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CHINOOK 1984 

Washington State University 
Volume 85 


1984 / Opening 1 



































r r 





X 


"Outside, even through 
the shut window pane, 
the world looked cold... 
and though the sun was 
shining and the sky a 
harsh blue, there 
seemed to be no color 


During the late 1800's, Herbert Spencer, a found¬ 
ing father of Sociology, said that society must be 
free from the meddling of governments. “When 
once you begin to interfere with the order of Na¬ 
ture there Is no knowing where the result will end." 
Spencer believed that government intervention 
would lead to the progressive deterioration of the 
human race. 

In 1949, George Orwell echoed almost the same 
message in his novel. 1984 . He created life in the 
character of Winston Smith, a man caught within a 
distorted world, where every life was held in the 
grip of the governing power. 


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2 Opening /1984 
























1984 /Opening 3 















Putnam 


In writing this novel, Orwell launched the yea* 
1984 into the history books. It ranks among the most 
famous dates of our time, having a popularity worl¬ 
dwide. The novel, which has always been a recog¬ 
nized literary success, reached astromonical 
heights once again as the top selling book of 1984. 

Each person, who reads of the world of Big 
Brother and Newspeak, takes Orwell’s message dif¬ 
ferently. Some, who read the book, see it as a 
foreshadowing of an ominous future. Others simply 
shake their heads, chuckle, and forget it the mo¬ 
ment they close the back cover. 


4 Opening /1984 




















1984 /Opening 5 


Putnam 



















6 Opening /1984 










"The solid world exists, its 
laws do not change. 
Stones are hard, water is 
wet, objects unsup¬ 
ported fall toward the 
earth’s center.” 




Whether Orwell meant 1984 to be a prediction of 
the future, or not, the fact remains that the year is 
upon us. We are the Winston Smith's of today; we 
are the generation of 1984. 

We cannot superimpose our society into Orwell's 
Oceania. The resemblance does not hold up. This 



1984 / Opening 7 

























Burke 



“Of course he chanted 
with the rest: it was im- 
k possible to do other¬ 
wise.” 

is not to say, however, that 1984 holds no lessons to 
leam. One of Orwell’s main points is an issue we 
must ultimately face...one that deals with the ties 
that interconnect the future with the past. 

Orwell stressed the need to remember the past, 
Instead of letting it drift away. He also urged that 































10 Opening/1984 


Salsbury 















X 




“Who controls the past, 
controls the future: Who 
controls the present, 
controls the past." 


the future be looked upon with a certain sense of 
skepticism. To take the future with a blind faith, 
never buying insurance for our goals, is a very 
dangerous way to live. 

We. the present college generation, are at the 
threshold to the “real" world, whatever that may 
become to each of us. The time which we spend 
within the security of the educational womb will 
soom leave the realm of the present and join with 
the other memories of our past. We must not forget 
the lessons we learned during these happy days of 
brotherhood and folly. We must not push them 
away into the shadows of our minds. 


1984/Opening 11 











12 Opening/1984 




















Ahola 


Our past holds a montage ot the friends we 
made, the lovers we met, and the relationships we 
took part in. We were children when we arrived, 
and as the years quickly passed, our lives blos¬ 
somed and bore fruit. We will emerge from this 
fortress a new people, no longer fhe innocent and 
naive babes we once were. 


“He was alone. The past 
was dead, the future was 
unimaginable.” 


1984 /Opening 13 












enter 


Our sights are pointed toward the future. We look 
to ourselves in twenty years and like what we see. 
We have plans and goals that we want to fulfill. We 
will let nothing stand in our way. This Is a nice 
dream, but let us not look forward wilh blinders 
strapped to our heads. The world is a land of rain¬ 
bow chasing, and sometimes, the gold at the other 
end has already been spent. We must fight for whal 
is to come, not simply lie back and await its arrival. 


Ahola 



“To know and not to 
know ... to use logic 
against logic... to forget 
whatever it was neces¬ 
sary to forget...” 


14 Opening /1984 













1984 /Opening 15 


Warfel 






































“To the future or to the 
past, to a time when 
thought is free, when 
men are different from 
one another and do not 
live alone-From the age 
of uniformity, from the 
age of solitude, from the 
age of Big Brother ... 
greetings!" 


The time Is now. We are the children of 1984. We 
will remember the past, we are the present, and we 
will make the future. 



Ahola 



















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CONSTANTINE CHERNENKO GLENN JENKINS 


DAVID LEE ROTH JULIE COLLINS 


ADOLF HITLER AARON CHOI 



Big Brother 
is Watching 

You 


As 1984 passes, George Orwell 
must be spinning in his grave. 
Throughout the Western world, a 
substantial segment of the media, 
academia, and common citizenry are 
gearing up to “appreciate” his ideas 
and assure the rest of the world that 
“There will never be a 1984 in 
Orwell’s sense.” After everybody has 
gotten over the novelty of his ideas, 
however, and ceased to speculate as to 
what particular details of life in 1984 
match those in 1984, they will realize 
that, at the present, Orwell would 
have sufficient cause to don his war 
fatigues and roll up his sleeves. 

Through Orwell’s field glasses, the 
globe by 1984 is supposed to be 


TOM SELLECK 


MARK A. CHAPMAN 


DAN RATHER 


JIM VAN COOTEN MR. T 


TIMOTHY DEWITT 





20 Expressions /1984 




















RICHARD NIXON MARCEL DESRANLEAU DENG XIAPENG JIMMY J. LEE 


dominated by three interchangeable 
superpowers who are continually at 
war. All three battle with each other in 
order to keep their subjects in a state 
of political frenzy and to insure per¬ 
petual rule over them. Humanity is 
caste in fear and distrust, characte¬ 
rized by probing two-way telescreens, 
truth erasing “memory holes”, and 
brutal thought police. The official 
language, Newspeak, fabricates real¬ 
ity to suit the party platform. The 
masses dwell in unthinkable poverty 
and constant terror, always under the 
thoughtful eye of their loving and 
omniscient leader, “Big Brother.” 

George Orwell, born in India and 
schooled in England, wrote his novel 


in 1948 and published it in 1949, dur¬ 
ing which time he was severely ill. Be¬ 
fore dying, one year after the publica¬ 
tion of 1984 , he said the book “would 
not have been so gloomy if I hadn’t 
been so ill.” Many will not read the 
book because it is so grim; others dare 
not read it a second time. Still others, 
perusing till the depressing end of the 
story, realize the book is worth a look 
even after the passing of the prophe¬ 
tic year. 

Historically speaking, the world 
during Orwell’s life should have 
seemed relatively safe from the boot 
of totalitarianism. The Alliance had 
recently crushed the imperialistic 
fascism of the Axis to end World War 


FIDEL CASTRO 


LEE FENTON BALD EAGLE 


MEGAN CAMPBELL 





ABRAHAM LINCOLN IAN YOUNG 


II. And with the end of the war, the 
United States rose to global military 
superiority, trumpeting its pledge to 
fashion a world safe for democracy. 

During World War II, however, 
Orwell saw an irresistible energy in 
the kind of sadism displayed by the 
Nazis that made totalitarian regimes, 
founded solely on power for their 
own sake, believable. Orwell also per¬ 
ceived, with brilliant clarity, the fu¬ 
ture costs, in security and in wealth, 
that the atomic billows over Japan 
would create for our generation. 

1984's protaganist, Winston Smith, 
works in the ministry of truth, which is 
the doublethink title of the ministry of 
propaganda. His job is to alter news 


JOAN CRAWFORD TR1CJA ELLIO'IT 



1984 / Expressions 21 















CLINT EASTWOOD STEVEN MIKKELSEN 

Big Brother 
is Watching 
You 

BOY GEORGE JOHN OTOOL 


GEORGE SCHULTZ HISAO SHITN1ZU 


items in the London Times, using the 
official language of the state, News- 
peak, so that no one will ever know the 
party line has changed, or that the 
current version of historical fact is a 
“rectification.” The language of 
Newspeak is designed to prevent peo¬ 
ple from thinking independently by 
limiting the language to a few official¬ 
ly approved words with reduced and 
precise meanings. In as much as peo¬ 
ple think in language, the diminished 
vocabulary makes it virtually impossi¬ 
ble to think a heretical thought. 

Today’s distressing trend is to an 
expanded, fanciful language, em¬ 
ploying large words and dead 
metaphors, which prevent thought 


LYNDON B. JOHNSON BRIAN LITTLE 


PAUL NEWMAN SABARINAH SH. AHMAD. 


rather than promote it. This techni¬ 
que allows the government to morally 
justify unjustifiable actions. “For as 
any self-respecting bureaucrat knows, 
it is bad form indeed to use a single, 
simple word when six or seven obfus¬ 
cating ones will do.” Orwell warns that 
by using cloudy images, worn out 
euphimisms, and large words, the 
reality language attempts to picture 
becomes muddled and confused. 

Bill Moyer, commentator for the 
CBS Evening News, reported that the 
United States State Department had 
eliminated “killing” from its vocabul¬ 
ary. “The unlawful or arbitrary de¬ 
privation of life” is used, instead. Lan¬ 
guage of this type smothers the reality 


CHEVY CHASE JEFF SCHAUB 


22 Expressions /1984 





















MICHAEL JACKSON BAIO FATIREQUN 


ALEXANDER HAIG 


TEE YEU TAN 


YARI ANDROPOV JEFF DAHLQUIST 



of killing as vicious and brutal, and 
links it with a petty or “arbitrary” act, 
affecting no one. 

The next time Larry Speaks refers 
to the U.S. bombing of defenseless vil¬ 
lages, in search of Salvadorian rebels, 
as “accidental bombings”, maybe the 
American people ought to know what 
accidental means. Is he saying that the 
bombardier accidentally tripped the 
lever reaching for his cocktail or does 
“accidental” mean the bombings were 
unfortunate but necessary? Could it 
be that the wrong harbors are being 
mined after all? It seems that the real 
danger lies in the mass of distortions 
that the government, with the help of 
language, passes off as truth. 


In Orwell’s 1984 , the Party uses 
organizations, such as the Junior 
Anti-Sex League, The Spies, and the 
Youth League, to effectively sever all 
loyalty between members of families 
and their lovers. This is in order to 
obtain complete commitment to the 
Party and its dogma. Even sex be¬ 
tween husbands and wives is control¬ 
led by indoctrinating women against 
the pleasures of sex. Copulation is a 
monthly duty to the Party members 
and nothing more. 

The only breeding done in 1984 is 
the breeding of a complete loyalty to 
an idea. Similar to religion, Party 
opinion is expressed in absolute 
claims. Doubt cannot exist because it is 


the fruit of reflection. To keep a cor¬ 
ner on the truth, dissent cannot be 
tolerated. Religious truth, or in 1984 , 
political truth, is absolute and its pos¬ 
session makes everything else unim¬ 
portant. Hence, religion never 
preaches the duty of critical thought 
or of searching or investigating sup¬ 
posed facts. Often the opposite is 
taught; we experience a narrowing of 
our perspective. In a certain sense, 
stupidity becomes a necessary condi¬ 
tion for life and growth. The spirit of 
truth-seeking dies from deprivation. 
The will to believe contrary to demon¬ 
strative evidence is often lauded as a 
religious virtue; in the Orwellian 
world of 1984 this is known as Doub- 


RONALD REAGAN JASEM AL-AMEERI 




JOHN F KENNEDY JEFFREY J. RYAN 


DAN MOON 


STING 



1984 / Expressions 23 



























Big Brother 
is Watching 
You 

lethink. It is the ability to hold and 
believe two contradictory ideas simul¬ 
taneously. 

With the end of independent 
thought and the corresponding 
evolution of truth, reality can be fabri¬ 
cated to any form and dimension the 
Party pleases. Man, with his insatiable 
need to be certain of his beliefs, be¬ 
comes, in an instant, ready to kill or be 
killed to uphold the version of truth 
he believes in. This belief, in 1984 , 
comes from the all powerful leader, 
Big Brother. 

Considering the fact that the 
persecution of heretics fills pages 
upon pages of our history books, this 
tendency to violently defend accus¬ 
tomed beliefs is not overly fantastical 
on Orwell’s part. Men are willing to 
burn others and to be burned them¬ 
selves over the question of whether 
they should cross themselves with one 
finger or two, or whether God is one 
person of various aspects, or three 
persons of one substance. 

The absolute character of religious 
claims, like the political claims of 
1984 , emphasizes sanctions of fear — 
the terrifying consequences of disbe¬ 
lief. An eternal lot of fire and brim¬ 
stone awaits the non-believer after 
death while on earth, dissidents die as 
martyrs for their refusal to follow con¬ 
ventional lines of thought. As history 
shows, martyrs that die for their cause 
demonstrate to those left behind that 
the belief or refusal to believe is worth 
dying for. Often, this strengthens the 
power of persuasion. 

The rulers of 1984 knew that to sus¬ 
tain their version of the truth, and 
thus continue their rule, no one could 


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die a martyr. Political subversives died 
for their heresy, or so the Party made 
it seem. In reality, they died through 
the use of torture and brainwashing. 
Worse than that, they died loving Big 
Brother and the Party. 

In Oceania, one of the three world 
superstates, Big Brother is synony¬ 
mous with God. Every success, every 
achievement, every victory, every sci¬ 
entific discovery, all knowledge, all 
wisdom, all happiness and all virtue 
are believed to come directly from his 
leadership and inspiration. He is the 
focal point for all affection and devo¬ 
tion. The principles of Ingsoc, War Is 
Peace, Freedom Is Slavery, and 
Ignorance Is Strength, are slogans of 
loyalty, as far as Party congregants are 
concerned. This loyalty depends 
upon the system of thought known as 
Doublethink. In 1984, Doublethink 
training is indispensable. 

In an effort to join a non-existent 
subversive organization committed to 
the defeat of the Party, Winston Smith 
obtains from an Inner Party Member, 
a copy of Goldstein's The Theory and 
Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism , 
which details the theology of the Prin¬ 
ciples of Ingsoc. Orwell incorporates 
two lengthy Goldstein extracts into 
1984 in an effort to warn what he 
thought was incipient totalitarianism 
in present day English Socialism. 
These extracts are considered some of 
Orwell’s best writing and are very 
readable, separate from the rest of the 
novel. 

In the first extract from Goldstein’s 
book, Orwell outlines the modern 
tragedy of the industrialized world. 
Man’s dream, since the beginning of 


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civilization, has been to have a society 
where all share a common lot with 
plenty to eat, shelter, and functional 
clothing for all types of outings. 

The society of perfect equality was 
simply a technical impossibility until 
the development of the steam engine 
during the 18th Century. It was then 
perceived by men, such as Karl Marx 
and Freidrich Engels, that with the aid 
of automation and power-driven 
machinery, man could eliminate dirt, 
illiteracy, and human drudgery with¬ 
in a couple of generations if the 
machinery was used to that end. But 
man’s dream of an “earthly paradise 
had been discredited at exactly the 
moment it became realizable.” 

Orwell perceived that the essential 
structure of society throughout the 
ages has never failed to reassert itself, 
even after seemingly irrevocable 
changes. A high, middle, and low class 
has always existed and the ambitions 
of the three continue to remain the 
same. The high class simply wishes to 
perpetuate its social station as long as 
possible, while the middle and the low 
classes strive to replace the high class. 
The middle class will often enlist the 
low class in a concerted effort to estab¬ 
lish justice and equality by overthrow¬ 
ing the high class through revolution. 
Then as soon as the new high class 
feels confident in its position, it will 
re-establish a new low class, but with 
more determination than its prede- 
ssessor did. Orwell notes that this 
“cyclical movement of history was now 
intelligible, or appeared to be so; and 
if it was intelligible then it was alter¬ 
able.” 

Thus with human equality now 


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24 Expressions /1984 

















1984 / Expressions 25 

































ft 



26 Expressions /1984 





























Big Brother 
is Watching 
You 

technically possible and the need for 
class distinctions having disappeared, 
the new rulers no longer strive for 
human equality but treat it as “a dan¬ 
ger to be averted.’' Goldstein says that 
looking over the last forty years, the 
new rulers differ from former rulers 
in that the newer rulers “were less 
avaricious, less tempted by luxury, 
hungrier for pure power, and above 
all, more conscious of what they were 
doing and more intent on crushing 
opposition. This last difference was 
cardinal.” 

In the second extract from Gold¬ 
stein’s book, Orwell explains the role 
of war in crushing opposition. From 
the onset of modern mechanization, 
the new industrial society has had one 
central problem: how to use up the 
surplus of goods produced by the 
machines without raising the stan¬ 
dard of living. “For if leisure and 
security were enjoyed by all alike, the 
great mass of human beings who are 
normally stupefied by poverty would 
become literate and would learn to 
think for themselves; and when once 
they had done this, they would sooner 
or later realize that the privileged 
minority had no function, and they 
would sweep it away.” Poverty and 
ignorance then, became necessary 
conditions for social stability. 

The new regime learned that the 
only way to restrict distribution of 
goods to the people in a “psychologi¬ 
cally acceptable way” was endless war. 
Endless war accomplishes the two¬ 
fold purpose of supressing the masses 
in ignorance, and equally important, 
in fear. The looming shadow of nuc¬ 
lear catastrophe strips man of his 






security in the world he lives in and 
prevails upon him moods of despair 
and hopelessness. Moreover, un¬ 
leashed defense spending sucks the 
national wealth out of the economy, 
producing products that never enter 
into the free market. Capital other¬ 
wise available to private enterprise is 
squandered on bigger and better mis¬ 
siles to keep those nasty REDS further 
away from the land of free thinking 
people. 

In 1984 , the superstates are utterly 
unconquerable and self-contained. 
War, now being continuous, has 
changed character. There is no milit¬ 
ary efficiency because the purpose of 
war is not to conquer each other but to 
conquer the excess of industrializa¬ 
tion. Nothing about the enemy is ever 
known, except that they are entirely 
responsible for all of earth’s evils. All 
acts of governmental perversion can 
be justified in the interest of defeating 
the enemy. The distracted multitude 
never looks beyond the surface of 
things. They believe what is told to 
them, and never search for any deep¬ 
er understanding. Orwell knew the 
real war waged is against the subjects 
of each superstate by the rulers to 
“keep the structure of society intact.’’ 
Thus continuous war and continuous 
peace are synonomous. War Is Peace. 

Winston now knew how but not 
why. His new found knowledge, 
however, helped none but his own 
curiosity, because Goldstein’s book 
was not written for rebel spirits like his 
own in the interest of the Brother¬ 
hood. The Brotherhood didn’t exist 
and Goldstein didn’t exist. The book 
was divinely inspired by Big Brother 


himself to expose weak Party Mem¬ 
bers. Good Party Members do not 
think for themselves but, with the 
help of intense doulblethink training, 
accept traditional conventions even in 
the face of evidence to the contrary. 
In low esteem are those who care 
enough about truth to think singular¬ 
ly about the world around them; they 
are a threat to stability, authority, and 
sanity. Those in lowest esteem, diabo¬ 
lical in nature and in ranks with the 
Devil, are those who not only question 
conventional lines of thought, but are 
willing to risk their own blood to dare 
instability. 

It is not hard to see, therefore, how 
the justifications and policies of some 
of the current superpowers were an 
inspiration for Orwell. Gorrupt poli¬ 
tical figures hold sway over the ignor¬ 
ant masses, hiding from them things 
as they really are. Governmental poli¬ 
cies benefit only those who are in pow¬ 
er and attempt to subordinate those 
who have none through ignorance 
and misrepresentation of the truth. 

Who is to say whether Orwell, in the 
writing of 1984 , was predicting life as 
we now know it, or decribing life as he 
saw it. What can be said, however, is 
that much of the horror found in 
1984 can be realized even in today’s 
civilized world. Although we cannot 
hold Orwell's book to be a doctrine of 
fact, we can, and must, take it as a 
reminder of the way of life we could 
be heading toward. 

by Paul Sweeny 


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1984 / Expressions 27 














sun 


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So Many Questions 


Which is real, 

And which is not? 

These things we claim to know. 


Ahola 


What is right, 

And what is wrong, 
And what is really so? 


28 Expressions /1984 










1984 / Expressions 29 
























30 Expressions /1984 


























1984 / Expressions 31 
















32 Expressions /1984 












Are there truths 
And more truths, 

One upon the other? 

Or do we just 
Deceive and lie, 

From one to another? 

Can we view 
With open eyes, 

The things we long to see? 

Which is real, 

And which is not, 

And can these ever be? 

— Nathalie Bull 


Warfel 



1984 / Expressions 33 
































































































The Racoon Patrol 


I stepped into my polypropylene 
underwear, making sure the ankle, 
wrist and neck openings were fitted 
properly. Then I put on my NASA- 
designed tri-layer polyester laminate 
pants and jacket. I stepped into, and 
secured, my 16 inch high, hard shel¬ 
led, flexing boots. Next came the 
leather forearm gloves, the full-head 
cap, and the polarized goggles. 

I then left the changing room to 
join my comrades outside. When we 
all had assembled, we affixed our run¬ 
ners and moved to the transport lift 
which would take us to the starting 
point of our first run. We arrived a 
few minutes later and, after coordi¬ 
nating, we were off! 

We accelerated rapidly, blazing past 
other skiers on the slope, showing off 
our hard-earned expertise. Then, we 
were at the bottom of the chairlift, 
ready to go back for more. We skied 
for five days at Jackson Hole, then 
boarded the bus for the trip home. 
The trip was an experience in itself, 
eighteen hours of nearly non-stop 
partying. When we arrived in Pull¬ 
man, we grabbed our stuff and 
headed home, pleasantly exhausted 
and wanting to go back to Wyoming. 

Every year, thousands of people 
join the ranks of skiers worldwide. All 
of these new skiers need equipment, 
and many of the old pros decide to 
update theirs. This translates into mil¬ 
lions of dollars for the ski industry. Ski 
equipment is not inexpensive; a good 
setup can easily cost a thousand dol¬ 
lars or more. That's accounting for 
boots ($250),skis ($350), poles ($35), 
bindings ($150), gloves ($30), goggles 
($50), and clothing ($300). Then you 
have the costs of travel, lodging, food, 
and chairlift tickets, all of which vary 
from place to place. 

WSU Activities and Recreation has 
helped to cut the cost of some exotic 
ski vacations to a level more afford¬ 
able to college students. The ski trips 
offered this year were Ski Jackson 
Hole, Ski Canada, and Bend Over 
Break. The Jackson Hole trip took 
place during semester break and cost 
$235, which included transportation, 
lodging, and ski tickets for five days of 


skiing. Whitewater and Red Moun¬ 
tain were the destination of the Ski 
Canada trip in March. For $99 skiers 
got a weekend in Canada, again with 
travel, lodging, and tickets included in 
the price. The final ski trip of the year 
was the trip to Mt. Bachelor in Bend, 
Oregon. It was held during spring 
break, cost $115, and inluded the 
standard package of travel, lodging, 
and four days of skiing. 

If you are not a skier, you might ask 
why someone would want to spend so 
much money just to slide down a hill 
on a couple of sticks. Skiing is not 
quite that easy; it takes dedication and 
time to become a Phil or Steve Mahre. 
Once a minimal amount of control 
over direction is learned, a sense of 
independence and accomplishment is 
gained. Nearly every skier will agree 
that the reason they keep skiing is for 
the adrenaline rush, the feeling of the 
wind, the grace, the power, and the 
snow bunnies. 

The speeds of recreational skiing 
can be up to 45 miles per hour, com¬ 
petitive speeds are much higher. The 
world’s speed record on skis is 126 
miles per hour. At speeds like that an 
error can mean death. Even among 



recreational skiers there are many 
deaths due to speed. A skier may be¬ 
come over-confident on smooth 
slopes and ski beyond control. Over 
90 recreational skiers died last year, as 
a result of skiing too fast, losing con¬ 
trol, and hitting trees, lightpoles or 
other objects. The most important 
thing to remember about skiing is to 
remain under control at all times. If 
you just use common sense, skiing can 
be very safe. 

If you are not a skier, try it out. Rent* 
a pair of skis and boots, and take a few 
lessons. You could very easily become 
a convert. Be sure to take lessons from 
a qualified instructor. Sadistic friends 
(c’mon, let’s ski Exterminator and 
then the Elevator Shaft!) dont’ make a 
good first impression. 

If you already are a skier, try out the 
ski trips offered by Activities and Re¬ 
creation. You just might have the time 
of your life. Don’t forget to wear your 
goggles to get that distinctive racoon 
tan. It seems to be quite the fashion 
during the winter. Good luck finding 
the powder and remember to keep it 
safe; let’s put the ski patrol out of busi¬ 
ness. 

by Dale E. Higgs 



Higgs 


1984 / Expressions 37 














In Search 
of Boyer 









One morning in late May, some¬ 
thing very strange happened. I woke 
up and looked outside my window, 
expecting to see the dismal grey of 
Pullman. What 1 saw amazed me. In¬ 
stead of the usual, dreary 40 degree 
temperature, I saw a sky of brilliant 
blue with a very bright disc-like object 
in it. I remembered seeing a day or 
two like that when I was a child, but I 
thought they came only once or twice 
a century, kind of like a comet or an 
eclipse. The bright disc-like object did 
strange things to the people of 
Pullman. 



