Tau. 



TAU BETA PI—ROW 1: Donald Roth, Douglas Corey, James Rhodes, Leonard Krazynski, Bruce Johnson, Norman Seilstad, Wendell Love. 
ROW 2: Gary Nelson, David Stiefbold, Raleigh Davis, Ron Strong, Norm Scott, Larry King, John Doolittle. ROW 3: Bill Acheson, Nicholas 
Popoff, Ned Baxter, Robert Grossman, Rod Hanneman, Janis Ikstrums, Glenn Rodeman, Richard Pehl. 


390 










Theta Sigma Phi 

Small in number, the girls of Theta Sigma Phi are well 
known on campus. The group has two major campus wide 
functions. The first is the annual Theta Sig variety show 
that packs Bryan for two nights running. The other is the 
Matrix Table, which is more closely allied to the interests 
of girls in Theta Sigma Phi, women's professional journal¬ 
ism honorary. The Matrix Table is a banquet for both stu¬ 
dents and faculty interested in publications or journalism. 
At this annual affair new members of Theta Sigma Phi are 
tapped, those of the men's journalism honorary announced 
and several journalism awards are given. This year the 
banquet had the largest turnout ever, having a private 
party cater the dinner. 



THETA SIGMA PHI—ROW 1: Marlene Mitchell, Anne Gyllenberg, 
Shirlee Newell, Marcia Cass, Sherry Oliver. ROW 2: Charles Cole, 
Mrs. Elmer Erickson, Barbara Wilson, Ann McClure. 



TWO CLOWNS IN BAGGY PANTS entertain the crowds at Theta Sig THETA SIG PRESIDENT PRESENTS the trophy to the overall winner , 
variety show. while Tom Tiede f master of ceremonies , grins . 




391 












WESLEY FOUNDATION—ROW 1: Marji Mink, Dorothy Anderson, Polly Hartman, Janet Williamson, Patricia Deal, Beverly Kirkwood, Anne 
Sprow, Shirley Cannon. ROW 2: George Mink, Rich Gray, Karl Allgeier, Brian Johnson, Barbara Wiswall, Marjie Gill, Marge Mount, Mary Lee 
Hamilton. ROW 3: Dave Rosenquist, Frank Backus, George Holbrook, Bob Root, Sayles Albee, Ron Fragner, Larry Burch. ROW 4: Robert 
Pharr, Chris Tressler, Guy Priest, Terry Brady, Roger Moore, Les Stone, Richard Slocum, Larry McRae. 


Wesley Foundation Westminster 


Sunday evenings were full of good times for the Methodist 
students who were members of Wesley Foundation. Their 
weekly get-togethers were sparked by interesting speakers 
and visitors who explained their theories of religion; some¬ 
times two persons whose ideas conflicted made the meeting 
most interesting. The group often had informal discussion, 
too, along with their dinners, as well as informative and 
inspiring movies. 


Active and interested Presbyterian students on the WSC 
campus enjoyed the opportunities provided them through 
their church group, Westminster. The site of their weekly 
Sunday evening meetings was the basement of the Gray- 
stone Presbyterian church. They enjoyed the informal 
dinners and discussion groups in which they participated 
whole-heartedly. Guest speakers and motion pictures gave 
them more incentive to come to share Christian ideas. 



WESTMINISTER—ROW 1: Monita Engvall, Elizabeth Ackert, Marybelle Kellogg, Jane Snowden, Sylvia Jenrich. ROW 2: Bruce Johnson, Carmen 
Johnson, Rose Marie Van Winkle, Maecel Johnson, Linda Perrine, Elaine Widmer, Colleen Pflugmacher, Pat O'Connor, Terry O'Connor. ROW 
3: Dan Clem, Dave Engvall, Larry Ernst, Ed Rosland, Ed Ahrens, John Block, Larry Coppock, Carl Rosenkilde, Allen Mettler, Rich Wilson, 
Wally Toevs. 


392 


















■ 



YOUNG DEMOCRATS—ROW 1: Lee Larson, Larry Jones, Eleanor Ambrose, Shirley Davies, Dave Hill, Ted Lopuszynski. ROW 2: E. R. Mag- 
nuson. Gene Hopkins, Robert Jensen, Earl Darrah, Robert Stead. 


Young Democrats Young Republicans 


The Young Democrats were very busy on campus this year, 
especially for a non-election year. Sponsoring a booth at 
the annual Activities Roundup, the club went on to have a 
debate with the Young GOP's. Still later in the year, club 
members played host to Paul Butler, national chairman of 
the Democratic party. His trip was very hurried, but the 
Popcorn Forum he spoke to was jammed. Such enthusiastic 
enterprises kept the group's spirits high for congressional 
elections approaching at the start of next school year. 


Those students who are strongly Republican minded, find 
their political energies can be spent as members of Young 
Republicans. The group works throughout the year, being 
busiest at the time of local and state campaigning. They 
help to distribute literature for campaigning and sponsor 
speakers who will "enlighten" the public on the Republi¬ 
can platform and candidates' qualifications. At the fall 
Activities Roundup, the members volunteer cakes to those 
interested in goodies along with campaign literature. 



YOUNG REPUBLICANS—ROW 1: Susan Stoffel, Dahleen Dahl, Marilyn Fry, Effie Lowary, Tom Rolfs, Dan Gadman. ROW 2: Marilyn Trefren, 
Dick Howard, Phil Collins, Larry Bundy, Gene Osborn, Barbara Schmidt ROW 3: Joe Brand, Eldon Magnuson, Ben Wood, Jr., Bill Davies, 
Norm Johnson. 


393 










SUBJECT INDEX 


Acacia 152 

Activities Round Up 287 

ADMINISTRATION 49 

Agriculturist 334 

Agronomy club 346 

Air Force Blue Angeles 99 

Air Force Distinguished 

Military Students 98 

Air Force Drill Team 100 

Air Force Rifle Team 98 

Alpha Chi Omega 118 

Alpha Delta Pi 119 

Alpha Gamma Delta 120 

Alpha Gamma Rho 153 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 154 

Alpha Kappa Psi 366 

Alpha Phi 121 

Alpha Phi Omega 384 

Alpha Phi Sigma 367 

Alpha Tau Alpha 350 

Alpha Tau Omega 155 

Alpha Zeta 347 

Alumni Association 55 

Am. Dairy Science Association 348 

Am. Institute of Architects 367 

Am. Institute of Chemical 

Engineers 368 

Am. Institute of Electrical 

Engineers 368 

Am. Institute of Mining and 

Metalurgical Engineers 369 

Am. Pharmaceutical Association 369 

Am. Society of Agricultural 

Engineers 349 

Am. Society of Civil Engineers 372 

Am. Society of Mechanical 

Engineers 372 

Am. Society of Military 

Engineers 91 

Army Distinguished Military 

Students 90 

Army Flight Program Students 90 

Army Rifle Team 91 

Army Sponsors 90 

Arnold Air Society 101 

A S C A 399 

ASCA Officers 342 

ATHLETICS 199 

ASSCW board of control 281 

ASSCW Carnival 288 

ASSCW officers 280 

AWS committees 302 

AWS officers 298 

Baseball 230 

Basketball 219 

Beta Gamma Sigma 373 

Beta Theta Pi 156 

Big Ten 22-41 

Board of Regents 54 

Bookstore board 284 

Boxing 218 

Chi Omega 122 

Chinook 327 

College FFA 352 

College Fire Station 157 

College 4-H 351 

College of Sciences and Arts 76 

College Photo staff 334 

Commission on Evaluation of 

committees 283 

COMMUNICATIONS 319 

Community 123 

Community Relations committee 289 

Concert band 252 

Cosmo club 373 

Cougar Boosters 289 

Cougar Code committee 289 

Cougar Coordinating council 290 

Crimson Circle 359 

Crimson W 244 

Cub Art committee 292 

Cub Crafts committee 292 

Cub Dance committee 293 

Cub Games committee 292 

Cub House committee 293 

Cub Music committee 293 

Cub Program Council 292 

Cub Publicity committee 293 

Cub Special Events committee 293 

Dad's Day 295 

Davis 125 

Debate 255 


Delta Chi 158 

Delta Dela Delta 127 

Delta Gamma 128 

Delta Phi Delta 374 

Delta Sigma Phi 159 

Delta Tau Delta 160 

Delta Upsilon 161 

Delta Zeta 129 

Do Si Do club 243 

Duncan Dunn 130 

Election board 294 

Epsilon Pi Tau 374 

Evergreen 322 

Faculty Student committees 282 

Farm House 162 

Fencing team 228 

Ferry 163 

Fish Fans 242 

Football 203 

Foreign Films committee 284 

Forestry dub 350 

Freshman class officers 310 

Freshman-Faculty 

Weekend committee 284 

Frosh football 216 

Gamma Phi Beta 132 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 375 

Golf 235 

GOVERNMENT 277 

Grad Student officers 318 

Gray W 202 

Greek Political Action 

Representatives 304 

Guest performers 256 

Gymnastics 217 

Homecoming 296 

Hort club 353 

Hui Hauoli O'Hawaii club 377 

Idaho commission 283 

Improvement of Instruction 

committees 282 

Independent Board of 

Representatives 305 

Independent Political Actions 

Council 305 

Institute of Agricultural 

Sciences 68 

Institute of Technology 73 

Intercollegiate Knights 360 

Interfraternity Council 308 

International Festival 285 

Intervarsity Christian 

Fellowship 375 

Intramural committee 290 

Jr. Am. Home Ec. club 377 

Jr. Am. Vetinary Medical association 370 

Jr. Class officers 314 

Jr. Interfraternity council 309 

Jr. Orchesis 242 

Jr. Panhellenic 307 

Kappa Alpha Theta 133 

Kappa Delta 134 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 135 

Kappa Psi 377 

Kappa Sigma 164 

Kruegel 165 

KWSC 335 

Lambda Chi Alpha 168 

Lambda Kappa Sigma 378 

Lariat Club 335 

LIMELIGHT 245 

Little International 344 

Lutheran Student association 378 

Madrigal singers 254 

MARRIED STUDENTS 105 

Majorettes 215 

Marching band 253 

May court 300 

MEN STUDENTS 149 

Men's intramurals 194 

McAllister 169 

McCroskey 136 

MILITARY 85 

Mortar Board 358 

Mu Beta Beta 351 

Mu Phi Epsilon 379 

National Collegiate 

Radio-TV Guild 379 

Neill 171 

NSA committee 291 


Nurse graduates 44 

Off-campus girls 126, 380 

Omicron Nu 380 

ORGANIZATIONS 355 

Outing club 381 

Outstanding seniors 46 

Panhellenic 306 

P.E. Majors club 240 

Pershing Rifles 93 

Phi Beta Kappa 45 

Phi Chi Theta 382 

Phi Delta Kappa 383 

Phi Delta Theta 174 

Phi Eta Sigma 383 

Phi Gamma Delta 175 

Phi Kappa 176 

Phi Kappa Phi 45 

Phi Kappa Tau 177 

Pi Beta Pi 138 

Pi Kappa Alpha 179 

Pi Lambda Theta 384 

Pine Manor 180 

Pi Tau lota 385 

Poultry Science club 354 

Public Relations committee 291 

Publications board 334 

Rally squad 290 

Rifle team 228 

Regents Hill 139 

Rho Chi 385 

Scabbard and Blade 92 

Scarab 386 

Selection of Outstanding Seniors 

committee 288 

Senior class officers 316 

SENIORS 19 

SCHOOLS 65 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 182 

Sigma Chi 183 

Sigma Delta Chi 386 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 375 

Sigma lota 388 

Sigma Kappa 145 

Sigma Kappa Phi 387 

Sigma Nu 184 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 185 

Sigma Tau 387 

Sigma Tau Alpha 389 

Skiing 226 

Social Skills committee 290 

Society for Advancement of 

Management 389 

Society of Automotive Engineers 382 
Song Fest winners 300 

Sophomore class officers 312 

Spark 332 

Spurs 361 

Stevens 146 

Stimson 186 

Stimson Senate 390 

Student Activities board 282 

Student Production board 286 

Swimming 227 

Tau Beta Pi 390 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 189 

Technometer 333 

Tennis 234 

Theta Chi 190 

Theta Sigma Phi 391 

Theta Xi 191 

Track 236 

Traffic Safety committee 291 

Union board 286 

Vet medicine grads 48 

Waller 192 

Wesley Foundation 392 

Westminister 392 

Wilmer 147 

Womens' Day 301 

WOMEN STUDENTS 115 

WRA 239 

WRA Sports club 240 

Wrestling 229 

WSC choir 254 

Yell squad 215 

Young Democrats 393 

Young Republicans 393 

YMCA 364 

YWCA 362 


NAME 

A 


Aaberg, T. 

22 

189 

226 

Aamot, J. 120 

293 

328 

361 

Abbanat, J. 



175 

Abbas, A. 



192 

Abbot, J. 



350 

Abelson, J. 


160 

360 

Abey, B. 



22 

Absher, H. 



147 

Acheson, W. 

22 46 

163 

324 333 375 

387 

390 

Ackert, E. 


134 

314 



375 

392 

Ackermon, R. 



383 

Ackley, W. 



286 

Acton, A. 



374 

Actor, C. 



155 

Actor, M. 

122 

254 

379 

Adorns, A. 


135 

307 

Adams, B. 



61 

Adams, D. L. 



308 

Adams, D. P. 

334 

350 

384 

Adams, G. 


145 

293 

Adorns, J. 



139 

Adams, M. 


120 

326 

Adorns, R. 


184 

292 

Adkison, P. 



186 

Agee, A. 

119 

242 

373 

Agee, M. 

202 

208 

223 


225 

273 

Ahlf, R. 


192 

378 

Aho, L. 

174 

202 

230 



231 

233 

Aholo, K. 



22 

Ahrens, E. 



392 

Aimonetto, L. 



169 

Ain Uddin, K. 



161 

Aitkenheod, W. 


73 

Ajirogi, A. 


22 

123 

Akamine, T. 



383 

Aker, K. 185 304 

348 

360 

Akers, G. 


22 

369 

Akin.C. 



186 

Albee, S. 



392 

Albers, G. 



169 

Alberts, G. 



165 

Albertson, R. 



372 

Albro, W. 



371 

Alby, E. 



169 

Aldrich, A. 


132 

287 

Aldrich, B. 



205 

Aldrich, G. 22 46 

101 

294 

342 347 

350 

352 

383 

Alexonder, J. 


190 

382 

Allemandi, R. 


22 

368 

Allen, B. 


138 

307 

Allen, C. 



171 

Allen, D. 22 

163 

369 

377 

Allen, Gordon 


171 

313 

Allen, Gray 



288 

Allen, T. 



156 

Allerdice, K. 



309 

Allgeier, K. 

92 

154 

360 


372 

392 

Allington, F. 



171 

Allison, D. 



186 

Allison, J. 
Allmendinger, 



375 

D. 

165 

281 

Almon, Jack 



108 

Alman, John 



371 

Aim, K. 



139 

Almy, L. 


303 

330 

Alsworth, D. 


127 

242 

Altobelli, W. 



216 

Alton, L. 


22 

171 

Alward, H. 

79 

334 

386 

Ambrose, E. 


313 

393 

Ames, M. 134 

242 

299 

303 

Amundson, R. 


168 

364 

Anocker, D. 



177 

Andersen, M. 

122 

310 

329 

Andersen, R. 



169 

Anderson, B. 22 45 46 

139 


239 244 300 358 


Anderson, C. 22 

135 

382 

Anderson, Dorman 


178 

Anderson, Dorothy 

125 

392 

Anderson, E. 22 

139 

384 

Anderson, F. 22 97 

153 

282 

304 

353 

Anderson, G. 


186 

Anderson, James 


59 

Anderson, James D. 


192 

Anderson, Jon 


182 

Anderson, Jeonette 


128 

Anderson, Joan 

134 

291 


306 

375 

Anderson, Judith 


135 

Anderson, K. 


285 

Anderson, Larry 


174 

Anderson, Loretto 


130 

Anderson, Marvin 

22 

168 

Anderson, Mary 


45 

Anderson, P. 


77 

Anderson, Richord 


113 

Anderson, Robert 

190 

365 

Anderson, Rodger 


168 

Anderson, Solly 


125 

Anderson, Suson 


125 

Anderson, V. 


22 

Anderson, W. 


368 

Andrew, J. 


174 

Andrews, A. 

129 

306 

Andrews, K. 


184 

Andrews, M. 


130 

Andrews,V. 


333 

Anglea, J. 

186 

372 

Ankeny, J. 


130 

Annibol, D. 171 

295 

329 

Appel, D. 

186 

349 

Appel, R. 

186 

349 

Applegate, G. 


125 

Archer, J. 


101 


394 













INDEX 

Arend, D. 182 

251 252 293 

Argano, K. 

127 

Arinzeh, J. 

192 373 

Arkorn, C. 

288 

Aril, K. 

139 

Arlt, W. 

236 237 

Arleth, J. 

182 

Armitoge, C. 

134 242 378 

Armstrong, H. 

22 184 308 

Armstrong, J. 

101 

Armstrong, R. 

383 

Arnold, E. 

130 239 


242 244 

Arnold, Karren 

139 

Arnold, Kelley 

164 293 

Asher, M. 

147 252 

Ashley, P. 

387 

Ashmun, E. 

139 

Asimus, J. 

147 305 363 

Asimus, R. 

89 90 283 

Ashworth, L. 

139 

Askew, T. 

160 251 


304 308 

Aslokson, R. 

186 

Aspinwall, L. 

182 

Aspaos, L. 

189 

Atheran, R. 

180 

Atkinson, L. 

119 303 310 

Aucuft, C. 

123 

Aulerich, V. 

145 

Aust, S. 

192 

Austin, D. 

165 

Austin, G. 

74 

Auvil, A. 

179 

Avery, A. 

190 

Axelson, R, 

92 184 202 


221 282 

Axtell, L. 

90 186 372 

Ayers, R. 

63 

Ayling, J. 

169 228 236 

Aylar, W. 

22 168 

B 

Babcock, J. 

169 

Bochoroch, G. 

86 87 88 

Bachmann, L. 

155 

Backus, F. 

22 45 180 


384 392 

Backus, G. 