First, it made them come out of 
their houses early in the morning. 
Next, it caused them to gaze up at the 
sky, placing one of their hands against 
their brow. And then, they started 
chanting the same words over and 
over again. “Boyer, Boyer, Boyer.” 
Over and over I heard those words. 
Not just from a few select people, but 
from everyone. Being a college stu¬ 
dent, my curiosity got the best of me 
and I began to wonder not only what 
strange powers this bright disc posses¬ 
sed, but what “Boyer” was. I ran back 
into my house, threw on my jeans and 
winter jacket, and began my quest. 

Determined to find out exactly 
what “Boyer” was, I headed across 
campus. The First thing that I realized 
was that the air had gotten hot and 
humid. I tore off my winter coat and 
slung it over my shoulder. I was walk¬ 
ing by some of the dorms and noticed 
that everyone was piling into cars with 
six-packs under their arms and fris- 
bees in their hands. The chanting of 
“Boyer, Boyer, Boyer” Filled the air. I 
ran up to them and asked, “Where are 


you going...What’s Boyer?” All of 
them gazed at me with a puzzled look 
on their faces, broke out laughing, 
and yelled “Freshman!” Somehow, I 
knew that this wasn’t the answer. I 
continued on my search. 

I headed for Greek Row, wonder¬ 
ing how this bright object in the sky 
was affecting them. By the time I got 
there, no one was in sight. The entire 
area was deserted...or so I thought. I 
spotted a lone greek, dressed in work¬ 


ing clothes, emptying some garbage 
by one of the fraternities. I went up to 
him, hoping that he could answer my 
question. But when I reached him, I 
noticed that he had a very sad look on 
his face. “What’s wrong?” I asked. 
“Oh, I’m just a pledge, so I have to stay 
here and work while everyone else 
goes to Boyer,” he said. Then he went 
inside of th house and slammed the 
door. There was that word again- 
...“Boyer.” I knocked frantically on 
the door, but he did not answer. 

By this time, I was getting discour¬ 
aged. But, being the determined 
young college student that I am, I con¬ 
tinued on my quest. I headed down¬ 
town too Find an answer, since it was 
obvious that I was getting nowhere on 
campus. 

When I passed Rosauers, I saw a 
i huge pickup jammed with people and 
beer. There was more beer in the back 
of that truck than I have ever seen. 
Along with the beer, of course, came 
the familar chant of “Boyer, Boyer, 
Boyer.” 

I ran as quickly as possible to the 


truck, throwing myself in front of it 
and waving my arms frantically. “Are 
you going to Boyer?” I pleaded. “I 
have to know what it is. Can someone 
please explain it to me?” 

Instead of answering my question, 
they stepped on the accelerator and 
nearly ran me over. I had to dive to get 
out of the way. They were all 
laughing, thinking that they had got¬ 
ten rid of me, but what they didn’t 
know was that I had hopped into the 



1984 / Expressions 39 
















In Search of 


Co€ 



back of their truck. At last, I was going 
to find out who, what, or where a 
“Boyer” was. 

The truck headed out of town and 
through the Palouse. As I peered my 
head over the bed of the truck, I 
noticed a long line of cars in front and 
behind us. I knew that I was on the 
right track...all I had to do was wait. 

My anticipation reached climax as 
we came to the top of a very steep and 
winding grade. At the bottom of the 
hill, I noticed a river. As the truck 
began its descent, the chani from the 
cab of the pickup grew louder. 

The truck finally stopped at an 
open grassy area by the bank of the 
river. I maintained my croached posi¬ 
tion, praying that no one would dis¬ 
cover me until I had the answer to my 
quest. 

I waited until I was sure that no one 
was around, and then I slowly climbed 
out from by hiding place. What I saw 
was amazing. 

People, hundreds of people, were 
everywhere. Greeks and dormies and 
GDPs were all communing together, 
and no one was fighting. Everyone 
was having a great time. I noticed that 
the activities ranged from throwing 
frisbees to drinking beer, from sunba¬ 
thing to drinking beer, from swim¬ 
ming to drinking beer. 

So this was “Boyer”. ..the cause of all 
my trouble. It was a beautiful park in a 
serene environment. It was simply a 


place to escape from the pressures of 
school. I sat down in the cool shade of 
a willow tree, feeling very content and 
satisfied. My search for “Boyer” was 
over. My curiosity was fulfilled. 

Just then, a tanned body walked by 
in a daze chanting over and over 
again, “the Dunes, the Dunes, the 
Dunes.” “What?” I asked in surprise. I 
was too late, the sunbather had 
vanished. 

1 thought, “Not again”. This time, 
however, my search was not as compli¬ 
cated as the first one had been. A 
stream of people, looking much like 
ants as they make their way into their 


home, drifted off from “Boyer” and 
headed over a dam. I followed. What I 
found was a setting much like the one 
at Boyer. It was less manufactured, 
one might even say primtive, but it 
was beautiful. 

As the day drew to a close, and I 
headed back homeward, I thought ab¬ 
out the strange day I had had. I 
reached a conclusion. The next time a 
day like that fell upon Pullman, I 
would grab some beer, a few friends 
and start the ritual chanting. Only this 
lime, I would know to leave my winter 
jacket where it belonged...at home. 

by Chris Baumgartner 



Coe 


40 Expressions /1984 

















It is 1984 and George Orwell’s 
prophetic tale of ‘Big Brother’ has 
never seemed more relevant than in 
the Liquor Control Board’s denial of 
three liquor license applications in the 
Colorado Street area in Pullman. 

Dooley’s Deli, N.E. 902 Colorado 
was denied its application Jan. 20, 
1983. The Golden Goose, located in 
Adams Mall, was turned down twice 
during the fall of 1983 and the spring 
of 1984. 

In all three of the decisions, the li¬ 
quor board cited, as its major reason 
for the denials, that the number of 
liquor licenses already in the area at 
the time was “adequate to responsibly 
meet the needs of the community.” 

Craig Guse, owner of the Golden 
Goose, was granted the right to appeal 
the board’s decision after meeting 
with liquor board officials . 

Guse does not agree with the 
board’s contention that there are 
enough drinking establshments in the 
area. 

Three businesses in the Colorado 
Street area are now in possession of 
liquor licenses — the Cougar Cottage, 
the Campus Cavern and the Village 
Deli. 

“I simply don’t agree (with the 
board),” Guse said. “We are sitting in 
one of the most densely populated 
parts of town. 


is Watching You 


“Whereby,” he continued, “if we 
move four or five blocks downtown, 
they have just granted a license to 
Sam’s Barbeque and he is sitting in the 
middle of the Station and Godfather’s 
plus probably another five off- 
premise licenses.” 

Ray Hensel, supervisor of the Li¬ 
quor Licensing Department but not a 
member of the State Liquor Contol 
Board, explained that Sam’s Barbe¬ 
que was granted a license while lo¬ 
cated in the midst of other alcohol- 
licensed business of its location. 

“It is just a case of it being a business 
district,” Hensel said. “A lot of times 
you are going to get a large concentra¬ 
tion of alcohol establishments in one 
area and none in another.” 

The Liquor Licensing Department 


does not maintain lists of all the liquor 
licenses in a particular area. Approx¬ 
imately 32 licenses are now in use in 
Pullman. 

Gambino’s Italian Restaurant, 
another establishment in close pro¬ 
ximity to the campus, was granted a 
liquor license in 1983. Gambino’s is 
located approximately 200 yards 
from the Stephenson domitory com¬ 
plex. 

Guse and Pat Dooley, owner of 
Dooley’s Deli, both cited the problems 
associated with the combination of li¬ 
quor and college campuses as the ma¬ 
jor reason the the denial of their ap¬ 
plications. 

“We simply did not get ours for the 
reason that, the people in Olympia, 
look at the reports and the problems 


42 Expressions /1984 






that Pullman has with liquor and they 
see it in this (the Colorado Street) area 
because that is where most of the 
population is,” Dooley said. 

Ouse's comments were similar to 
those of Dooley’s. 

“I am sure that they are concerned 
about the problems inherent to alco¬ 
hol and being close to a college cam¬ 
pus,” Ouse said. “It is certainly con¬ 
ceivable that there would be a certain 
number of alcohol related incidents. 

“The problems that they have had 


up here in the past have been related 
to underage persons consuming it on 
the streets and if I’m selling on¬ 
premise only I won’t be contributing 
to that problem,” he said. 

In the Gonzaga University district 
in Spokane, five drinking establish¬ 
ments are located on the same in¬ 
tersection, less than one city block 
from the university’s campus. 

Hensel said Pullman is a special case 
because it is so isolated. 

“Pullman is different from Spokane 


just like Moses Lake is different f rom 
Spokane,” Hensel said. “Spokane is 
more of a metropolitan area and has 
more business districts and, there¬ 
fore, will have more drinking estab¬ 
lishments.” 

Guse said he sees the board as hav¬ 
ing a “motherly attitude” toward uni¬ 
versity students. 

“One thing that bothered me 
throughout my dealings with the li¬ 
quor board is that somehow they dis¬ 
count students as being legitimate 


1984 / Expressions 43 










Licenses... 

citizens of the state of Washington,” 
he said. “They are paying their taxes 
and I see no reason that the same con¬ 
sideration not be given a student as is 
given the general public.” 

Hensel said that the board is con¬ 
cerned with the problems of delin¬ 
quency. 


“I wouldn’t say the board has a 
‘motherly attitude’ exactly — r that is 
not the right word,” he said. “I would 
say that the board’s main concern is 
that the bulk of the students are below 
the legal drinking age.” 

Dooley stated that the liquor board 
might also be looking out for the best 
interests of those businesses in the 
area that already have liquor licenses. 

Paul Hildebrandt, co-owner of the 
Cougar Cottage, would no comment 


on whether he was opposed to the two 
establishments being granted liquor 
licenses, saying, “There are a lot cir- 
cumstnces involved so I don’t really 
want to comment.” 

Gary Nordgaarden, owner of the 
Campus Cavern, said he is opposed to 
either one being granted a liquor 
license. He cited financial reasons for 
his objections. 

“I am not sure how much it would 
cut into my business but I am sure it 









would have some adverse effects,’' 
Nordgaarden said. 

Colleen McCulley, owner of the Vil¬ 
lage Deli, said she has no objection to 
either Dooley’s Deli or the Golden 
Goose being granted a liquor license. 

“It is a totally different situation be¬ 
cause they were basically asking for 
on-premise permits while ours is take¬ 
out,” she said. 

Dooley said he would not reapply 
for a liquor license. 



“We never intended to become a 
strong seller of liquor.” he said. “We 
are not losing that much money be¬ 
cause we cater to a group of people 
that are going to have a coke or a glass 
of milk instead of a beer. 


“Sure some people are going to 
want a beer with their sandwich and 
they going to go down the street,” he 
said “But I do not think we are losing a 
lot of money due to that fact.” 

Guse said he will have to change his 
whole format if he is not granted the 
liquor license and that not having the 
permit is costing him between $6,000 
and $10,000 monthly. 

“It is getting down to the dilema 
now where I have to dec ide how long I 
am going to sit and pour money into 
the project,” he said. “The liquor 
license is critical to my business. I am 
going to have to figure out something 


else to do with the place — make it into 
an ice cream parlor or something else 
to try to generate sufficient income to 
make it work.” 

Hensel said he could not answer 
whether another liquor license will 


ever be granted in the Colorado Street 
area. 

“Each application is looked at on its 
own merit and then the board de¬ 
cides.” he said. “The three members 
of the liquor board do not meet when 
they evaluate an application. It is pas¬ 
sed from desk to desk so the reasons 
put on the notice are not always all of 
the reasons for the denial.” 

NEWS FLASH: On April 11, Craig 
Guse, owner of the Golden Goose, 
Was granted a license to sell beer and 
wine for on-premise consumption. 
Big Brother apparently changed his 
mind. 


1984 / Expressions 45 


























Watched 


k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k kk 
kk.kkkkk.kk.kkkkkkkkk.kkkk 



Trent Miller is the director of the 
Big Brother program at WSU. When 
I spoke with him, I became aware of 
how important the world of a Big 
Brother can be. Trent believes that, 
“One-to-one type relationships based 
on friendships and trust; that’s our 
basic goal.” Tent began as a Big 
Brother four years ago, and gradually 
became more involved. Now, he 
volunteers five or more hours a week 
to keep the program operating 
smoothly. 

The program began at WSU in 
1963 and has grown steadily since 
then. There are now about 100 Big 
Brothers and Big Sisters. The Big Sis¬ 
ter program, an offshoot of the Big 
Brothers’, brings young women 
together in much the same way as the 
Big Brothers’ does for men. Both 
programs are a vital component of 
campus life. 

One of the misconceptions about 
the Big Brother program, is that all of 
the little brothers are from single or 
broken homes. In actuality, less than 
50% of the little brothers are from 
these kinds of households. 

In the past two years, there has been 
a dramatic rise in the requests for Big 


46 


Expressions /1984 

































Brothers. Unfortunately, this is due to 
the graduation of many of last year’s 
Big Brothers. The application process 
is rigorous, because the YMCA and 
WSU, who jointly run the program, 
want to insure that their staff is no¬ 
thing but the best. 

After a possible Big Brother has 
submitted his application, he is inter¬ 
viewed and asked many questions, 
some of which concern his age prefer- 


ance, his hobbies and skills, what he 
thinks that he can provide for his little 
brother, and what he expects out of 
the program. Most of the Big 
Brothers are from 18-24 years of age, 
but there are some graduate students, 
and even one faculty member. 

Although they don’t claim to solve 
all problems, they are successful in 
easing the minds of parents, and shar¬ 
ing their lives with children who need 


their guidance, support, and 
friendship. 


Richard G. Harris Jr. 


1984 / Expressions 47 



















From A 
Gilded Cage 


To some it might appear to be a 
good existence: an abundance of 
food, the best of care, and protection 
from the elements and the hardships 
of life; yet this life lacks the most fun¬ 
damental of all things: freedom. 

In the spring of 1980, a program 
began on campus which gave many 
birds a second chance at life. Those 
which would have otherwise found a 
slow, painful death on the side of the 
road were given a new start at life in 
the wild, through the university’s rap¬ 
tor rehabilitation program. 

The program, which began at the 
vet school, was founded by Dr. Eric 
Stauber, a virologist from the Uni¬ 
versity of Idaho. He became in¬ 
terested in raptors (birds of prey) 
while still in his native country, Ger¬ 
many. 

A falconer since 1957, Stauber re¬ 
habilitated birds at his home until the 
establishment of the program at 
WSU. Over the years, he has seen the 
interest in raptors increase. “Until the 
passage of the endangered species act, 
raptors were considered little more 
than vermin,” said Stauber. “It was 
this growing interest which allowed 
for programs like ours to be estab¬ 
lished.” 

Starting with the original 40 birds, 
which were transferred here from 
Stauber’s home, the program swelled 
to nearly 140 birds in the first year of 
operation. An average of between 80 
to 100 birds are now treated each 
year. Of those birds treated, some 90 
percent are found on the roadside, 
apparent victims of car accidents. 
With the onslaught of hunting season 
the number of birds brought to the 
clinic increases. Most survive, thanks 
to the care they receive at the clinic. 

Rehabilitating raptors can cause 


problems, especially in view of the 
different needs the other varieties of 
birds which are also brought in for 
care. The most serious problem here 
is the shortage of space. 

The clinic facility itself can hold 
only 16 birds. Plans of the college to 
tear down some of the outside sheds 
used to house the birds during recon¬ 
ditioning will cause elimination of 
much of the precious space needed to 
make the birds flight-ready. : At this 


time, the program is somewhat un¬ 
sure. 

The vet students are an integral 
part of the program. Usually, three to 
four students work at helping to reha¬ 
bilitate the birds after surgery each 
week. Students are rotated through 
the different wards of the hospital, 
with work with raptors being merely 
one part of their training in the hand¬ 
ling of animals. Actual surgery on the 
birds is done by the faculty and staff of 

















... cage 

the vet school. Since the birds are con¬ 
sidered state property this surgery is 
free of charge. 

The average cost for the total re¬ 
habilitation of a bird is around $60. 
Some of this cost is covered by a tax- 
free endowment fund established by 
Stauberin 1981. It is hoped that some 
day the entire expense of the program 
will be paid for in this way. This 
money, plus what is received from in¬ 
dividuals and a certain amount of 
slate monies, helps to augment the 
cost of rehabilitation, reducing the 
amount that must be absorbed by the 
clinic. 

The only other programs of this 
kind which exist in the area are main¬ 




tained by private individuals who, like 
Stauber in the early years, help birds 
because of a genuine concern for the 
animals. Similar programs exist 
throughout the nation, the closest to 
Pullman being located in Boise. “It 
has been rumored in recent times that 
an extensive program in breeding, as 
well as rehabilitation will soon be 
underway in Boise,” Stauber said. 
“But, the only way I see anything hap¬ 
pening to our program is for a possi¬ 
ble conservation of resources.” Pull¬ 
man’s program takes birds from a 
100-mile radius, but birds from west¬ 
ern Washington, Oregon, lower Ida¬ 
ho, Montana and beyond have found 
their way to Pullman. 

After students for the program are 
gathered, the birds are examined, 
their injuries are noted, and possible 
treatments are discussed. Discussion, 
however, is not always possible. “If a 
break is fresh, it is best to treat the bird 
as soon as possible, before infection 
has a chance to set in,” said Stauber. 
Every bird is X-rayed upon arrival, 
blood samples are taken and from this 
information an assessment of the 
bird’s condition is made. It will then 
be treated. For many, cage rest is all 
that is required. Others in the prog¬ 
ram must have a more involved treat¬ 
ment. 



















After surgery and a recooperation 
time in the clinic; a conditioning 
period is slated so that an evaluation 
of the bird’s condition can be made. 
Ultimately, the birds are released in 
the same area in which they were 
found. The treatment period is kept 
as short as possible, lasting an average 
of three to four weeks. 

For the unfortunate few who are 
too seriously injured to ever be re¬ 
turned to the wild, life in a zoo or with 
the WSU vet clinic for use in public 
relations becomes their fate. Any bird 
not surviving is used for class studies 
on campus or is mounted for display. 

The ultimate goal of this program 
is, of course, to see the birds returned 
to the wild. The rest of the goals in the 
program are both idealistic and prac¬ 
tical ones: to give students experience 
in handling and care of wild birds; as 
well as developing new and better 
techniques of care and diagnosis. 
There is interest in a breeding prog¬ 
ram, but for now this exists only in the 
possible future. “I would like to instill 
an appreciation for the beauty and 
regality of the raptor, for the more 
people who learn to appreciate wild 
creatures the greater the benefit will 
be to wildlife,” stated Stauber. To this 
end, Stauber and his students work to 
educate the public by delivering talks 
to schools and youth groups, and any¬ 
where there are people willing to lis¬ 
ten and learn about the plight of rap¬ 
tors. Thanks to the efforts of those in 
the raptor rehabilitation program, 
many birds escape their gilded cages 
to once again feel the freedom of 
flight. 


Preceding Page: Out for a bit of exercise, a great 
homed owl finds needed space at Rogers-Orton field. 
Lower Right: Robert Stewart, of Montesano Wa. 
prepares a great homed owl for treatment. 


Lower Left: Dr. Eric Stauber and a patient take a 
stroll. Upper Left: Flip, a saw-wet owl residing at the 
clinic gets a look at life outside his cage. Right: 
Getting final preparations before being released, a 
redtail hawk seems less than pleased. 



1984 / Expressions 51 








It was early morning when the 
alarm went off. Anxious for the day 
ahead, the hunter hurried out of bed, 
quickly dressed, and gathered 
together his gear. He pondered over 
his plans for the day when preparing 
for a successful hunt, it was necessary 
to make sure he not only had the 
proper attire and amunition, but a 
drive and determination to overcome 
his adversary as well. He left home 
and entered into the jungle. It wasn’t 
long before, through the morning 
fog, the hunter saw his prey. Was he 
ready? He asked himself. As ready as 
he would be, he thought. 

After smoothing the front of his 
three-piece suit and straightening his 
tie, his brief case in hand, he took a 
deep breath and entered the execu¬ 
tive building. This was it; his first job 
interview. 

One of the many and well-known 
fears of a graduating college senior is 


that of finding a job. How to inter¬ 
view, how to write a resume, and how 
to dress while interviewing are just a 
few of the questions seniors may have 
when starting out on their job hunt. 

One organization at WSU that is 
constantly working to aid seniors is 
the Career Placement Center. 

Shortly after WWII, WSU experi¬ 
enced an influx of students which in¬ 
creased the need for a liaison between 
employers and potential employees. 
In 1949 the Placement Bureau was 
initiated at WSU, later becoming the 
Career Placement Center. 

In 1983-84, the Career Placement 
Center will link three to four hundred 
companies with about 2,200 students, 
for 10,000 interviews. This not only 
includes positions for seniors, but for 
graduates, internships, and summer 
work as well. Besides setting up job 
interviews, the Career Placement 
Center works with many students, 


helping them decide on a career or 
field of study. An example of this is 
the Coop Program. 

The center works with the students 
participating in the Coop Program by 
examining their curricular schedule. 
These students participate in three 
paid internships during their four 
years as WSU undergraduates. Mem- . 
bers of the Coop Program are not al¬ 
ways, but most often from one of the 
schools of Agriculture, Engineering, 
Business, or Arts and Sciences. 

Another program offered by the 
Career Placement Center is the 
Career Development Program. This 
helps students who don’t know what 
they want to do in college. While 
working with the center throughout 
their college education, students 
often have an opporunity to use the 
center’s computer, called SIC I (Sys- I 
tern of Interactive Guidance and In¬ 
formation). This micro computer aids 
students in finding out what type of a 
career they may want to pursue. 

In the future, the program plans to 
expand and implement more compu¬ 
ters — they would like to keep up with 
the times. 

Dr. Sid Miller, director of the cen¬ 
ter, said that they deal with approx- 1 
imately seven to eight thousand stu¬ 
dents per year. 

He feels that some students don’t 
realize that the center is on campus to 
serve all majors. The biggest problem 
with making students aware of the 
center, is that students are not in¬ 
formed of the services available. If 
students have questions pertaining to 
their majors they should consult the 
people at the Career Placement Cen- • 
ter in the Ad Annex Building. 



m 




k.k.k.k.k.k.kk.k.kk.1 























Ahoia 


One Alum Recalls 



“While I was still in school, I had ai least 
15-26 job interviews. Some of them were 
through the career Guidance Center, and 
some I seeked on my own. The hardest 
part of interviewing was knowing each in¬ 
terview would be a shot in the dark. Un¬ 
employment was high; 15 companies can¬ 
celled their appointments with the Career 
Guidance Center for student interviews 
because of a lack of job openings. 1 con¬ 
stantly felt frustrated because I was com¬ 
peting for jobs with people who were 
more qualified for the positions. The 
Career Guidance Center probably had 


possibilities of being beneficial, but my use 
of the facility wasn’t great. Interviewise, 
the Career Guidance Center helped pre¬ 
pare me for later interviews. I didn’t have 
high expectations due to the economy. 1 
expected to have to apply many limes 
without any interviews which was very 
hard. I eventually seeked help from a Per¬ 
sonnel Agency. They were helpful be¬ 
cause they had confidence in me when I 
was bumed-out from a long search. The 
whole process had me in a state of depress¬ 
ion which I had to handle through humor. 
After a year-long search, the Personnel 


Agency eventually placed me in a job that 
1 enjoy. The agency was expensive, but it 
got me a job: I’m not complaining. My 
advice for those going through interviews 
would be to go through as many inter¬ 
views as possible. This will give you more 
interview experience and the law of aver¬ 
ages will eventually vyork lor you. Start 
searching in fall, and by spring you will 
have more experience and possibly a job 
by graduation.’* 

Jeff Sherling 

1983 Graduate 




53 









Better than 
K-Mart! 


Where would you go to find 100 
rolls of red tape (% inch embossing), 
55 gallons of 200 proof ethyl alcohol, 
(or the distilling aparatus to make 
your own), 5,000 disposable syringes, 
400 feet of garden hose, and a cylin¬ 
der of nitrous oxide? 

The names Sears and Roebuck, JC 
Penney’s and K-Mart may come to 
mind, but the likelihood of finding 
these objects there is slight. All this 
and more can be found in an unpre¬ 
tentious one-story green building 
with a small sign saying, Central Stores. 
From this building comes the vast quantity 
of office supplies, lab supplies, glassware, 
electrical supplies and chemicals used by 
this university each year. 

The present day Central Stores came 
into being 35 years ago when an older 
campus stationery store and a warehouse 
operation set up in 1946 were combined. 


Since then, Central Stores has grown over 
the years, constantly expanding its inven¬ 
tory to match the needs of the university. 