130 328 

Bacon, S. 

22 139 

Bogott, 1. 

171 

Bogott, J. 

171 

Bogatt, Joan 

146 251 

Bagott, N. A. 

22 375 

Bahler, H. 

377 

Bahrenburg, A. 

308 360 

Bailey, A. 

283 371 

Boiley, B. 

230 231 

Bailey, C. 

22 121 

Bailey, G. 

368 

Bailey, M. 

45 372 382 

Boiley, N. 

369 378 

Bailey, Robert 

186 283 

Bailey, R. G. 

186 283 

Bailey, S. 

366 389 

Bailor, R. 

186 390 

Baines, G. 

186 202 

Boird, N. 

186 

Bajemo, K. 

163 

Bakomis, B. 

374 

8oken, J. 

138 

Baker B. 

202 223 

Boker C. 

139 351 

Baker,G. 

202 211 

Baker, Janet 

145 361 382 

Baker, Jomes 

183 

Baker, Peggy 

384 

Baker, Phil 

168 

Baker, R. 

171 

8olcom, D. 

23 

Boldwin, W. 

371 390 

Ball, M. 

90 147 

Ball, V. 

273 

Banan, H. 

228 

Banford, L. 

179 360 

Bong, H. 

84 369 

Bang, L. 

378 

Banks, G. 

174 

Bonta, P. 

146 

Barber, P. 

23 191 342 

Barber, R. 

336 338 

Barbo, K. 120 242 326 331 

Barbre, A. 

139 

Barclay, D. 

169 

Barclay, L. 

164 

Barclay, R. 

23 

Barcus, V. 

139 

Bardwell, K. 

185 

Bare, J. 

118 

Barker, S. 

139 244 

Borkley, S. 

23 139 

Barksdale, T. 

23 164 281 

Barlow, H. 

67 73 334 

Barnhalt, B. 

251 

Barnes, C. 

147 

Barnes, E. 

128 329 

Barnes, W. 

284 

Barnett, V. 

254 

Barr, A. 

23 89 171 

Barrett, B. 

254 361 

Borrett, Barry 

184 216 

Barrett, G. 

23 119 299 

Borron, B. 

190 309 

Barrow, C. 

139 

Barry, W. 

371 

Bortelheimer, C 

). 136 

Bartels, E. 

118 

Barth, C. 

370 

Barthol, C. 

350 

Bartles, A. 

139 239 240 

Bortlett, B. 

136 

Bortlett, L. 

145 

Bartal, G. 

182 


Bass, J. 



216 

Bassett, B. 


147 

293 

Bassett, G. 


239 

244 

Batdarf, R. 



251 

Bates, F. 

125 

305 

322 

Bates, J. 



165 

Bates, M. 



389 

Bates, S. 



80 

Batey, H. 



284 

Bauer, C. 


128 

293 

Bouer, N. 



139 

Bough, G. 



191 

Baughman, J. 



44 

Bauman, J. 



171 

Boxter, N. 

23 

368 

390 

Bay, R. 

23 

347 

348 

Bayless, L. 



123 

Bea, D. 



184 

Beamer, J. 


23 

153 

Bean, G. 



139 

Bean, T. 



171 

Beard, J. 


23 

139 

Beardslee, R. 


113 

326 

Bearse, W. 23 92 

189 

287 

Beasley, W. 



78 

Bech, T. 


160 

251 

Beck, J. 


230 

233 

Beckett, L. 



128 

Beckett, P. 



79 

Beckley, P. 



178 

Beckstrom, D. 



251 

Bedell. C. 



186 

Beeman, C. 

23 

169 

372 

Beeston, J. 



369 

Beitinger, J. 



23 

Belaire, L. 



130 

Bell, J. 23 90 

174 

372 

Bell, P. 130 254 

328 

381 

Belles, S. 



215 

Belles, W. 


186 

346 

Belshaw, B. 


45 

371 

Belshe, J. 


153 

354 

8emis, J. 



372 

Bendele, G. 


134 

331 

Bendix, F. 



189 

8ennett, D. 



182 

Bennett, L. 

48 

110 

370 

Bennett, W. 

227 

376 

384 

Benson, Ja 



139 

Benson, John 

23 

369 

378 

Benterud, K. 



121 

Bentz, A. 



368 

Benville, P. 



186 

Berg, B. 



370 

Berg, C. 



290 

Berg, D. 



215 

Berg, P. 


130 

354 

Bergersen, J. 


138 

302 

Bergevin, D. 

23 90 

349 

Bergevin, J. 


45 

371 

Bergh, D. 



135 

Berghman, S. 



161 

Bergsten, B. 



174 

Bergstresser, C. 


125 

Berney, J. 


23 

351 

8ernave, J. 



136 

Berntsen, C. A. 


267 

293 

Berry, C. 



61 

Berry, H. 


371 

388 

Berry, W. 


156 

216 

Berthalf, R. 

192 

295 

368 

Bertilson, E. 



114 

Bertilson, H. 



114 

Bertramsan B. 



70 

Bethmonn, C. 


23 

369 

Betts, A. 


74 

368 

8ettys, D. 



136 

Bevaart, M. 

147 

242 

381 

Bianchi, C. 



139 

Bible, J. 



178 

Bibbins,C. 



123 

Biddle, V. 


134 

302 

Bienek, A. 

126 

295 

351 

Biehn, D. 


139 

378 

Bierbaun.W. 

62 

286 

293 

Bierbower, W. 



334 

Billeter, D. 



171 

Billings, E. 



133 

Birdsell, D. 



352 

Birkenfeld, K. 



171 

Birkland, J. 



191 

Bissanette, P. 



371 

Bishop, N. 
Bjorkiund, H. 



45 

45 

Bjorn, J. 



156 

Bjornson, B. 



139 

Bjarnstad, S. 

136 

282 

305 

Blackwell, F. 


23 

177 

Blain, J. 


180 

352 

Blain, S. 



121 

Blake, A. 


118 

362 

Blakely, M. 



352 

Blaker, B. 



164 

Blantan, M. 


23 

139 

Blauert, F. 23 

162 

350 

352 

Bleasner, W. 


349 

378 

Bliesher, E. 



159 

Blinn, G. 

164 

252 

360 

Blinn, L. 



164 

Bliss, E. 



182 

8lock, J. 186 

312 

369 

392 

Blamberg, R. 



168 

Blamsness, J. 



218 

Blonden, R. 



374 

Blood, K. 



61 

Bloom, M. 



123 

Bloom, N. 



174 

Blomgren, S. 



192 

Blomquist, C. 



139 

Blonden, R. 



152 

Blosser, T. 



291 

Blosset, J. 


337 

338 

Blossom, B. 



125 

Blount, J. 

128 

327 

329 

Blount, R. 



171 

8lue, Rodger 



371 

Blue, Roger 



190 

Blumenschein, 

R. 


178 

Bly, S. 

23 

368 

389 


Bocella, H. 



228 

Buckmaster, P. 


139 

Bodell, P. 



122 

Buecher, S. 


139 

Bodily, G. 


162 

371 

Bugge, W. 24 

156 

291 

Bodrak, G. 



254 

Buhman, N. 

171 

252 

Boettcher, R. 



312 

Bull, E. 


371 

Boettcher, W. 


171 

385 

Bull is, B. 


334 

Boggan, C. 



251 

Bumgorner, R. 


383 

Bogon, J. 



129 

Bundy, L. 

155 

393 

Boggan, J. 



23 

Bungay, C. 

24 

159 

Bagar, G. 



171 

Bunnell, P. 


159 

Bohlke, J. 



139 

Burch, L. 169 251 

392 

Boleraski, L. 



128 

Burdick, R. 

189 

360 

Bolingbroke, R. 


174 

231 

Burgess, B. 145 

304 

379 


237 

383 

Burgess, D. 


168 

Boning, C. 


349 

Burgess, Dieter 


373 

Boning, M. 

23 

136 

384 

Burgess, H. 

24 

240 

Booker, J. 


128 

Burginyon, G. 

169 

Boone, R. 



179 

Burke, C. 

128 

302 

Boo re, W. 



369 

Burke, G. 

24 

381 

Booth, J. 

Booth, R. 
Barnhalt, 8. 


163 

23 

252 

236 

217 

139 

379 

Burke, J. 

Burke, M. 

Burke, N. 

Burkhart, S. 

113 

24 

165 

139 

Barcheim, G. 
Barazan, D. 

Rncco D 


171 

387 

218 

101 

Burkner, B. 

Burkner, G. 24 

8urnett, C. 186 254 

155 

163 

388 

Bostic, S. 
Bottemiller, E. 
Bottemiller, M. 
Batting, L. 

Bourgett, H. 

Bouse, C. 

Bowers, P. 

Bowls, C. 

Bowler, J. 23 46 
Bowman, R. 

8oyce, J. 

Boye, B. 24 121 

Boyd, R. 

Bayden, R. 24 342 
Boyden, W. 
Boydsten, T. 

Boyer, A. 
Bayington, A. 
Brooten, D. 

Brodel, T. 

Braden, N. 
Bradford, A. 
Bradford, B. 

126 

23 

119 

23 
122 

292 

24 
350 

254 

24 

380 

109 

369 

122 

361 

366 

23 
368 
380 
384 
171 
293 
235 
352 

24 
182 
293 
251 
119 
378 

57 

132 

114 

Burnham, C. 
Burnham, K. 

Burns, D. 24 

Burns, J. 

Burns, Robert 

Burns, R. 

Burris, V. 

Burrows, C. 
Burwell, S. 134 

Burton, D. 

Burton, G. 

Burton, J. 

Burton, M. 

Burton, T. 

Buse, C. 

Bush, A. 

Bushow, D. 
Bushnell, J. 
Bussanich, M. 99 
Butler, L. 

8utton, B. 139 

Button, D. 

Butts, L. 90 92 

Byse, L. 

48 

179 

24 

302 

335 

138 

138 

330 

191 

370 

171 

379 

122 

192 

122 

217 

125 

331 

169 

240 

127 

130 

186 

336 

234 

383 

326 

382 

45 

389 

139 

308 

24 

Bradford, W. 



114 


Bradle, J. 



388 

C 



Bradshaw, G. 


24 

366 

Cady, H. 

60 

363 

Brody, Tekla 


128 

367 

Coin, J. 

127 

Brady, Terry 


334 

392 

Cairns, J. 


182 

Bragat, L. 



272 

Coirncrass, D. 


125 

Brake, J. 

79 

147 

281 

Calbick, D. 


254 



293 

375 

Caldwell, L. 


169 

Braithwaite, R. 



186 

Caldwell, M. 191 

252 

254 

Brand, G. 

155 

304 

24 

Callaghan, M. 

160 

310 

Brand, J. 

393 

Calvin, L. 

24 

180 

Brondner, J. 


180 

374 

Cornfield, F. 24 

372 

387 

Brandt, L. 



127 

Cameron, B. 


186 

Brandt, Sharon 



128 

Cameran, D. 

132 

290 

Brandt, Sherry 


127 

328 

Common, J. 

123 

252 

Bronnon, W. 



334 


323 

324 

Branson, 1. 


153 

308 

Camp, A. 

138 

265 



314 

354 

Campbell, C. 


77 

Brasel, A. 


147 

254 

Campbell, D. K. 


273 

Braun, D. 



120 

Campbell, Dorothy, 


61 

Broun, F. 



119 

Campbell, Doug 


371 

Braun, M. 



366 

Campbell, G. 


171 

Brietenbauch, 

24 45 

192 

Campbell, L. 


169 


355 

373 

389 

Campbell, S. 


123 

Bteitenfeldt, D. 


186 

314 

Compbell, V. 169 252 

384 

Breitenger, J. 



192 

Cornfield, C. 

174 

192 

Brewer, M. 


24 

125 

Connon, B. 

191 

338 

Brickell, J. 



350 

Connan, S. 

139 

392 

Briggs, R. 



369 

Cano, F. 

176 

323 

Briscoe, R. 

169 

251 

254 

Capps, T. 


186 

Brislown, G. 



58 

Capen, D. 


371 

Brislawn, L. 

132 

285 

385 

Carden, Z. 147 329 

330 

Bristole, W. 



161 

Carey, T. 

169 

348 

Bronson, J. 

24 

136 

382 

Carkeek, J. 

48 

370 

Brookes, 

171 

342 

353 

Carlson, B. 


178 

Brooks, E. 



350 

Carlson, G. 


179 

Brooks, M. 



380 

Carlson, J. 


139 

Brothers, A. 


161 

292 

Carlson, P. 

164 

354 

Brovelli, A. 



202 

Carlson, N. 24 92 

176 

Brown, Art 


186 

336 


286 

366 

Brown, A. M. 



371 

Carlsan, R. 


390 

Brawn, B. 



352 

Carlson, Richard 


169 

Brown, David 



324 

Carlson, T. 
Carmody, T. 


182 

Brown, Dudley 


24 46 


382 

165 293 

305 327 

Cams, J. 


121 

332 

334 

373 

389 

Cor pen ter, C. 


139 

Brown, Doug 



389 

Carpenter, G. 

24 

171 

Brown, Marilyn B. 

24 

273 

Carpenter, M. 

122 

290 




304 

Carpenter, W. 


190 

Brown, Marilyn 


45 

135 

Carratt, T. 


160 

Brown, Neal 



154 

Carriker, R. 


155 

Brawn, Noel 


89 90 

Carson, D. 


372 



217 

347 

Carson, J. 


314 

Brown, T. 

24 90 

178 

Carstens, M. 


123 


368 

387 

Carstens, P. 


186 

Brown, V. 


120 

363 

Carstens, S. 

361 

375 

Brown, William A. 

24 

111 

Carter, C. 

362 

363 

Brawn, Williom 


371 

Carter, D. 


305 

Brownson, W. 



168 

Carter, L. 


379 

Brubaker, W. 



338 

Carver, T. 


370 

Bruce, L. 

130 

305 

328 

Casali, A. 


360 

Bruce, R. 



169 

Cass, K. 

24 

126 

Brunhaver, L. 



174 

Cass, M. 146 

323 

324 

Bruntlett, J. 


24 

194 


334 

391 



368 

389 

Cass, W. 


61 

Brunton, Borbara 

133 

287 

Caspersen, V. 

45 46 




303 


121 

285 

Brunton, Bruce 


191 

309 

Castagna, D. 

136 

389 

Brunton, R. 



160 

Castle, J. 47 

121 

252 

Bruya, R. 



369 


281 

290 

Bryan, D. 



24 

Cathey, G. 

350 

354 

Bryan, D. 45 

162 

308 

371 

Cecchi, J. 


184 

Bryant, E. 


182 

228 

Cederbloam, G. 


45 

Bryant, J. 



146 

Celette, E. 


63 

Buch, V. 


129 

307 

Chamberloin, A. 


114 

Buchanan, B. 



156 

Chanberlain, Jim D. 

347 

Buchanon, D. 



159 

Chamberlain, Jim 


114 

Buchanan, L. 



79 

Chambers, J. 


139 

Buchet, P. 



164 

Champlin, J. 


121 

Bucholz, H. 


92 

366 

Chapman, J. 

229 

374 


Chapmon, S. 



139 

Corvin, C. 
Costner, G. 



371 

Chondler, L. 



390 



184 

Chariot, R. 


177 

254 

Cottrell, B. 



139 

Charlton, L. 


192 

350 

Cattrill, S. 



368 

Chase, D. 



227 

Cotton, N. 


125 

269 

Chase, J. 



25 

Coulter, J. 



165 

Chase, T. 


347 

350 

Caurson, N. 



145 

Cheathan, L. 


118 

Caurrier, S. 



121 

Chen, F. 



373 

Coury, J. 

139 

303 

389 

Cheney, C. 

25 

147 

377 

Cowell, A. 

186 

305 

139 

Cheung. C. 



171 

Cowin, R. 

390 

Chesterfield, R 



370 

Cox, Carol 



380 

Chew, J, 



139 

Cox, C. 

165 

294 

388 

Childress, M. 


24 45 

Cox, G. 



294 


381 

384 

Crabb, M. 


135 

288 

Childress, W. 


381 

Crady, E. 


165 

118 

Chisholm, B. 



146 

Craft, D. 


254 

Chisholm, J. 


99 

132 

Croig, Gory 

171 

251 

360 

273 

298 

299 

Craig, G. 


139 

192 

Chisholm. P. 

299 

315 

Craig, J. 


378 

Christiansen. A. 

381 

139 

Croigin, V. 



138 

Christensen. D. 


92 

368 

Crompton, S. 



136 

Christensen. H. 

292 

Crandell, J. 


129 

79 

Christensen, K. 


25 

182 

Crawford, K. 


292 

Christensen, L. 


25 

Crawford, R. (Mrs.) 

192 

44 

Christie,T. 



371 

Cresswell, 


236 

Christy, S. 
Church, J. 


118 

127 

361 

Creveling, D. 
Crews, C. 



157 

127 

Churness, D. 


369 

378 

Cripe, R. 



164 

Churney, M. 
Clapp, E. 
Clapp, K. 
Clapnam, W. 
Clark, B. 

Clark,C. 

Clark, Clyde 
Clark, D. 

Clark, E. 

Clark, J. 

Clark, L. 

Clark, N. 
Clork, P. 

Clark, T. 
Clorke, N. 
Clayberg, N. 
Cleave, D. 

25 

136 

312 

174 

125 

367 

389 

153 

153 

304 

354 

296 

169 

385 

82 

178 

380 

175 

226 

254 

146 

125 

227 

Cromer, A. 
Cranin, J. 
Crosby, D. 

Crosby, J. 
Crasley, B. 
Crossland, E. 
Crowe, M. 
Crawe, R. 

25 

26 

128 

291 

122 

252 

183 

121 

273 

361 

98 

146 

379 

373 

373 



Crowder, H. 

25 

251 

379 

25 

252 

182 

178 

Crawder, R. 
Crutchfield, J. 

Culbertson, J. 
Curtis, R. 

Curtis, R. 26 97 

Cutler, A. 26 

179 

175 

310 

145 

110 

169 

333 

309 

364 

77 

254 

366 

368 

Clem, D. 

25 92 

175 

D 




364 

365 

387 

392 

Dade, J. 



140 

Clem, R. 



25 

Dague, R. 


152 

304 

Clemons, L. 

136 

305 

310 

Dahl, Dahleen 

89 90 

128 

Clemons, W. 



171 

304 323 

324 

393 

Clemons, 1. 


202 

217 

Dahl, Deanno 


147 

381 

Clemons, P. 



134 

Dohlquist, P 


176 

370 

Clevelond, P. 



113 

Dahlquist, R. 



122 

Cleveland, S. 


25 

113 

Dohmen, C. 



369 

Clerf, C. 147 

254 

305 

381 

Dahmen, N. 


169 

236 

Click, O. 


334 

346 

Dalgardmo, N. 



120 

Clift, M. 



176 

Dolstone, B. 


26 

121 

Cline, J. 


230 

233 

Doly, M. 



120 

Cline, M. 



44 

Domon, F. 


230 

315 

Cline, R. 



25 

Daniel, R. 


45 

387 

Clinehens, S. 


155 

285 

Doniels, D. 


184 

360 

Clinton, J. 

191 

309 

384 

Daniels, J. 



176 

Clower, W. 



388 

Danielson, J. 


308 

314 

Clumpner, D. 



191 

367 

386 

387 

Caart, J. 


138 

239 

Donsby, D. 



178 


242 

304 

382 

Dorlington, R. 



371 

Coates, D. 


190 

333 

Darnell, R. 



372 

Cochran, C. 


378 

Darrah, E. 

26 45 

393 

Cochrane, J. 



378 

Dart, B. 


60 

114 

Cockerline, M. 



139 

Dart, E. 26 

114 

347 

353 

Cody, J. 



164 

Dauggh, D. 



371 

Codding tan, C. 


186 

David, H. 

162 

312 

352 

Coffee, W. 

168 

309 

310 

Dovidson, D. 


140 

310 

Coffie, C. 



382 

Davidson, Jomes 

26 

209 

Coffin, K. 

133 

288 

303 




350 

Coffin, L. 133 

254 

295 

313 

Dovidsan, Joy 

122 

302 

363 

Coffmon, G. 



192 

Davidson, K. 



369 

Cogdill, G 


213 

214 

Dovies, S. 



393 

Coheely, W. 


25 

165 

Davies, W. 


160 

393 

Colburn, B. 

45 

135 

281 

Dovis, Carol 



140 

Cole, C 

322 

324 

332 

Davis, Charles 



254 


334 

386 

391 

Davis, Dan 



153 

Collins, C. 

25 

155 

373 

Davis, Dixie 

119 

292 

377 

Colilns, P. 



393 

Davis, G. 

26 

175 

365 

Collins, R. 25 93 

161 

385 

Davis, H. 

26 

125 

317 

Colwell, R. 



185 

Davis, Jerry 

26 

175 

365 

Colwell, W. 



168 

Davis, Joe 



155 

Combes, Joe 



308 

Dovis, K. 



371 

Cambes, John 



175 

Davis, Raleigh 

26 47 97 

Combs, C. 



123 

164 282 367 

390 

Comfort, B. 



125 

Davis, Rowland 


169 

Comstock, C. 


92 

365 

Davis, Roy 

26 89 

165 

Comstock, J. 



136 

Davis, T. 



178 

Conont, B. 



171 

Davis, W. 


169 

215 

Conany, L. 



125 

Davis, Z. 



186 

Condy, K. 



125 

Dawson, E. 


120 

285 

Conkling, B. 



139 

Dowson, P. 


175 

354 

Conrady, N. 


351 

375 


360 

365 

383 

Cook, B. 

25 

322 

324 

Deal, P. 45 

130 

251 

252 



336 

379 


363 

379 

392 

Caak, T. 



160 

Dean, G. 


165 

381 

Cooksey, E. 

45 

139 

299 

Deon, Robert 


153 

354 

Coombs, J. 

158 

308 

346 

Deon, Ruth 



45 

Cope, R. 



25 

Dearth, J. 



26 

Cooper, Don. 


192 

366 

Deaton 



192 

Cooper, D. 


169 

349 

DeChenne, L. 



346 

Cooper, Gary 


25 

387 

Deering, J. 


122 

389 

Cooper, G. 


99 

190 

Deeter, 1. 



218 

336 

338 

379 

DeGroat, M. 



98 

Capenhaver, Joy 


25 

De Jong, F, 



125 

Copenhaver, J. 


25 

389 

Delano, B. 



351 

Copp, D. 



139 

Delaney, W. 



164 

Copple, R. 


174 

216 

Delany, K. 

125 

351 

378 

Cappack, L. 


153 

252 

De Lapp, C. 



145 



291 

392 

Delaurenti, R. A. 

140 

282 

Cararon, A. 


82 

286 

Deliganis, C. 



136 

Corcoran, P. 



125 

Delles, G. 26 

* 47 

178 

359 

Corcoran, N. 

133 

293 

303 

Delk, K. 


178 

236 

Cordell, A. 


314 

366 

Delzer, K. 


180 

326 

Cordes, A. 


130 

252 

Demaray, R. 



226 

Cordon, D. 



190 

De Marco, D. 



384 

Carey, D. 


45 

390 

Demco, J. 


146 

290 

Carless, M. 


25 

182 

Dement, N. 



337 

Corlew, R. 

152 

182 

291 

Deming, H. 



253 

Corliss, A. 

99 

118 

329 

De Moise, L. 


125 

389 

Corliss, J. 

25 

180 

353 

Denes, D. 



179 

Carnelison, L. 



388 

Dennis, M. 


153 

371 

Cornwell, R. 



218 

Denny, P. 



140 

Corteau, R. 



185 

Deonigi, D. 



372 


395 





De Phelps, J. 164 

De Pree, J. 215 

Devlin, R. 64 

De Visser, S. 140 

De Vos, J. 125 

Dhong, J. 26 

Dibble, G. 191 

Dickie, J. 61 

Dickinson, L. 156 

Dickson, D. 153 310 

348 351 

Dillsi, M. 368 373 

Dillon, D. 127 

Dilts, R. 189 

Dimmitt, K. 165 

Dingle, R. 313 

Dirkson, R. 136 

Dishmon, B. 136 

Dismong, A. 251 

Dixon, Joe 26 45 375 
Dixon, Johnny 174 

Dixon, R. 135 

Dixon, W. 189 

Dizmang, A. 133 285 387 
Doon, T. 186 

Dobler, B. 26 112 384 

Dobler, W. 112 373 

Dodd, M. 26 138 

Dodge, G. 155 

Dodge, J. 121 

Doebke, R. 158 309 

Doell, D. 97 184 

Doepke, P. 375 

Dolphin, R. 48 370 

Donley, J. 175 

Donohue, S. 125 363 

Donovan, C. 48 370 

Doolittle, J. 291 390 

Dorge, G. 147 

Doric, W. 155 388 

Dornbloser, N. 186 

Dornbloser, R. 294 312 

Doty, B. 125 378 389 

Doty, N. 146 254 

Dougherty, D. 26 

Dougherty, J. 368 

Douglas, D. 132 

Douglass, C. 130 389 

Doutrich, 8. 128 296 

314 327 329 

Dow, E. 252 

Downing, V. 380 

Doxon, J. 26 47 119 306 

Dragoo, J. 125 329 

Draggoo, J. 153 

Drake, Dr. Charles 228 

Drake, Charles T. 26 164 

Drake, D. 120 288 303 

330 331 384 

Drake, M. 130 

Dreger, R. 186 293 

346 352 378 

Dreiwson, 8. 26 146 346 

Drengson, R. 330 

Dressier, H. 130 

Driskill, R. 184 

Druehl, L. 7 84 

Drummond, M. 183 192 

305 

Drury, L. 323 

Duchoteau, W. 26 165 367 
Duchie, W. 163 

Dueker, K. 177 

Duff, J. 48 370 

Dugan, G. 372 388 

Dugan, T. 777 

Dugger, W. 26 350 

Dullea, J. 147 

Duncan, D. 383 

Duncan, M. 162 

Duncan, V. 63 284 

286 287 293 

Dunlop, A. 135 

Dunn, D. 136 

Dunn, H. 217 286 

Duprel, R. 185 202 

Durand, B. 125 

Durand, H. 125 252 

Durham, D. 171 252 

Durkee, R. 177 

Durkin, P. 740 

Duskin, D. 168 209 

Duskin, G. 168 371 

Dykstra, N. 140 


133 


Eafema, S. 
Early, R. 
Eastep, G. 
Easterly, S. 
Eastlick, H. 
Easton, D. 
Easton, S. 

Eaton, A. 
Eaton, J. 
Ebert, S. 
Ebner, F. 
Eckhort, D. 
Eckles, J. 
Eddy, J. 
Edqmond, M 
Ediger, R. 
Edward, G. 
Edwards, N. 
Edwardson, 
Egan, J. 
Egge, E. 
Ehrig, E. 
Eilert, C. 
Ekstran, G. 
Ekstram, L. 
Elder, James 
Elder, Jane 
Eliason, J. 


Eller, R. 
Ellersick, D. 
Ellingsen, D. 


381 

174 

98 

138 

77 
174 

26 45 165 
316 317 364 
169 
158 
140 389 
48 370 
27 140 
273 293 361 
155 

160 304 
371 
179 

121 310 
62 
123 
136 
319 
292 
216 
165 

78 
132 

161 202 
217 312 

171 

191 208 212 
156 202 
204 214 236 


Ellingson, L. 

Ellis, Dovid 
Ellis, Don 
Ellis, F. 

Ellmore, T. 

Ells, F. 2 

Ellsworth, D. 
Emigh, G. 
Elmquisf, Jockie 
Elmquist, Judith 
Eisner, C. 

Elterich, E. 
Emanuels, M. 
Emblen, R. 

22 

Emerson, C. 
Emerson, H. 
Emtman, R. 

Eng, K. 

Eng, N. 


Englund, L. 
Engvall, D. 
Engstrom, J. 
Engstrom, P. 
Ensminger, M. 
Erdahl, J. 


Erdmann, P. 
Ericksen, A. 
Erickson, Don 
Erickson, Donna 
Erickson, Elmer 
Erickson, Elvin 
Erie, L. 

Erlondson, J. 
Ernst, L. 

28 

Espe, M. 

Estep, D. 

Esvelt, L. 
Evangelos, S. 
Evans, J. 

Evans, L. 

Evans, M. 



138 

Fletcher, J. G. 


153 

310 

Gibson, G. 



383 

45 

180 



351 

354 

Giedt, D. 

27 

175 

308 


178 

Fletcher, J. N. 



164 

Giedt, E. 



140 


291 

Flodin, L. 45 
Flottmon, S. 

178 

236 

372 

Gies, J. 

178 

322 

386 


335 


127 

314 

Giese, J. 


147 

378 

136 

351 

Floyd, J. 



97 

Gifford, R. 



164 


254 

Flynn, Jim 



310 

Gilbert, G. 



152 


175 

Flynn, Judy 


136 

242 

Gilbert, J. 



125 


122 

Foisy, V. 



27 

Gilbert, Ron 


28 

175 

122 

255 

Foley, R. 



189 


288 

369 


123 

Ford, D. 



179 

Gilbert, R. 


27 

368 

27 

121 

Forder, F. 



140 

Gilbertson, H. 



386 

160 

209 

Forehand, J. 



155 

Gilden, R. 



183 

27 

189 

Forrester, M. 

140 

254 

330 

Gildersleeve, C. 

174 

235 

254 

261 

Forslund, M. 


135 

389 

Giles, D. 

122 

307 

389 


147 

Fosberg, J. 

90 

369 

377 

Gill, M. 130 369 

378 

392 


383 

Fossum, R. 



360 

Gilleland, J. 


89 

184 


180 

Faster, J. 


293 

361 



336 

379 


180 

Foster, L. 



171 

Gillespie, R. 



54 

27 

180 

Fowler, R. 


27 45 

Gillette, S. 


133 

251 

374 

381 

Fax, James 


177 

189 

Gillis, W. 


161 

284 

236 

238 



291 

360 

Gilmon, E. 



152 


138 

Fox, Jerry 


175 

308 

Gimp, F. 



310 


392 


360 

365 

368 

Gingrich, D. 
Girsn, B. 



175 


174 

Fox, Jimmy 



367 


122 

293 

254 

293 

Foxtan, K. 

140 

305 

375 

Glendenning, G. 

179 

293 


71 

Foy, Y. 


140 

389 




388 

146 

332 

Fragner, R. 


171 

392 

Glover, A. 



290 

377 

389. 

Frahm, V. 

27 

140 

378 

Glover, S. 


129 

363 

153 

350 

Fraki, S. 


128 

362 

Goakey, E. 

28 

192 

372 

7 90 

387 

Frandsen, K. 

179 

255 

314 

Goddard, C. 

28 

372 

382 

48 

370 

Frank, J. 



140 

Goedde, L. 



171 


372 

Franklin, D. 



177 

Godonarich, 1. 



367 


27 

Franklin, G. 

186 

254 

390 

Goemmer, C. 



186 


335 

Franklin, R, 



177 

Gaffrey, J. 



242 


282 

Franklin, S. 



286 

Galler, J. 



242 


177 

Franklin, V. 



125 

Good, B. 


140 

329 


147 

Frantz, C. 


140 

389 

Goodfellow, B. 

28 

367 

386 

7 45 

186 

Franz, M. 



169 

Goodman, D. 


169 

369 

254 

292 

Fraser, J. 



128 

Goodwin, G. 



130 


171 

Froser, S. 



136 

Goodwin, R. 



370 


140 

Frasier, C. 45 

113 

372 

387 

Goodwin, W. 



54 

313 

390 

Frasier, D. 



354 

Goossen, W. 


28 

130 


373 

Frasier, G. 


113 

384 

Gorden, D. 



171 

27 

138 

Frasier, R. 



80 

Gorden, Don 


184 

295 


371 
120 293 303 


Fray, C. 
Fray, J. 


134 307 331 
175 


Evans, V. 
Everest, L. 
Everhom, K 
Eyre, B. 
Eyrich, H. 


304 312 331 369 378 Fredeen, W. 180 372 381 


130 
58 

125 329 
145 293 
375 


Fabian, J. 177 

Faden, G. 383 

Fader, C. 375 

Fagerstram, C. 140 378 

Faithful, R. 121 374 

Fair, B. 123 

Fairbanks, R. 169 

Fairbanks, S. 118 292 

Falconbury, C. 369 

Folk, S. 27 47 122 

290 304 

Falkner, J. 145 307 

Fonkhauser,C. 27 184 

250 336 379 

Fanning, J. 156 202 206 
213 214 236 238 273 
Fansler, G. 182 

Farani, U. M. S. 383 

Forley, H. 27 

Farley, M. 334 

Farley,R. 45 

Farr, D. 27 186 369 

Farrar, R. 189 206 209 
Forrish, J. 371 

Fossero, D. 146 

Faulkner, A. 135 302 377 
Faulkner, L. 45 

Franklin, S. 146 

Feise, J. 58 

Feitcher, N. 45 

Felber, K. 118 307 389 
Felch, J. 132 

Feldman, 154 

Fellows, D. 165 

Feltis, P. 132 291 382 388 
Fenske, L. M. 169 251 252 
Fentan, C. 127 

Ferguson, R. 179 

Ferrond, C. 120 307 331 
Ferrell, J. 370 

Ferra, C. 120 

Fetzer, C. 179 227 369 
Ficke, J. 127 295 369 

Fields, James 157 

Fields, Janet 127 295 369 

Fields, R. 27 186 390 

Fife, M. 251 

Fike, J. 121 273 

Filer, T. 27 112 

Filion, A. 108 

Filion, D. 186 

Filion, G. 108 251 379 
Findley, P. 132 

Fischer, G. 71 

Fishback, J. 360 

Fishel, G. 165 

Fisher, C. 140 

Fisher, D. 136 

Fisher, E. 27 90 192 372 

Fisher, G. 27 156 349 
Fisher, L. 27 89 177 

Fisher, W. 110 350 384 
Fisker, G. 179 

Fitts, M. 125 

Fitzgerald, J. 135 330 331 
Fitzpotrick, D. 186 

Fitzsimmons, P. 365 

Fitzsimmons, R. 27 178 354 
Flannery, G. 165 

Flechsig, A. 368 

Fleming, L. 89 90 92 

114 372 387 
Fleming, M. 114 

Fleming, P. 367 

Fleming, R. 372 387 


Freeman, G. 
Freer, H. 

Freese, R. 
French, C. C. 
Freter, D. 

Freter, K. 
Freudenstein, L. 
Fricksa, C. 
Frichette, S. 
Friel, Jock 
Friel, John 
Fritenmo, C. 
Fritsch, L. 

Fritts, S. 
Fritzberg, K. 
Fronek, D. 

Frost, H. 

Frost, R. 

Frost, W. 
Frastad, J. 

Fry, B. 

Fry, C. 

Fry, M. 

Frye, S. 

Frydenberg, K. 
Fryxell, R. 
Fulkerson, A. 
Fullerton, D. 
Fulton, L. 

Funk, M. 

Funk, N. 

Funk, W. 
Fussell, R. 


189 
251 252 

135 
50 53 54 

180 347 
125 
27 176 
383 
98 179 
235 
164 286 
376 
27 

121 363 
140 
186 390 
138 314 287 
159 
159 
140 323 
125 351 
178 
128 393 
236 237 

136 
375 

371 
153 

145 307 
135 363 
140 

372 
371 


Gorden, E. 
Gorden, R. 
Gorden, H. 
Gorrill, M. 
Gorman, R. 
Goslow, T. 
Gouthom, B. 
Gould, J. 
Gould, M. 
Goulet, M. 
Gowler, K. 
Grace, N. 
Grace, R. 
Grady, R. 
Grodwohl, N. 
Graedel, T. 

Graef, J. 
Groff, S. 
Graham, A. 
Granberg, $. 
Granger, G. 
Grant, E. 
Grant, J. 
Grant, Stuart 
Grant, S. 
Grantsan, C. 
Grattan, J. 
Gray, John E. 
Gray, John C. 
Gray, M. 
Gray, R. E. 