Central Stores appears to be like any 
other office supply store. It has several 
ready sales representatives standing be¬ 
hind a long, low counter heaped with re¬ 
ference material. Behind the counter are 
long, dimly lit aisles crowded with a 
variegated multitude of objects seemingly 
haphazardly arranged. Only one thing is 
missing, the cash register. 

Of the over one million dollars in busi¬ 
ness that Central Stores does each year, it 
doesn’t see one cent of it in cash. Instead it 
uses IRI’s (inter-department revenue in¬ 
voices), which are a form of paper money 
within the university. For example, if a 
department wishes to buy, say one ream of 
paper, it must fill out an IRI, and take it to 
Central Stores. Central Stores will give the 
department the merchandise, and send the 


IRI to French Ad. The money will be taken 
out of the department’s account and trans- 
fered in to Central Store’s account. 

Central Stores is a self-supporting agen¬ 
cy that sells over 15,000 items. These 
items are sold with just a slight mark-up to 
cover operating expenses. You may say 
4 Wow, I could really save some money by 
shopping there!’, but unfortunately Cen¬ 
tral Stores can only sell to non-profit orga¬ 
nizations recognized by the State of 
Washington, such as university-affiliated 
agencies, outlying schools, and other 
organizations that are issued an IRI num¬ 
ber by the state. 

The location of Central Stores is not 
known to many, but it serves a major role 
supplying this university with the items 
that are it‘s lifeblood.. .paperwork and red- 
tape. 

—by Eric Anderson 

















































Is this woman real? In the year 1984 
do we have the capability to create 
human life? Or, is what we are seeing a 
trick? 

On November 8, the Washington 
State University opened the doors to 
the gallery and also opened the doors 
to a world of fantasy. In this fantasy 
land were not just people but mecha¬ 
nical and household objects, collage, 
rags, steel, cardboard and paper 
forms. Ordinary things, seen in every¬ 
day life, were.now labeled as works of 
art (art referred to as trompe I'oeil , 
which is French for “trick or cheat the 
eye"). 

The simple subject matter becomes 


more and more complex. The pieces begin 
to puzzle and mystify; they force us to 
question reality and illusion. 

Artists have been making trompe I'oeil 
since the fifth century B.C. But it was not 
until the seventeen and eighteen centuries 
that European trompe I'oeil painting and 
sculpture reached its height of popularity. 
The paintings of this period were convinc¬ 
ing illusions of the ordinary. In sculpture, 
every conceivable fruit and vegetable as 
well as small animals were convincingly 
crafted,. 

It was not until the middle of the twen¬ 
tieth century that trompe I'oeil painting 
and sculpture again became popular. 
Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Claes 


Oldenburg, Andy Warhol and other young 
artists began using materials and images 
from the world around them. This was the 
advent of Pop Art and a rush toward a 
new-found love of realism. 

It wasn’t long before the irony and wit of 
Pop Art led to a new form of figurative art. 
This “new" realism takes a much cooler 
stance than Pop. Images are now derived 
from photography. The artists avoid social 
commentary, and present the world as it is. 
The viewers are left to decide for them¬ 
selves whether these simple objects are in 
some way a form of art. Art that not only 
represents our culture, but it our culture. 

— by Tracy Smith 


56 Expressions /1984 














Duane Hanson 

Self Portrait with Model 

1979 


Polychromed polyvinyl 
acetate and mixed media 
life-size 


What is Reality? 



Dana Loomis 
Optical Allusion 


1982 

Oil on linen 
40” X 44” 


1984 / Expressions 57 

















-Them Bones- 


Some 12,000 years ago, a great aged 
mastadon ended his life on a inarshv 
grassland, of scrub brush and cattails, 
with the help of the mighty preditor, 
man. In its death, it left a record to be 
discovered in 1977, which is still being 
uncovered by WSU anthropologist, 
Carl Gustafson. 

In August of 1977, Emanuel Manis 


began digging to create a resting pond 
for migratory waterfowl, and in his 
digging, uncovered pieces of a masta¬ 
don tusk. The tusk would, on further 
investigation, turn out to indicate the 
oldest recorded evidence of man in 
the Pacific Northwest. His wife, Clare, 
pursued the matter and eventually 
her news reached Drs. Richard 


Dougherty and Carl Gustafson of 
WSU. 

Once informed, Gustafson and a 
graduate student from the university, 
Delbert Gelbow, loaded their two-ton 
truck with all the equipment they 
could get for the project and headed 
for the Manis farm, located just south 
of Sequim, Washington. There they 
met Dougherty. It took only a few 
hours for the importance of the find 
to come to light. In an unearthed rib, 
the men found an imbedded bone 
“projectile/* the apparent evidence of 
some unsuccessful attempt on the 
mastadon’s life. Five months that win¬ 
ter were spent by Gustafson and Gel- 
bow excavating the mastadon before 
having to return to the university. 

The following two years of digging 
attracted much interest from the pub¬ 
lic and were supported by grant 
monies and matching funds. With 
these monies, a field school was estab¬ 
lished and run for two years. After the 
initial excitement, the monies and 
public curiosity dried up, for all ex¬ 
cept the Manises and Gustafson. It is a 
continual summer project for Gustaf¬ 
son and his son, Brad, and a way of life 
for the Manises. 

Emanuel and Clare Manis have 
taken the project to heart. Emanuel 
took a job driving a school bus in the 
winters, leaving his summers open to 
help with the excavation where he 
can. The tourist industry is of import¬ 
ance to Clare Manis, who conducts 
tours through their barn (turned 
viewing area) for the viewing of arti¬ 
facts found on the farm. 

The site is representative of only a 
few days in the life of a band of prehis¬ 
toric humans, so trying to reconstruct 
very much about their existance is 
often a difficult task. The plant re- 

Lefv. Carl Gustafson, a WSU anthropologist, ex¬ 
amines a bison skull found at the Manis farm site. 
Much study of the pieces found at the dig is still 
necessary. Right : Putting together the pieces of bone 
found on the site may reveal much about them. Here 
Gustafson assembles pieces of mastadon tusk. 



58 Expressions /1984 






Oborn 


cords for the area are much easier and 
have been well documented. “We 
have got the best vegitation record for 
the period between 11,000 and 
12,000 years ago in the Pacific North¬ 
west,” Gustafson stated. They indicate 
that the familiar evergreen forests of 
the area had not yet arrived on the 
area so recently freed by the receed- 
ing northern glaciers. The docu¬ 
mentation of the human presence at 
the site has presented more of a chal¬ 
lenge. Because of the short duration 
of their stay in the area, little undis¬ 
puted evidence, such as a stone imple¬ 
ment, has been found. Gustafson says 
he, “doesn’t want to fall into the trap 
of having to prove the site with a stone 
implement,” and went on to say that, 
“Every early man site, more than 
11,000 years old, in the world has 
been disputed.” What has been found 


on the area so far have been scratched 
and polished pieces of bone and tusk 
that Gustafson postulates were made 
into tools and used the butcher the 
animal. These tool were then left be¬ 
hind by their makers. 

In the original excavation of the 
mastadon, only one side of its skeleton 
was found, those relatively in tact. 
The other side of the animal was 
found in various other diggings scat¬ 
tered on the high slope of the glacial 
terrain: a feat not normally occuring, 
which would indicate the presence of 
man. The condition of the two diffe¬ 
rent sets of bones was also revealing. 
The scattered bones were broken, 
scared, and their shapes altered, un¬ 
like their down slope counterparts. 
Besides the bones of the Sequim mas¬ 
tadon, the bones of other assorted in¬ 
habitants have been found on site, in¬ 


cluding many bison, some carabou, 
ducks and a variety of others. Little* 
study has of yet been done with these 
fragments but, with further study, 
they may also reveal parts of the past. 

Much remains to be studied on the 
Manis farm in order to discover more 
about the lives of the people who once 
lived in the area. The persistant work 
of Carl Gustafson and the Manises 
may one day shed some light on the 
past. The recent discovery of what 
appears to be another mastadon near 
the original find has yet to be exca¬ 
vated, and its story of the past may fill 
the vacancies left in the tale of his 
counterpart. Perhaps his could supply 
the rest of the pieces to the 11,000- 
year-old puzzle. 

by Kathy Gilbert 


1984 / Expressions 59 











The Road 
Again 


Mostly, the roadie just likes to lie 
left alone. 

Alone so he can do his job instead ol 
hanging tint and talking about it. 

Roadies are the individuals re* 
sponsible lor setting up and plugging 
in all that you see when you see any 
form of louring stage entertainment, 
and then taking it down again after 
you have gone home to the safety and 
comfort of your soli feather bed, 

"But where are these guys? Who are 
they?/* asks middlecbss America. 

Hie average roadie is rarelv to be 
seen during a show because, by the 
time his show gets to your town, he has 
seen it all before and would rather 
spend his time poking around this 
strange place winch you, ihe audi¬ 
ence, call your hometown. 

Ladies and Gentlemen, meet the 
roadie. 

He wants to hang nut with you, con¬ 
cert hungry America. He loves travel¬ 
ing amongst you and experiencing 
you from a distance. And you can bet 
he gets mure culture than you, L or 
Princess Anne could even dream of. 

His job is simple He tours around 
the country with any givrn entity of 
stage or dub entertainment. His life is 
an endless enigma of otie-nighters 
and unfamiliar scenes comparable 
only to those found in the darkest 
lyrics of the Jackson Browne collec¬ 
tion. 

Concert bands, perhaps the most 
popular form of touring entertain¬ 
ment, can embark on nationwide 
tours that last months and sometimes 
years on end. The equipment takes a 
beating, the musicians fake a healing 
and the roadies take a heating. Mainly 
for the sake of money. 

The roadie embarks upon a gruell¬ 
ing tour much like the sailor who is 


headed out to sea. Both can spend 
seemingly endless periods of time de¬ 
tached from the place they call home, 
if there is such a place in their lives. 

The roadie is on die front lines for 
the entire four- From San Diego to 
Greenwich Village, and even stinking 
gig in between, reality, and sometimes 
die cringing harshness ol It* is an in¬ 
escapable path for the roadie to 
follow. 

He works for his wage. Depending 
upon what kind of a hand he is louring 
with, money could be saved or spent 
on a variety of substances. 

Fours can earn a great deal of 
money for bands and technical staffs, 
but roadies always seem to be left be¬ 
hind. Funny, because the roadie is 
truly the backbone of the entertain¬ 
ment industry's struggle for perfec¬ 
tion. 

Some organizations exist to protect 
the roadies right to subsist, the largest 
of which is mammoth labor union 
with local branches around the coun¬ 
try called the International Alliance of 
rhea Ideal and Stage Employees 
(IATSE}. I he IATSE protects the 
roadie wage much like the tnickers' 
union protects the truck drivers, and 
sometimes in as violent of a manner. 

But, like everyone else, roadies 
have their ow n flavor, approach to life 
and argument for existence. Life, to 
the average roadie, is the utterance of 
a quick truss word anti a vow to get the 
job done no matter what the circumst¬ 
ances. 

Roadies come from a variety of 
backgrounds and upbringings from 
all over the country. The word which 
fits the roadie best, though it is unfair 
to place them all on the same stage, is 
“vagabond'*. 

The roadie does not wish to talk 
about his past, nor is he the least bit 


interested in yours. There is often tur¬ 
moil or problems in the roadie s past 
which he does not need to he re¬ 
minded of. Life is here and now for 
the roadie. Yesterday is a gig gone 
past. 

The roadie has always been there. 
He was there ai Altajnom and Wood- 
stock, He continues to been masse lot 
large rock bands. He is there for coun¬ 
try, reggae, ska, punk, wave, orches¬ 
tral, soul, funk. R & B, disco perform¬ 
ances, and the list goes on. America 
has seen the roadie. 

Most roadies do not strive lor stabil¬ 
ity in their lives. In I act. a great deal of 
the roadie workforce of the industry is 
running from stability , as well as many 
other tilings. 

Complacency is a rule of thumb on 
the road, though sanity is noi re¬ 
quired. The road is a 10-hour ride on 
a tourbus nearly every night of the 
roadies nocturnal life. 

The roadie works on a rime sche¬ 
dule much like that of a bam owl. I he 
day begins at the end of the night, 
when the lights have gone down and 
the crowd is filing out. If you can man¬ 
age to hangout at the concert site long 
enough, you will see the roadie 
emerge from the darkness to blindly 
attack his work. 

By the time the roadie begins dis¬ 
assembling t unplugging, unpatch mg, 
unbolting and packing, the hand is 
long gone from sight 

Taking apart a concert stage Ls the 
beginning of a long night for the 
roadie. The night *xxasionally begins 
with a disagreement between the 
lighting and sound staff, both work¬ 
ing independanUy of each other and 
trying to strike (disassemble) their re¬ 
spective systems anti load them up 
first. 

While this is taking place, the ever- 


60 Expressions /1964 




work }s done without a word. 

During the strike, the roadies usuai- 
ly &K Ital impersonal things Willi; 
one another, and am always he ex¬ 
pected iv verbally abuse the staff" of| 
whatever coliseum the concert was 


i staffs, to roadies, are the 
are a pa hi in the ass 
irircg and after perform-! 
>af|i€ once gave me hts phi- 
r ■ ttl members in 


o'e on 11«<" 


gjprt, including he 
to mt“ at I I- resnu 


this arc hiddest, It i> t; 
mtty IP the road that 
ing bat k. just as then 


1 alone |n | new town, he cast 
nd act anyway he wants. He 


Gpiiip’ 























































































































































62 Expressions /1984 


J 

































PRESENTS 


Uabama 


e 12 Seat 09 $1/ 


1984 / Expressions 63 





















A 



FANTASTICK 

BEGINNING 



Act I 

Slats of light cast flickering shadows on 
the Daggy Little Theatre. The stage, like 
the rows of seats that surround it, is empty, 
and the only sounds to be heard are the 
echoes of my footsteps. Without actors to 
give it life, the theatre sits waiting for the 
next production. 

Then... 

Lights!!... 

Music!!... 


Suddenly, the stage is the scene of a 
flurry of activity. Actors are running 
around, practicing blocking arrangements 
and reading lines. Todd Baker croons out a 
song while Alan Wilke attempts a dance 
step. Practice for the Fantasticks has be¬ 
gun and the excitement level grows as the 
opening night draws closer. 

There is something different about this 
show; a certain quality permeates it, giv¬ 
ing its cast distinction. Perhaps it’s be¬ 
cause the play is entirely produced, 
directed, and organized by students. 
Maybe the vitality and comraderie of the 
actors differentiate this production from 
all of the others this season. Or is could be 
that in the midst of a major production, 
with all of the chaos that it entails, a small 
woman sits in the corner of the theatre, 
staring intently at the cast? 

Her cast... 

Her show... 

Karen Skrinde is the student director of 
The Fantasticks, and a remarkable lady. A 
fifth year senior, Karen holds a myriad of 
talents. Soon, she will be embarking for 


64 Expressions /1984 










jland, where whe will be a teacher of 
school students. Additionally, Karen 
jveteran of many of the dramatic pro¬ 
tons here at the university. What is so 
| ing about her is that she is so unlike the 
£otype that comes to mind when we 
c of the word director, 
here is no sarcasm in her voice, just a 
pmination to get things right, 
vough she will not admit it, the task of 
pting a show is an overwhelming re- 
lsibility, and a feat that very few per- 
are capable of accomplishing sucess- 

y. 

iirst, a suitable work must be selected, 
actors that will convey the right mood 
he play must be found. This task is 
ipleted only after the director has 
ved many auditions. Perhaps the most 
cult task of any director’s work is to 
someone who has toiled many hours to 
■lorize a snatch of dialogue that ... 
tu were good, but just not good 
jgh” ... Sets must be constructed, and 
liming picked. All this, and more, is 
iled in a collegiate production. 


Listening to Karen, you notice that there 
is no strain or tension in her voice. You 
couldn’t surmise that through a good por¬ 
tion of the practices, she had the flu. That 
her social life ceased. That she lived the 
play. How does she know that all of the 
work is worth it? 

Act II. 

Scene I: A restive audience at Daggy Little 
Theatre. 

February 18 has arrived. 

There is no more time. Tonight is the 
opening night and I am poised, pen in 
hand, eagerly awaiting the results, good or 
bad. The chatter of the audience fills the 
theatre, then ceases as the lights dim and 
The Fantasticks begins. 

This is good, no... 

This is great... 

All the work that has been poured into 


the play begins to come to fruition. The 
audience is swept up in the growing pains 
of the characters in the play, and as the 
production ends, the theatre is filled with 
applause. Outside the theatre, people con¬ 
gratulate Karen on the wonderful quality 
of the production. Backstage, the cast is 
jubilant. The first night was terrific!! 
Karen smiles and reads back her notes to 
the cast. It’s not over, and yet the sense of 
accomplishment is borne on the faces of 
the cast and Karen herself. 

It has been a wonderful accomplishment 
for the cast... 

A Fantastick beginning for Karen... 

by Richard G. Harris 

Lower Left: Todd Baker, the lead player in The 
Fantasticks , in a moment of excitement. 

Above: Karen Skrinde looks over her notes and script 
during a long practice as the the director of The 
Fantasticks. 

Photos by Mike Salsbury. 


1984 / Expressions 65 












Burke 


66 Expressions /1984 














































PRESENTS 


She Stoops 
To Conquer 


Portrait of the 
Artist as Filipino 


ow 17 Aisle 12 oeat 09 $1, 


ow 1? Aisle 12 ijeat 09 $lj 


Ahola 


Putnam 


1984 / Expressions 67 






























‘ ‘The enemy is clumsy. He wants to si¬ 
lence your voice with his own, but, we all 
know your voice alone resounds, that it 
alone ignites." Nicholas Guillen 

On Jan. 14, activist and philosopher 
Angela Davis, a member of the Commun¬ 
ist Party, U.S.A. and an author of four 
books, spoke at the Beasley Performing 
Arts Coliseum. Her speech was based on 
her latest book, “Women, Race, and 
Class.’* 

The lecture opposed oppression of any 
person because of race, creed or political 
and religious affiliation. 

Davis believes that people are unaware 
of the power they possess as a group. “We 
(the public) have to recognize that if we are 
black, white, Latino, Chicano, old or 
young.. .as long as we are oppressed in this 
society, we have the same adversary. 

“The biggest mistake made by the 
movements of the past, * ’ Davis said, ‘ ‘ was 
the single-minded belief that their move¬ 
ment was not linked to others.” 

Nuclear devastation was another issue 
which Davis felt that Americans should try 
to prevent by uniting together. 


Obom 

“I would like to encourage all of you 
who are concerned about the destructive 
tendencies of those who sit in the halls of 
the White House to join some organization 
or another; our responsibility is to prevent 
a global nuclear holocaust.” 

Since Reagan has been in office, more 
minorities than ever have been oppressed, 
according to Davis and she stressed, “We 
need to understand the importance of not 
re-electing Ronald Reagan...Reagan is a 
very strange man. Often times his percep¬ 
tion of himself is not as the role of head of 
government.” 

Reagan’s and Davis’ ideologies have 
clashed before in 1969. Reagan, then the 
Governor of California, tried to have 
Davis fired from the University of Califor¬ 
nia in Los Angles (UCLA) because of her 
affiliation with the Communist Party, 
U.S.A. 

Davis spoke to about 1,500 people. She 
was asked to speak here by the Association 
of Women Students. She was originally 
scheduled to speak on Dec. 9; but she had 
to cancel because the San Francisco Air¬ 
port was fogged in. 

-Brenda J. Breaux 



68 Expressions /1984 















tk.k.k.mwk.mk.k.k.k.k.k.k. 


WOMEN, RACE 
and CLASS 












PRISE NTS 


John Erlichman 


Oborn 


70 


Expressions /1984 








































1984 / Expressions 71 



























































The Sound of Music 


X k kkTk \y*L k 

k l *jrL lll 
Lytk k Lyc 
y k k^^ k 
^ k^k k kX 

yL k k k k/k 

“Music is the mediator between the 
spiritual and the sensual life. 
Although the spirit be not master of 
that which it creates through music, 
yet it is blessed in this creation, which, 
like every creation of art, is mightier 
than the artist.” 

-Ludwig van Beethoven 

For at least 400 years, one form of 
music that has remained a challenge 
for composers, performers and audi¬ 
ences alike is symphonic music. At 
WSU about 50 or so students have 


been given the opportunity to con¬ 
quer the feat of learning, understand¬ 
ing and performing this music for an 
audience anxious to listen. 

Acclaimed by some critics as 
“sounding like a professional orches¬ 
tra because its quality is so high,” the 
WSU Symphony Orchestra contri¬ 
butes to the high level of arts main¬ 
tained here. 

This year, the symphony put on 
three performances in Pullman and 
Moscow, Idaho. One consisited of a 
program of works by Wolfgang A. 
Mozart, while another consisted of 
only works by Gustav Mahler, includ¬ 
ing a performance of his fourth sym¬ 
phony. Attempting Mahler’s fourth 
symphony was quite a challenge, and 
the high quality performance display¬ 
ed showed a considerable accomplish¬ 
ment. 

The symphony practices together 
four and one half hours a week. Out¬ 
side group rehearsals, each member 
usually works at least two to three 
hours per week on symphony mate¬ 
rial. For music students, this would 
not include practice for other per¬ 
formance areas. 


The symphony is made rougly of 
two thirds music majors, while the 
other third comes from outside the 
department. The WSU symphony, as 
well as other music groups in the de¬ 
partment, has served many students 
as an outlet from hours of tedious 
study, particularly in some scientific 
and technical fields. 

The WSU Symphony Orchestra is 
directed by Dr. Martin-Deatus Meier, 
a native of Switzerland. In the words 
of one music student and symphony 
member, “Dr. Meier is the most fan¬ 
tastic director we (as students) have 
ever had. He’s beyond anything we’re 
used to. He is really musical as well as 
inspiring, so you want to play well for 
him. He teaches us a lot more than 
music; he also exposes us to literature 
and other arts.” 

The WSU Symphony Orchestra has 
not toured in a couple of years, but 
some students are hoping to have the 
opportunity to do so when it can be 
afforded. For now, the symphony will 
keep attempting new challenges, 
while audiences will continue to enjoy 
experiencing their accomplishments. 

Cindy Reynolds 



1984 / Expressions 73 


















Van Living... 

The Cheapest Rent in Town 

M 






From | .1 HILDA In |tJ|U ol 
foiln fa pseudunv mi speiii h-w I 11 il 
lale mm mugs lolling in hi* bed In die 
winter. iht' temperature in his home 
dipped helm* freezing .md in [|u 
spring, \ igoruiis Niiulighr blazed 
ihi * Mi^h dir windows, 11 ramig utmost 
nubciiiable Ileal 

For .ilmuM live mmillls. John's 
home was a IWJ Yulkswaguu van 

■ fl WAS iUlMn i\ lit" ltd let tv, "hill Ft l 
tin II again it 1 li;ul In.’ [ol 111 mmt l (I m 
a spat ions rental house the billowing 
Nrplembri 

[ It -1 nine m Pullman I mm die Mid - 
west in intend giaduate sthonl. I n 
lOllU\ Tile van's Valves blew, ,mtl .1 
t rat k developed in ihr engine hint k. 

I lir inM ni tepah mg (In* damage sap¬ 
ped Ids a I reach limited siipplv nl 
hmd-s. 

In Pullman, howevei, In- happened 
m meet a student u hu had been living 
in a van iui two vearv Mils m u at- 
quamtaiu e inspired \* *lut tot It a elup a 
similar Itvini; auaugrmctiL Vs a 
teat hint; assistant, he earned inn 
ninth to gel a tuiasanleerl Srudenl 
Loan. ” I here realh wasni an\ 
alternative (ni me but in live in the 
van," he said. 

First. he tgf-X a spet in I pal king dit k- 
(’i I min a li tend vvhu It enabled lin 11 to 
leave ihe van in die (iraduate ( emei 
parking lot. | r 1 1 111 1 1ad 1 n f u w die Va 1 1i- 
i le there. 

I le I>et line a master ai impn wisa- 

(ion. 

|uim took shown s in I he limn 
lot ket mum and in site basement ul a 
t auipus ul! it e building. 

\ telephone outside Ins small ol lit v 
strived as his home phone, 

d IwMigltr a meal lu ket and ah at 


file Uoio. I hat rust me about S I dll a 
month, whit It w as a bit expensive/' he 
explained. "Hut I think good iinire 
iioti is important. You have to eat 

John i (aims that “I |usr needed a 
plat e w here 1 1 nit Id sleep ami keep inv 
1 1<it lies/' 

He admits living m the van was 
'*pMChnlngua1lv a i bore Mouevei. 
In- spent a great deal ol tune in his 
ni lit e. I think that was advantageous 
beiause die linn* I spent rheie ru¬ 
nt bed no experiences with die ntliei 
students and mv professors 

I lie ul I it e also pmv ided him u tili a 
place fui daib 1 1 ansumdemal medii a- 
tinn. 