263 360 
375 

28 157 387 
55 
132 
28 
168 
140 
252 383 
140 
28 
140 
171 254 
169 
28 174 
125 
175 286 
365 369 379 
130 331 
147 
147 
161 308 
184 
140 
168 
360 
135 273 
130 
146 
350 
174 
28 346 
180 365 392 


Gray, R. W. 180 365 392 


Godman, D. 186 393 

Gadd, R. 135 

Gaffney, J. 130 

Gaiser, G. 123 

Goiser, M. 134 242 244 

Galbraith, R. 178 

Galbraith, W. 178 220 

273 389 

Galgan, M. 354 

Gallagher, J. 189 311 

Gallagher, M. 140 

Gallaugher, L. 158 

Galley, J. 179 

Galligan, G. 80 

Gallwas, G. 140 

Gambald, B. 204 

Ganson, P. 127 

Ganson, R. 27 97 101 
168 366 

Ganey, G. 123 273 

Gard, K. 27 171 

Gardner, Corol 140 314 

Gardner, C. 48 370 

Garred, T. 369 377 

Garrett, C. 370 

Garrison, L. 101 159 

228 308 

Gates, T. 251 252 313 

Gowne, M. 165 

Gowne, S. 121 251 

Geib, G. 27 

Geil, J. 165 

Geist, B. 177 

Geloneck, N. 127 

George, J. 349 

George, K. 27 47 153 359 
George, W. 349 

Gerl, J. 27 

Germeau, P. 292 330 331 

Gerth, J. 27 169 

Getschmonn, K. 134 330 

331 

Get ties, J. 182 

Gibb, D. 227 

Gibford, R. 228 

Gibson, D. 137 255 

295 361 


Gray, T. 
Graybeal, K. 
Green, K. 
Green, L. 
Green, P. 
Green, R. 
Green, W. 
Greene, L. 
Greenlee, B. 
Greenlee, V. 
Greenup, J. 
Greenwald, L. 
Greenwalt, N. 
Gregg, 8. 
Gregg, R. 
Gregory, C. 
Greig, J. 

Greve, J. 
Gribbin, G. 

Gribbin, R. 
Griffin, G. 
Griffin, W. 
Griggs, A. 
Grillo, K. 
Grimlund, G. 
Grinned, J. 
Griswold, J. 
Grobstok, P. 
Grabstok, T. 
Groeneveld, W. 
Gronko, R 


202 209 350 
153 
368 
230 
140 
28 
192 
125 
118 
45 

138 291 
136 
159 
346 347 
360 375 
171 
174 216 
145 
177 202 
236 238 
28 186 390 
120 326 
374 
165 
28 
153 
187 
123 
28 185 
28 182 
171 
348 

Grotepas, J. 28 89 90 123 
Grosse, D. 147 254 

Grossman, R. 25 112 228 

359 390 


Grossman, $. 
Grunewals, G. 

Grunwald, G. 
Grytness, P. 
Guard, J. 
Guord, R. 
Gubrud, J. 
Gudnunson. K. 
Guerin, R. 
Guenther, R. 
Guess, J. 
Guhlke, R. 
Guilliams, D. 
Guinduard, D. 


112 
45 187 
294 369 
165 
183 
190 
177 
227 
140 
28 153 
177 366 
190 
372 
28 189 
383 


Gunderson, D. 


168 

385 

Gunderson, R. 



152 

Gunter, G. 


99 

182 

Gustin, M. 


184 

312 

Gustafson, M. 


140 

389 

Guthrie, R. 



371 

Guyer, F. 

45 

368 

387 

Gwinn, D. 



79 

Gyllenberg, A. 

28 

125 

293 


322 

375 

390 

Gyllenberg, J. 



136 

H 




Haase, S. 


184 

291 


336 

337 

338 

Hocker, S. 



77 

Horkney, R. 


28 

156 

Hadar, J. 



45 

Haddock, G. 



375 

Hadley, C. 



120 

Hagen, P. 



240 

Hoggardt, D. 

140 

273 

323 

Haggorty, T. 
Hagiund, A. 


191 

372 

145 

Hahn, E. 174 

230 

232 

292 

Hahn, F. 


177 

331 

Hahn, R. 


28 

350 

Haing, B. 



251 

Hair, M. 



130 

Hakolo, G. 


351 

382 

Haldi, J. 


159 

252 

Holey, N. 


48 

370 

Hall, G. 



28 

Hall, L. 


202 

232 

Hall, R. 


48 

370 

Hall, S. 



54 

Halleen, R. 



382 

Halsey, S. 



130 

Halvarson, W. 

28 

169 

348 

Hamid, S. 



373 

Hamilton, M. 


147 

392 

Hamilton, V. 


140 

287 

Homma, P. 


129 

305 

Hommar, Martha 


380 

Hammar, Mary 

240 

380 

Hammorlund, R. 

377 

385 

Hammond, B. 



217 

Hammond, J. 



178 

Hamon, N. 



171 

Handler, 8. 



109 

Hander, Mary 



140 

Hander, Mike 


28 

109 

Hanford, Dee Ann 

120 

273 



331 

333 

Hanford, Denton 

28 

190 




333 

Hankinsan, R. 


191 

308 

Hanna, S. 

28 

372 

373 

Hannah, J. 


28 

125 

Hannas, L. 



218 

Hannemon, R. 


45 

192 


369 

387 

389 

Hanner, R. 


168 

365 

Hanning, P. 



130 

Hansen, 8. 


125 

273 

Hansen, Jerry 


281 

294 

Hansen, Joan 


130 

330 

Hansen, Jon 



182 

Hansen, K. 



42 

Hansen, L. 



140 

Hansen, P. 


318 

375 

Hanson, E. 


28 

182 

Hanson, Janet 


28 

135 

Hanson, Judith 


122 

273 

Harbour, T. 

28 

366 

389 

Hard, M. 



69 

Hardenbergh, M. 

118 

361 




273 

Harder, R. 



371 

Hording, N. 



216 

Horig, T. 


121 

331 

Harkema, S. 



40 

Harkness, F. 



156 

Harkness, N. 



138 

Harleman, P. 



28 

Harlaw, S. 



147 

Harmon, H. 



189 

Harmon, M. 



328 

Harms, P. 



29 

Harms, S. 



147 

Harris, D. 


239 

244 

Harris, E. 

29 

119 

299 

Harris, J. 



171 

Horris, Marilyn 


29 

127 

Harris, Michael 



389 

Harris, S. 



135 

Harris, Z. 



147 

Harrison, B. 


64 

335 

Harrison, W. 

182 

251 

252 

Harrop, K. 


140 

254 

Harstan, G. 


48 

370 

Hartley, C. 

121 

304 

384 

Hartling, J. 



136 

Hartman, B. 

322 

323 

386 

Hartman, J. 



383 

Hartman, P. 


130 

392 

Harvey, Mary 


29 45 
235 380 

Harvey, Michoel 29 89 90 



92 

367 

Hasbrouck, M. 



135 

Haselton, M. 


90 378 

Haslom, M. 


29 

140 



380 382 

Haskell, R. 



371 

Hastings, J. 

146 

291 

302 

Hatch, J. 147 

250 

254 293 

Hatch, W. 



183 

Hathaway, D. 


29 89 



90 

165 

Hothorn, M. 



121 

Hatt, J. 



348 

Hattenburg, J. 



130 

Hotlrup, A. 

29 

163 

346 

Haun, S. 

154 

308 368 

Houser, K. 



140 

Haven, P. 



138 

Hawker, D. 


128 299 


Hawkes, D. 


29 156 


194 

214 282 

Hawkins, J. 

125 

240 375 

Howks, K. 


125 314 

Howorth, E. 


227 

Haworth, N. 


118 307 

Hayes, J. 


147 

Hayes, L. 

99 

140 273 

Hayes, S. 


145 

Hayes, T. 


29 165 

Haynes, G. 


382 

Hays, J. 


155 

Hay, B. 


182 

Hazlet, R. 


135 

Hazlet, S. 


57 

Heald, P. 


292 

Heath, C. 

126 

205 389 

Heathman, J. 


383 

Heotan, R. 


169 

Hecht, A. 


78 

Heckman, J. 


184 

Hed, W. 


378 

Hedges, M. 


123 

Hedglin, K. 


378 

Hedmon, D. 


192 

Hedman, J. 

29 47 120 

305 327 328 334 

Heglar, N 

138 

242 288 



304 363 

Heidenreich, J. 


184 293 



360 

Heiling, M. 


140 

Heino, C. 


185 

Heirichs, J. 


273 

Helland, J. 


123 389 

Helphrey, J. 


159 

Helmick, P. 

83 90 96 

Helms, W. 


163 

Hebree, R. 


166 

Henderson, B. 


216 

Henderson, W. 


371 

Hendricks, C. 


180 

Hendricks, L. 


45 

Hendrickson, J. 


384 

Hendrikksen, A. 

29 152 



321 366 

Hendriksen, E. 


373 

Hendrix, W. 


376 

Hennessy, M. 


130 

Henning, J. 


133 

Henning, L. 


169 372 

Henricksen, N. 

90 

127 293 

Henricksan, S. 


350 

Henrie, C. 


120 

Henry, Barbara 

264 

Henry, Bill 


155 

Henry, Bruce 


187 

Henry, C. 


155 

Henry, Jane 


133 363 

Henry, Janice 

130 

330 331 

Henry, Joanne 


133 273 



292 302 

Henry, K. 

29 

133 273 

Hensley, K. 


171 

Herman, M. 


140 310 

Hermanson, K. 


177 

Herres, A. 


147 

Herrin, C. 


388 

Hewitt, B. 


303 

Hewitt, J. 


123 

Hibben, D. 


123 252 

Hibben, J. 


191 381 

Hibben, T. 

29 

191 252 

Hickey, N. 


389 

Hickey, S. 


118 310 

Hicks, M. 

324 

328 386 

Hicks, S. 


99 331 

Hickstein, H. 


161 

Higgins, G. 

92 

177 366 

Hill, C. 


147 

Hill, D. 


255 393 

Hill, E. 


371 

Hill. J. 


140 

Hill. W. 


382 

Hilliard, R. 


182 

Hillier, G. 


29 159 

Hillstram, M. 


147 252 


323 

324 351 

Hilt, O. 


184 

Hilton, J. 


380 

Hinchliff, R. 


153 

Hinden, F. 


179 304 



323 324 

Hinman, P. 


189 

Hinrichs, D. 


90 

Hipke, J. 

29 

189 368 

Hipp, D. 


29 160 

Hirzel, E. 


252 

Hite, J. 


289 

Hitzel, M. 


213 

Hix, C. 


286 

Hodge, R. 


169 

Hodgson, M. 


126 254 

Hoehne, W. 


183 286 

Hofer, P. 


121 

Hoffmann, F. 


180 

Hoffman, F. 


29 

Hoflond, J. 


147 

Hofmeister, A. 


286 

Hogorty, N 

140 

362 389 

Hogorty, P 

129 

361 389 

Holland, D. 


29 368 

Hokansan, G. 

169 

236 377 

Hokansan, T. 


132 

Holbrook, G. 


392 

Holcomb, S. 

129 

293 304 



337 379 

Holbein, S. 


130 

Holden, P. 


169 381 

Hollister, B. 


171 

Holm, P. 


169 360 

Holmberg, B. 


140 

Holmberg, S. 


136 

Holman, D. 


192 

Holmes, 8. 

285 

312 378 

Holmes, C. 


112 

Holmes, P. 


112 252 

Holmstrom, J. 


183 

Holmquist, J. 


178 


396 
















Halsapple, G. 
Halt, L. 
Haltarf, J. 
Holzberger, J. 
Holway, W. 
Homan, D. 
Honsinger, R. 

Hood, A 
Hood, M. 

Hoak, J. 

Hooper, S. 
Hopf, N. 
Hopkins, E. 
Hopp, E. 
Hoppel, D. 
Horley, G. 
Horiuchi, T. 
Horn, D. 
Horne, M. 

Harschel, F. 
Horschel, N. 
Horton, A. 
Horton, M. 
Hosch, J. 
Hoseley, R. 
Hosier, R. 
Hosking, R. 
Hottatt, J. 
Hougen, J 


384 

159 
169 

191 365 
171 

160 
180 360 
384 385 

153 

29 185 273 
308 359 
45 184 304 
360 369 
119 251 307 
337 
393 
140 
29 
118 
29 
368 

179 273 308 
333 360 
192 

29 45 134 
45 384 
39 133 
350 

30 112 
130 
187 
166 

145 242 382 
Hougland, E. 138 293 303 


Jenkins, M. 30 47 128 
299 305 358 380 


Hougland, T. 
Houk, V. 
Houston, B. 


Howard, A. 
Howard, B. 
Howard, M. 
Howard, N. 
Howord, R. 
Howlett, D. 
Howlette, E. 
Hrdina, F. 
Hublou, C. 
Hudson, L. 
Huff, J. 
Hughbonks, L. 
Hughes, B. 
Hughes, D. 
Hughes, F. 
Hughes, J. 
Hulseman, R. 
Hultstrom, D. 
Humes, E. 


Hunter, R. 
Huntington, B. 

Huntley, S. 
Hurd, C. 
Hurford, W. 
Hurley, J. 
Hurlack, D. 
Hurt, V. 
Husbyn, J. 
Huseby 
Huson, K. 
Hutchinson, J. 
Hutsinpiller, B. 
Hutton, B. 

Huttan, I. 

Hyden, D. 
Hylton, D. 


I ekes, M. 
Ikstrum, J. 

lies, J. 
Immel, A. 
Indohl, L. 
Ireland, S. 
Irwin, J. 
Irwin, R. 
lsaksen, D. 
Issocson, G. 


Jaosko, E. 
Jacklin, C. 
Jacklin, D. 
Jockman, R. 
Jockson, T. 
Jacobson, I. 
Jacobson, J. 
Jacobson, S. 
Jacquot, M. 
Joeger, M. 
Jaekel, K. 
Jamor, R, 
James, M. 
James, R. 
Jomison, H. 

Janes, K. 


Janssen, R. 
Jaros, B. 30 
Jarvis, A. 
Joussoud, L. 
Jay, J. 

Jayne, R. 
Jelmberg, C. 
Jellum, W. 
Jenkins, A. 
Jenkins, Dove 
Jenkins, D. 


Jennings, G. 
Jenrich, S. 

Jensen, D. 
Jensen, J. 
Jensen, M. 
Jensen, Robert 
Jensen, R. 

Jensen, Sally 
Jensen, S. 
Jerimiah, D. 
Jerimiah, R. 
Jerrow, B. 
Jeswine, M. 
Jett, M. 

Jewell, M. 
Jewell, N. 
Jiencke, S. 
Johansen, A. 
Johansen, J. 
Johonnesen, J. 

Johanson, R. 
Johnson, Betty 
Johnson, Bev 
Johnson, Brian 


368 
136 

30 45 141 


283 298 299 358 


145 
30 
141 
30 252 
155 393 
179 
251 
126 354 
120 

281 283 385 
171 292 

135 
372 

136 
155 388 

30 169 
30 
145 
126 351 


145 

46 292 363 
375 392 
48 
228 
153 
190 393 
92 175 254 
360 364 365 
123 
166 375 
189 
180 285 
141 
136 

90 138 302 
361 362 
171 
141 254 
141 
177 366 
136 
122 293 
302 
372 
126 310 
126 295 
187 285 
366 392 
Johnson, Bruce 30 47 90 
92 390 392 
Johnson, Carmen 128 392 
Johnson, Coral 90 331 
Johnson, Chorles 185 

Johnson, Darleen 136 

Johnson, Dan 301 

Johnson, Doris 377 

Johnson, Elaine 141 378 

Johnson, E. 123 

Johnson, Gerald 387 

Johnson, Gordon 349 

Johnson, James 160 286 

Johnson, Janet J. 254 

Johnson, JanetM. 141 

Johnson, Janette 141 378 
Johnson, Jonelyn 121 242 
Johnson, Jotina 
Johnson, Judy 
Johnson, K. 

Johnson, Kathy 


Johnson, Laureen 
Johnson, Len 
Johnson, Linda 


141 
146 249 
130 331 
99 121 
328 331 
378 
179 235 
126 254 


Humphrey, A. 30 109 383 
Humphrey, John 309 352 
Humphrey, Judith 128 

Humphrey, M. 30 

Humphries, J. J. 179 

Hundley, W. 155 293 

Hunt, C. 202 217 370 


30 187 
30 184 
336 379 
30 
171 
123 
130 389 
175 
349 
141 
175 
147 
119 
189 


Johnson, Lorraine 141 295 
Johnson, Lynn 152 

Johnson, M. 30 146 392 
Johnson, Mary 330 

Johnson, N. 31 47 133 
306 317 358 
Johnson, Neill 228 

Johnson, Norman 187 393 


Johnson, O. 


282 


Johnson, Ray 31 172 382 
Johnson, R. E. 164 368 


Johnson, R. L. 
Johnson, Ran 
Johnson, W. 
Johnston, D. 
Johnston, J. 
Johnston, M. 
Johnston, Ray 
Johnston, Richard 
Jahnston, T. 

Jolin, D. 


166 189 
169 
369 
185 213 
389 
296 
371 
388 
177 
136 


140 

382 

Jonos, D. 


111 

384 

389 

Jonos, R. 

284 

305 

45 135 

294 

Jones, B. 

134 289 

363 

304 

314 

Jones, D. 


172 

330 

383 

Jones, D. D. 

97 101 

111 

171 254 

305 


202 207 

230 

Jones, Dan 


308 



Jones, Darlene 

122 

251 

30 

141 


252 

45 92 93 

Jones, Doreotha 

130 

368 387 

390 

Janes, Dareatha 

251 

254 

361 

Jones, Doug 


176 


155 

Jones, David 


166 


187 

Jones, E. 


179 


293 

Jones, Larry 

48 

370 

179 360 

388 

Jones, Lawrence 31 45 46 

252 


179 255 

393 


141 

Janes, Leroy 

166 

292 


178 


305 

315 


Jones, Lyle 

158 

369 

1 


Janes, M. 

122 

389 

30 166 

367 

Jones, O. 


136 

30 

123 

Jones, R. 


370 

120 304 

369 

Jones, Ron 


187 


373 

Jordan, N. 


147 

189 

223 

Jorgensen, L. 

45 

363 


141 

Jorgensen, R. 


178 


175 

Jawders, V. 


252 

30 

128 

Joy, W. 


128 

30 126 

380 

Judge, H. 


145 


44 

Jump, C. 


372 


130 

Junell, R. 


381 


187 

Jungroth, D. 


31 


179 

Junker, J. 


255 

184 288 

360 

Justice, S. 

89 90 

138 

141 

182 


242 290 

315 

202 

229 





121 

K 



22 30 45 

298 

Kachinsky, D, 

89 

292 

299 300 

358 

Kadow, P. 

127 

363 

39 9 0 92 

366 

Kainu, N. 


130 


169 

Kalamar, D. 


172 

109 374 

383 

Kaldenberg, K. 


147 


140 

Kamol, A. 

31 

373 


190 

Komol, Z. 


172 


331 

Komoly, H. 

364 

373 


192 

Kangos, A. 

174 230 

231 


48 

Kanouse, K. 

26 31 45 99 


174 

147 270 300 302 

316 

202 

217 

317 342 343 

353 


228 

Kane, N. 


178 

48 

370 

Kann, S. 


123 


Kanzler, A. 147 375 

Kapp, D. 168 

Karaiaannoglou, T. 31 123 
273 300 


Korlsen, 

152 378 

Karnis, B. 31 

141 327 330 

Korr, H. 

383 

Kary, A. 

130 

Kastberg, K. 

135 

Kossens, D. 

187 

Katterle, E. 

133 

Katterle, Z. 

50 84 

Kauffmon, G. 

155 366 

Kouzlarich, J. 

135 378 

Kawaguchi, L. 

53 

Kayali, F. 

169 

Kearley, E. 

371 

Keech, E. 

226 

Keene, J. 

90 132 374 

Keene, P. 

58 

Keeney, J. 

119 307 

Keithley, T. 

377 

Kellard, G. 

175 304 379 

Kelldow, S. 

187 

Keller, B. 

44 

Kelley, D. 31 

172 372 387 

Kellogg, K. 

371 

Kellogg, M, 

137 375 392 

Kellogg, R. 

250 

Kelly, J. 

141 

Kelly, T. 

333 

Kelsow, 

318 

Kelso, D. 

140 342 354 

Keltch, C. 

158 

Keltner, D. 

166 

Kemp, B. 

390 

Kemp, T. 

140 389 

Kene, J. 

78 

Kennedy, J. 

126 

Kennedy, K. 

135 346 

Kennedy, Ken 

92 284 

Kennedy, M. 

182 202 221 

Kennedy, T. 

76 

Kennon, H. 

372 375 

Kennan, J. 

375 

Kent, J. 

179 

Kent, Jay 

255 

Kenzy, S. 

81 

Kepmer, C. 

252 

Keolker, R. 

366 

Keranen, D. 

169 236 237 

Kestle, D. 31 

45 187 385 

Kestle, M. 

141 

Ketchel, D. 

230 233 

Ketchie, C. 

202 207 211 


212 213 

Kevin, E. 

155 

Keyes, M. 

370 

Keyes, R. 

172 251 382 

Kicha, G. 

179 

Kidder, M. 

375 

Kiehn, M. 

169 

Kies, Paul 

67 

Kilgore, R. 

368 

Killian, P. 

31 218 375 

Kimball, R. 

184 

Kimura, J. 

166 218 375 

Kinder, S. 

141 240 

King, L. 

31 347 387 

King, R. 

141 

King, W. 

31 170 

King, Wayne 

166 

Kingston, J. 

130 

Kinoshita, S. 

31 

Kinzer 

141 351 377 

Kiperts, A. 

187 378 

Kirby, S. 

130 

Kirihora, R. 

166 374 

Kirk, K. 

31 89 90 


164 293 308 

Kirkeby, M. 

176 230 


232 372 

Kirkwood, B. 

141 252 392 

Kirzel, W. 

163 

Kiser, R. 

190 

Kissinger, D, 

31 112 

Kitterman, S. 

31 

Kjelstad, M. 

182 

Klorich, C. 

114 

Klarich, J. 

114 290 302 

Klavona, G. 

48 370 

Klavano, P. 

81 

Kleweno, D. 

155 

Klinkenberg. J. 

218 

Kloth, B. 

141 

Kluge, B. 

141 

Klundt, l. 

31 89 163 

Knopp, E. 

31 180 

Knopp, G. 

164 

Knight, K. 

172 

Knight, W. 

73 

Knopf, C. 

164 383 

Knowles, M. 

141 

Knowles, R. 

120 

Knutsen, J. 

128 296 302 


361 378 

Knutsen, Joan 

145 363 384 

Knutsen, Joonne 31 45 


135 296 302 

Knutsen, N. 

378 

Koch, A. 

31 45 192 


346 347 

Kochen, G. 

141 

Kaeppen, C. 

126 313 

Kohne, F. 

182 

Kolb, D. 

45 

Kolb, L. 

112 172 383 

Kolb, Leo 

312 

Koller, D. 

170 

Koller, L. 

180 305 352 

Komp, G. 

190 

Komp, R. 

141 

Kandro, V. 

189 

Konicek, S. 

134 

Konu, R. 

367 

Koppe, R. 

172 

Koreis, 1. 

141 

Korsgaord, L. 

126 251 

Kosin, 1. 

45 


Katechi, V. 

331 

Kralevich, T. 

31 141 

Krause, K. 

141 

Krogh, J. 

187 

Krohn, H. 

179 

Krook, H. 

31 45 46 


132 380 

Kronhalm, D. 

31 372 

Kronquist, R. 

160 255 308 

Kruesel, P. 

161 

Kruger, C. 

370 

Krummel, M. 

145 303 


310 369 

Kruse, H. 

45 318 

Krussel, R. 

31 187 

Kuelper, G. 

141 

Kuhl, R. 

374 

Kuhn, J. 

180 

Kuiper, B. 

190 

Kun, A. 

190 

Kumpula, J. 

172 

Kuppler, C. 

141 353 

Kurtz, D. 

172 369 

Kuvaro, B. 

163 305 

Kuzma, J. 

370 

Kvamme, R. 

92 153 342 


347 353 

Kyle, G. 

130 254 

Kylen, B. 

141 

L 


Laonde, R. 

166 

Labberton, D. 

92 175 368 

Lacey, J. 

147 

Locey, R. 

31 

Ladderud, A. 

378 

Ladderud, L. 

378 

Ladwig, M. 

31 141 

La Follette, J. 

371 

Laird, K. 

161 

Loke, H. 

154 

Lake, L. 

154 310 

Lake, M. 

123 

Lo Liberte, S. 

141 

Lomberson, G. 

123 

Lammers, H. 

170 

Lombarn, R. 

338 

Lancaster, L. 

187 314 

Lancaster, S. 

145 330 

Landerholm, A. 

45 133 

Landes, R. 

31 90 162 

342 343 350 

Lone, A. 

32 45 133 

Lone, J. 

137 

Lone, K. 

123 

Lone, M. 

166 

Lang, R. 

32 374 

Long, T. 

176 

Longe, C. 

371 

Langill, R. 

166 388 

Langsather, J. 

137 

Lapsley, J. 

189 293 

Large, R. 

172 

Largent, L. 

218 

Larimore, G. 

32 136 337 

Larkin, S. 

32 170 

Larsen, A. 

147 

Larsen,J. 

192 

Lorsen, L. 

126 252 254 


378 380 

Larsen, M. 

121 

Larsen, S, 

122 

Larson, E. 

99 126 284 

Larson, G. 

184 310 

Larson, J. 

32 159 

Larson, Karen 

141 

Larson, Kenneth 371 

Larson, Larry 

187 334 

Larson, Lowrence 383 

Lorson, Lee 

32 393 

Larson, S. 

389 

Lorson, T. 

191 

Larson, V. 

108 

La Rue, 1. 

123 

La Turner, G. 

251 252 

Lau, S. 

32 

Lauer, M. 

141 

Lauerman, L. 

48 370 

Laughlin, R. 

180 

Lourance, P. 

145 304 329 

Lauri, R. 

158 

Lautenboch, J, 

172 342 


353 

Lovender, J. 

147 

Law, D. 

336 

Lowson, A. 

178 

Lowrence, D. 

14) 242 


310 381 

Lowrence, J. 

187 

Lawson, B. 

121 

Lawton, J. 

110 

Lawton, W. 

110 

Layman, C. 

146 

Layman, J. 

141 389 

Lozzar, L. 

130 

Lean, R. 

175 354 

Leavitt, G. 

370 

Lebow, B. 

32 177 

Le Blanc, W. 

191 304 

Leckie, G. 

388 

Ledgerwood, J. 

192 

Lee, Donald J. 

32 347 

Lee, Donold K. 

32 45 376 

Lee, Jack 

376 

Lee, Jan 

380 

Lee, John 

48 

Lee, K. 

192 367 

Lee, S. 

32 

Lee, W. 

182 

Leeright, G. 

122 

Le For, S. 

132 314 

Legaz, J. 

146 

Legge, H. 

177 

Le Gore, C. 

99 128 

Lehman, D. 

185 

Lehmann, W. 

32 45 157 

Leinweber, K. 

32 190 

Leitz, F. 

45 92 347 


349 387 

Leman, J. 

130 329 


Lemaster, D. 



216 

Lemcke, R. 



177 

Leming, S. 



141 

Lemmon, D. 



158 

Lemmon, M. 


189 

371 

Lemon, C. 

133 

254 

303 

Lendstrom, R. 



174 

Lennart, C. 


32 

137 

Lentes, D. 


124 

378 

Leonard, C. 

177 

346 

351 

Leonard, D. 


189 

360 

Leanord, S. 


135 

273 



302 

361 

Leschner, D. 



354 

Lesiak, P. 



354 

Le Worne, J. 

32 

166 

388 

Lewis, A. 



162 

Lewis, C. 


172 

375 

Lewis, E. 



187 

Lewis, P. 



329 

Lewis, R. 


189 

371 

Ley do, S. 



118 

Liddell 



141 

Lightle, S. 



164 

Likes, J. 



89 

Lilley, N. 



141 

Lilliquist, W. 



168 

Lillywhite, J. 



190 

Lind, W. 


160 

308 

Lindberg, Arne 



78 

Lindberg, Audrey 


146 



294 

377 

Lindblom, K. 

134 

291 

302 

Lindeen, G. 



383 

Linden, J. 



61 

Linden, P. 


135 

291 

Lindgren, J. 


121 

302 

Lindley, B. 


138 

290 

Lindley, D. 


92 

367 

Lindquist, M. 



124 

Lindsay, M. 


184 

202 



211 

288 

Lindsey, V 

32 45 

350 

Lindsley, M. 



130 

Lindstrom, L. 



122 

Link, E. P. 32 45 46 

156 

289 316 

373 

388 

Link, S. 


145 

388 

Linn, W. 


32 

189 

Linnan, M. 



382 

Lipp, L. 



166 

Lippert 


254 

334 

Lipsett, M. 


131 

375 

Lipscomb, M. 

32 45 

146 

Liptac, J. 



141 

Liptoc, L. 



111 

Lisle, B. 



178 

Listello, T. 


190 

310 

Litchfield, N. 

32 

124 

379 

Little, E. 



141 

Little, 1. 



389 

Little, O. 



126 

Livsay, J. 



142 

Livesoy, M. 


119 

322 

Livseoy, N. 



127 

Lloyd, B. 



388 

Loan, R. 



48 

Lobe, G. 



172 

Lochbaum, V. 



142 

Locke, J. 



371 

Loescher, R. 


170 

305 

Lafgren, L. 



126 

Lofgren, R. 32 

45 

346 

347 

Lombard, A. 


132 

215 



273 

374 

Long, J. 



134 

Long, L. 



166 

Long, P. 



126 

Long, R. 



48 

Longevin, L. 



388 

Lonneker, T. 



174 

Look, J. 


179 

309 

Loomis, R. 



159 

Lopuszynski, T. 



190 



228 

393 

Lord, J. 


174 

308 

Lorenz, R. 

32 

368 

379 

Loreen, O. 



350 

Loreen, S. 

153 

372 

387 

Lorer, A. 



126 

Lose, Jomes 



183 

Lose, Jerry 



183 

Losee, J. 



156 

Losk, G. 



126 

Loss, J. 



158 

Lothrop, B. 



142 

Loudenback, L. 

32 

155 

366 

Loudon, W. 


131 

330 

Loughlin, R. 


189 

216 

Louis, M. 



131 

Lounsberry, J. 



204 

Love, K. 

156 

350 

352 

Love, V. 



147 

Love, W. 

32 97 

154 


308 

368 

390 

Lovelace, S. 


142 

242 

Lovell, A. 



369 

Lovely, R. 



110 

Lovitt, L. 


142 

312 

Lowory, E. 


145 

320 



328 

393 

Lowary, J. 


142 

328 

Lowry, M. 



164 

Lucas, Carol 


134 

307 

Lucon, Charlie 


160 

333 

Lucas, G. 



383 

Luce, R. 



61 

Ludwig, R. 



251 

Luendenking, R. 


368 

Luft, D. 


293 

332 

Luhn, C. 


45 

353 

Luhn, D. 



32 

Lund, G. 



170 

Lungdahl, J. 



142 

Lunger, R. 


48 

370 

Lunnum, J, 


135 

334 

Lusk, B. 

127 

242 

310 

Lust, C. J. 

32 

155 

308 

Lust, M. 



155 

Lybecker, D. 



187 


Lyle, C. 132 361 

Lynn, J. 290 


M 


Maas, J. 

190 227 

293 

Maas, L. 



290 

MocBoyle, W. 

295 308 

366 

MacDonald, D. 



336 

Mackechney, R 

32 97 98 



101 

388 

Mackdanz, C. 

183 

360 

368 

Macomber, B. 

32 

157 

368 

MocPhee, J. 

32 90 

168 

MacPherson, C. 

146 

242 

MacNeil, R. 



372 

MacRae, K. 



371 

MacQuarrie, D 



155 

Madsen, J. 


156 

216 

Madsen, L. 



68 

Mae, D. 



308 

Mag in, 1. 


32 

375 

Magorty, A. 



113 

Magorty, G. 



113 

Magnuson, E. 


378 

393 

Mahn, R. 



172 

Maki, C. 



185 

Molcom, B. 


32 

350 

Malik, J. 


163 

381 

Mo ling re, A. 

32 

133 

373 

Mallory, W. 


33 

346 

Malinowski, J. 


172 

236 

Maloney, N. 



142 

Maloney, W. 


33 

218 

Manicke, E. 


33 

187 

Manley, L. 



142 

Mankowski, E. 



190 

Monn, B. 



378 

Manring, B. 



307 

Manring, Jill 


142 

273 

Monring, Jim 


33 

170 



347 

353 

Manring, M. 


97 

101 



185 

282 

Mansfield, Marilyn 


158 




349 

Mansfield, Michoel 


156 

Mansperger, J. 


158 

349 

Marble, E. 

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Maras, J. 


221 

223 

Marcy, P. 



127 

Moresh, B. 


33 

142 

Margaretich, J. 


120 

314 

Markley, S. 



59 

Marks, B. 



338 

Morler, J. 



179 

Marsh, S. 


132 

2)5 


286 

290 

306 

Marshall, A. 


128 

307 

Marshall, J. 


48 

370 

Marshall, K. 


45 

373 

Marsholl, M. 


128 

292 

Marshall, W. 


48 

370 

Martin, B. 


33 

142 

Martin, Bonnie 


33 

142 

Martin, C. 



92 

Martin, D. 



192 

Mortin, Denny 



216 

Martin, J, 



334 

Martin, John 



159 

Mortin, Jean 



147 

Martin, L. 



183 

Mortin, P. 



354 

Martin, R. 



189 

Marugg, S. 



348 

Martini, M. 


131 

255 



295 

361 

Mortinez, S. 


187 

351 



354 

390 

Marx, R. 



176 

Mashburn, M, 


133 

361 

Mason, A. 



127 

Masan, M. 



121 

Mast, P. 156 

202 

208 

228 

Masuda, J. 



376 

Masterson, H. 



170 

Masterson, M. 

174 

281 

291 

Matheson, B. 


131 

Mathews, D. 



372 

Mothewson, G. 


120 

328 

Mathison, P. 

183 

234 

368 

Motsudka, T. 



370 

Matthiesen, D. 


33 

130 



282 

323 

Mattson, C, 



133 

Mattson, Caryl 


119 

306 

Moughan, D. 



83 

Maughon, K. 


45 

110 

Maughan, P. 


33 46 


97 

110 

359 

Mourer, P. 



142 

Maw, D. 

207 

236 

238 

Maxfield, K. 


33 

142 

Moxson, R. 

33 45 

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May, C. 



124 

May, J. 

166 

229 

315 

Mayer, C. 



370 

Maylor, J. 

146 

311 

381 

Maynard, R. 


152 

384 

McBride, J. 

138 

215 

302 

McBride, Janice 

33 

120 


306 

327 

330 

McBride, M. 



193 

McBride, P. 



142 

McCague, S. 



137 

McColl, D. 



78 

McCahn, R. 

33 

163 

372 

McComish, W. 



163 

McCaslond, L. 



126 

McChesney, S. 



331 

McClane, J. 



290 

McClellan, Roger 

45 

371 

McClellond, R. 

178 

350 

352 

McClintick, S. 


145 

326 

McClure, A. 

30 33 45 

358 362 

363 

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391 

McClure, D. 


33 

187 

McClure, K. 



187 

McClure, S. 

33 45 97 98 

McCluskey, J. 

33 45 369 

McConnell, B. 



183 


397 






McConnell, 0. 



179 

Miller, H. 



369 

Murphy, M. 



190 

O'Dell, P. 



121 

Pavlic, C. 

132 

293 

Porter, W. 


45 

371 

McCorkle, B. 


132 

283 

Miller, James 


168 

383 

Murphy, L. 



142 

Oestreich, J. 



133 

Paxton, D. 


372 

Partin, S. 



143 

McCormick, D. 



120 

Miller, John 



68 

Murphy, S. 



374 

Oestreich, M. 



133 

Payne, G. 