"Mavbe la people knew W here I 
lived sail I |olm. "In (at 1. 1 g< >t a lot nl 
posit ive leedlnu k Horn pc* >ple. I doi i t 
i [link most people wain to lie i onu-tt* 
tionat. I hat’s boring. 1 think it makes 
them glad when someone breaks out 
in some small wav .“ 

Mam ol his assoi rates remained un¬ 
aware. "I wanted 11 that wav Imauseir 
was extremeh important lur me to 
maintain a professional profile u it Inn 
I he dep;n l met it/' he explained I re- 
inemhet nine though, a piulessoi 
said, ‘voidre here all the* lime. I'd 
almost sav vou live here. |ohn I was 
just a liitle i oruenied, 

1 odav he sav s Ills I inaiu es ai e mou 
stable and dial his housing lias im¬ 
proved bv "quantum leaps Hill joint 
si 1 11 maintains dial he would do it 
again, l it unlv do ii again it 1 was 
rxdrmeh despenile though. 1 ha- 
ven t forgotten vv hat it was like to wake 
up in tin- middle ol dir night so mid 
that I didn’t warn to move, bet a use i( l 
did I'd have to warm up another spot 
in mv sleeping bag/' 


Story by Alya Freepuna 
Photo by Scott Obom 







habite a Pullman! 


Jaunt along any lane at WSU, and 
you are likely to hear a variety of lan¬ 
guages and accents. Students from 
over fifty foreign countries attend this 
university, for Cougar Country is tru¬ 
ly a melting pot of diverse people and 
cultures. On Campus Avenue, there is 
a residence that brings the Wazzu stu¬ 
dent in contact with the language and 
life of France. 

La Maison Francaise, more com¬ 
monly known as the French House, is 
home to twelve American students, 
and one native French student. Until 
two years ago, the University of Haute 
Bretagne, Rennes, France, sent one 
student to live at the house, but be¬ 
cause of travel restrictions imposed by 


the French government, this became 
impossible. In 1984, the house will be 
celebrating it’s eleventh anniversary, 
and it has the distinction of being the 
only language house on campus. Pre¬ 
viously, language rooms, and lan¬ 
guage floors were tried in various 
dorms and houses across campus. 
The drawback was that in-depth study 
and mastery of foreign languages was 
difficult, because the vast majority of 
the residents spoke English. 

Since coming to the French House, 
life for Carrie, Tanya, Diane, Leah, 
Gary, Marylou, Mike, Sandy, Joseph, 
Liane, and Sheila has not been typical¬ 
ly American, but has become an im¬ 
mersion into the French culture. 


French is the only language spoken at 
the house, and although they all pro¬ 
fess to love the language, Diane did 
say, “It’s wearing on the nerves, dur¬ 
ing finals week, when you don’t care 
what language the answer is in.” 

There is a threefold requirement 
for gaining admission into La Maison. 
You must have sophomore standing, 
speak French, or have an avid interest 
in the language, and must garner the 
approval of E. Hartman, the French 
House advisor. Of course, in addition 
to these requirements, there are 
others, such as grades and a willing¬ 
ness to abide by the rules of the house. 

The reasons voiced for joining the 
house w ere as varied as the personali- 
















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kkkkfc 


ties of the students themselves. Two 
are language majors but the majority 
simply decided to improve their ling¬ 
uistic skills. Carrie, who saw the house 
being touted in the student admis¬ 
sions catalog said that she was “Petri¬ 
fied at first; but since living here, I 
love it.” Marylyn Shang has lived in 
the house for two years. French being 
her native language, she has a diffe¬ 
rent outlook and differing experi¬ 
ences than the other students. “When 
I first arrived at the house, I felt on the 
spot. When people first learn a lan¬ 
guage they are very picky about what 
you say, and they demand an English 
translation for everything, which is 
impossible. All of the time you feel 
like you are in a classroom.” 

It is notable that the students seem 
more like a family, and not just a 
group of strangers. Each member of 
the household is responsible for a 
different chore daily, and each stu¬ 


dent pays rent which covers food, util¬ 
ity, and housing costs. The house has 
an outreach program, which helps ex¬ 
pose the WSU student to different 
aspects of the French culture. It in¬ 
cludes hosting receptions for the 
guest speakers who come here on the 
behalf of the Foreign Language de¬ 
partment, holding an open house 
twice yearly, and carolling around 
campus during Christmas, En Fran- 
cais, of course. 

“This place is better than an apart¬ 
ment; I don’t have to cook.” This 
statement elicited a chuckle from 
everyone. The friendly atmosphere 
surrounds you the moment you enter. 
The unique way of life they share, the 
wonderful language they speak, and 
the bonds that bring them together, 
make an outsider want to become a 
part of the fascinating house that they 
live in. The French House, mes amis, 
is truly formidable!! 

by Richard G. Harris Jr. 



1984 / Expressions 77 

















Sabbury 

It’s a Global Affair 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 


78 Expressions /1984 










Upon entering my calculus class on 
the first day of the semester, I noticed 
a foreign student sitting in the front 
row. Immediately I said to myself, 
“there goes my ‘A’. The curve in this 
class is going to be hell!” This is a 
common reaction in such a situation. 

Connie Johnson, of the Office of 
International Programs, has recently 
divulged information which contra¬ 
dicts those assumptions about foreign 
students possessing computer brains 
and not requiring sleep, thus being 
able to study 24 hours a day. Accord¬ 
ing to Connie, foreign students do in 
fact have just as many problems, if not 
more, than everyone else. Many re¬ 
quire assistance in adapting to Amer¬ 
ican university life, and the deficiency 
rate among foreign students is about 
the same as that among U.S. citizen 


percent from their home govern¬ 
ments, and the rest from public and 
private sources worldwide. That is, if 
they receive money at all. According 
to the Lewiston Tribune, some stu¬ 
dents, especially those from Iran and 
Nigeria, have difficulty in obtaining 
any money from their governments 
or families due to bureaucratic red 
tape. 

Don’t replace one misconception, 
however, with another. The charac¬ 
teristics of foreign students are every 
bit as unique as American students. 
One example of an exceptional fore¬ 
ign student on campus, Nicholas John 
Havez Mikhaleides, a citizen of Leba¬ 
non, tends to reinforce our initial 
thoughts about foreign students. His 
father works for a large petroleum 
corporation in northern Lebanon, 


attracts students who are willing to 
study in great amounts just for the 
privilege of remaining a student. 

The university Nicholas went to, in 
Angers, was a relatively small one with 
only 250 to 300 students in a clas¬ 
sroom. In some of the larger universi¬ 
ties (there are 10 to 15 in Paris alone), 
the number of students in a classroom 
can go as high as 1,000. 

Nicholas says that even with the free 
tuition, he spent $500 to $600 per 
month on room, board and trans¬ 
portation. Now that he is in the U.S., 
that amount has jumped to about 
$ 1,200 a month. Two hundred dollars 
of that is for his phone bill alone. 
Nicholas regularly makes calls to such 
places as France, Greece, and 
Lebanon. 

Nicholas says that he came to the 



students, she says. 

There are 685 foreign students 
from 79 countries at the university 
this year, that tallies out to about four 
percent of the student population. 
The countries these students come 
from range from Argentina to Zim¬ 
babwe and just about everywhere in 
between. The largest student popula¬ 
tion from one country is 86, that being 
from Canada; followed by 45 students 
from Singapore. 

Another common misconception 
about foreign students, besides their 
universal academic expertise, is their 
great wealth. According to federal fi¬ 
gures in 1982,67 percent of all money 
received by foreign students was from 
their families and personal savings, 13 


which makes him appear wealthy, and 
Nicholas has a 3.65 GPA with a dual 
major in Pharmacy and Organic Che¬ 
mistry, which satisfies the bookworm 
concept. Nicholas says that he studies 
about seven hours a day, in addition to 
the time he spends in classes. The de¬ 
grees he will receive here will be in 
addition to degreees he has already 
acquired in French Education and 
Cooking. 

Prior to coming to the U.S., Nicho¬ 
las attended a French university 
where he says the classes were much 
more competitive than here at WSU. 
A factor contributing to the difficulty 
of the French system is the fact that 
education in France is free. And be¬ 
cause of the limited class size, this 


U.S. “because the (education) system 
here is easier, and because it is better 
than the European countries and 
Lebanon. I think it is less competition 
too, because it is a big country.” 

Before Nicholas moved to the 
Northwest he lived in Florida where 
he attended Florida Atlantic Universi¬ 
ty. Nicholas says that he prefers the 
Northwest because “people here in 
the countryside, I think, are more 
friendly. The nature is beautiful and 
the weather is nicer and less humid 
than in Florida.” Nicholas is very fond 
of Washington and Oregon and 
hopes to gain citizenship so that he 
might live and work here. 

In addition to his studies, Nicholas 
has several activities to keep himself 


1984 / Expressions 79 






















Global... 


further occupied. He says that he likes 
all types of social activities and that 
there are many of these in Pullman. 
Nicholas is a member of Circle K, 
which is a student organization spon¬ 
sored by the Kiwanis Club. He is a chef 
for Kappa Kappa Gamma and for 
special banquets in the CUB. He is 
also president for the local chapter of 
Phi Theta Kappa, a national honor¬ 
ary. Before he moved to WSU, Nicho¬ 
las was the vice-president of the PTK 
chapter at Florida Atlantic. 

I want you to do me a favor. Don’t 
make the mistake that I have made so 
many times and that I vow never to 
make again. Don’t form preconcep¬ 
tions about anyone, expecially a fore¬ 
ign student. Wait until you have met 
and spoken with a person before you 
make any decisions about that per¬ 
son’s character. You just might be 
suprised. 


Money can be a great problem for 
some foreign students here. This is 
not difficult to understand when you 
look at the rates for non-resident reg¬ 
istration. According to the 1983-85 
W.S.U. Bulletin, undergraduate non¬ 
residents pay $1812, plus $174 per 
credit over 18, each semester. Gradu¬ 
ate non-residents pay $2346, plus 
$277 per credit over 18, each 
semester. 

To compound the problem, about 
13 percent of the money foreign stu¬ 
dents use to go to school on is from 
their home governments. Bureaucra¬ 
cy comes into play and money may 
arrive too late to pay for tuition and 
fees. 


In November, the Daily Evergreen 
reported that 10 foreign students had 
not yet payed tuition, and of those 10, 
seven were faced with disenrollment. 
The other three remained enrolled 
because they were affiliated directly 
with the Office of International Prog¬ 
rams. 

Susan Wohld, assistant director of 
International Programs, stated in 
February that of the original 10 stu¬ 
dents, two had to miss the entire 
semester (one withdrew and the other 
was disenrolled). She said that the dis- 
enrolled student has since received 
money and is enrolled for the spring 
semester. The fate of the student who 
withdrew is unknown. 




80 Expressions /1984 


Obom 



























The Office of International Programs is located in Bryan 
Hall, room 108. It was formed in January of 1964 by the 
University Regents with the primary responsibility being, 
“study abroad,” both of foreign students here and WSU 
students overseas. The OIP is funded about $100,000 per 
year. This money goes toward paying the salaries of all the 
OIP staff members, as well as the operating costs of the 
office. There are 10 staff members at the OIP. 

The current director of the Office of International Prog¬ 
rams is Dr. Vishnu Bhatia. He has held the position for 12 
years. Dr. Bhatia is also the director of the Honors Program. 

According to Dr. Bhatia, the OIP “takes care of problems, 
concerns, and requirements encountered by foreign stu¬ 
dents here.” He says that “most of the work at the OIP is 


related to visas, immigration requirements, work permits 
and other federally required activities.” The OIP also hand¬ 
les all of the foreign study programs for American students. 

There are fourteen foreign study programs and seven 
foreign exchange programs. Approximately 100 WSU stu¬ 
dents participate in these programs each year. Dr. Bhatia 
says that it is very easy for WSU students to become involved 
in these programs. In some cases, a foreign language back¬ 
ground is not even required. 

The OIP provides special instruction to persons whose 
command of the English language is not sufficient for their 
specific needs in America. They also make all the arrange¬ 
ments, such as hotel accomodations, transportation, and 
guides, for foreign visitors to the University. 

by Dale E. Higgs 



Salsbury 


1984 / Expressions 81 













If My Friends 
Could See Me Now 



Lila Vaughn is a senior in Criminal 
Justice. She would like to earn her 
second degree in psychology, and 
then continue her education in 
Graduate School. David Jenkins has 
his B.S. in Forestry, and he is now 
completing his Masters in Engineer¬ 
ing. These students sound typical; 
neither of them is very different from 
the thousands of others who attend 
WSU. If Lila or David were in any of 
your classes, however you would 
probably do a double take. Why? Be¬ 
cause both of them are older than you 
. . . much older. 

Lila and David are called re-entry 
students, a group that surprisingly 
makes up over 10% of the Wazzu stu¬ 


dent population. Their name comes 
from the Re-Entry program, which 
operates through the Office of Prog¬ 
rams For Women. In many aspects 
re-entries are like other students, yet 
int others they are different. They, 
too, spend long hours cramming for 
tests, standing in line at Fort French, 
and furiously scribbling down that 
crucial bit of information before the 
lecture ends. There are, however, 
additional hardships. Often, they 
have been away from school for many 
years, and the readjustment can be 
trying. Or perhaps, after a long day at 
school, they have children to care for 
at home. The life of an older student is 
often difficult, but people like Lila 
and David beat these hardships to 
attain their goal: A college education, 
and a broadened outlook on life. 

Lila is 42 years old and a mother of 
three. Throughout her life she had 
worked at a variety of jobs, from bar¬ 


tending to janitorial work, all for very 
low pay. Finally, she decided that she 
wanted something better for herself. 
She attended Lower Columbia Com¬ 
munity College shortly after receiving 
her C.E.D. in 1976. She has been a 
Cougar since February of 1983. She 
feels that her varied experiences out 
in the real world, give her many 
advantages over her fellow students. 
“There is a lot to learn from living; 
you can learn only so much in a tex¬ 
tbook. M Her decision to return to 
school drew mixed reactions from her 
family. “I raised a few eyebrows/’ she 
said. Additionally, Lila explained that 
while she was growing up, education 
wasn’t stressed to the extent it is today. 
She feels that today’s students expect 
more from their lives than just mar¬ 
riage and raising a family. 

David Jenkins, 33, graduated from 
WSU with a degree in forestry. When 
the Weyerhauser Corporation laid 



82 Expressions /1984 
















him off in 1982, he was earning more 
than $23,000 a year. His family made 
the trek east, to Pullman, so that David 
could go back to school, and continue 
his education. There were many 
adjustments to be made, one of them 
being an attempt to support a family 
on the salary of Susan, his wife. 

When David first came to college a 
decade ago, it was chic to major in any 
field that sounded socially “relevant/’ 
Today, with the spectre of unemploy¬ 
ment facing the college student as 
soon as he receives his diploma, many 
tend to be more practical in choosing 
their field of interest. What all this 
means to David is stiff competition for 
a limited number of jobs. 

He still remains optimistic of his 
chances to gain employment, and of 
the myriad of opportunities his 
education will provide for him. His 
return to school has affected the 


home front as well. He and Susan now 
share in the daily household chores, 
and the raising of their two children. 

Rowena Swan is 53 years old, and a 
mother of three. When she was 47, 
she decided to return to school, and 
pursue a college education. Presently 
she is working on her Masters in Adult 
and Continuing Education, and she 
hopes to teach in the near future. 
Additionally, she is considering 
attaining her Ph.D. and exploring 
what the Communications field has to 
offer her. 

When asked about what it was like 
to go to school, Rowena sounded just 
like any other harried college student. 
She finds the Social Sciences easy, but 
like many of us, has to struggle 
through mathematics; the concepts 
continually elude her. Her biggest 
dilemma, however, is how to budget 
her time. 


She also feels she has much to con¬ 
tribute to her classes, although some 
of her instructors may seem 
threatened by her. “I’m more apt to 
ask them questions that they don’t 
know the answers to,” she explained. 

David, Lila, and Rowena are exam¬ 
ples of how education doesn’t end at 
23, or 33, or at 53. Each one of them 
has availed themself of the opportun¬ 
ity to grow and broaden their hori¬ 
zons. Together, they have much to 
offer those of us who have just taken 
our first steps in life. 

by Marilee Moser 


k.k.kk.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.kt.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.kk.k.k.Wk.Wk.fc.k.k.k. 


1984 / Expressions 83 






























With this ring, 
I thee wed... 



The scene is set. You’re in a clas¬ 
sroom, struggling to take down the 
notes, when you notice her sitting be¬ 
side you. As she shifts in her seat, her 
long, brown hair falls over her shoul¬ 
ders in a carefree fashion. The spark¬ 
le in her eyes and her innocent smile 
makes you want to get to know her 
better. You wait until the hour draws 
to a close and then you make your 
move. “Hey, what are you doing 
tonight? Would you like to see a movie 
or something?” “No thanks,” she re¬ 
plies. “I’m married.” 

Most students seem a little shocked 
when they learn that a fellow class¬ 
mate has a husband or a wife. Andrew 
Montgomery, a third year 


er, isn’t limited to just the two of them. 
One of the two bedrooms in their 
apartment belongs to their 15 month 
old daughter, Auna Rachelle Mont¬ 
gomery. 

Andrew attends school full time, 
while Dana is listed as a part-time stu¬ 
dent. This is mainly because one of 
them wants to be home with Auna 
until she is older. When school starts 
in the Fall, however, Dana will start as 
a full-time student. Auna will then be 
old enough to enroll in an on-campus 
daycare program. “She’s just too 
young right now.”, Dana said. “I don’t 
want to leave her with just anyone, so 
this year I’m staying with her most of 
the time.”. 


“Being married isn't the hard part. 
It's starting a family that takes all 
your energy." 


Architecture student, thinks that 
since his marriage to Dana, he gets 
invited out to parties a lot less often. 
“Guys expect you to behave in a cer¬ 
tain way when you go out. I guess they 
think I can’t go partying anymore be¬ 
cause I have to get home to my wife 
and daughter.”, Andrew said. 

Dana says that she still gets asked 
out for dates and that when she ex¬ 
plains that she’s married, guys give 
her kind of a funny look. “I can just 
hear them saying, ‘Oh, that old ex¬ 
cuse’.”, Dana said. 

Andrew and Dana Montgomery 
were married on October 3, 1981. 
They both reside in Pullman and 
attend school here. They hope to 
graduate in 1986, Andrew in 
Architecture and Dana in Fashion 
Merchandizing. Their family, howev- 


Dana feels that there are too many 
negative conceptions about being 
married while still in school, not to 
mention about starting a family while 
so young. “It’s actually easier being 
married than being in love and being 
seperated,” Dana said. “We get to 
spend more time together and the 
atmosphere is so much more re¬ 
laxed.” 

Andrew said that he feels it takes 
less energy to be married than it does 
to be single. “You don’t have to go 
partying all the time to look for dates, 
and you get away from all of the dorm 
screaming,” Andrew said. He also 
added that the food is much better 
now. 

Both Andrew and Dana believe in 
the old cliche’ that two can live as 
cheaply as one. They have their share 


1984 / Expressions 85 





























with this ring... 


of financial problems, like all college 
students do, but they find it easier to 
budget their money now. ‘It’s easier to 
do it, when you know that you have to, 
” Dana said. They also receive finan¬ 
cial aid, such as Pell Grants, to help out 
with the school expenses, and Andrew 
works during the summer. Auna, 
although the daughter of “poor col¬ 
lege students” (as Andrew puts it), still 
gets most of what she wants...if not 
from her parents, then from her 
grandparents. “They love to spoil 
her,” Dana said. 

Although they don’t get out as 
much as they used to, they have 
friends over to their apartment. Also, 
they ocassionally get out of the house 
for a night on the town with a stop at 
the pizza parlor. Their friends con¬ 
tain both single and married students, 
but mostly single ones. “I think that 
we make a good impression on the 
single ones,” Dana said. “They see, in 


us, that being married isn’t as hard as 
everyone thinks it is.” 

Belonging to somewhat related 
fields, Dana and Andrew can help 
each other out with studying and pro¬ 
jects. Also, because Dana is only a 
part-time student at the present, she 
can handle most of the chores about 
the house and let Andrew study as 
much as he needs to. 

“I really feel that people have the 
wrong attitude about being married 
in school,” Dana said. “Your college 
years are the best time to meet people 
and you have the biggest selection of 
potentials,” Dana said. “Besides, 
being married isn’t the hard part. It’s 
starting a family that takes all your 
energy.” 

In an answer to being asked if they 
ever regretted getting married while 
still in school, Dana and Andrew 
simply looked at each other, smiled 
and gave a casual, “No”. 

by Nathalie Bull 




One of the things which comes with 
marriage is children. In Pullman, day¬ 
care services for children between one 
month and six years of age are easy to 
find for the busy student. There are 
nine centers located around town. 

Attending school while pregnant or 
raising children, though, is strenuous 
and stressful. Along with the press¬ 
ures of classes and studying, die stu¬ 
dent most likely works one or more 
jobs. 

If a woman chooses to have a child 
in Pullman, however, she will find that 
Pullman is one of the cheaper places 
in Washinton to have a child. 

An expecting mother has the choice 
of different methods of child birth. A 
method that has recently become 
popular in the United States is the 
LaMaze method. It was popular in 
Europe for over 10 years before mak¬ 
ing its way to America. 

Pullman has six variations to the 
LaMaze program. The session usually 
lasts six weeks. The programs consist 
of different breathing exercises, 
physical exercises, and instruction ab¬ 
out the birth process. 


The staff of Memorial Hospital’s 
maternity ward feels that mothers 
who go through the LaMaze program 
are better educated about their bodies 
and their unborn fetuses than 
mothers who do not get involved with 
the program. The l,aMaze mothers 
are considered less frightened by the 
birth process then the unprepared 
mothers. 

The Memorial Hospital's maternity 
staff consist of 16 persons, three ob¬ 
stetricians, two pediatricians, I I 
licensed nurses and two nurses aids. 
According Margene Bauer, the per¬ 
son in charge of the section, the unit is 
well prepared to handle any emergen¬ 
cy which might occur 

The woman who chooses to have a 
x:hild in Pullman can feel secure about 
having her child in an organized en¬ 
vironment. If she chooses, she will be 
able to return full time to any respon¬ 
sibilities she has with the knowledge 
that her child is in good hands. 

By Brenda J. Breaux 


E 


1984 / Expressions 87 


















The “In” Thing 


In 1983, TIME magazine raised a 
great controversy when is named, as 
man of the year, the computer. Yes, a 
collection of hardware and electricity 
bested die competition and received 
front cover exposure. This machine, 
so integral a part in the running of 
George Orwell’s fictional 1984, estab¬ 
lished itself , filling its place in the real 
world. 

The computer has permeated near¬ 
ly all aspects of daily life, and no where 
is this computer age advancement 
more visible then on the college 
campus. 

Upon entering campus life, most 
aspects of the daily routine are 
touched by computers. From eating 
meals in the dining hall, to checking 
out a library book, to life in the clas¬ 
sroom. the computer is present. Even 
recreation, in part, has been touched 
by the computer as the crowed games 


area of the CUB will attest. 

The computer services, provided 
through the university’s Computing 
Center, are rapidly expanding. 
“We’re growing about 40 percent ev¬ 
ery year,” stated Robert Lord, acting 
head of Computing Services. 

The current capacity of this uni¬ 
versity consists of some 700 to 900 
terminals, which are available on a 24 
hour a day basis. This access to the 
computer system provides many edu¬ 
cational opportunities, from data 
analysis to simple printing and word 
processing. These capabilities, and 
the many other services of the uni¬ 
versity’s computer system, are under 
great expansion. By the start of Fall 
Semester, Computing Services will be 
in the early stages of expanding its 
availability to students. Upon comple¬ 
tion, each student will have a compu¬ 
ter account on which to do homework. 


“We would like it to become second 
nature, like going to the library to get 
books, for them to use the compu¬ 
ters.’’ said Lord. 

To supply the terminal access 
necessary, the university will not only 
supply more terminals, including 
placing terminals in dormitories, but 
are also heavily pushing the sale of 
personal computers to students and 
faculty. Competition amoung various 
computer companies is stiff for a 
share of the 1.3 billion dollar personal 
computer market. This competition 
has allowed the university to offer low 
cost personal computers next year, 
thanks to the generous discount 
offered by a competing computer 
company. 

This school year also marked the 
beginning of expansion of computers 
into other areas of education, besides 
the often required computer science 



. 


88 Expressions /1984 














courses. For the first time, English 
201 courses were provided access to 
word processors for work on composi¬ 
tions. Next year will see the continua¬ 
tion of this program, directed mostly 
toward the introductory English 


courses. Many other departments 
have also found use for computers in 
their ciriculum, including engineer¬ 
ing, education and others. 

Regardless of the apprehension 
many may feel toward the computer 


age, what was once thought of as the 
video game fad has spread into a 
national obsession with the computer. 
It would seem that in 1984 the compu¬ 
ter is here and it’s here to stay. 

by Kathy Gilbert 


1984/Expressions 89 
















Trick - or - Beer 


‘ ‘Darkness falls across the land , the 
midnight hour is close at hand . 