135 

273 

Possinger, J. 



183 

McCormick, W. 



177 

Miller, Judi 



142 

Murthy, S. 



373 

Ogawa, T. 



172 

Payne, S, 


134 

Potter, B. 



170 

McCowon, S. 


33 45 

Miller, Judith 



118 

Muse, R. 



79 

Ogilvie, B. 


35 

374 

Pazer, H. 


166 

Potter, C. 



148 

McCoun, C. 



145 

Miller, K. 



191 

Mufh, R. 



160 

Ogston, S. 



142 

Peoce, T. 


143 

Poulsen, A. 



282 

McCoy, T. 



142 

Miller, L. 


126 

273 

Myers, D. 

182 

292 350 

O'Haro, C. 

35 

146 

316 

Pearsan, Betty 


148 

Powell, M. 



143 

McCulloch, W. 



48 

Miller, R. 



371 

Myers, V. 

92 

182 347 

O'Hara, T. 


92 

218 

Pearson, Bonnie 


148 

Powell, S. 



121 

McCurdy, J. 



81 

Miller, M. 


99 

131 

Myklebust, K. 


174 

314 

Oldenberg, C. 



181 

Pearson, K. 


368 

Power, R 


153 

348 

McCutchan, T. 

174 

202 

229 

Miller, R. 



155 





Oldenburg, D. 


35 

142 

Pearson, L. 


146 

Powers, Lee 


206 

218 

McDaniel, S. 



137 

Miller, Robert 



371 

N 




Oldham, G. 



164 

Pearson, R. 


36 

Powers, Lori lee 


126 

361 

McDonald, A. 



142 

Miller, T. 


161 

374 

Nagle, Jock 


92 

202 

Oldham, R. 



36 

Pedersen, C. 

382 

388 

Prater, E. A. 


145 

382 

McDonald, D. 


155 

312 

Miller, V. 

34 

124 

305 


229 

230 231 

Olds, E. 

121 

284 

361 

Pedersen, H. 


179 

Prater, N. 



175 

McDonald, K. 


33 

131 

Miller, W. 


367 

386 

Nagle, John 


71 

350 

Olds, M. 


282 

286 

Pedersen, 1. 


181 

Pratt, S. 37 

' 46 

184 

252 



282 

305 

Mills, C. 



366 

Naimy, B. 



126 

Oliver, R. 


36 

368 

Pedersen, J. 


384 


281 

282 

308 

McDonald, Rosemary 

131 

Mills, D. 


148 

351 

Nokama, F. 


332 376 

Oliver, S. 

146 

332 

391 

Pedersen, S. 

134 

323 

Prelwitz, M. 



143 

McDonald, R. 



379 

Millsap, W. 



164 

Nakamura, R. 



370 

Olmsted, J. 

134 

306 

332 

324 

331 

332 

Prescott, J. 



172 

McDougal, G. 



131 

Milner, D. 


34 

182 

Nakosone, J. 

35 

163 

376 

Olney, D. 


48 

370 

Pederson, D. 187 360 

390 

Prescott, R. 



37 

McDusky 



385 

Milnes, R. 


160 

252 

Nolder, N. 



135 

Olsen, D. 


118 

361 

Pederson, G. 

36 

187 

Presnell, D. 

37 89 90 

McElhaney, J. 


281 

336 

Minor, S. 



44 

Naqib, A. 


35 

163 

Olsen, J. 



351 

Pehl, R. 

36 

187 



92 93 



338 

379 

Mink, G. 



392 

Narancich, D. 



159 

Olsen, K. 

45 

128 

273 

368 387 

390 

Prewitt, N. 


37 92 

Me Ewan, H. 


193 

379 

Mink, M. 



392 

Narayanan, K. 



373 


363 

373 

382 

Pehrson, A. 131 

242 

286 



190 

367 

McFarlane, J. 


190 

309 

Minetti, G. 



170 

Nossar, E. 



372 

Olsen, L. 



172 

Pehrson, R. 36 

187 

286 

Price, John 96 97 98 

101 



310 

388 

Mirriom, D. 



368 

Nathe, V. 

172 

254 388 

Olsen, P. 



152 

Pelczar, A. 


143 

Price, Judith 



134 

McFarland, R. 


176 

304 

Misner, D. 



137 

Naught, V. 



166 

Olson, A. 


179 

348 

Pemerl, B. 135 298 

299 

Prichard, E. 


37 

382 

McGee, M. 

33 99 

133 

Mitchell, D. 


193 

372 

Neal, G. 


191 

378 

Olson, Bonnie 



137 

Pemberton, J. 

252 

281 

Prichard, W. 



370 

McGillivray, D. 



354 

Mitchell, J. 


183 

310 

Neill, E. 



334 

Olson, Bruce 



36 

Pence, P. 


310 

Pridham, B. 



146 

McGillivroy, R. 



161 

Mock, J. 



175 

Neil son, R. 



55 

Olson, D. 



348 

Pennochi, M. 


179 

Priest, B. 



160 

McGinnis, D. 



142 

Mae, D. 

34 89 90 

Nelsen, B. L. 



127 

Olson, Edro 


118 

294 

Penney, B. 


153 

Priest. G. 193 311 

351 

392 

McGinnis, J. 



71 

Moe, H. 


158 

179 

Nelson, Betty 

138 

310 389 

Olson, Edward 



170 

Penninger, B. 170 367 

386 

Priest, W. 



255 

McGinnis, L. 



168 

Moehring, R. 


34 

163 

Nelson, Buzz 



174 

Olson, G. 



145 

Perdue, E. 

322 

324 

Prince, A. 

37 

124 

254 

McGinnis, S. 

132 

290 

374 

Moffat, R. 



174 

Nelson, Camille 

127 

242 

Olson, Jack 


36 

183 

Peressini, A. 


45 

Prince, B. 



118 

McGlode, J. 


156 

295 

Moffat, W. 



371 

Nelson, Corol 



148 

Olson, James 


336 

379 

Percivol, R. 


193 

Prince, J. 


37 

153 

McGreevy, M, 



351 

Mohr, C. 

34 90 92 

Nelson, Coroly 

n 

35 99 

Olson, JoAnn 



142 

Perkins, P. 


108 

Pritchard, L. 


37 

170 

McGrew, B. 



193 


172 

251 

252 



132 

306 

Olson, P. 

174 

304 

310 

Perkins, R. 


108 

Proctor, B. 



60 

McGrew, C. 


193 

324 

Mohr, R. 


48 370 

Nelson, Don 

202 

213 

236 

Olson, R. 



61 

Perras, L. 


155 

Pryor, R. 



190 

McGuire, D. 



166 

Moilanen, M. 



142 

Nelson, Doris 



131 

Olson, S. 


131 

254 

Perrin, J. 


183 

Pue, M. 


143 

384 

Mclntee, D. 

163 

381 

384 

Molsness, J. 



187 

Nelson, Gary 

35 45 97 


273 

331 

381 

Perrine, L. 

375 

392 

Puette, M. 



254 

McIntosh, R. 


177 

360 

Monoghon, K. 


76 

284 



177 

390 

Olsson, C. 



138 

Perring, C. 135 361 

378 

Purcell, M. 


118 

326 



365 

366 

Mondich, G. 



187 

Nelson, Gene 



372 

Omey, E. 



45 

Perry, C. 


216 

Purcell, W. 


45 

387 

McIntyre, V. L. 

33 

147 

373 

Monarch, R. 

34 

166 

368 

Nelson, Ginny 


363 

377 

O'Neil, J. 

190 

336 

338 

Perry, E. 


119 

Purdom, P. 



132 

McJunkin, D. 

174 

372 

382 

Moneymaker, M. 


170 

Nelson, James 



354 

Onstot, G. 



187 

Perry, G. 


190 

Purdon, A. 


37 

168 

McKail, Janice 



142 

Monroe, K. 

34 45 46 

Nelson, Jeonnie 

124 

272 

Oppelt, J. 



36 

Perry, Janice 135 361 

389 

Purkett, T. 


37 

155 

McKail, Joonn 



142 

133 

254 302 

304 


343 345 

354 

Opsahl, J. 



158 

Perry, Jim 


371 



291 

366 

McKoy, P. 



183 

Monroe, M. 

34 

124 

305 

Nelson, John 



122 

Opstod, T. 


36 

111 

Perry, M. 

48 

370 

Purser, E. 342 343 

346 

347 

McKoy, W. 



34 

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166 

Nelson, Judith 



124 

Oretorp, 1. 


259 

296 

Persson, K. 

143 

389 

Purser, O. 37 

15 5 

291 

366 

McKeever, W. 



178 

Mon tee, D. 

174 

230 

232 

Nelson. Maria 


35 

131 

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375 

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156 

Puterbaugh, G. 



172 

McKellor, D. 



34 

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131 

Nelson, Marlene 


146 

Ormsby, S. 

89 90 

292 

Peters, B. 


143 

Putnam, D. 


37 

369 

McKeirnan, M. 



148 

Montgomery, L. 

35 

126 

Nelson. Marvin 


157 


293 338 

379 

Peters, E. 


36 

Putnam, R, 



183 

McKenzie, D. 



172 

Mooberry, J. 



236 



202 

209 

Ormiston, K. 



185 

Petersen, C. 


36 

Pyeatt, R. 

37 

367 

386 

McKi 11 ip, C. 



226 

Moore, A. 



120 

Nelson, P. 



148 

Orphilla, R. 



375 

Petersen, D. 36 89 90 

A 




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369 

Moore, D. 



170 

Nelson, R. 



372 

Orr, C. 



370 


92 

347 

u 




McKinney, L. 



370 

Moore, Dole 



166 

Nelson, V. 



121 

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369 

Petersen, J. 


126 

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118 

292 

McKinstry, S. 



161 

Moore, Don 



187 

Nelson,Willord 


371 

Orr, U. 



375 

Petersen, S. 


187 

Quaife, M. 


118 

292 

Mcleon, B. 

34 46 

136 

Moore, Donald 



368 

Nelson, William 


35 

Osbakken, W. 


172 

375 

Peterson, Beatrice 


120 

Quam, J. 



155 

282 283 

302 

306 

358 

Moore, Duane 



166 



166 

367 

Osborn, Gary 

36 97 

156 

Peterson, Beverly 

36 

143 

Quinn, C. 


37 

388 

McLean, D. 



370 

Moore, E. 



75 

Nesbit, C. 



172 

Osborn, Gene 


166 

393 

Peterson, C. 

143 

351 

Quinn, R. 



372 

McLenegon, L. 



142 

Moore, G. 

142 

240 

242 

Ness, E. 



142 

Osborn. George 


159 

Peterson, Delbert 


383 

n 




McLeod, J. 



182 

Moore, H. 



372 

Nessbitt, J. 



251 

Osborn, J. 



122 

Peterson, Donold 

36 

182 





McMockin, M. 


162 

287 

Moore, J. 



166 

Nettleton, J. 



179 

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172 

252 


367 

386 

Rader, L. 



188 


314 

346 

360 

Moore, L. 

35 

180 

369 

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193 

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368 

384 

Peterson, J. 

143 

273 

Radtke, W. 



37 

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254 

284 

Moore, M. 

120 303 

304 

Nevins, D. 



193 

Osborn, P. 


132 

293 


286 

361 

Rae, R. 


37 

374 

McManis, Donna 


248 

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142 

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35 

166 



304 

361 

Peterson, K. 


143 

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379 

McMechon, W. 


34 

177 

Moore, P. 


35 

124 

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132 

273 

281 

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182 

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135 

Ragle, A. 



137 

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34 

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252 

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145 

322 

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170 

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194 

365 

Rains, F. 



166 

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131 

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383 

392 



324 

390 

Osaood. P. 



153 

Peterson, R. 

45 

282 

Rains, S. 

239 

244 

286 

McPeek, L. 


146 

291 

Moore, S. 



146 

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166 

375 

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170 

Peterson, T. J. 

48 

370 

Roistakka, D. 

174 

342 

348 

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185 

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360 

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350 

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202 

204 

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376 

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166 

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178 

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179 

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142 

205 207 

209 

211 

213 

Ostheller, R. 


92 

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182 

218 

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242 

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190 

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35 97 

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293 

389 

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290 

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143 

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392 

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145 

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35 

185 

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293 

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389 

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145 

381 

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0/ 40 

299 

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142 

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35 

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380 

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142 

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291 

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O/ 40 46 

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34 

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377 

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164 

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160 

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36 

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244 

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143 



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134 

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133 

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124 

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81 

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309 

Ranger, D. 



190 

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161 

Morgan, G. 



164 

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142 

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172 

217 

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185 

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202 

223 

236 

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189 

371 

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124 

303 

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172 

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388 

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381 

Ronta, M. 


37 

369 

Meek, G. 


168 

202 

Morgon, Jon 


135 

142 

Nickel I, S. 


137 

249 

Overstreet, P. 

1A9 

9A.*i 

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120 

326 

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37 354 

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172 

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A A A A 97 

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252 

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181 

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142 

251 

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282 

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191 

252 


1AQ 9AD 

359 

Pflugmacher, C. 


128 

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202 221 

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161 

Mork, M. 


142 

285 

Nieland, D. 


185 

366 

Overturf, G. 



48 


291 

392 

Rasmussen, F. 

37 

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387 

Melin, M. 


34 

138 

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35 

174 

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168 

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161 

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392 

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173 



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306 

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376 



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384 

Owens, D. 



190 

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189 

388 

Rasmussen, W, 



173 

Melcher, M. 

242 

312 

361 

Morrell, C. 


202 

206 

Nielsen, L. 



182 

Owens, G. 



181 

Philips, Douglas 

48 

370 

Ratliff, G. 



188 

Melhus, M. 



142 



207 

214 

Nielsen, R. 


142 

288 

Owens, L. 



181 

Phillips, Donald 


188 

Rotzlaff, G. 


174 

234 

Mellinger, C. 


174 

293 

Morrell, T. 


180 

389 

Nielsen, S. 



373 





Phillips, H. 


143 

Rath, L. 202 

205 

206 21j 

Mellom, R. 


251 

293 

Morris, L. 



90 

Niemczyk, W. 



137 

P 




Phillips, V. 

83 

286 

Rauch, B. 



1/3 

Melton, J. 


34 

170 

Morris, R. 



35 

Nilsen, K. 35 

170 

353 

381 

Paddock, T. 


158 

304 

Phillips, W. 


143 

Raun, P. 

J/ 40 4/ 

Mercer, L. 

34 97 

170 

Morris, S. 


122 

306 

Nisbet, J. 



142 

Page, G. 

36 

187 

287 

Phipps, J. 36 45 

189 

375 



IJ4 

384 

Mercer, R. 



90 

Morrison, D. 



64 

Nishi, K. 


131 

287 

Painter, C. 



334 

Pickering, S. 

36 

189 

Raupp, M. 



37 

Mercier, A. 



126 

Morrison, D. 


166 

305 

Nixon, K. 



384 

Painter, R. 



371 


296 

359 

Rawlings, S. 



143 

Merriam, D. 


34 

159 

Morrison, P. 



383 

Noble, A. 


35 

121 

Pallerson, J. 



346 

Pickord, A. 

132 

307 

Doy, D. 



367 

Merriam, P. 



337 

Morrisson, W. 



152 

Noble, D. 

118 

273 

345 

Pallies, G. 


187 

333 

Pickett, A. 


36 

Ray, R. 



76 

Merriam, W. 



375 

Morrow, S. 

35 

142 

375 

Noble, J. 



118 

Polmer, J. 



148 

Pickett, K. 


124 

Rayton, V. 



351 

Merrill, T. 



71 

Morse, L. 


124 

314 

Noble, N. 



142 

Palmer, L. 

181 

353 

384 

Piene, L. 


128 

Reardon, J. 



126 

Merten, P. 


161 

388 

Morse, S. 



132 

Noble, W. 


48 

370 

Polmer, R. 



379 

Pierini, J. 36 

166 

374 

Reay, J. 



378 

Messinger, E. 


34 

374 

Morton, P. 



209 

Noe, B. 90 93 

258 

341 

Palmer, W. 


332 

386 

Piele, D. 


383 

Rebholz, G. 



293 

Metcolf, S. 


128 

378 

Morton, W. 



371 

Noel, A. 



142 

Polmquist, G. 



218 

Pierson, J. 


369 

Rebillord, A. 


133 

306 

Mettler, A. 



392 

Moser, G. 

35 

172 

374 

Noel, R. 

185 

230 

231 

Ponko, S. 



166 

Pierson, M. 

36 

132 

Rebillord, G. 



133 

Mettler, M. 



142 

Mosher, E. 



60 

Nofkee, F. 

62 

282 

286 

Pardee, L. 


325 

326 

Pierson, N. 


126 

Reed, B. 



375 

Meves, P. 



148 

Mosher, M. 



350 

Nold, N. 


127 

312 

Pare, E. 



372 

Pike, W. 

183 

383 

Reed, G. 



161 

Meyer, P. 


131 

378 

Mott, B. 



335 

Nopp, C. 

35 

191 

350 

Parish, M. 


242 

314 

Pinkerton, A. 


118 

Reed, J. 



143 

Meyers, V. 



295 

Mattou, D. 



142 

Nordheim, E. 

35 

142 

377 

Porker, J. 



323 

Pipe, P. 

143 

305 

Reed,M. 



361 

Michael, W. 



101 

Mount, H. 



383 

Nordquist, P. 

90 

122 

273 

Parker, T. 



216 

Pirkey, P. 

127 

306 

Reed, R. 


164 

309 

Michoelsen, S, 



148 

Mount, M. 


134 

392 

Noren, R. 



170 

Porkhill, J. 



55 

Pittman, G. 


369 

Reese, A. 



369 

Michel, F. 



193 

Mounts, D. 



142 

Normon, K. 



189 

Porkhill, R. 



164 

Pitzer, M. 


137 

Reese, D. 



121 

Michlitch, R. 



127 

Mowat, D. 


35 

172 

Northrup, C. 


50 60 

Parks. J. 


36 

377 

Pixlee, W, 


89 

Regan, A. 


132 

254 

Mickens, S. 



142 

Mowery, J. 



187 



282 

299 

Parlet, G. 


101 

187 

Plokinger, T, 

188 

372 

Rehberg, H. 