Creatures crawling in search of blood, 
to terrorize your neighborhood. 

And who-so-ever shall be found without 
the souls of getting down must stand and 
face the hounds of hell and rot inside a 
corpse s shell ...” 

These words, transcribed by Vincent 
Price, describe, in the very best way, the 
mood of a Halloween night. 


When darkness falls across our campus, 
Bryan Tower mysteriously giows as its 
ghosts begin to walk the halls. 

Students transform into gruesome crea¬ 
tures, famous performers, E.T., or Gar¬ 
field look-alikes. These creatures are not 
in search of blood, but brew. They terro¬ 
rize every neighborhood from Greek Row 
to Campus Commons in need of a party. 

And who-so-ever stand in the way of the 
feast before All Saints Day, shall stand and 
face the hounds at Pelican Pete’s Hallo¬ 


ween Party and rot inside an empty keg 
shell. 

So beware; you’re never safe at 
Washington State University on Hallo¬ 
ween. You may become a creature that 
even in your darkest nightmare could not 
be pictured, and though you fight to stay 
alive, and sober, your body transforms 
into a beer-guzzling creature in search of 
satisfaction because no mortal can resist 
the power of a Halloween party. 

— Fran Mullen 



90 Expressions /1984 



























































l^nTTnC'davs or kffcHWal Kurland, 
the CeiTlc people celebrated (la* be¬ 
ginning of winter with a (estival that 
be^an on the eve o( the winter solstice 
and lasted several class. 

Alt hough the rituals of l)t nidism, a 
form of sun-worship practiced h\ the 
ancient Celtic people, were kept set ret 
and never written down, the festivals 
that were an important part of these 
rituals, were public and survived as 
folk customs for mans centuries. 

Samhttinn was a das of thanksgiv¬ 
ing for the safe return of the wander¬ 
ers and the renewal of the food 
suppK. 

It is believed that the Samlminu fes¬ 
tival originated at a vers earls period 


in the Cult of the Dead and perhaps 
was practiced as fat back in time as 
ancient Babylon. November was the 
season of the earth's decay, and the 
das that marked the end of summer 
w,ts ssmbolic of death. Thus. 
Samliuinn also became known as a 
das of rememberenie of the dead. 
Years later when the Christian 
Church came to Britain, they attemp¬ 
ted to replace the pagan festivals with 
Christian ones. Samhuinn became the 
Feast of All Saints to commemorate 
the blessed dead, and October SI was 
then known as All Hallows Kve. It is 
from that Christian feast that the 
name Halloween has evolved. 

Nancy Sc hlarmann 


1984 / Expressions 91 

























you can be tOO thin 


She watches the television intentlv 
as a beautiful, slender model appears 
on the screen advertising a watch. The 
model whispers to the viewers in a 
seductive tone, “You can never be too 
thin, or too rich.” But this woman 
knows differently. 

“Yes you can be too thin,” she 
warns, “I know they’re talking about 
the watch but I believe they are also 
talking about people.” 

The thin, small-framed 20-year-old 
woman is 5’4” and 107 pounds. She 
claims, “It’s fine for other people to 
gain a few pounds, but not for me.” 

A sophomore in psychology, Jane, a 
fictitious name, is a victim of an eating 
disorder which is inflicting an increas¬ 
ing number of women. Anorexia ner¬ 
vosa is an eating disorder in which a 
person never thinks they are skinny 
enough, and constantly diets. Its vic¬ 
tims have an intense fear of becoming 
obese, which does not diminish as 
their weight loss progresses. They 
have a distorted body image, claiming 
to “feel fat” when emaciated. Their 
weight loss exceeds 25 percent of their 
original body weight. They refuse to 
maintain body weight over a minimal 
normal weight for their age. 

Anorexia nervosa’s victims are 90 
percent female, and 3 to 27 percent of 
them die from the disorder. 

“There is no one solution to or fac¬ 
tor that causes anorexia nervosa,” re¬ 
ports Counseling Psychologist Dr. 
Barbara Merriam from YVSU 
Counseling Services. 

Merriam explains the disorder as 
“something out of the ordinary to 
make her feel like she’s in control” 


Merriam counsels the eating dis¬ 
order patients who come into the 
Counseling Center. She says the key 
to helping an anorexia patient is 
“helping them get in touch with the 
things they say to themselves.” 

“I blew my diet. I’m a lousy person,” 
is an average response from patients 
according to merriam. 

The media takes partial credit for 
the growing numbers of anorexia vic¬ 
tims, explains Merriam. Women see 
the excessively thin models on televi¬ 
sion and in magzines and see that im¬ 
age as the one they should live up to. 

A low self-esteem is another contri¬ 
butor to the disorder. “They feel they 
need to do something in order for 
them to be valued by others and by 
themselves,” said merriam. 

Jane admits, “It’s such a sad, sick 
disease. And you do need help. You 
can’t overcome it by yourself.” 

Remembering the summer be¬ 
tween her sophomore and junior year 


"It's like an alcoholic . You tell your¬ 
self ids O.K. 7 can handle it', but it's 
not a self control disease. ” 


in high school, Jane recalls the origin 
of a problem she has struggled with 
for five years: “My friends were diet¬ 
ing, so I started dieting too. The I 
started going out with someone, 
wanted to look my best, and kept los¬ 
ing. I remember asking him if he 
would like me if I were fat, and his 
relpy was ‘I don’t know, but it doesn’t 
matter because you’re not.’ I couldn't 
- believe it! He should have said he'd 
like me no matter what I looked like.” 

“It’s our society. Your exterior 
counts, it’s not what’s inside. Being 
thin is beautiful. We should be accept¬ 
ing each other for what we are, not 
what we look like,” Jane exclaimed. 

Jane’s senior year in high school she 
attended a party where she had a few 
drinks. Never having had alcohol be¬ 
fore the drinks hit her hard because of 
her low weight. The pressure of her 
weight loss struggle exploded. “I 
came home and started screaming 


‘I’m so fat. I’m so fat!’ and I onl 
weighed 103 pounds! I woke up m 
family. Then my mom wanted me t< 
see a psychiatrist.” 

It was this incident that brough 
Jane to the reality of her problem 
“It’s like an alcoholic. You tell yoursel 
it’s O.K., ‘I can handle it,’ but it’s not 
self-control disease.” 

The starving became more ex 
treme. Jane began vomiting afte; 
meals or after binging. “You say t< 
yourself, ‘You’ve blown it this far,jus! 
go for it!”, Jane explains. 

Anorexia nervosa is a disorder it 
which the person overcontrols the eat 
ing habits and their bodies, versu 
bulimia or the “Binge and purge” dis 
order in which the person is not ii 
control of their eating habits anc 
therefore binges and vomits mort 
often. 

Jane’s psychologist helped her sto 
vomiting and she has not vomited fo 
weight-loss reasons since. “Now it' 
such a stigma not to throw up, ever 
when I’m sick.” 

After graduating from high schoo 
Jane’s weight went up and down, los 
ing and gaining up to 30 pounds. I| 
has been a series of binging anc 
dieting. 

She is now 107 pounds and is trying 
to lose weight. Her goal is 95 pounds 
“When I’m in this stage, I can kee^ 
losing. I can look at myself, and se< 
those little bulges and think ‘Oh nv 
gosh, I need to lose weight!” 

Jane is now seeing a psychologis 
and participates in a group therapy 
session through Counseling Serviced 
on campus, but she says, “All they cai 
do is give suggestions, they don’ 
know how to cure it. How do you work 
with something when you don’ 
understand it.” 

“People tell me ‘you look good’, bu 
I don’t think I do. I want to be skinrn 
enough so my old clothes will fit,’ 
Jane said. 

Jane thinks about her weight almos 
constantly, “I’m a perfectionist,j 
which is not uncommon for anorexia 
victims, “I have to be the best at some 
thing.” 

“You know you’re thin, but the 


92 Expressions /1984 




















■ 



1984 / Expressions 93 


Oborn 













TOO THIN... 

thinner you are, the less chance you 
have of being fat. There’s this fear of 
fat. You’re not going to be loved if 
you’re fat. You go through stages. 
Sometimes you can look at it 
rationally.” 

The open-minded, expressive 
young woman is not afraid to talk ab¬ 
out her disorder when people ask. She 
would like to help others overcome it. 
“I don’t want to get better just for me, 
but for other people. 1 want to under¬ 
stand it. 1 want to help other people.” 

‘‘I really want to like myself,” she 
explains as she stares out of the win¬ 
dow in her room. “I know the prob- 


“/ know the problem. I know that 95 
pounds is thin” 


lem. I know that 95 pounds is thin.” 

When asked why she diets, starving 
herself to the point of hurting herself 
physically as well as emotionally and 
mentally, Jane explains, “It’s strange. 
I understand this problem, but you 
make excuses like: ‘I’m tiny-boned’ 
and ‘I’m different’, I. don’t know 
why!” 

Reflecting on the commercial with 
the beautiful model and her wrist 
watch, Jane comments on what people 
with anorexia nervosa would say ab¬ 
out the commercial: “That’s right, you 
can’t be too thin, but I know I can.” 



Anorexia nervosa can be cured, 
according to Laurel Branen, profes¬ 
sor of human nutrition and foods 
here. Branen has overcome the eating 
disorder herself and talks openly ab¬ 
out it. 

“People have to stop looking at it 
with a negative viewpoint; talking ab¬ 
out how destructive the disorder is 
and the death rate that follows it. 
What we need to do is work the char¬ 
acteristics of the anorexic victim, like 
compulsiveness and perfectionism, 
into recovering,” Brannen declared. 

The best way you can help someone 
who is struggling with anorexia is to 
ignore comments about weight and 
eating completely. By remarking on 
the person’s weight loss or gain, or 
discussing their good or bad eating 
habits, “ypu are reinforcing their 
anorexic behavior,” she said. 

What should be reinforced are the 
reasons the person is a friend. Branen 
suggests telling the individual why 
they make a difference in others’ lives. 


“By reinforcing them as human 
beings, the person can say to thenself 
‘I have something else to offer besides 
just low weight.” “Every woman on 
campus has to stop talking about their 
own dietng,” Branen stated. The com¬ 
petition is hard on the person who is 
recovering. They feel they have to 
keep up with everyone else, and they 
want to be the skinniest. 

A major symptom of anorexia is 
when the focus of food and exercise 
take over the person’s life. At that 
point, Branen stresses, “It’s not your 
job to diagnose the person. That’s for 
psychologists and physicians to de¬ 
cide. Simply say, ‘I’m concerned about 
you.” 

Anorexia nervosa is the broken re¬ 
lationship between hunger and appe¬ 
tite, explains Branen. The person de¬ 
nies their appetite for so long that 
their body doesn’t know when they 
are full or hungry. This system takes a 
long time to become re-established. A 
person who is overcoming anorexia 


94 Expressions /1984 










Obom 


may eat normal amounts and gain 
more weight than the average person 
bcause their metabolism has slowed 
down so much, and is used to getting 
by on so little. 

Branen recovered from the dis¬ 
order two years ago after four to five 
years of struggling with it. She de¬ 
veloped anorexia after she graduated 


“There’s this fear offat . You’re not 
going to be loved if you’re fat.” 


from college and moved to a new area. 
Not knowing anyone in town, she 
needed something to focus her atten¬ 
tion on, and food became the center 
of everything. She didn’t realize what 
she was doing to herself until later 
when her husband gave her a book on 
nutrition. Then her focus became 
nutrition. 

She recalls the day she knew she was 
cured. After a professional meeting 


where she ate excessive amounts of 
food, her appetite was low and she 
thought she was coming down with 
the flu so she ate very little the follow¬ 
ing two days. There was no guilt in¬ 
volved, no panic, and no diet. “I lis¬ 
tened to what my body was saying!” 
she exclaimed enthusiastically. 

Branan believes today’s approach 
to anorexia treatment should inclue 
psychoanalysis as well as a nutritional 
analysis. She stated that 99 percent of 
the research in the field of anorexia is 
in psycholoty and feels the nutrition 
side has been ignored. 

In class Branen descrives the dis¬ 
order as “kind of like a pendulum. 
You deny yourself of food, then you 
swing all the way back and eat every¬ 
thing you can, then you swing all the 
way back and starve yourself again, 
but this time you’re a little more cau¬ 
tious because of what it caused last 
time,” she explained. A person keeps 
swinging back and forth until they re¬ 
cover from the disorder. 


Compulsiveness and perfectionism 
are characteristics that Branen ha 
taken from her anorexic experiences 
and redirected into her teaching posi¬ 
tion. She tells her classes that she has 
had the eating disorder “not because 
I’m proud of it, but because I hope 
that maybe some of my students will 
finally admit it once they know that 
I’ve gone through it.” 

She says she still has a somewhat 
distorted image of her body, but hav¬ 
ing recovered from the disorder 
Branen says she trusts people more. 
Before she recovered she would re¬ 
ceive a compliment or hear someone 
tell er she wa too skinny and she would 
think “they’re just saying that.” 

Her new life is one of no “safe-food 
lists”, and no calorie counting. “I eat 
what I like; what is good and nutri¬ 
tious.” 

by Peggy O’Boyle 


1984 / Expressions 95 





That’s The Way 

It Was 1983/1984 



Locally the biggest news of the 1983-84 school year was 
the retirement plans of Dr. Glenn Terrell after many years 
at the helm of Cougarland. He will retire July 1, 1985. 

A new term was learned by university officials — compa¬ 
rable worth. The state was found guilty in federal court of 
paying women less than men for doing work of comparable 
worth. A secretary job was ruled equal to a truck driver- 
delivery person. The decision may cost the state up to 
$500,000,000. 

Another term popped up — checkerboard! Students be¬ 
came involved in a housing plan for Orton Hall which would 
allow men and women to live on the same floor in a checker¬ 
board pattern. 


The spring saw new light in Pullman with the lighting of 
Bailey baseball field. On May 11, Coach Chuck “Bobo” 
Brayton pulled the switch and 3,100 fans gave their approv¬ 
al, thus marking the first night baseball game in Pullman. 

By winning 15 of its last 19 games, the Cougar Baseball 
team won the league co-championship with Portland State. 
The Cougars then won the four-team playoff series at Port¬ 
land, but did not make it past Tempe, Arizona on their way 
to the Collegiate Baseball World Series in Omaha. 

John Skurla was the unanimous choice as Northern Divi¬ 
sion Player of the Year. Skurla was the only Cougar named 
on this year’s PAC-10 Northern Division All Star team. 

The Cougar Track team was the PAC-10 champ for the 


96 Expressions / 1984 














second year in a row and came in second in the NCAA meet 
in Eugene. They had been the pre-meet favorites but lost to 
the Ducks of Oregon. 

Julius Korir, in the 5,000 meters, brought an individual 
title home to Pullman for Coach John Chaplin. 

The famous WAZZU floor parties in university housing 
were under close examination, with new rules being drawn 
up to end the drinking problems. 

A number of well-known entertainers were on campus, 
including Bill Cosby, Rich Little, The Pretenders and Huey 
Lewis and the News. One of the biggest shows of the year, 
however, was provided free of charge by Sister Cindy and 
Brother Jed, who preached in the mall. They outdrew the 
student election debates as students stood in the rain to 
listen, cheer and jeer the pair. 

The thousands of students lining up to have their pictures 
taken for the new student body cards brought a little of 
Orwell’s “1984” to reality. 

The 88th graduating class experienced the setting of new 
university rules, planning to reduce the amount of drinking 
at the commencement ceremony. 

“Slum” housing, which had seen hundreds of married 
students through its doors, came down as the Fairways were 
burned and levelled. 

The announcement of a Mr. Steak restaurant coming to 
town was front page news, proving that life can be slow in 
Pullman. 

The university and city were involved in a new game — 
wheel locks for vehicles whose owners had not paid parking 
violations. 

A board game called “Pullman” was being sold in down¬ 
town stores. It was like Monopoly but with local names for 
the propery squares — the high point of the game is to own 
all of the Pullman bars. 

Use of Canadian coins became a “no-no” and signs forbid¬ 
ding the use of the northern money were seen everywhere 
except on certain pop machines on campus. 

Faculty excellence awards were given to Glenn Rosby for 
research in chemistry, C.A. Ryan for instruction in bioche¬ 
mistry and William Funk for public service in engineering. 

M. Stephn Lilly was named the Dean of Education and 
Reid C. Miller the new Dean of Engineering. 

Named as outstanding senior men and women at the 
university were Aliza Allen, Gina Brislawn, Colleen Cook, 
Melani Jo Hiles, Jane Ann Smith, Daniel Lynch, Patrick 
Lynch, Scott MacQuarrie, Gary Steele, and Gregory Witter. 

Religion or the lack of it was an issue on campus. An 
October rally drew over 400 to the mall area and some felt a 
local religious group was attempting to take-over the stu¬ 
dent assembly. 

Col. John Fabian returned from outer space and came to 
Pullman. The hero went to high school and college here. 
Fabian was a member of the Challenger space shuttle. 

The artificial turf in Martin Stadium had to be replaced — 
it was too hard said football players — and the villian may 
have been volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens. The university 
and the manufacturer ended up splitting the costs of about 
$500,000. 

The president of the grad students, Phillip Braun, called 
for a boycott of Coors beer but the plan was called off after 
he heard the complete text of Coors officials talk concerning 
blacks. 


Students got involved in the First Annual Turtle Races, 
held in Bohler Gym. The event was sponsored by a beer 
company, but then almost everything is sponsored by a beer 
company these days. 

Students used the state lottery to spend those extra coins 
and some even won — its more fun to pay state taxes this 
way. 

Bomb threats were common on campus and many clas¬ 
srooms were emptied as Spokane bomb squads came roar¬ 
ing into Pullman to check out buildings. The university 
officials countered the threats by moving tests to other 
buildings, rather than cancelling class and by offering re¬ 
wards for help in catching the “bombers”. 

Faculty members complained about low salaries, and 
although administration officials kept saying increases were 
important, they also said that the money was not there yet. 
Students got the same message from parents. 

The campus and town of Pullman bid farewell to the old 
ways and prepared to welcome the new early-start calendar 
in the fall of 1984. 

The winter was mild in Pullman with little snow, but 
police kept talking about the increased use of another type 
of “snow” in the area. 

The Green River murders, while 300 miles from Pullman, 
kept the attention of Pullman residents as the number of 
victims surpassed 20. 

The Pullman theaters were sold, with eight of the local 
screens now being owned by the same company. The price 
of tickets and popcorn went up, but so did the number of 
movies hitting town on their first run. The Old Post Office 
started showing 99-cent shows and proved that the drop in 
the number of people attending movies was not because of 
poor subject matter, but rather high prices. 

The Return of Spock had Trekkies lined up the day 
before the opening show. Spock, in his Earthly body as 
Leonard Nimoy, visited Pullman and drew large audiences. 
He refused to give the ending to his movie but did give his 
famous sign...live long and prosper. 

Even before the awards were given, anyone who was half 
attentive to movieland this year knew that the motion pic¬ 
ture Terms of Endearment was destined to win the Academy 
Award for the best picture of 1983. The film represented a 
comeback for star Shirley MacLaine and the honor of 
garnering the award for best actress of the year was the 
height of her long and often stormy career. Robert Duvall 



1984 / Expressions 97 


Burke 










That’s The Way It Was 

1983/1984 


broke new ground when he portrayed a country singer on 
the comeback trail in the film Tender Mercies. His perform¬ 
ance, which many critics cited as the best of his career, 
earned him an academy award for best actor. 

Girls Just Wanna Have Tun, an unassuming statement by 
itself, was given new meaning by singer Cyndi Lauper as 
people around the nation listened to her number one tune 
and watched her frolic on the streets of New York City on 
Music Television. Her tiny stature and mousy voice instantly 
made her the favorite of millions everywhere. Her follow up 
number one hit Time After Time proved that Cyndi Lauper 
isn’t a flash in the pan. She’s around to stay. 

Boys will be boys...or will they? With his pink lipstick, 
multicolored hair, and green cape, George O'Dowd popu¬ 
larly known as “Boy George” of the group Culture Club 
seems to defy definition. No one seems to know exactly what 
he is... and he’s not telling. Recently called an “over made- 
up tart” by Britain’s Princess Margret, Boy George seems 
destined to turn heads wherever he walks...or struts. 

Michael Jackson is back and he’s laughing all the way to 
the bank. Sales of the album “Thriller” have been phe¬ 
nomenal and Michael Jackson hysteria has swept the nation. 
Everything from biographies to Michael Jackson bubble¬ 
gum cards are now being sold. Recently, a poster displayed 
Michael Jackson dressed in a yellow Lacoste sweater. At 
Nordstom’s in Seattle, sales of yellow sweaters skyrocketed. 
“...New York, New York, big city of dreams, 
but all in New York ain’t always what it seems, 

You might be fooled if you go downtown, 

but I been in Harlem, and I know my way around. 

Too much, too many people.” 

This rap, done by Grand Master Flash and The Furious 
Five, puts to music the hopelessness of life in the ghetto. Out 
of that misery, an art form gained popularity throughout 
the U.S. “Break Dancing,” or “breakin’ ” as it is called by 
some, is a combination of disco, jazz dancing and gymnas¬ 
tics. It has progressed from the back streets and alleys of 
many major cities to a favorite pasttime of kids and agile 
adults alike across the nation. Since its popularity from the 
hit movie Ftadidance , it has moved out of the big cities and 
into the small towns across the nation. Its popularity can be 
seen in several movies based solely on the street dancing art, 
such as Street Beat and Breakin . 

Football was sort of fun the first part of the season, but a 
loss to the University of Arizona and then a 24-14 heart- 
breaker loss to the UCLA Bruins took the joy out of being a 
Cougar. The term “Couged-it” became a password among 
the faithful and faithless. 

But then the impossible happened — the Cougars caught 
fire and became the hottest and probably the best team in 
the PAC-10 according to Sports Illustrated. Next came the 
biggest shock in the history of football in this state — the 
Cougars for the second year in a row prevented the Huskies 
from going to the Rose Bowl. The Cougars stalked into 


Seattle and kicked the once-proud Dawgs in the butt. 

Walden was given a pay raise and he rejected suggestions 
he would move to more fertile fields to teach his brand of 
football. 

Len Stevens made his debut as head basketball coach and 
most students and fans took a wait-and-see attitude. It was 
soon apparent that Stevens had a different brand of basket¬ 
ball and a different tailor than George Raveling. 

Students listened while the state and university officials 
set tougher entrance requirements for future Coug Classes 
— “better them than 11 s” was the general consensus. 

One of the things that made the year complete was an 
earthquake that hit Pullman about 7 a.m. one day in the 
pre-final haze of first semester. Most students were asleep 
but lied if asked what they were doing. 

Cougar fans started getting interested when Mark Ry- 
pien, a quarterback from Spokane, announced he was leav¬ 
ing Pullman to play baseball at a different college, but then 
later returned. 

Forty percent of the students receiving mid-semester 
grades were found to be deficient which made it harder to 
write home for money. 

Turf wars came to mean the fight to bring higher educa¬ 
tion to the Spokane area. There was also a plan to combine 
Eastern and this university into one facility. 

John Erlichman came to campus and drew a large crowd 
to the CUB. The reason the former Nixon confidant drew 
about 1,000 viewers was open to question — was it to see the 
former White I louse Aide and his view of history or because 
it was a class assignment? 

The spring election was the old guessing game — Who’s 
on First? There was a primary and a general election, which 
was overturned. Starting over again from scratch, there was 
a second primary followed by another general election. 
When all of the bureaucratic dust settled, it turned out that 
the winning ticket had not even appeared in the first two 
elections. 

There was a catastrophic shortage of loveable little Cab¬ 
bage Patch Dolls during the hectic final shopping days be¬ 
fore Christmas, creating panic and riots. 

On the international level it was a testing year for Amer¬ 
ican foreign policy, a year in which the costs of being a global 
superpower became dramatically clear. 

Lebanon proved to be one of the great controversies in 
recent history. America made the role switch from 
peacekeeper to open supporter of President Gemayel’s 
crumbling regime. After the deaths of 264 American 
Marines and a series of setbacks in prestige, the United 
States called it quits. Most Americans seemed to think the 
Marines were the right men doing the wrong job. 

In Grenada, U.S. Marines and Army Rangers staged their 
first major combat operation since Vietnam. The invasion 
resulted in the rescue of 1,000 Americans and the uncover¬ 
ing of Soviet and Cuban arms. President Ronald Reagan 


98 Expressions / 1984 



described the invasion as “just in time” but other nations of 
the world questioned the necessity of the action. 

Colonel Muammar Kaddafi and Libya were as news¬ 
worthy as ever in 1983-84. The highlight of Libya’s mischief 
was the gunning down of anti-Kaddafi demonstrators out¬ 
side the Libyan embassy in London, provoking British 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to break diplomatic ties. 

The United States didn’t always play by any set of rules 
either. Senator Barry Goldwater summarized the CIA’s in¬ 
volvement in the mining of Nicaragua’s harbors by staling 
"this is an act of war. I don’t know how we’re going to explain 
this one.” 