389 

Middleton, B. 


142 

389 

Moyer, G. 

145 

285 

306 

Norton, D. 


110 322 

Parr, D. 



184 

Plant, L. 

143 

381 

Reichter, B. 



226 

Mielke, D. 


156 

310 

Moyes, C. 



371 


334 

338 

386 

Parrott, A. 


145 

242 

Plott, S. 


137 

Reid, M, 



119 

Mielke, H. 34 46 

156 

251 

Mozes, B. 


193 

310 

Norwood, W. 


35 45 

Parrott, M. 



183 

Pleasont, A. 174 

230 

273 

Reilly, H. 

126 

330 

389 

Mielke, R. 



172 

Mudd, J. 



383 



373 389 

Parris, M. 



152 

Pleines, S. 

148 

351 

Reimann, E. 



131 

Migaki, T. 



371 

Mueller, J. 



177 

Nothwang, L. 


180 

181 

Porry, D. 


189 

308 

Plewo, M, 

36 

143 

Reinhold, J. 

126 

351 

389 

Miharo, J. 

146 283 

315 

Mueller, L. 



187 



369 

381 

Parsons, Jean 


133 

254 

Pledger, W. 


143 

Reinbold, M. 



38 

Miles, D. 


184 

290 

Muir, G. 



187 

Novell, J. 



184 


286 

302 

307 

Plymole, B. 


121 

Reinhold, M. 



45 

Miles, J. 

202 

223 

225 

Mull, E. 



124 

Noyd, G. 


35 

174 

Parsons, Judson 

36 

172 

Pooge, J. 45 

126 

252 

Reinke, W. 

37 

153 

354 

Mileski, J. 



142 

Mullen, C. 



137 

Nuaent. N. 

128 

293 363 

Portido, E. 



83 

Polenske, R. 


188 

Reiton, V. 


48 

370 

Milholland, K. 



34 

Mu lock, M. 



252 

Nyberq, Borbaro 

122 

361 

Porfington, J. 



132 

Pollack, S. 


348 

Reiter, N. 


143 

389 



342 

350 

Mundell, G. 



189 

Nyberg, Berit 


142 

296 

Possage, R. 



350 

Ponti, K. 


179 

Reitmeier, J. R. 


162 

291 

Millard, R. 


156 

384 

Munn, B 166 323 324 

386 

Nye, N. 



124 

Possmore, G. 



370 

Pool, E. 


184 


304 

346 

347 

Miller, A. 


64 

335 

Munn, R. 



62 

Nygord, L. 



371 

Patterson, B. 


138 

337 

Poole, D. 


388 

Remillard, M. 



346 

Miller, B. 34 89 90 92 

158 

Munns, E. 



316 





Patterson, J. 



55 

Poole, R. 


164 

Remington, F, 



148 

Miller, B. 


34 

148 

Munroe, C. 



181 

O 




Potterson, M. 


127 

361 

Pope, B. 


131 

Remington, J. 



179 

Miller, C. 



44 

Murabayashi, H. 

35 

367 

O'Brien, C. 



290 

Pottison, A. 



380 

Pope, D. 

178 

310 

Remley, C. 

38 

118 

306 

Miller, Dovid 



346 



376 

386 

O'Bryan, P. 


35 89 

Pattison, P. 


129 

307 

Pope, J. 

36 

178 

Rempel, P. 


57 

284 

Miller, Dean 


48 

370 

Murakomi, P. 



376 


156 

194 

388 

Pouley, C. 



120 

Popkema, J. 

36 

143 

Rench, D. 



377 

Miller, Deonno 



126 

Murbach, D. 



187 

O'Callaghan, P. 


371 

Pauley, S. 


142 

242 

Popoff, N. 

36 

158 

Renfro, J. 



206 



252 

380 

Murdoch, T. 


46 

145 

O'Connor, R. 


181 

392 

Pouley, V. 


148 

323 

367 

386 

390 

Rennilson, L. 

38 

146 

293 

Miller, Dick 



371 

Murken, J. 



129 

O'Connor, T. 



392 



326 

376 

Poppe, D. 


273 

Renshaw, R. 



143 

Miller, Gail 



252 

Murphy, A. 



146 

O'Doy, R. 



166 

Paulon, D. 


184 

309 

Porter, G. 


122 

Rensink, V. 


137 

375 

Miller, Gary 



183 

Murphy, J. 



371 

O'Dell, G. 


35 

193 

Poup, N. 



126 

Porter, M. 


137 

Repanich, J. 


188 

383 


398 






Repp, J. 120 285 

331 

361 

Ruble, K. 


143 

Scott, N. 39 41 

162 

283 

Smith, Jack 217 

366 

Stevens, R. 

188 368 

Tate, M. 

191 

Rettig, T. 


181 

Rucker, J. 38 

193 

350 

284 347 349 359 387 

390 

Smith, Jean 131 361 

363 

Stevens, R. 

188 368 

Taylar, D. 

41 368 

Reyholds, J. 


252 

Rudd, R. 

120 

329 

Scott, R. 



377 

Smith, Jeanne 

293 

Stewort, B. 

212 

Taylor, E. 

173 293 

Rheiner, S. 60 

282 

365 

Rudy, L 

38 

156 

Scott, R. 


174 

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Smith, Jimmy 

193 

Stewort, J. 

212 375 

Taylor, G. 

188 353 

Rhodes, J. 

37 

193 

Rufener, 8. 


193 

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146 

Smith, K. 

145 

Steword, M. 

152 

Taylor, H. 

63 

368 

387 

390 

Rufener, J. 


126 

Seamans, D. 



286 

Smith, Lorry 

375 

Stickley, K. 

144 

Taylor, L. 

126 

Rhodes, R. 


388 

Rufener, R. 


146 

Sebening, H. 


178 

226 

Smith, Lawrence 

40 

Stickney, J. 

181 367 386 

Taylor, Rosalie 

144 

Ribanyi, M. 


131 

Rulffes, W. 


172 

Seeley, J. 


170 

236 

Smith, Leonord 

40 

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45 369 


254 379 

Rich, D. 

236 

237 

Rundell, H. 284 

335 

379 

Segrest, F. 


170 

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Smith, Lyndo 148 

254 


387 390 

Taylor, Rass 

173 385 

Rich, M. 


60 

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143 

Seilstad, N. 



188 

Smith, Marcio 

143 

Steller, J. 

40 

Teal, G. 

179 

Rich, R. 


174 

Rusho, D. 39 189 

291 

372 

Seitz, R. 



178 

Smith, Morilee 

146 

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160 251 252 

Teel, R. 

181 

Richord, D. 


126 

Russel, J. 


190 

Seilstad, N. 


39 

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Smith, Mary J. 

40 

Still, M. 

302 

Tegler, J. 

118 363 

Richard, R. 168 

273 

360 

Russell, A. 

39 

372 

Selde, K. 



240 

Smith, Mary L. 

143 

Stockdale, W. 

158 360 378 

Tegner, B. 

131 

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38 

189 

Russell, D. 


188 

Sell, N. 



291 

242 

252 

Stocker, C. 

193 296 

Telford, H. 

70 

Richards, R. 

156 

252 

Russell, G. 


39 

Senne, S. 



252 

Smith, P. 40 134 

239 

Stockman, D. 

40 185 

Temples, J. 

124 

Richardson, A. 


128 

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61 

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Smith, Pep 309 

310 

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144 

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126 


290 

306 

Russell, Joe 


112 

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39 

143 

Smith, Richord F. 

185 

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40 152 

Terry, D. 

48 370 

Richardson 8. 

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381 

Russell, Linda 


134 

Seth, T. 


92 

173 

Smith, Richord H. 

89 

Staff el, S 37 40 133 279 

Terry, S. 

118 361 

Richordson, D. 

138 

290 

Russell, Loretta 


148 


286 382 

387 

315 

338 

281 299 

300 302 306 

Theige, D. 

372 

302 

326 

362 

Russell, T. 


183 

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48 

370 

Smith, Richard Horace 

40 

323 

334 358 393 

Thomas, G. 

41 164 

Richordson G. 


38 

Ruud, J. 


131 

Shaffer, D. 

39 

128 

363 

Smith, Rogene 

146 

Stoffer, R. 

181 342 346 

Thomos, Jeonette 

144 

Richordson, K. 


369 

Ryan, S. 


122 

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389 

Smith, Roger 

170 

Stoller, A. 

173 

Thomas, Jo. 

137 290 

Richardson, P. 

161 

308 

Rygg, M. 

132 

311 

Shah, K. 



373 

Smith, Sheila 143 361 

378 

Stolp, 8. 

148 369 378 

Thomos, N. 

128 

Richert, R. 

38 

160 




Shannon, M. 


138 

282 

Smith, Stephen 40 89 

Stone, C. 

229 

Thomas, P. 

144 

Richey, S. 

38 

138 

S 





313 

361 

90 92 

153 

Stone, E. 

81 

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76 

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38 

162 

Soori, A. 47 131 

281 

292 

Sherman, E. 


161 

336 

Smith, Wallace 173 

374 

Stone, L. 

349 392 

Thompson, C. H. 

383 

Richmond, F. 

236 

237 

Sackett, V. 


152 



338 

379 

Smith, William 

48 

Stoneman, J. 

188 

Thompson, Clifford 

4? 

Richmond, S. 


374 

Sodoff, F. 


282 

Sharp, 8. 

39 

134 

362 

Smythe, L. 

144 

Stoneroad, J. 

132 

Thompson, D. 

183 

Riddell, M. 


131 

Sager, S. 

129 

306 


363 369 

385 

Snell, G. 

38 

Storment, G. 

93 346 

Thompson, George 

374 

Rider, F. 


156 

Sagerser, J. 


254 

Shatila, H. 

39 45 

372 

Snelson, M. 

179 

Storie, J. 

217 

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216 

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173 

Saiegh, N. 


143 



373 

387 

Sniff, E. 

371 

Stormshak, F. 

153 342 

Thompson, l. 

303 

Ridgeway, R. 


188 

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387 

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175 

Snodgrass, F. 

218 


343 348 350 

Thompson, James 

162 

Ridpath, D. 131 

242 

292 

Saint Clair, M. 


134 

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254 

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295 

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202 370 

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144 

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137 

305 

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129 

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72 

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174 

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76 

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188 

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119 

351 

Sailer, V. 

135 

374 

Shaw, J. 


39 

148 

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120 

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254 365 

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144 

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121 

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143 

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184 

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392 

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188 

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124 

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39 

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380 

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372 

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146 


184 282 304 

89 90 

112 387 

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124 

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134 

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385 

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90 132 338 

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38 

179 

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111 

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132 

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120 

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40 47 177 

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137 306 

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179 

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166 

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127 

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254 

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190 333 

Thornton, R. 

164 

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143 

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384 

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39 45 

143 

Solberg, J. 144 

378 

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144 

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41 

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168 

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184 

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129 

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310 

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371 

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41 


213 

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188 

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39 

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131 

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131 

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40 352 

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176 383 

Robbinson, R. 


38 

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39 

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101 

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166 


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336 

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143 

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41 184 

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81 

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173 

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Taepel, S. 

148 

Robinson, K. 


148 

Schick, E. 


170 



303 

312 

Spille, J. 

173 

Subra, R. 

40 385 

Taeves, W. 

392 

Robinson, R. 


158 

Schick, L. 


170 

Sieveke, S. 


133 

307 

Sprague, W. 40 

379 

Suckow, F. 

190 

Togawa, P. 

376 

Robison D. 


190 

Schierman, W. 


155 

Sievers, S. 



122 

Spray, M. 146 

242 

Suhodolnik, M. 

41 

Tolonen, D. 

188 

Robison, E. 


114 

Schildt, R. 


178 

Silvernail, J. 



182 

Springer, J. 148 

293 


120 288 

Tomaras, 8. 194 

229 290 

Rackom, J. 


188 

Schiller, B. 


134 

Silzel, S. 



133 

Springer, S. 

170 

Sulgrove, 8. 

127 

Tomazin, P. 

126 

PftHemnn (i 

38 45 

Schilling, D. 

39 

188 

Simanton, V. 



132 

Sprow, A. 144 

392 

Summers, W. 

353 

Tomtan, T. 41 97 

189 227 

163 368 390 


251 

252 

Simchuk, G. 

166 

226 

310 

Spry, J. 45 

371 

Sundberg, D 

109 389 

Tomlinson, J. 

255 363 

Rndaers. L. 135 262 

361 

Schillinger, F. 

39 

366 

Simmons, M. 



291 

Srail, J. 173 

252 

Sundquist, G. 

41 193 

Tompkins, D. 92 

155 290 

Roetcisoender, 8. 

38 97 

Schillinger, J. 

366 

389 

Simmons, S. 



128 

Stack, A. 

121 

Sunich, P. 

150 

Toney, J. 

148 

98 101 

182 

290 

Schink, D. 

174 

353 

Simons, D. 



148 

Stackhouse, E. 47 

316 

Sutherlond, J. 

204 

Tonnes, J. 

188 

D 188 348 

351 

Schink, W. 

45 

252 

Simpson, Charles 


188 

Stackpole, J. 

166 

Sutton, G. 

175 290 

Tonkin, J. 

182 

PahpI Kyi 


143 

Schmalbeck, M. 


323 

Simpson, Claude 


56 

Staeber, N. 

289 


304 365 388 

Topping, G. 

374 

auyci, *vi. 

Rogers, J. 


273 

Schmella, E. 


143 

Simpson, D. 



143 

Stafford, N. 144 

381 

Svenson, G. 

41 145 

Torchio, L. 

204 


38 

126 

Schmedding C. 


124 

Simpson, Jack 



156 

Stahl, R. 

191 

Svinth, C. 

68 

Torgerson, R. 

189 215 

Royci o, <»»• 

Rogers, S. 


351 

Schmeil, P. 


188 

Simpson, John 



40 

Stairs, G. 40 45 108 

350 

Svinth, D. 

190 


252 290 

Roh If, L 


148 

Schmick, Sharon 


120 

Simpson, M. 



44 

Stalder, P. 144 293 

299 

Svinth, J. 

132 

Tostenrude, L. 

378 

Rohlman, D. 


38 

Schmick, Stanley 


178 

Simpson, P. 


138 

311 

302 305 

382 

Swoin, J. 

41 97 

Toth, B. 

122 252 

Rnhrer B J 

128 

295 

Schmidt, A. 


174 

Simpson, R. 


40 

188 

Stalder, R. 

193 


101 111 374 


286 379 

rvuiii cp , u. j* 

Rajan V* 


146 

Schmidt, B. 

148 

393 



372 

390 

Staley, L. 

144 

Swain, L. 

145 

Tousley, R. 

82 373 

Rolla/j. 


124 

Schmidt, L. 

176 

377 

Simpson, S. 


120 

242 

Stambaugh, J. 

190 

Swonson, Corol 33 41 128 

Tower, Lee 

188 

Rolph H. 


193 

Schmidt, Margie 


131 



273 

304 

Stambaugh, R. 

190 

280 299 

300 358 384 

Tower, Lynn 

170 

Rolfs, T. 

155 

393 

Schmidt, Mario 

193 

249 

Sinclair, M 



329 

Stanford, E 

383 

Swanson, Charles 382 

Tozer, D. 

173 

Romain, L. 

129 

304 

Schmidt, Myron 


193 

Singleton, W. 


367 

386 

Standol, J. 184 

293 

Swanson, D. 

173 

Tramm, B. 

368 

Romaneschi, K. 


160 

Schmidt, R. 

349 

352 

Siple, V. 



380 

337 360 

379 

Swanson. F. 40 90 166 354 

Tranum, D. 

41 185 

Romney, G. 


80 

Schmidt, T. 


39 

Sire, J. 



375 

Stanley, D. 

292 

Swansan, G. 

161 

Tranum, J. 

185 202 

Ronhaar, P. 


222 

Schmidt, W. 

184 

384 

Sire M. 



375 

Stanton, P. 40 

134 

Swason, L. 

160 383 

Tropp, E. 

161 

Ronsonville, G. 


367 

Schmitt, B. 


363 

Sisler. D. 40 89 90 

168 

Starbuck, D. 

189 

Swanson, Mariarie 127 

Trapp, O. 

182 251 

Rnnt 1 . 


122 

Schneider, J. 

39 

128 

Sjaboen, R. 


347 

350 

Starkel, M. 97 

101 


303 307 330 

Tropp, V. 

42 182 

Rnnt R 350 352 

392 


306 

382 

Siolander, A. 



152 

Start, E. 

168 

Swanson, My ran 168 346 

Travis, M. 

121 290 

Rnrpv L. 


384 

Schaeff, J. 


145 

Skeen, D. 



188 

Startup, W. 169 170 

389 

Swanson, P. 

124 389 

Treadwell, J. 

119 

Rase, R. 38 45 

347 

Scholl, S. 


125 

Skinner, C. 



78 

Stoudt, A. 

371 

Swanson, R. 

318 

Trefren, M. 148 

361 393 

Rasellini. A. 5152 77 

296 

Schomaker, T. 


143 

Skinner, Larry 



291 

Stauffer, M. 

124 

Swart, 

144 293 

Treider, N. 

137 305 

Rose Mini, Mrs. A. 


50 

Schomer. J. 

168 

230 

Skinner, Leona 


133 

242 

Stavely, D. 204 

216 

Swartwood, J. 

41 153 

Tressler, C. 

392 

Rosencrants, 1. 


371 

Schoonover. Reed 39 97 98 

Skinstad, J. 



62 

Stead, R. 

393 

342 

343 345 347 

Trimble, J. 146 

310 381 

Rosenkilde, C. 


45 

Schoonover. Roland 

352 

Skouge, J. 

291 

325 

326 

Stearns, E. 

170 


350 354 359 

Triplett, P. 

290 390 

188 

291 

392 

Schorzmon. D. 


152 

Skylstod, M. 



188 

Stecher, D. 168 

348 

Swedberg, W. 

353 

Traeh, C. 

135 

Rosenauist. D. 38 90 92 

Schreiber. 8. 148 351 

377 

Slack,C. 


40 

164 

Stedham, M. 

370 

Sweatt, G. 

284 

Trolson, M. 

144 382 

162 346 

347 

392 

Schroeder, H. 


173 

Slater, S. 



132 

Stedman, J. 

40 

Sweeney, M. 

40 144 

Tromley, R. 

189 

Rosland, E. 173 

375 

392 

Schroeder, L. 

156 

216 

Slezak, D. 



170 

Stedman, K. 

170 

Sweet, B. 

145 

Trout, S. 

166 

Roslund, J. 

38 

189 

Schroedel, T. 161 

350 

384 

Slichter, S. 

45 

143 

305 

Steen, K. 

40 

Swendsen, D. 

174 

Trotter, D. 

173 305 

Rndund S 


388 

Schulberg, D. 


143 

Sloan, M. 

145 

291 

306 

Steen, R. 189 

309 

Swent, B 

178 


360 367 

AU3IUNVJ, 

Rass B 

118 

285 

Schuller, L. 

184 

309 

Slocum, R. 


175 

392 

Steer, G. 366 

373 

Swenson, K. 

45 

Trueblaod, P. 

128 285 

Ross Diane 


124 

Schulthess, A. 


132 

Slocum, W. 



70 

Stegman, W. 

383 

Swenson, M 

62 282 

Trunkey, D. 

155 282 

Ross Donna 


124 

Schultz, G. 


170 

Slothower 


40 

366 

Steiger, W. 

350 


292 294 

Tucker, A. 

193 

Ross James 

189 

202 

Schultz, J. 

176 

308 

Smart, D. 



213 

Steigner, G. 131 

251 

Swenson, S. 

68 

Tucker, J. 42 

138 285 


220 

223 

Schultz, L. 


148 

Smasne, F. 



137 

252 303 

379 

Swerin, K. 

337 

Tucker, T. 

42 

Ross, Judy 


143 

Schultz, T. 


176 

Smasne, M 


124 

377 

Stein, J. 144 

252 

Sybrant, G. 

182 

Turkington, D. 

42 168 

Ross' L. 


143 

Schumacker, D. 


176 

Smids, 1. 



134 

Steiner, R. 159 

255 

Syck, 

148 381 

Turnbow, R. 

42 184 

Ross, M. 

134 

291 

Schuster, C. 124 

351 

377 

Smiley, W. 


168 

384 

Steinmetz, D. 

144 

Syvrud, R. 

370 


336 379 

Ross, R. 


170 

Schuster, J. 

133 

303 

Smith, A. K. 

143 

254 

285 

Stennes, G. 189 296 

308 

Y 


Turner, 8. 

144 351 

Roth, D. 38 

372 

390 

Schutter, R. 


173 

Smith, A. R. 



40 

Stephan, R. 40 

182 

I 


Tuten, M. 

120 

Roth, S. 143 

362 

378 

Schutzman, M. 39 

127 

306 

Smith, C 90 

135 

265 

307 

Stephens, S. 

289 

Tahmazian, E. 

184 372 

Tufty, H. 

173 

Rothrock, F. 

121 

254 

Schuy, D. 


45 

Smith, D 



193 

Stephenson, D 89 252 

387 


373 387 

Twibell, D. 

227 

Roundtree, C. 


138 

Schwab. M. 


98 

Smith, Dixie 

45 

131 

282 

Stephenson, G 

375 

Taipale, R. 

40 156 350 

Tye, D. 

155 

Rounsaville, O. 


143 

Schwisow, D. 183 346 

378 

Smith, Douglas 


188 

Stephenson, N 179 

309 

Talbott, W. 

153 

Tye, H. 

154 

Rautson, R. 


350 

Schy, A. 

39 

158 



234 

368 

Stephenson, S. T. 

56 

Tampien, A. 

144 



Rowe, R. 

367 

386 

Scott, D. 


143 

Smith, E. 


156 

216 

Sterba, B. 

144 

Tandy, C. 

166 

u 


Rowell, R. 


163 

Scott, G. 


179 

Smith, G. D. 



56 

Stetler, D. 

146 

Tonzer, P. 

41 182 

Udell, C. 42 47 174 

Rowley, D. 

38 

152 

Scott, K. 

39 

369 

Smith. Gretchen 


143 

Stevens, C. 

126 

Tarbet, J. 

290 373 


282 359 

Ruark, K. 135 

254 

289 

Scott, Janet 


39 



312 

363 

Stevens, E. 177 205 

207 

Tarpenning, K. 

144 

Unman, B. 37 42 139 

Rubenser, R. 

153 

236 

Scott. Joyce 


63 

Smith, H. 


80 

239 

Stevens, J. 

254 

Tate, J. 

41 368 


344 305 


399 






Ullock, C. 

144 

Ulrich, M. 

45 

Undeberg, O. 

230 

Underwood, K. 

174 

Unger, K. 

131 

Upham, M. 

Upper, C. 

326 

42 175 

Upshaw, M. 

42 189 

Uptagraft, B. 42 

114 367 

Urdahl, Dr. & Mrs. 

378 

Urness, P. 

42 

Usher, J. 

155 

Uthmann, R. 

252 

Ulterback, S. 

126 

Utzmon, G. 

178 

V 

Vadnais, D. 163 

372 387 

Valen, J. 127 

242 363 

Valentine, R. 

370 

Vallandigham, V. 

254 384 

Von Ackere, M. 

42 177 

Von Antwerp, E. 

191 
284 388 

Van Ausdle, K. 

144 

Van Beek, K. 

42 189 

Van Bevers, J. 

144 273 

305 

313 361 

Vande Brake, J. 

42 

144 305 

Vender Griend, S. 

148 

Vandervort, L. 

166 

Vandeveer, A. 

120 

Van Doren, L. 

122 260 

Van Dusen, S. 

133 

Vang, E. 

159 

Van Gelder, W. 

42 170 

Van Hersett, D. 

191 

Van Horn, G. 

230 232 

Van Leuven, D. 

101 349 

Van Leuven, R. 

170 

Vannoy, G. 

155 309 

Vanouek, J. 

42 163 

Von Treose, D. 

193 

Van Vleck, J. 

292 

Van Well, T. 

42 182 

Van Winkle, R. 

124 

361 

382 392 

Van Woerden, D. 

177 

Vasudev, A. 

373 

Vatnsdal, M. 

42 47 
127 303 

Veoch, N. 42 47 

127 303 

Veach, W. 

255 

Veenhuizen, E. 42 47 97 

153 282 

346 348 

Veenhuizen, J. 

164 

Veith, L. 

184 

Venema, W. 

254 350 

Verhey, D. 

211 

Vessey, J. 

170 

Vickery, A. 

190 

Viebrock, C. 

168 

Viele, J. 

131 314 

Vik, L. 

144 273 

Villaescusa, F. 

368 

Vimont, J. 

42 

Vimant, L. 

42 

Virtue, A. 

42 168 

Vitums, Voldis 

189 216 

Vitums, Vitolds 

189 

Vockert, W. 

371 

Voegtlin, C. 

334 

Vog, W. 

348 

Vogel, E. 

188 

Vogel, R. 

42 189 

Vogelsong, R. 

286 

Vogl, A. 
Valgelman, R. 

173 374 

42 170 

Volkman, D. 

188 

Voile, F. 

61 

Vollmer, D. 

134 257 

293 361 

362 379 

Von Gortler, J. 

43 90 
325 366 

Vostral, H. 43 47 153 

308 346 347 359 

W 

Wacker, J. 45 

170 251 

252 

292 378 

Wagor, V. 

179 251 

Wagener, L. 

133 292 

Wagner, B. 

60 

Wagner, H. 

378 

Wagner, J. 

144 

Wagner, K. 

148 

Wagner, R. 

166 370 

Wanid-ul-hamid, S. 

348 

Wahl, G. 

43 144 

Wakefield, D. 

148 378 

Wakin, J. 

145 

Walby, A. 

176 

Walden, L. 

122 

Wallace, D. 

144 

Wallbridge, P. 

164 286 

Wallenmeyer, D. 

351 

Wolling, R. 

138 382 

Walter, D. 170 236 360 

Walter, T. 

189 

Walters, D. 

251 

Walther, D. 

185 

Walton, K. 

131 292 

Ward, Dennis 

376 

Ward, Dick 

191 

Ward, Jack 48 

110 370 

Ward, James 

48 370 

Ware, D. 

36B 

Warnke, R. 

361 

Warwick, D. 

252 

Warwick, R. 

161 

Watson, Cal 

335 

Watson, Carolyn 

137 351 
389 

Watson, J. 

43 166 
292 293 

Watt, K. 

168 372 


Watt, W. 

166 

336 

338 

Watts, A. 


290 

322 



323 

386 

Watts, R. 



371 

Watts, W. 



293 

Webb, R. 

43 

156 

368 

Webber, N. 



353 

Webber, R. 

43 

366 

389 

Weber, D. 



166 

Weber, Jacob 

43 

173 

354 

Weber, Jon 


122 

255 

Weber,M. 



138 

Webert, D. 



371 

Webster, J. 



242 

Webster, K. 



190 

Webster, N. 


43 

144 


252 

254 

379 

Weeks, D. 



161 

Weeks, S. 

128 

307 

310 

Wegner, D. 

135 

254 

379 

Weger, E. 



48 

Wehe, D. 


121 

312 

Weinrich, B. 


43 

168 

Weintraub, P. 



188 

Weir, J. 



61 

Weissenborn, A. 


120 

Weiss, A. 



379 

Weiss, E. 



378 

Weiss, Marie 



146 

Weiss, Mary 


131 

254 

Weiss, R. 

43 

170 

368 

Weitz,C. 



148 

Welch, J. 



166 

Welch, M. 

159 

309 

369 

Weld, V. 


113 

372 

Weldin, F. 

152 

308 

360 

Weldin, J. 43 

173 

366 

373 

Welle, A. 


182 

366 

Weller, H. 


75 

386 

Weller, J. 



144 

Weller, R. 



204 

Wellington, R. 



183 

Wells, D. 


79 

226 

Welsh, M. 

146 

242 

332 

Wendt, R. 


92 

291 

Wene, S. 



366 

Wentz, E. 


127 

303 

Werkau, 



118 

Werner, C. 


121 

293 

Wesen, L. 



173 

West, V. 


212 

236 

Westbrook, P. 


43 

131 

Westcott, S. 


144 

242 

Westby, B. 



118 

Westrum, L. 



45 

Westaver, D. 


43 

388 

Wexler, F. 


184 

309 

Whotley, E. 



156 

Wheeler, R. 


334 

350 

Wheeler, V. 

152 

215 

336 



338 

379 

White, C. 


144 

378 

White, D. 



368 

White, J. 


174 

292 

White, Larry 


43 

336 


338 

379 

White, Lorene 



135 

White, Richard 



60 

White, Robert 



43 

White, S. 



146 

Whitehouse, J. 


133 

307 




323 

Whiting, G. 

43 

1B1 

202 


230 

232 

233 

Whitmore, Darrel, 


218 

Whitmore, Doris 


144 

Whitney, D. 



252 

Whitney, F. 


281 

291 



326 

366 

Whitney,S. 


122 

304 

Whitten, L. 



131 

Whyatt, F. 


43 

157 

Wick, G. 



372 

Wicker, E. 

45 

334 

350 

Wicker, M. 


144 

242 

Wicks, G. 



191 

Widby, J. 



190 

Widmork, H. 


185 

216 

Widdows, T. 



170 

Widmann, A. 



144 

Widmann, M. 



137 

Widmark, H. 


185 

216 

Wiedemann, P. 


164 

310 




383 

Wieland, B. 



145 

Wieland, D. 


132 

310 

Wiesen, B. 


162 

Wigen, M. 


127 

242 

Wilber, S. 

43 99 

145 



215 

242 

Wilcox, G. 



137 

Wilcox, M. 


127 

293 



303 

337 

Wilcox, S. 


124 

271 

Wildey, R. 


251 

252 

Wildin, C. 



293 

Wile, D. 



379 

Wiles, E. 



137 

Wilgus, G. 



188 

Wilkins, B. 

43 45 

188 

Wilkins, J. 



148 

Williams, A. 

144 

286 

302 



362 

379 

Williams, B. 



144 

Williams, G. 



138 

Williams, H. 

89 90 

349 

Williams, James 
Williams, Jimmie 

48 

370 


56 

Williams, John 



369 

Williams, N 

43 

120 

239 

Willioms, R. 



170 

Williams, W. 



173 

Wililamson, A. 


92 

212 

Williamson, H. 



134 

Williamson, J. 

43 

148 

377 




392 

Williamson, R. 



43 


Willms, D. 

170 

Wills, B. 

43 148 305 

Wills, P. 

363 

Wilson, B. 

120 306 325 


334 382 391 

Wilson, David J. 92 205 

Wilson, David O. 176 

Wilson, Dwight 156 

Wilson, G. 

283 316 

Wilson, J. 

158 

Wilson, K. 

110 

Wilson, R. 

392 

Wiltse, J. 

178 

Windham, R. 

202 206 230 


232 233 

Windus, W. 

152 310 

Wineck, E. 

43 173 

Wing, R. 

170 252 374 

Wingfield, N. 

126 

Wininger, J. 

177 

Winiecki, K. 

137 

Winslett, C. 

135 

Winter, M. 

90 92 

Winters, W. 

45 

Winthers, K. 

144 

Wioppelt, J. 

368 

Wiswall, B. 

131 351 363 


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Wifheraw, M. 

188 

Witkowski, C. 

144 

Woerner, S. 

118 273 

Wojt, C. 

378 

Woit, R. 

190 

Wold, K. 

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Wold, N. 

375 

Wolf, D. 

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Waif, L. 

212 

Wolfe, M. 

138 

Wolter, J. 

137 

Womack, S. 

137 295 

Wong,A. 

376 

Wong, P. 

173 

Wong,S. 

388 

Woo, B. 

43 181 305 


368 387 

Woo, G. 

181 

Wood, A. 

43 375 

Wood, B. 

155 393 

Wood, K. 

144 323 

Wood, L. 

90 138 

Wood, M. 

144 381 

Wood, Pat 

188 292 

Wood, Pryor 

170 

Wood, Rex 

43 

Wood, Ron 

173 366 

Wood, S. 

144 

Woodbridge 

353 

Woods, J. B. 

234 

Woods, J. E. 

166 

Woods, R. 43 

193 278 316 

Woodward, D. 

227 

Woodward, G. 

118 302 

Woodward, J. 

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Woodward, S. 

178 

Woody, P. 

134 

Working, E. 

72 

Worley, R. 

178 

Worthington, R. 308 315 

Worth, M. 

189 252 383 

Wright, Richard 175 

Wright, Ray 

48 

Wulff, J. 

183 

Wulff, L. 

152 

Wunderlich, D. 

168 273 


282 290 367 

Wynecoop, R. 

43 166 

Wynn, J. 

146 

Wyrick, R. 

168 291 312 

Y 


Yambra, M. 

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Yates, J. 

310 364 

Yates, Robert 

371 

Yates, Ruth 

126 

Yates, W. 

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Yeager, C. 

28 

Yeager, T. 

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Yeend, W. 43 

45 193 375 

Yenney, M. 

44 

Yenter, P. 

138 306 

Yoder, R. 

168 202 236 

Yoshino, R. 

286 

Yost, J. 44 

45 145 175 

Young, D. 

170 

Young, G. 

173 

Young, K. 

137 326 

Young, Lean 

B9 170 

Young, Leonard 69 384 

Young, O. 

376 

Young, P. 

337 379 

Young, Robert 

44 89 248 


336 379 

Young,Ruth 

144 351 

Young, T. 

181 368 

Yaungquist, V. 

153 348 

Z 


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Zahniser, F. 

101 372 

Zediker, G. 44 

99 138 273 

Zeeben, J. 

47 

Zehm, L. 

43 162 

Zehnder, C. 

193 381 

Zellen, J. 

148 

Zeller, R. 

153 

Zemp, D. 

178 330 331 


332 384 386 

Ziegler, A. 

138 

Ziegler, N. 

126 305 

Ziegwied, G. 

173 234 

Zillar, J. 

173 251 

Zimmerman, A. 

127 294 


304 

Zion, H. 

61 

Zobrist, F. 

153 

Zuppe, R. 

183 

Zurcher, E. 

190 

Zwicker, G. 

182 371 


This Was 

All That Was Left ... 

This was all that was left to be done—the closing and printing of 
the final section of the book. With this closing a final word of 
appreciation from the editor is voiced to the many who toiled to 
make this book a reality. The staff members who gave up leisure and 
study time to help out in a rushed period . . . the students and faculty 
who found it necessary to work with the staff on mutual problems 
. . . the crews at the engravers and printers who toiled into the 
summer past many of their planned vacation times. To these go 
parting thanks. 



THE PRESSES ROLL on the lost part of Chinook to be printed in Deers 
press room. 

COLOPHON: 

The Deers Press, Seattle, printed 4,750 copies of the 1958 Chinook 
on production gloss paper, a high-grade white enamel. Printing 
ended in August with the annuals mailed from the printers. Type 
faces are all Spartan, a modern sans serif type. 

The S. K. Smith company, Los Angeles, made the cover from aqua 
fabrikoid. The design was embossed and then silk screened in 
white, chartruse and fuchsia. Barbara Doutrich, Chinook layout mana¬ 
ger, designed and prepared art work for the cover. Opening section 
layout was designed by Norm Eng, a Chinook layout editor. Recog¬ 
nition goes to Wayne Fredeen and Tom Opstad for colored trans¬ 
parencies used in the four-color work. 

This year's budget approximated $41,000—some $31,000 from 
voluntary book sales and the rest from space sales. The staff ranged 
from 200 to nearer 100 by the close of school. Editorial and busi¬ 
ness phases were carried out by the staff under the guidance of 
Maynard Hicks and Bert Alward, editorial and financial advisers, 
respectively. 

Over 1,275 copper engravings, 133 screen, were made by Western 
Engraving and Colortype company, Seattle. The bulk of the photo¬ 
graphy was done by College Photo, under Bob Bullis' direction. How¬ 
ever, Evergreen assistance—and Ben Cook's help in particular— 
should be recognized for filling in rough spots. Portrait pictures were 
taken by Midway Photo Shop, Hutchison and Fine Arts studios 
at the individual's expense. 


400