American military involvement escalated throughout 
Central America, but the El Salvadorian rebels continued to 
gain strength and the CIA-backed anti-Sandinistas con¬ 
tinued to fail. Maybe if we just send a little more.... 

The Iran-Iraq conflict raged stronger than ever. Both 
sides threatened to close the Persian Gulf and the United 
States vowed to keep it open. This proved the futility of 
words when several commercial and oil vessels of various 
nations were bombed by Iraq. 

"A barbaric act” was how Ronald Reagan described the 
downing of Korean Airlines flight 007 last fall. The jumbo 
jet and its passengers were the victim of a Soviet fighter’s 
missile after the Korean plane intruded into Soviet airspace. 
The attack triggered a new chill in Soviet-American rela¬ 
tions and a wave of anti-Soviet sentiment throughout the 
world. After weeks of searching through the wreckage, the 
United States had more questions than answers about flight 
007. 

The Pershing II missiles arrived in Europe on schedule. 
Europeans responded with massive anti-nuclear demon¬ 
strations. The Soviet response? Cessation of the arms limita¬ 
tion talks and a buildup of ballistic submarines off the Un¬ 
ited States coasts. 

A death in the Soviet Union changed the relationship 
between the two major world powers. Yuri Andropov spoke 
to those gathered at the f uneral of Lenoid Brezhnnev. After 
14 months Konstatin Chernenko buried Andropov. The 
change in command produced some renewed hope for 
arms reductions talks, but Chernenko proved to be a tough 
cookie. 

In Poland, Lech Walesa had been considered in three 
previous years for the coveted Nobel Peace Prize. This past 
year, however, Walesa was the winner, which did not make 
Communist rulers happy. Walesa’s honor provided inspira¬ 
tion to thousands of Polish Solidarity workers and the rest of 
the world. For Walesa personally? It was "too beautiful to be 
true”. 

A national fast food chain started the phrase "Who’s Got 
the Beef’ and the campaign entered the language of the 
average citizen. It became the punchline of dirty jokes and 
part of the political campaign of the Democratic party. 

Fritz Mondale and Gary Hart battled for the Democratic 
Party while President Ronald Reagan blasted around the 
world in Air.Force One to visit Ireland, England, China and 
other parts of the world. 

The campaign had the first serious black candidate run¬ 
ning for president — Jesse Jackson. As a result, record 
numbers of black voters turned out and aided Jackson in 
acquiring up to 20 percent of voter preference in some 
states. 


Ronald Reagan’s popularity soared during 1983-84, but 
some of his associates weren’t seen in such a favorable light. 
After three years of sticking his foot in his mouth, James 
Watt finally swallowed it whole. Sierra Clubbers and Beach 
Boy fans couldn’t oust him from his position as Secretary of 
the Interior but "a black, a woman, two jews and a cripple” 
finally did. Edwin Meese, a major White House adviser, was 
nominated as U.S. Attorney General but as the investigation 
of his alleged finances unfolded, it appeared that he might 
have a few too many skeletons in his closet. 

On September 1, 1983, Senator Henry "Scoop” Jackson 
died in his home town of Everett, Washington. Jackson 
served nearly 43 years in Congress including a number of 
years in the U.S. Senate. He was one of the most influential 
members on the subjects of defense and environmental 
protection. Former Governor Dan Evans was appointed to 
temporarily fill Jackson’s post. 

Last vear marked the twentieth anniversary of John F 
Kennedy's assassination and added two more tragedies to 
the Kennedy’s growing list. In September. Bobby Jr., son of 
the late Robert Kennedy, was arrrested for possession of 
heroin; in March of this year, David, another son of Robert, 
v\as found dead in a Palm Beach hotel of a drug overdose. 

America’s Gold rush in the Winter Olympics at Sarajevo 
highlighted the sporting year. Washingtonians brought 
home four of the seven medals won bv Americans. Phil and 
Steve Maine of Yakima captured the two top spots in the 
slalom while Debbie Armstrong of Seattle look the gold in 
the giant slalom. Rosalyn Sumner of Edmonds finished 
second in womens’ figure skating. A precedent was set when 
Billy Johnson became the first American to take top honors 
in the downhill. 

The summer Olympics in Los Angeles got off to an in¬ 
teresting start when the Russians ordered a boycott and a 
number of the Eastern Bloc nations followed order, and 
announced tiler would not travel to Southern California. 

Earlier the Pan-American games provided quite a scantlai 
for sports fans. Anabolic steroids and other drugs were 
found in the bloodstream several athletes. 

For the f irst time in over a century, the America Cup, the 
world-recognized troph) lot vaclu racing, left home. It now 
belongs to the Aust ralians. Next year the race will be held "in 
the land down under” 

The Oakland, better make that the L.A., Raiders, won the 
tide as best professional football team in America bv whip¬ 
ping the Washington Redskins 38-9 in Super Bowl XVIII. 

In Collegiate football, the University of Miami captured 
the heart of America when it whipped Nebraska in the 
Orange Bowl. No surprises in the 1 leisman Frophy race as 
Mike Rozier of Nebraska was named the winner. He sur¬ 
prised the spotting world when he signed with the U.S. 
Football league as did Steve Young who moved to the L.A. 
Express. 


1984 / Expressions 99 



WHO 

CARES 


(we all do) 




Put a communications major from 
Renton together with a math major 
from Spanaway and what do you get? 
Most people would be hard pressed 
for the answer. Give these otherwise 
normal college students the tools of 
their trade, however, and they are 
transformed into a highly visable 
component of WSU athletics. They 
are otherwise known as the mikemen. 

Camron Dime returned for his 
second year behind the mike with new 
comer, Mark Oppelt. Their visibility 
found on the court sometimes spills 
over into everyday life on campus. 
“There is a subtle recognition that you 
get on campus, unless you happen to 
misspell Cougars at a game,” was 
Oppelt’s view of the existing situation. 

With their unique dress and crazed 
antics, the mikemen have established 
themselves as an institution to Cougar 
fans. The crowd, is of course, an in¬ 
tegral part of the product that the 
mikemen achieve. “There is always 
pressure to get the crowd going,” 
Oppelt noted, “and there are always 
trying moments.” On the other hand, 


there are those times when their 
efforts are rewarded and the crowd is 
reponsive. The reputation of the 
WSU crowd has grown steadily over 
the recent years and this is, in great 
part, due to the not so subtle urging of 
the mikemen. 

Each member is known by certain 
trademarks. Camron Dime, in his fin¬ 


al year, has brought to Friel Court 
“the wave” and many a college co-ed is 
familiar with his bawdy tribute to 
Michael Jackson’s ‘‘Billie Jean”. 
Thanks to his mother’s sewing ability, 
Marrk Oppelt, in his first year, is 
famous for his collection of shorts. 
Mark still has another year to contri¬ 
bute to his reputation. 


100 Expressions /1984 












The mikemen receive support for 
their efforts from local businesses in 
the form of donated prizes for con¬ 
tests run in pre-game shows, but 
money is often tight for the squad. 
Many of the expenses associated with 
the mike squad are from their own 
pockets. Other money is brought in by 
fund raisers and in 1983, for the first 
year, funds were supplied to the 
squad through S & A fees. With the 


cutbacks in many areas of funding on 
campus, however, the continuation of 
funding through S & A fees is uncer¬ 
tain. 

Each year, selection for filling 
vacancies on the squad is decided 
through a series of interviews. Next 
year will see at least one new face out 
on the floor, and if funding is avail¬ 
able, possibly a second. 

Oppelt sees himself returning for 


another year in front of the crowd, 
and he is looking forward to the ex¬ 
perience. “I’ll miss Camron, but Ell be 
happy with whoever they choose to 
replace him. I’m really looking for¬ 
ward to next season. It will be fun.” 

Thanks to their time-consuming 
effort, Cougar fans will continue to be 
entertained, pushed and prodded by 
the zany on-court antics of the WSU 
Mike squad. 

by Kathy Gilbert 





















PENGUINS ARE FOREVER 




Penguins are forever? Not many of 
us realize that once you’re a penguin 
in the Cougar Marching Band, you’re 
always a penguin. Perhaps illustrating 
band tradition, innovativeness, and 
unity, a few years back when new uni¬ 
forms were purchased, band mem¬ 
bers noticed their striking resembl- 
ence to penguins. Thus, began pen¬ 
guin-mania, one of the many ideas 
that portrays their outstanding 
creativity and uniqueness. 

With much dedication, pride, and 
commitment, band members have 
worked together to represent WSU 
with spirit and enthusiasm. During 
football season, marching band mem¬ 
bers practice eight to ten hours a week 
plus their all day performances on 
game days. During basketball season, 
practice time is not as demanding, 
however, new themes of dress for 
each game must be planned. In spite 
of the long hours of practice, mem¬ 
bers still remain enthusiastic. As mar¬ 
ching band director, Pat Root, noted, 
“They refuse to get bored...they make 
things exciting for themselves.” 

In order to become and band mem¬ 
ber, certain criteria must be met. Dur¬ 
ing freshman orientation week, audi¬ 
tions are usually set for Sunday. Parti¬ 
cipants perform selected pieces in 
which they are asked to play certain 
scales, in order to establish their 
range. Once the musical abilities of 
the performer have been analyzed, 
they are asked to another meeting 
that evening. Following a trial period, 
each individual decides if they are 
willing to contribute the large amount 
of time necessary to perfect the band’s 
performance. 

Rose Coulter, a marching band 
member for three years, also known 
as the Head Penguin due to her en¬ 
thusiastic support and love for pen¬ 
guins, said, “The band unity is great! 
We look out for one another.” 


The band also has numerous 
awards given to members at the end of 
the season. The Percy Penguin Award 
was given to the outstanding fresh¬ 
man, Chris Swanson; the Percival 
Penguin Award was given to the most 
outstanding upper classman, Rick 
Keller; and the Best in the West 
Award was given to the most out¬ 
standing overall band member, Vince 


Carlson. The awards are given for 
creativity as much as for rewarding 
the excellence of the band members. 

The president of the marching 
band, Kris Conde, explained what 
being a member of the band means to 
her: “It means being a part of the big¬ 
gest, most unified, enthusiastic group 
representing WSU.” 


102 Expressions /1984 









Putnam 



The overall goal of the band is 
aimed at support of the Cougs and 
school spirit. However, entertainment 
and social amusement for the band 
members are also important. Band 
director, Pat Root, stated that her 
goals are, “To see each student leave 
at the end of the marching period 
feeling like a success.” Whatever their 
specific aims, individual or team, the 
Cougar Marching Band is doing an 
outstanding job of reaching these 
goals. 

Carol Trautenberg 



1 984 / Expressions 103 








Twist and Shout 


You learn something new every 
day. 1 had always thought that being a 
WSU cheerleader was an easy, gla¬ 
morous, weekend job. Then 1 was 
assigned (in truth 1 volunteered) by 
the yearbook editor to do a story on 
the cheerleaders. Expecting a nice 
cushy assignment, I set up an inter¬ 
view with Carla Copenhagen, grab¬ 
bed a tape recorder, and went to get 
all thejuicy details about the social life 
of a cheerleader. Much to my chagrin, 
Carla told me that cheerleaders don’t 
have much time to do anything be¬ 
sides practice and study. 

Cheerleaders are required to have 
the standard 2.0 gpa and take at least 
twelve credits per semester. To be¬ 
come a cheerleader, candidates must 
go through preliminary tryouts, 
which involve three or four work¬ 
shops, where they learn various songs, 
routines, stunts, jumps, and gymnas¬ 
tics. Then the hopefuls must go be¬ 
fore a judging panel of 25 people with 
gymnastic, dance, or other qualifying 
backgrounds and present their own 
material. After that, an interview 
must be completed and the panel then 
selects the twelve cheerleaders for the 
next year. 

The odds for becoming a cheer¬ 
leader aren’t very good if you base 
them just on numbers. Over 100 peo¬ 
ple show up for the first workshop. By 
the time the final tryout comes up, 
only about 40 women and 15 men re¬ 
main in the running. Of these, 12 are 
selected for the varsity, or crimson, 
squad. 

A considerable amount of time is 
required in being a cheerleader. 
There are two hours of practice per 
day, five days a week, plus extra prac¬ 
tices on weekends when they are 
needed. Emphasis is also placed on 
activities outside of practice, such as 
weightlifting, running, dancing, and 
aerobics. Of course all of these prac¬ 
tices and workouts are for a purpose; 
the live event, varsity games. In addi¬ 


tion to all of the home games, the 
cheerleaders often go on the road 
with the teams. This sometimes causes 
the cheerleaders to miss classes. Carla 
Copenhagen says that at times, some 
instructors can be very uncooperative, 
but in most cases the profs are very 
understanding and lenient. For the 
exceptions, there is an athletic 
academic advisor who will help out. 

There are other disadvantages to 
being a cheerleader. At times there 
are injuries, the most common cause is 
the girls being dropped, resulting in 
sprains. Carla mentioned sprained 
ankles and necks as two of the in juries 
encountered, saying that she herself 
had hurt her neck earlier in the year. 

Cheerleaders are treated well by the 
coaches and WSU fans, but some 


opponent fans and referees, especial¬ 
ly at away games, can be disagreeable. 
Treatment by other students on cam¬ 
pus also varies. Carla says that some 
social stigmas are placed on cheer¬ 
leaders. She says that since cheerlead¬ 
ers are a little more visible than other 
students, more pressure and higher 
expectations are placed on them. 

Carla says that she would definitely 
recommend trying out to anyone with 
any cheerleading talent. She says that 
cheerleading is a great outlet, that you 
get to travel, and that you get to know 
the teams. A person must be aware of 
the time constraints though, and that 
cheerleading can be like a job at times, 
Carla says. All in all, cheerleading can 
be a lot of fun, but it also takes dedica¬ 
tion and a lot of work. 


by Dale E. Higgs 



Burke 


104 Expressions /1984 






































Burke 



1984 / Expressions 105 














TRIBUTE! 

Dad’s and Mom’s Weekend 



They loom in our memories as the 
cruel dictators of our past. They set 
our curfew at 11:30 when everyone 
else got to stay out until 1:00. They 
had the knack for grounding us the 
very weekend of our “big” party. And 
we were the only ones in school who 
couldn’t go to the new adventure 
movie everyone was talking about, be¬ 
cause it was rated R. At times we hated 
them. We couldn’t wait for the day 
when we would pack our bags and 
journey off to college. We would be 
out from under their over-protective 
eyes and our minds blurred with the 


excitement of the freedom that would 
someday be ours. 

So, what happened? A few years 
have passed and our resentment has 
mellowed, but it seems like more than 
this. There is a deeper realization sur¬ 
facing. Are we the same “kids” who sat 
in the solitude of our bedrooms, 
swearing we would never speak lo 
those two people again? We look the 
same, but our attidues have certainly 
changed. 

No longer despising our parents, 
we feel the sweat and dust mingle and 
unite on our bodies as we work to de¬ 
grime our apartments, dorms, and 
houses. We dig out the clothes that 
boast the least wear in them, not to 
mention the least odor. We make a 
run on the barbers and hair stylists 
seeking our annual cuts and touch 


ups. And we make our last minute trip 
to the grocery store in search of some¬ 
thing more substantial for our shelves 
than our usual diet of Top Ramen and 
Campbell’s Soup. 

Are we trying to impress our pa¬ 
rents? “Never” reverberates the cry of 
defiance. Jt just seems like a good time 
lo beautify the campus, plant new 
flowers, mow the lawn, gather up the 
weather-beaten and forgotten trash 
from the gutters, and hang colorful 
banners. 

There’s just something about this 
time of year that makes us clean the 
toilet, wash the windows, water the 
plants, and change the sheets. It has 
nothing to do with the fact that Dad’s 
or Mom’s weekend is just a few days 
away. We could care less if they’re 
coming to see us...but we hope they 



Anderson 


106 Expressions /1984 





















make it in time for the kick-off of the 
big game or the curtain of the musical. 

Who are we fooling? We squirm 
with excitement over the thought of 
seeing our parents again. We left the 
nest but we didn’t fly that far away. We 
not only enjoy, but feel justified to 
honor them these few times a year. 
After all, when all we expect from the 
mailman are bills, their letters seem to 
appear. When final exams and de¬ 
pression set in simultaneously, their 
flowers or care packages magically ar¬ 
rive. When the money runs short and 
we face the check-bouncing blues, a 
few bucks pass from their wallets. 
When it seems like we haven’t a friend 
in the world, the phone rings and 
mom or dad says, “Hello.” 

The bad times are all but forgotten 
and the good times grow brighter. We 
remember the time dad came home 
with two tickets to the game that had 
been sold out for months; the time 
mom found enough extra money in 
her private stash to buy the expensive 
prom dress in the department store 
window; the time the gift under the 
Christmas tree had holes punched in 
the side and a rustling life barked to be 
let out; the time they took turns trying 
to cheer us up when our first romance 
didn’t quite reach our expectations. 

They took us to the circus when we 
were younger, helped us with our 
paper route after they swore they nev- 




er would, and got us out of those awful 
jams we somehow got ourselves into. 
They stood behind us when no one 
else was there. They held us tight and 
dried our tears when we had nowhere 
else to turn. 

They never asked us for anything 
back, yet they never stopped giving. 
We salute those people we sometimes 
loved to hate, because now we under¬ 
stand them. They gave us the two 
most precious gifts that can ever be 
given ...their love and our life! 

by Nathalie Bull 


1984 / Expressions 107 




































He’s the Cat’s Meow 


Part of being in a Pac-10 school is 
the fun and festivity the crowd pro¬ 
vides at “the game.” Whether the 
Cougs are balding it out on the field or 
on the court, it just wouldn’t be as 
exciting in the cheerstaff weren’t out 
there rallying the fans and the team 
on to victory. 

One member of the Rally Squad 
especially personifies the Cougar spir¬ 
it. Butch, our school mascot, is one of 
the most recognized symbols here on 
campus—and for most of the year, no 
one even knows his true identity. 

Does anyone ever guess Butch’s real 
identity? 

“Friends of mine can tell who 1 am. 
Friends from home have watched me 
at the U of W game, for example, and 
even though they didn’t know 1 was 
Butch, they could tell it was me.’’ 

Every other year, a new “Butch’’ is 
selected through a screening process 


held by the Athletic Department. 
Butch candidates first try out for Rally 
Squad and are then selected from that 
group. The position carries a lot of 
responsibility, as Butch must attend 
all Cougar football and most basket¬ 
ball events, as well as some baseball 
games and track meets. Mostly, Butch 
is just himself and lets his personality 
shine when lie’s at a game. He can’t 
talk with anoyone, except other Rally 
Squad members. Action, of course, 
speaks louder than words anyway. 

Butch says that being involved in 
the best part of being the team mascot. 

“Being at the game, the crowd itself 
psychs me up...being part of the spirit 
group, you need to keep the fans 
going, even when the Cougs are los¬ 
ing. I just try to be myself, and not put 
on a front. The things Butch does, I 
do.” 

Being Butch isn’t all fame and 




A 




glory. Kendall Williams, Butch for the 
’83-’84 season, is an architecture stu¬ 
dent, works part-time, and sings at 
Saint Thomas More Catholic Church. 

Some wild things can happen when 
you’re dressed up in a Cougar outfit, 
too. One incident occured at the Uni¬ 
versity of Washington/Washington 
State basketball game where some 
overly anxious fans in the bleachers 
above the court came from out of the 
blue and “jumped” Butch. Butch said, 
“Little kids like to attack me, too. They 
like to pull on my tail. Wherever it 
goes, I go.” 

Most of all, though. Butch enter¬ 
tains. When the crowd is low, he can 
always bring a smile. When we’re win¬ 
ning, he’s in the stand cheering along. 
The Cougar teams may have their ups 
and downs, but with a mascot like 
Butch, Cougar spirit has got to be the 
best in the Pac-10. But mostly, “Hav¬ 
ing fun is what it’s all about.” 

— Wendy Ann Ehringer 









There’s no place like home 


‘Twas the week before Homecoming and all over town. 

No one was idle, no loafers were found. 

The banners were hung from the buildings with care, 

In hopes that the alumni soon would be there. 

The Coug fans were nestled all snug in their beds, 

While visions of victory danced in their heads. 

And Glenn in his office and Butch in his den. 

Were sure in their hearts that the Cougars would win. 
When out in the mall there arose such a clatter, 

That everyone rushed to see what was the matter. 

The CUB, it was emptied, and Holland the same, 

For many were curious as to who was to blame. 

The sun on the rust of the bricks under toe, 

Gave a brightness and brilliance to all those below. 

When what to our wondering eyes should appear, 

But the band and the rally leading a cheer. 

With the screaming of voices and the clapping of hands, 
We knew in a moment they were true Cougar fans. 

Coach Walden came next and talked of the game. 

He commanded the players and called them by name: 
“Now, Turner! now, Williams! now, Porter! and Blakeney! 
On, Marshall! on, Millard! on, Lynch! and Beasley! 

March over those Bruins on the way to the top! 

Now, dash away, dash away, and don’t ever stop!” 

So down to the stadium the players they flew, 

Followed by Butch, and the Cougar fans too. 

And then with a startle, we heard a strange sound, 


As the Bruins, the hated, invaded our town. 

They unpacked their gear to the sound of our hissing, 
Realizing at once that their own fans were missing. 
Donahue, their coach, stepped off last of all. 

Next to Walden the Great, he looked awfully small. 

The next day came quickly and kickoff drew near, 

Our players walked proudly with nothing to fear. 

Their eyes how they seared! their bodies were lean! 
They wanted this game! their grins were so mean! 

The Crimson wave rushed from the tunnel below, 

Onto the Field, face-to-face with their foe. 

And Cameron stood ready, his weapon in hand, 
“Section thirty-two” came his command. 

“Stand up all you Cougars,” he screamed to the crowd, 
“Let’s keep this wave going, and make our team proud. 
Butch, he was there, a real sleek and cool cat. 

He prowled the sidelines awaiting combat. 

With the look in his eye, and the tilt of his head, 

Butch made the Bear know he soon would be dead. 

He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work, 
And clawed up the Bruin, and then turned with a jerk. 
The crowd raised its hands in a mighty salute, 

To Kendal, the Cougar, inside of that suit. 

Coach Walden, so calm, to his team gave a yell, 

As he readied the troops for three hours of hell. 

But we heard him exclaim as he talked to the men, 
“Play like true Cougars. Go out there and win.” 



Ahda 


110 Expressions /1984 
















Salsbury 



Annual events, such as the Homecoming Dance, this 
year to the theme of Doin' the Bruin Ruin (left page) 
are a major part of the spirit of Homecoming. In the 
living group games of competition (above), members 
representing each living group try to outlast, outrun, 
and outmaneuver other teams. Various signs and 
banners plague campus as the week of festivities 
draws near. This year, a board (left), located in the 
CUB, allowed visiting alumni to boast of their gra¬ 
duation date from WSU. 


1984 / Expressions 111 




The Tradition 

Continues 













We have the freedom to walk through those doors 
and encounter challenge, or to step aside 
and walk out the way in which we came. 

We can explore and discover the unknown, 

seek and understand the complex, 

and challenge and criticize the doubtful. 

We are free to study and to achieve as we please. 
We are free to search, free to learn, 
free to risk, free to grow, free to change. 

We can love, laugh, sing, dance, 
or we can do nothing. 

For it is here that we are important. 


We are influential; we are needed. 

Each of us is an essential part of the system. 

Each owns a little corner of this world. 

Each has a small piece of unique idealism 
which is neccessary if we are to complete 
fully the personality of the world in which we live. 

The gifts we take from our friends, 
the learning that enriches our souls, 
the knowledge that enhances our vision. 

These things will enable us to touch the world out there 
with our own individually acquired magic. 

We pass this way but once, but we will make a difference. 

by Kriss Griffin 


1984 / Expressions 113 






























































♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




SPORTS 


A New Athletic Director.118 

Football.120 

Women’s Cross Country.134 

Volleyball.136 

Olympians.140 

Men’s Basketball.144 

Women’s Basketball.150 

Gymnastics.156 

Wrestling.160 

Swimming.164 

Turning It Around.166 

Men's Tennis...-168 

Women’s Tennis.170 

Track.172 

Golf.180 

Baseball.182 

Rifle.188 

Intramurals.190 

Athletic Faculty.193 

Athletic Trainers.194 

Cougar Rally Squad.195 

Crimson Squad.196 

Gray Squad/Coug Guys 8t Gals.197 

ASWSU Ski Team.199 

ASWSU Waterpolo Club.200 

ASWSU Bowling Club.201 

ASWSU Men's Crew.202 

ASWSU Women’s Crew.203 

ASWSU Women’s Soccer.204 

ASWSU Men’s/Women’s Rugby.205 


► ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

116 Sports/1984 











































































1984/Sports 117 











♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

A Change In 
Administ ration 



The man who many people in the 
Palouse loved to hate, Sam Jankovich, 
left the cow pastures of Pullman for 
the sandy beaches of the University of 
Miami, Florida before students had a 
chance to offer a “good riddance.” 

During his seven year tenure as 
“Big Brother” of the Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics, Jankovich 
made a lot of enemies among the stu¬ 
dents and faculty. He did this by run¬ 
ning his department with an iron 
hand, never taking “no” for an 
answer. To Jankovich, the depart¬ 
ment always came First. 

Jankovich encountered many con¬ 
troversies but said that each one made 
the department better as a whole. 

Some of the problems Jankovich re¬ 
ferred to include: 

—making the 50-yard-line seats on 
the students’ side of Martin Stadium 
into reserved seating 
—developing the all-sports pass 
rather than raising student Service 
and Activities fees 
—hiring a man, Harold Rhodes, as 
permanent coach of the women’s bas- 
ketball team because Jankovich 
thought he was the best “person” for 
the job 

—overseeing the merger of the 
men’s and women’s athletic depart¬ 
ments after some of the women 
athletes and coaches brought suit for 
equal money and facilities 
Jankovich was instrumental in the 
construction of Buck Bailey Field and 
the enlargement of Martin Stadium. 
He cut the Athletic Department’s de¬ 
ficit from $400,000 to $40,000 and he 
has the Cougar Club bringing in 
$800,000 yearly as compared to 
$85,000 when he took over. 

The Cougar program is in great 
shape, according to Jankovich, be¬ 
cause of its membership in the Pac-10 


Conference. 

“It is great to be in the Pac-10,” he 
said. “Everything is stable. You have 
guaranteed money coming in each 
year. Here in Miami, it is much more 
unstable. It is all hills and valleys. We 
either get a lot or we get nothing.” 

Jankovich said that he misses the 
people of Pullman more than any¬ 


thing. “The people there are the salt 
of the earth,” he said. “Washington 
State will never have a better friend 
than I.” 

The contract Jankovich signed in 
Miami makes him one of the highest 
paid athletic directors in the country, 
showing that, although he may not be 
overly popular, he is respected. 

by Dan Ivanis 


118 Sports/1984 








♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



I Say Hello... 

and You Say Goodbye 


The 1983-84 school year saw the 
addition of Dick Young, from Okla¬ 
homa State, as the new Cougar athle¬ 
tic director, replacing Sam Jankovich. 

Even though the new athletic direc¬ 
tor inherited what he considered to be 
a “good, solid program,” he said that 
there is always room for improve¬ 
ment. “I am really not satisfied with 


just good,” Young explained, “I want 
to be excellent.” 

Even though Young's ultimate goal 
of excellence for the department is 
always a concern to him, he said that 
he has to keep things in perspective. 
“We're here for the students. The ex¬ 
periences they share in athletics are 
helping shape them for the future.” 


In his first year at the WSU helm, 
Young was forced to make some deci¬ 
sions that even a veteran would want 
no part of. Declining football attend¬ 
ance, football seating for boosters and 
the need for new turf in Martin Sta¬ 
dium were all issues Young dealt with 
during his first year in Pullman. 

“We had to move a lot faster than we 
had wanted,” he explained. “We real¬ 
ly felt the football needs had to be 
addressed.” 

Some of the solutions Young came 
up with included moving all of the 
home football games to Pullman, in¬ 
stead of having the traditional two 
non-conference games in Spokane. 

Through Young’s guidance, a new 
seating plan for football boosters as 
developed. An agreement was also 
reached to replace the artificial sur¬ 
face in the stadium. 

Some of the other visable things 
that Young has had a part in, since 
coming to WSU, include the new 
lights at the baseball stadium and the 
remodeling that is being done 
throughout Bohler gym. 

As his first year in Cougar Country 
draws to a close, Young seems very 
comfortable about the future of WSU 
athletics. The director explained it 
was a building process to reach the 
level of excellence he was looking for. 

“Each year we’ll be building on what 
we've accomplished the last.” How 
long does Mr. Young invision his ideal 
athletic department will take to build? 
“If we're not where we want to be in 
five years, then we’ll have to take a 
serious look at things,” Young said. 

In the meantime, Cougar athletics 
finished the 1983-84 year with a 
budget surplus for the first time in 
years. 

by Scott Jones 


1984/Sports 119 

















The Halves 
Have It 


It was a year of halves for the 
Cougar football team in 1983. 

There were super halves, terrible 
halves and mediocre halves. 

In August, while the team was still 
going through two-a-days in the arid 
Pullman heat, Cougar Head Coach 
Jim Walden told sports writers that the 
Cougars would finish third in the Pac- 
10 conference, behind nationally- 
ranked Arizona and perennial 
powerhouse USC. 

With both of those teams on proba¬ 
tion, Walden was in actuality putting 
the Cougars in the Rose Bowl. 

But it didn’t quite work out that way. 

The Cougars did finish third in the 
Pac-10 conferece with a 7-4 record — 
but behind the UCLA Bruins (Rose 
Bowl) and the University of Washing¬ 
ton Huskies (Aloha Bowl, again). — 
and not before a lot of weird things 
happened. 

For the first six games of the season 


the Cougars could not put together 
two halves of football on the same 
Saturday afternoon. They waddled 
and floundered to a 2-4 record. 

"Good teams play sixty minutes. 
Teams that think they are good only 
play 30 and think that is enough," 
Walden said following a 38-17 loss to 
USC after being tied with the Trojans 
at halftime. 

Even against the lowly University of 
Nevada-Las Vegas Rebels, the 
Cougars had a commanding 38-7 
lead at halftime but had to hold on 
for a 41-28 victory. 

A 24-14 loss to UCLA in Martin Sta¬ 
dium was the final turning point in 
what had been a disappointing sea¬ 
son for the players, coaches and 
fans. 

The Cougars outgained the Bruins 
440-271 in total offense, but the Bruins 
ended up with the ‘W on the stand¬ 
ings board. That loss, it turned out, 


cost the Cougars the Rose Bowl berth 
that Walden had predicted before 
the season began. 

"That game was disappointing in a 
different way,” Walden said. "It was 
like a boxer winning a fight for 13 
rounds and getting knocked out in 
the 14th.” 

Following the UCLA loss the 
Cougars were written off in every¬ 
body’s book but their own. 

With the pressure off, the Cougars 
started rolling behind the running of 
sophomore Kerry Porter and the pas¬ 
sing and scrambling of senior quar¬ 
terback Ricky Turner. The defense 
manhandled its opponents as the 
Cougars swept through the final five 
games unscathed, including wins 
over nationally-ranked ASU in Tempe 
and Washington in Seattle. 

Porter, a part-time starter in the ear¬ 
ly part of the season picked up the 
slack created by injuries to Rueben 
Mayes and Don LaBomme. Porter en¬ 
ded up with 1,000 yards rushing for the 
season and had six consecutive 
games with more than 100 yards. He 
was only the third Cougar rusher in 
history to hit the 1,000-yard plateau. 

The defense, which had given up 
points by the bushel in the first part of 
the season, did not allow a single 
touchdown in 16 of its final 18 quarters. 


Although not an outstanding team, the 1983 
Cougars boasted several outstanding players. 
Keith Millard (left) spent most of his Saturday 
afternoons in the opposition's backfietd, breathing 
down quarterback's necks.(Photo by Scott Oliorn) 
Kerrs' Porter ran roughshod over opposing de¬ 
fenses while gaining l.(HK) yards during the sea¬ 
son. I le is only the third Cougar back to reach the 
1,000-yard plateau.(Photo by Mike Putnam) 



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120 Sports/ 1984 





















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 






Rueben Mayes (right) 
left defenders mystified 
with his flashy moves and 
blazing speed before 
being injured in mid¬ 
season. (Photo by Scxjtt 
Oborn) Noseguard Pat 
Lynch (upper left) gave 
Arizona’s quarterback 
Tom Tunnicliffe trouble 
but it didn't help as the 
Cougs lost 45-6. (Photo 
by Ernest N. Warfel) 
Gang tackling was the 
name of the game as the 
Cougar defense put an 
end to Oregon’s Rose 
Bowl dreams in Martin 
Stadium, 24-7. 


Halves... 

Despite the poor start Walden saic 
that the Cougars “did manage t< 
have a hell of a season.” 

The Cougar coach said that th« 
season was a combination of gooc 
news and bad news. 

"The bad news is that the 1983 tean; 
did not accomplish what it was cap 
able of," Walden said. “The gooc 
news is that they came face to face 
with total complete failure and rar 
right over it." 

WSU 27, Montana State 7 

Even though Walden kept most o 
his offense under wraps hoping tc 
spring some surprises on the nex 
week’s opponent, Michigan, the 
Cougars had little trouble disposing 
of MSU. 

Turner and sophomore Mark Ry- 
pien carried most of the load or 
offense, combining for 268 yards 
through the air. On the ground the 
Cougars managed only 100 yards 
total. 

Kicker John Traut gave the 
Cougars a 6-0 halftime lead with a 


“Teams that only 
think they are good 
play 30 minutes and 
think that is enough.” 

— Jim Walden 


pair of field goals. On the first posses¬ 
sion of the second half Turner hi' 
Rueben Mayes in the backfield anc 
he scampered down the sideline foi 
the first Cougar touchdown of the 
season. Turner hit Mike Marshall with c 
45-yard touchdown strike on the 
Cougars’ next possession that 
pushed the score to 20-0. 

MSU avoided a shutout by capita-! 
iizing on a Rypien fumble deep ire 
Cougar territory. 


122 Sports/1984 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































Halves... 

Michigan 20, WSU 17 

The one that got away. 

When John Trout’s game-tying field goal sailed wide left 
with 2:15 left in the game the Cougars had a moral victory 
against the team many considered to be the best in the 
country at the time. 

The Cougars had entered the game as 15-point under¬ 
dogs but led in the game with just over six minutes re¬ 
maining. 

The Cougar de¬ 
fense, which had 
held the Wolverine 
offense at bay for 
most of the game, 
broke down and let 
Michigan running 
back Reggie Rogers 
scamper around the 
left end for 52 yards. 

Cougar defensive 
back Cedric Brown 
dragged Rogers 
down at the 16 but 
three plays later the 
Wolverines were in 
the endzone and the 
Cougars were be¬ 
hind. 

Turner marched 
the Cougars from 
their own 28 to the 

Michigan 19 where the drive stalled. Traut came on and 
missed from 36 yards out. 

Walden, to say the least, was not happy with any moral 
victories. 

"We came here to whip Michigan’s ass,” he said. “We are 
trying to prove that we are not a flukish football team and 
that we can play with any team in the country. We had a 
chance to win and we should have won.” 

Arizona 45, WSU 6 

In the first conference game of the season the Cougars 
were embarassed in front of their home crowd in Martin 
Sadium by the University of Arizona 

Arizona’s starting quarterback, Tom Tunnicliffe, was 
knocked out of the game late in the first half just as the 
Cougars pulled to within four points, 10-6, of the third- 
ranked Wildcats. The rest was allAlfred Jenkins, Arizona’s 
freshman quarterback who had seen limited action up to 
that point. 

All Jenkins did was lead the Wildcats to five second-half 
touchdowns. 

The Cougars helped out too — fumbling the ball seven 


times, losing five of them and throwing two interceptions. 

The Wildcats amassed more than 450 yards in offense for 
the game. 

“It was one of those days," Walden said. “That was as 
embarassing of half as I have ever seen. It was just one of 
those freak things where everything goes wrong.” 

WSU 41, Nevada-Las Vegas 28 

For the first time in the young season the Cougar offense 
got on track but this high scoring victory over the Rebels 
proved costly. 

Mark Rypien, who had been given the starting nod at 
quarterback aweek earlier, suffered a broken collarbone 

and was lost for the 
remainder of the 
season. (See page 
126) 

Rypien went down 
shortly after scoring 
the Cougars’ first 
touchdown. Turner 
entered and im¬ 
mediately ignited 
the offense with a 59- 
yard touchdown 
pass to Dede Moore. 
Less than two minutes 
later Turner hit Mike 
James for 52 yards 
and another touch¬ 
down, pushing the 
score to 21-0. Kerry 
Porter scored next for 
the Cougars and by 
the half the 

scoreboard read WSU 38, UNLV 7. 

A Traut field goal early in the third period ended the 
Cougar scoring for the day and the team held on as the 
Revels pushed the ball over three more times before the 
final gun sounded. 

USC 38, WSU 17 

The Cougars next traveled to Los Angeles to take on the 
“struggling” USC Trojans. The Trojans were off to their worst 
startin more than two decades and sported a 1-2-1 record. 

Against the Cougars, however, the Trojans did anything 
but struggle. Shifting from their new passing attack to the 
old run-right-over-them offense, USC racked up 486 yards 

(continued on page 127) 


Starting off slow but finishing in a big way was freshman Richard Calvin (left). 
He saw very limited playing time at the start of the season but, because of 
injuries, teamed up with Kerry Porter in the backfield and ended up scoring 
hoth touchdowns in the Cougars’ upset victory against the Huskies. (Photo by 
Mike Putnam) “Head over heels” was the position many ball carriers found 
themselves in after meeting up with Cougar defenders Joe Taylor (3) and Ben 
Carrillo (91). (Photo by Scott Oliom) 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

124 Sports/ 1984 













— To Be or Not To Be? 


Although there were many memor¬ 
able moments for the Cougars on the 
field in 1983, some of the most con¬ 
troversial were off the gridiron. The 
two most memorable, although head 
coach Jim Walden would surely like 
to forget them, involved quarter¬ 
backs. 

The so-called "quarterback con¬ 
troversy" started in Septmeber when 
Walden elevated sophomore Mark 
Rypien to the starting spot ahead of 
senior Ricky Turner. 

Walden, feeling that Turner would 
be better utilized as a "relief pitcher” 
coming off the bench, decided to 
start Rypien over the senior. 

The Cougars were 1-1 at the time 
and heading into their first game of 
the season In Pullman against Ari¬ 
zona. 

In both of the previous games, a 
27-7 victory over Montana State an a 
20-17 loss to Michigan. Turner had 
been ineffective in the opening mo¬ 
ments of the game and only became 
productive after Rypien had given 
the team a spark late in the first half. 

Although the change was destined 
to be controversial, it was blown out 
of proportion after Turner made 
some comments in an Arizona Daily 
Star story that seemed to imply there 
were racial overtones to his ben¬ 
ching. 

But Turner said the remarks were 



Mark Rypien 


blown out of context. 

“I would never call Coach Walden 
a racist," Turner said. 

Although all involved were hoping 
the controversy would die down 
quickly after the Arizona game, the 
45-6 thumping inflicted on the 
Cougars by the Wildcats only in¬ 
creased it. 

After the Wildcat game, Walden 
announced that Rypien, who threw 
for more than 200 yards In the game, 
would start the next game against the 
University of Nevada-Las Vegas. 

Early In the game, Rypien led the 
team to a touchdown and an early 
7-0 lead; it seemed the sophomore 
would not be easily displaced from 
his new starting job. 

But in the second quarter, as Ry¬ 
pien carried the ball around the right 
end, he was tackled and fell on the 
hard Joe Albl turf, breaking his right 
collarbone. 

The quarterback controversy 
seemed to be over, as Rypien was 
expected to be out for the year. 

Turner, finally secure as the starter, 
seemed to show renewed confi¬ 
dence and the Cougars record was 
4-4 after two straight wins. Then on 
Tuesday November 1, Bud Nameck of 
KXLY-TV in Spokane, led off his sports- 
cast with the news that Rypien was 
leaving Washington State and was 
ready to enroll in another school to 
play baseball. 

The reasons for Rypien's leaving 
were never really clear. Two theories 
put forth hinted that the Cougars' 
emphasis on the option attack might 
deter from Rypien's considerable ta¬ 
lents as a passer and that he had a 
desire to play baseball. 

Walden said neither of the alleged 
reasons for Rypien’s leaving were 
legitimate. "Why would he talk base¬ 
ball and leave Washington State," he 
said, in reference to the fine reputa¬ 
tion the WSU baseball program has. 

Rypien and Walden met in Pullman 
on Nov. 2 to discuss the situation yet 
Walden said after the meeting he 
was still "pretty much In the dark" as to 
why the sophomore had decided to 
leave, but added that he was confi- 



Rlcky Turner 

dent Rypien would return. 

Rypien would not comment on the 
specifics of the meeting but said 
there were "some good things and 
some bad things" that came out of 
the meeting. 

Walden met with Rypien and his 
parents in Spokane on Nov. 6. the day 
after the Cougs beat Oregon State 
27-9, and the rumours grew that the 
former prep All-American was ready 
to return to Pullman. 

On Monday Nov. 7. Walden 
announced that Rypien was return¬ 
ing to WSU. 

"By the mutual agreement and to 
the satisfaction of both Mark and my¬ 
self, all concerns have been ironed 
out and Mark is very happy to be 
coming back to school now that 
these concerns he had have been 
alleviated." Walden said. 

The quarterback controversy was 
finally over and the Cougars finished 
the season with five straight victories 
and a 7-4 record. 

The events finally seemed to be 
washed away in the rain in Seattle as 
the Cougars concluded a sometimes 
tumoltous season with an oh-so- 
sweet 17-6 victory over the Washing¬ 
ton Huskies. 

— Bob Condotta 


126 Sports/ 1984 















Halves... 

during the afternoon. 

Kerry Porter took a pitch into the 
endzone from one yard out with 5:44 
to go in the first half and tied the 
game at 17. That was the point at 
which both the Cougar offense and 
defense decided to pull their di- 


“We are trying to 
prove that we are not 
a flukish football 
team and that we 
can play with 
anybody in the 
country.” 

— Jim Walden 


appearing act. 

The Trojans held the Cougars to 50 
yards in the second half while putting 
21 points on the board, including a 
16-play drive in the fourth quarter that 
did the Cougars in. 

Walden kept his players in the lock¬ 
er-room for more than an hour after 
the game. 

“I could not believe that we could 
prepare for two weeks and play that 
poorly," Walden said. He called the 
USC game the low point of the 
season. 


UCLA 24, WSU 14 

Excruciatingly painful. 

Those were the words that Walden 
used to describe the Cougars’ loss to 
the Bruins in Marin Stadium. 


Opposing running backs had more to worry about 
than linebackers and defensive backs when they 
broke into open field. The Cougar defensive line, 
especially Keith Millard (93) was very capable of 
catching smaller, quicker backs from behind. 
(Photo by Ernest N. Warfel) The Cougar defense 
held California to a total ol 11 yards on the ground 
in front of 16,000 fans in rain-drenched Martin 
Stadium while the Cal defense could do no more 
than take pot shots at Kerry Porter. (Photo by 
Mike Salsburv) 



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1984 /Sports 127 

























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Halves... 

The Cougars kicked the Bruins up one side of the field 
and down the other but could not get the ball over the goal 
line. 

Ricky Turner capped off an 80-yard drive by scrambling 
over from the one-yard line on the Cougars first possession. 
From then on the Cougars were within scoring range four 
times but came up empty. 

Three missed field goals and a touchdown called back 
for Illegal motion cost the Cougars their first conference 
win. Only late in the fourth quarter, with the game already 
decided, did the offense put seven more points on the 
board. 


Ricky Turner and Mark Rypien combined for 268 yards through the air against 
Montana State largely because of the work of Kirk Samuelson (left) and the rest of 
the offensive line. (Photo by Ernest N. Warfel) Oregon ballcarriers (above) had a 
rough time of it in Pullman as the entire Cougar defense seemed to know where 
every play was going. (Photo by Ernest N. Warfel) Don LaBomme, who returned to 
WSU after a one-year absence, missed the majority of the season because of injuries 
but not before doing some damage to opposing defenses. (Photoby Scott Obom) 




1984 /Sports 129 














♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


Halves... 


den had talked about in August. 
WSU 31. Arizona State 21 


"Those missed field goals were 
were excruciating.” Walden said. 
‘‘That missed touchdown was 
painful." 

"I am not sure where the turning 
point came,” UCLA Coach Terry 
Donahue said. "It was somewhere 
between WSU not capitalizing on our 
mistakes and our great play in the 
third quarter." 

This loss, however, woke the 
Cougars up. Now 2-4 on the season 
and out of contention for the Rose 
Bowl; the Cougars would finally start 
playing up to the potential that Wal- 


The Cougars took to the road 
again to face the red-hot Arizona 
State Sun Devils. Arizona State was 
ranked in the top twenty teams in the 
country at the time but the real 
Cougars decided to show up for this 
game. 

It looked like a blowout from the 
very beginning, but not what you 
would expect after seeing the final 
score. Midway through the first quar¬ 
ter the Sun Devils had scored twice 
and held a 14-0 advantage. 

WSU struck back and put 17 quick 
points on the board but the Sun Devils 



drove 80 yards in 1:04 to regain the 
lead 21-17 at the half. 

"Well that’s it,” said most fans. After 
all, the Cougars had been outscored 
77-7 in the second halves of their 
other three Pac-10 games. 

The revitalized Cougars did not lay 
down and die as they had previously. 
Porter scored on a two-yard run after, 
a successful fake punt. Two minutes 
later he took a pitch around the right 
end and went 68 yards to the en- 
dzone. 

"We had to hunt and peck to find 
the right option,” Walden said. “Re- 


“\ think that punt 
return had to go in. 
The three points 
didn’t help us.” 

— Husky Coach 
Don James 


member, they knocked us in the dirt a 
long time before we found it." 

Walden later called the victory 
against ASU the high point of the 
season. 

"That may surprise some people 
but the ASU win was enormous in 
terms of gaining confidendce," he 
said. 


WSU 24, Oregon 7 

Still riding high on the waves of the 
ASU win, the Cougars returned to Mar¬ 
tin Stadium for a match-up with the 
surprising Oregon Ducks. 

The Ducks, pernial cellar dwellers 
of the Pac-10, had put together a 2-1 
conference record and actually had 
thoughts of the Rose Bowl. Keith Mil¬ 
lard, Lee Blakeney and the rest of the 
Cougar defese soon put those 


Erwin Chappel (left), another freshman, broke: 
into the starting lineup in mid-season and ended' 
up making some big plays, including this tackh 
against Oregon and a fumble recovery against the 
University of Washington that ended a scoring 
drive in the first half. (Photo by Ernest N. Warfel I 
Kerry Porter eluded defenses all season long—I 
well, almost all season long. (Photo bv Ernest N 1 
Warfel) 


130 Sports/1984 




















































Halves... 

thoughts and the "Quack Attack" to 
rest. 

Ahead 7-0 at the halt — on a re¬ 
turned punt by Kitrick Taylor —the 
Cougars marched 80 yards for a 
touchdown early in the third quarter. 
Nineteen seconds later Ricky Turner 
jaunted into the endzone for another 
Cougar score. 

WSU 27, Oregon State 9 

The Cougars continued their ram¬ 
ble past conference foes by beating 
up on Oregon State in Corvallis. 

The Cougars took a quick 10-0 lead 
on a Porter touchdown and a Traut 
field goal. Then wierd things started 
happening. 

Cougar linebacker Sonny Elkinton 
intercepted a Beaver pass and Tur¬ 
ner marched his troops down to the 
OSU one-foot line. Three plays later 
OSU had the ball — still on the one- 
foot line. 

The next time the Cougars had the 
ball they drove to the OSU seven but 
two holding penalties and a ques¬ 
tionable call on Ricky Turner being 
over the scrimmage line when he 
threw a pass forced the Cougars to 
punt. 

Oregon State made up for lost time 
and scored on a 92-yard pass play 
that put the score at 10-7. 

"It was a wierd game," Walden 
said, “because we’d fail and punt or 
succeed and be penalized. Our fai¬ 
lures were bad and our successes 
were failures." 

On the next possession, punter 
Glenn Harpers’s kick was blocked 
and, on a heads-up play, a Cougar 
knocked the ball out of the endzone 
taking away a Beaver touchdown 
and conceding the safety. 

Traut pushed the score to 13-9 with 
a 30-yard field goal at the end of the 


Against UCLA and Arizona, the Cougar running 
hacks found plenty of open field running room, as 
shown hv Richard Calvin (above) and Ruehen 
Maves. But in neither game, however, could the 
Cougars push the hall over the goal line. The 
UCLA loss, it turned out, cost the Congarsa trip to 
the Rose Bowl. (Top photo by Scott Oborn. Bot¬ 
tom photo by John Burke) (Al)ove right) The 1983 
Cougar liiothall team. 


132 Sports/1984 

















S C O R 

E 

B 

0 

A 

R D 


WSU 

27 

Montana State 

7 

WSU 


31 

Arizona State 

21 

Michigan 

20 

WSU 

17 

WSU 


24 

Oregon 

7 

Arizona 

45 

WSU 

6 

WSU 


27 

Oregon State 

9 

WSU 

41 

Nevada-Las Vegas 

28 

WSU 


16 

California 

6 

Southern Cal 

38 

WSU 

17 

WSU 


17 

Washington 

6 

UCLA 

24 

WSU 

14 







Halves... 

half. The second half was all Cougars 
as the defense held OSU to -18 yards 
and the offense racked up 267 yards 
on the ground and two twouch- 
downs. 

WSU 16, California 6 

In front of only 15,000 fans and dur¬ 
ing a deluge of rain in Pullman the 
Cougar defense stopped a usually 
potent University of California offense 
and locked up their second winning 
season in three years. 

The Cougars held the Bears to 11 
yards on the ground and a total of 177 
yards for the game. The defense also 
picked off four Cal passes, recovered 
a fumble and scked Cal’s quarter¬ 
backs five times. 

Quarterback Gale Gilbert got the 
Bears on the board first by hitting 
nine-of-13 passes and setting up two 
field goals. Gilbert went down in the 
second quarter and Cal could man¬ 
age only four first downs the rest of 
the way through. 

Porter put the Cougars ahead on a 
three-yard touchdown set up by 
nose guard Pat Lynch's interception. 

John Traut added three field goals 
to lock up the game. 


WSU 17, Washington 6 

For the second consecutive year 
the University of Washington Huskies 
went to the Aloha Bowl courtesy of 


“The bad news about the 
1983team is that it did not 
accomplish what it was 
capable of. The good 
news is that they came 
face to face with total 
complete failure and ran 
right over It.” 

— Jim Walden 


the Cougar football team. Not that 
the Huskies don't enjoy Hawaii but 
Husky Coach Don James, his staff and 
players would much rather have 
been in Pasadena on New Year’s 
day. 

Yes, for the second straight year the 
Cougars knocked the roses right out 
of the Huskies. 

In 1982 the Cougars squeaked out 
a 24-20 win in Pullman. This time there 
was no squeaking. No mirrors were 


used. The Cougars went right at, 
through and over top of the Huskies 
both offensively and defensively. 

The biggest play of the game, and 
maybe of the season, came in the 
third quarter with the Cougars lead¬ 
ing 14-3. UWs Danny Greene fielded 
Glenn Harper’s punt and broke 
thrugh the Cougars’ line of defense. 
Harper, the lone defender between 
the ball carrier and the goal line, put 
such a hit on Greene that he had to 
be carried from the field. Seven plays 
later the Huskies had to settle for a 
field goal. 

“I think that punt return had to go 
in,” James said. “The three points 
didn’t help us.” 

The Cougar defense played its 
best game of the season, holding the 
high-powered Husky offense to just 
144 rushing yards and 142 yards 
through the air. 

Defensive linemen Keith Millard, 
Eric Williams and Pat Lynch were 
breathing down the neck of Husky 
quarterback Steve Pelluer all after¬ 
noon. In all, the defense forced the 
Huskies to cough up the ball three 
times on two fumbles and an in¬ 
terception. 

Kerry Porter again was the star for 
the offense gaining 169 yards while 
freshman Richard Calvin scored both 
Cougar touchdowns. 

Aloha. 

— Dan Ivanis 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

1984 /Sports 133 








A smile can go a long way, and 
Coach Rob Cassleman proved it this 
season by taking his 1983 women's 
cross country team where no WSU 
women’s team has gone before... the 
NCAA Championships. In 1982 the 
Cougars sent three women to com¬ 
pete on an individual basis, but tak¬ 
ing the whole team marked a first in 
the books for the Cougs. 

The 1983-84 team consisted of: 
freshmen Lisa Braun and Camille 
Rivard: sophomore Karri Jonassen; 
juniors Cheryl Livingstone and Linda 
Spaaragen; and senior Joan 
McGrath. The team also had two 


“When you make 
it to the nationals 
and it’s your first 
time, you’re young 
and excited to be 
there. It’s easy to 
get distracted. ” 

— Rob Cassleman 


women who ran on an alternate and 
individual basis — Kathy Currran and 
Nancy Miller. 

Braun, also known as the "freshman 
sensation" was the Cougar leader for 
most of the season. She started off 
well by placing 10th overall in the 
Cougs first meet, the Fort Casey In¬ 
vitational held on Oct. 1. Braun was 
followed closely by her teammates, 
Livingstone with a time of 18:01, 
McGrath, Rivard, and Curran. All 
finished with times under 19:30. 

Spokane was the next stop for the 
squad as they competed in the Spo- 


134 Sports/1984 


A Smile... 



Tells the Story 






















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


kane Community College Invitation¬ 
al on October 8. 

Braun sat out the meet due to ill¬ 
ness, while Livingstone went on to 
take first for the Cougs and first overall 
with a time of 18:58.7. Livingstone was 
followed directly by Spaaragen, 
Rivard, and McGrath coming in 2nd, 
3rd, and 4th respectively. Curran ran 
a 22:49.9, while Miller ran unattached 
with a time of 20:37 for the 5,000 meter 
course. WSU took first as a team over 


Spokane Community College, Green 
River Community College, and North 
Idaho College. 

The last two meets of the season 
were tough for the Cougs as they 
competed against some strong 
schools, including Oregon State, Col¬ 
orado State, and BYU. WSU placed 
fifth overall in the Oregon Track Club 
Invitational held on Oct. 16 in Eugene, 
Oregon. Braun paced the Cougs with 
a time of 17:36. Rivard finished in 17:55 



V »V» iV» • 
♦V* .oA\* 


■y m !>yn »i>'> f i 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

and took second place for WSU. 

WSU moved on to take fourth place 
overall in the Washington Invitational 
held in Burien, Wa. Braun, again, 
finished first for WSU and 15th overall. 

The next five spots were taken by 
Livingstone, Jonassen, Rivard, 

Spaaragen, and McGrath respec¬ 
tively. 

As the National Championships 
drew near, Cassleman had his squad 
busy training for the NCAA District 8 
NorPac Championships held in 
Eugene, Oregon on November 12th. 

The intensive training and everlast¬ 
ing smiles combined for a superb fin¬ 
ish in this meet with Braun, Livingstone, 

Rivard, McGrath, Jonassen and 
Spaaragen all placing in the top 
twenty-five runners from a field of 
nine west coast schools. 

"It was no fluke. We were one of the 
good four teams that deserved to 
make it and the team deserves to be 
second in NorPac,” Cassleman said. 

"We have two freshman, and a gal 
that has never run cross country be¬ 
fore. he said. But they knew what they 
had to do and they did it. 

Teams qualifying for the nationals 
held in Behtlehem, Pa., on Nov. 21 
were Oregon, Stanford, Cal-lrvine 
and WSU. Results of the cham¬ 
pionships were somewhat dis- 
sapointing for Cassleman, as well as 
the squad. He contributed the excite¬ 
ment of actually making it to nation¬ 
als as a key factor. 

"When you make it to the nationals 
and it's your first time, you're young' 
and excited to be there,” he said. “It’s 
easy to get distracted.” 

The race for a national title was not 
easy for any of the Cougars, as they 
placed 15th out of 16 teams. 

"If we had run more toward the 
front of the pack at the start of the 
race we would have finished higher." 
said Cassleman. 

The outlook for next year is very 
promising though, with all members 
returning, except for senior Joan 
McGrath. Whatever results come 
from next years squad, the 1983-84 
squad will always have the memory 
of making it to the national cham¬ 
pionships as a team, and certainly a 
smile will fall across their faces. 

— BJ. Duft 


1984 /Sports 135 
















♦ ♦ 



Winning Isn’t . 

Everything 



„ In its second year of rebuilding,, 
under Coach Jim Coleman, the 
Cougar women’s volleyball team en-1 
ded the season on the dismal note of 
a 1-25 record. It was a season of many 
disappointments, punctuated occa¬ 
sionally with some success. 

The Lady Cougars entered the sea¬ 
son with hope of improving upon 
their 2-19 record of 1982. "I’m not 
promising miracles, but I do expect 
improvement" was Coleman’s 
cautiously optimistic statement be¬ 
fore the start of the season but this 
soon fell by the wayside as the young 
Cougar squad could not find the 
consistency or the control to win. 

The Cougars had a a promising 
pre-season of competition in the U.S. 
Volleyball Association, winning the 
Evergreen Region under-19 title while 
remaining undefeated in play and 
placing fourth in the AA regionals. 

The Cougars opened their season 
on the road in non-conference com¬ 
petition, losing their first two games of 
the season to Nevada-Reno and 
Boise State. The Cougs then returned 
home for their Pullman debut. 

Matched against the Gonzaga 
Bulldogs, the Cougars failed to capi¬ 
talize on the leads they established 
and the Bulldogs came from behind 
in all games to win. 

“We are playing a very undisci¬ 
plined level of volleyball—and that’s 
not by choice,” Coleman said after 
the losses. 

After a short respite, the Lady 
Cougs crossed the border into Van- 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 


* 


136 Sports/ 1984 


















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 


dal country for tournament play at 
the University of Idaho. The first night 
of competition at the Idaho North¬ 
west Volleyball Classic matched 
them against Lewis-Clark State and 
the resulting victory snapped a 19- 
dual match losing streak and gave a 


hint of promise to the squad. 

Coach Coleman expressed high 
hopes after the game saying, "It is 
nice to win one eventually. It makes it 
easier to win the next one.” 

After a loss to the U of I, the Cougars 
came back to take a match from 
Spokane Falls Community College 
and then lost the remainder of their 
matches to finish sixth out of a seven- 
team field. 

It was then off to Oregon for the 
opening of NorPac conference play. 
In the first match against Oregon, 
errors contributed heavily to the 
Cougars’ three-game loss, and in 
competition with then 20th-ranked 
Oregon State, it took four quick 
games for the Cougs to once again 
finish short. 

Heading home to Pullman, the 
Cougs readied themselves to meet 
Montana State in a non-conference 
match. It was a strong start with a 
familiar ending as the Cougs drop¬ 


ped the match in four. 

It was back on the road and back 
to NorPac play for the spikers as they 
traveled to sunny California to meet, 
and eventually lose to, the University 
of San Francisco and the University of 
Santa Clara. 


The wins so hoped for had not 
come and the attitude was summed 
by hitter Linda Emtman, “You have to 
believe you can win but when you 
have the record we do it's hard.” 


Coming back to Washington, the 
Cougs traveled to the other side of 
the state, to face their cross-state Nor¬ 
Pac rivals, the UW Huskies, in a non¬ 
conference meeting. Following the 
lead of the rest of the games in the 
season, the trip met with defeat. 

They headed home for a long 
series of matches in Bohler Gym 
which found them first losing to Cali- 
fornia-Berkeley and then making a 
tough bid against highly ranked San 
Jose State. Despite the loss, the 
Cougs made a good showing and 
the next week found some reward in 
this difficult season. 

“They demonstrated they can 
play,” Coleman said. “So there is no 
excuse for not playing well." 

Lisa Davis, one of the Cougs’ junior 
setters, was honored for her outstand- 


“They demonstrated they can play — so 
there is no excuse for not playing well. ” 

— Jim Coleman 


The block, this one (left) is executed by blockers 
Man- Anne Rice, a junior out of Anacortes, and 
Laurie Lamken a freshman from Seattle, (photo by 
Ernest Warfel) Digging it out against Gonzaga 
(right) junior setter Lisa Davis reaches low. (photo 
by Mike Salsburv) 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


1984 /Spoils 137 

















♦ ♦ winning... 

ing play against San Jose and was 
named the NorPac player of the 
week. She became only the second 
Cougar athlete to be so honored in 
any sport. On this optimistic note the 
spikers took the floor against Eastern 
Washington but could not put things 
together and lost a tight match in 
four. 

The second meeting with the 
schools from Oregon proved no 
more productive than the first and 
two more losses were recorded. 

Another meeting with Lewis-Clark 
State brought speculation of a possi¬ 
ble repeat victory for the Lady Cougs. 
With the games even 2-2 and with a 


comfortable lead in the last game 
the pressure proved to be too great 
and the Cougars once again lost the 
lead and the match. Competition 
against University of Pacific, Fresno 
State, and Gonzaga ended in famil¬ 
iar defeat on the road for the Cougs. 

“I’m embarassed by how badly we 
played," was the dismal view of Cole¬ 
man after the defeats. 

Washington State got a taste of in¬ 
ternational competition at Idaho, 
taking on Ito-Yokado of Japan. The 
seasoned international competitors 
took only 18 minutes to defeat the 
downed Cougs in their two game 
meeting. 

In the final two games of the sea¬ 
son the Cougars led off by taking on 
their Palouse rivals, the Idaho Van¬ 
dals. Again the Cougars lost, due 
mainly to their own unforced errors. 

The last game of the long Cougar 















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


season was the battle for the confer- 
ence basement against the 
Washington Huskies. The prelim 
game to Apple Cup brought many 
fans to Bohler Gym to cheer the Lady 
Cougs, but by then the cliche ending 
prevailed and the Cougars lost in 
three, bringing their final NorPac re¬ 
cord to a disappointing 0-9 finale. 

Summing up the problems of the 


"A lot of people say win¬ 
ning Isn’t everything but 
when you don’t win it is a 
lot more important 

— Lisa Davis 


season Coach Coleman's remarks 
were simple. "In general, we made a 
lot of mistakes at important times.” 

It was not the season which had 
been hoped for when it began; it was 
a season of more failures than suc¬ 
cesses. The young Cougar squad, 
however, will be returning for the most 
part and, under the guidance of 
coaches Coleman and Patti 
Hagemeyer, the disappointments of 
an earlier season will be forgotten, 
and a new season will begin with re¬ 
newed hope. 

— Kathy Gilbert 


Challenging Montana State, Bev Sc-haaf, a sopho- 
more from Bothell, is watched hv freshman hitter 
Elena Barichievich. (photo by Scott Obom) con¬ 
tact with the ball is made by sophomore Linda 
Emtnian with some moral support given by Mary' 
Anne Rice, in the game against Montana State, 
(photo by Ernest Warfel) 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦ 


♦ 


< 


1984 /Sports 139 





















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




Olympians 


The following photos are of athletes that 
attended WSU during the 1983-84 school 
year and had a good chance of making the 
1984 Olympics. They are not the only 
WSU athletes who were in the running nor 
were they assured of making the Olympics 
at press time. Time and space require¬ 
ments limited our coverage. 


Brent Harken 
Track and Field 
High Jump 
United States 












Peter Koech 
Track and Field 
5,000 and 10,000 Meters 
Kenya 


140 Sports/1984 





















Richard Tuwei 
Track and Field 
Steeple Chase 
Kenya 


1984 /Sports 141 














Olympians... 

Kris Durr (left) 
Track and Field 
400 Meters 
United States 

Gabriel Tiacoh (right) 
Track and Field 
400 Meters 
Ivory Coast 




Jan-Olov Johansson 
Track and Field 
Javelin 
Sweden 


Photos by 
Ernest N. Warfel 


142 Sports /1984 































When a team starts out with a new 
coach, a new philosophy and only 
three players with experience, the 
fans and boosters don’t expect much 
— and with the 1983-84 Cougar bas¬ 
ketball team that is exactly what they 
got. 

With the departure of George 
Raveling to Iowa and the loss of Craig 
Ehlo, Aaron Haskins, Steve Harriel and 
Guy Williams via graduation, the 
Cougar basketball team was both 
young and inexperienced. 

Ricky Brown and Chris Winkler re¬ 
turned as the only full-time starters 
from 1983’s NCAA tournament team 
while Len Stevens tried his hand for 
the first time as an NCAA Division-1 
coach. Mike Wurm served as the 
token senior on the young squad. 

The inexperience showed through. 

The Cougars finished 10-18 overall 
and last in the Pac-10 conference 
with a 4-14 mark. 

Along the way the Cougars suf¬ 
fered an eight-game losing streak 
while the longest winning streak the 
team could manage during Pac-10 
play was two games. 

"Basketball is a game of action 
and reaction," Stevens said during 
the losing streak. "We are still thinking 
about what we a re doing and as long 
as we are still thinking, we will be slow 
and tenative about what we are 
doing. That is what is causing our 
problems." 

For the majority of the season, 
Stevens started juniors Bryan Pollard, 
Chris Winkler, sophomores Ricky 
Brown, Otis Jennings and Keith Mor¬ 
rison. 

The Cougars lacked the size that 
has become so vital in college bas¬ 
ketball today. Jennings, at 6-10, and 

►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


144 Sports /1984 


Starting From 
Square One 


Brown, at 6-8, were forced fo cover 
seven-footers throughout the season 
and wound up picking up cheap 
fouls that limited their playing time. 

Stevens’ new system, stressing 
man-to-man defense, was a total 
switch from Ravellng's change-up 
defense where the team was con¬ 
stantly going from ’zone’ to ’man’ de¬ 
fenses. 

The Cougars were starting from 
square one. 

"Overall, I think we have a lot of 
good things to look forward to,” were 
Stevens' optomistic pre-season com¬ 
ments. 

Stevens promised to implement a 
full-court press but, soon after the 
season began, the Cougar coach 
realized that the young team was 



having enough trouble and could 
not handle all the new changes at 
once. 

By the end of the season, Stevens 
said he had only gone over about 60 
percent of the new methodology. 

“We didn’t get to do a lot of little 
things that you do off your basic stuff,” 
he said. "We never got that far." 

The Cougars started off the season 
with a road victory against Puget 
Sound, 74-70, and a home victory 
against Seattle Pacific, 86-76. Brown 
and Pollard showed that they re¬ 
membered 1983 by scoring 18 points 
and 23 points, respectively, in the two 
games. 

Then the impossible happened; a 
17-game Friel Court winning streak 
was snapped by the University of 
Montana as the Grizzlies nipped the 
Cougars 47-45 in Pullman. 

Next came the Idaho Vandals and 
their new head coach, Bill Trumbo. 
The Cougars thrashed the Vandals in 
Pullman 82-69. Two nights later in Spo¬ 
kane, Winkler sank a jump shot at the 
buzzer to bag Gonzaga University in 
the fashion that the crowds had 
come to expect during the previous 
year. 

The Cougars then embarked on a 
nine-game road trip that foresha¬ 
dowed things to come. 

After dropping a 91-67 decision to 
Idaho State and whipping Oklahoma 


Slam dunks were few and far between during the 
1983-84 Cougar basketball season — even for 
high-flying Bryan Pollard (right). (Photo by Elliott 
Ahola). With many of the Cougar players lacking 
major college playing experience, including start¬ 
ing center Otis Jennings (left), the Cougars 
finished last in the Pac-10 with a 4-14 record 
(Photo by Ernest N. Warfel) 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 























Square One... 

City 71-52, the Cougars had to go to 
overtime before defeating the Uni¬ 
versity of Portland in the Far West 
Classic. In the second round of the 
tournament, the Cougars were put to 
shame by Oregon State 79-57. 


Deja vu does not occur often in 
sports and so it was the case in the 
Cougars rematch with Gonzaga. 
Winkler’s jump shot at the buzzer 
bounced off the rim and the Zags 
came away with the win, 71-70. The 
Cougars finished a disappointing 
fourth in the tournament and their 
overall record stood at 6-4. 

“It is a matter of the little things — 


and the frustration level,” Stevens 
said. “There is no team I have ever 
coached that has a better attitude 
than this group. I have never had a 
team from top to bottom so consci¬ 
entious about getting the job done." 

The Cougars opened Pac-10 play 
by losing to eventual Pac-10 co¬ 
champion University of Washington in 
Seattle, 58-48. Although staying even 
with the Huskies throughout most of 
the game, the Cougars could not put 
the ball In the hoop late In the game. 

“Our problems are on the offensive 
end. You can’t score 48 points and 
win a basketball game,” Stevens 
said. “In every game we seem to play 


“We didn't get to 
do a lot of little 
things that you do 
off your basic stuff. 
We never got that 
far." 

— Len Stevens 


pretty good in the first half, get j 
ourselves a lead and have a little bit 
of control in the game. In the second 
half, when the tempo changes, we 
don’t take advantage of it.” 

The Cougars continued their skid 
by losing to Arizona State, 62-64, be¬ 
fore knocking off Arizona, 51-49, to 
capture their first Pac-10 win. 

Nationally-ranked Oregon State 
was the Cougars’ next victim as the 
Cougars pulled a 74-65 upset victory 
on Friel Court. Mike Wurm provided 
the spark off the bench by complet¬ 
ing two three-point plays and draw¬ 
ing two charge fouls late In the game. 
The second charge sent Oregon 
State star Charlie Sitton to the bench 
with his fifth personal foul. 

Wurm, although not the most 
talented player on the team, was 
awarded the Pac-IO’s first-ever ‘sixth- 
man’ award for his hustle and team 
leadership. 

The Cougars could not keep this 
win streak alive as Oregon knocked 
them off 64-60. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


146 Sports/1984 

























“I know the problem right now is 
psychological, not physical,” Stevens 
said. "Right now I think maybe we 
need to look at playing a little more 
cautiously on offense. We need to be 
more concerned with ourselves than 
anyone else. It is the old saying, the 
opponent is you.” 

The Cougars continued their 
"close-but-no-cigar” style of play in 
bowing to California, 68-63 in over¬ 
time, and Stanford, 68-6S. 

Losses to UCLA, 73-59, and USC, 68- 
61, extended the Cougars' losing 
streak to five games. 

Consecutive losses to Arizona 
State, Oregon and Oregon State put 
the Cougars firmly in the conference 
basement and cast shadows over 
what remained of the season. 

The team’s lack of size showed 
through in the loss to Oregon as the 
Duck’s 7-0 Blair Rasmussen poured in 
37 points against the much smaller 
Cougars. 

“The road from Bohler Gym to Friel 
Court has not been an easy one for us 
right now," Stevens said. “There is no 
question we are not on the main 
highway right now. We are driving on 
the gravel. We’ll just keep taking tur¬ 
noffs until we find the highway.” 

Joe Wallace, who’s shooting range 
is limited only by the dimensions of 
the court, replaced Bryan Pollard in 
the starting line-up after Pollard took 
a leave of absence from the team 
because of personal problems and 
led the Cougars to victories over 
Stanford, 65-61, and California, 71-62, 
in Pullman. 

Those were, however, the last of the 
Cougar wins as the team absorbed 
losses to USC, UCLA on the road and 
Washington and Arizona at home. 


Although not the most talented player on the 
squad, Mike Warm (left), won the first-ever Pat- 
10 ‘Sixth Man’ award for his all-out hustle and 
leadership. (Photo by Scott Oliorn) Mismatches 
occurred frequently during the season, including 
6-4 Keith Morrison (above right) trying to score on 
Oregon’s 7-0 Blair Rasmussen. (Photo by Scott 
Obom) Ricky Brown (below right) was the team’s 
top scorer, using his bulk to muscle inside for 
baskets. (Photo by Ernest N. Warfel) 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Square One... 


1984 /Sports 147 












Square One... 

Although the season was a flop as 
far as most fans were concerned, 
Stevens saw the outcome as a learn¬ 
ing experience for both himself and 
his team. 

“I wanted to know who my players 
really were as people," Stevens said. 
“I preached to them all year long that 
chemistry is the most important thing 


“There is no team 
I have ever 
coached that has 
a better attitude 
than this group. I 
have never had a 
team from top to 
bottom so 
conscientious 
about getting the 
job done 

— Len Stevens 


in having championship success/’ 
Stevens said that the promise 
shown by the individual players on 
the team points to success in the fu¬ 
ture. 

“This team is going to win a Pac-10 
championship,” he said. “No ques¬ 
tion about it." 


Chris Winkler’s (above left) jump shot was as accu¬ 
rate as ever, but when opposing defenses shut him 
down, the Cougar offense stalled. (Photo by Scott 
Oborn) When Brvan Pollard took a leave of abs¬ 
ence from the team, freshman Joe Wallace (below 
left) stepped in and led the Cougars in scoring in 
three games. (Photo by Scott Oborn) The young 
Cougar scpiad, slow in picking up Stevens’ new 
defensive strategies, often found themselves going 
two-on-one. (Photo by Ernest N. Warfel) 



148 


Sports /1984 

















Always 
Next Year 

















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

The Cougar women's basketball 
team, in its second season of play in 
NorPac, showed that it was a team to 
be reckoned with and that it would 
no longer be the easy win. 

"I think we've adjusted really well 
from entering the NorPac,” said 
coach Harold Rhodes. "We’re no lon¬ 
ger the 'pansy* of the league, and 
teams no longer take us lightly.” 

The season record did not reflect its 
improvement, though. The team fell 
short of the 500 mark at 7-18 overall; 
with its NorPac record slipping to a 


7 don’t think this 
team is as bad as 
our record 
indicates. Many of 
our games could 
have gone either 
way.” 

— Harold Rhodes 


2-10 finish, but the margins were often 
small. “Eight of our losses this year 
were only six-point spreads," coach 
Rhodes pointed out, "and if we can 
win those types of games next year, 
we will have more confidence." 

The season started on a shining 
note for the Lady Cougars, as they 
opened on the road; meeting the 
University of Puget Sound in the Taco¬ 
ma Dome. In this first-ever womens’ 
collegiate game in the Dome, the 
Cougars dominated all aspects of 
the game, soudly defeating the Log¬ 
gers. Freshman Nikki Mohr led all 
scorers with a surprising college de¬ 
but of 28 points, while as a team the 
Cougars shot 52 percent from the 
field, 85 percent from the line, and 
forced 31 Logger turnovers. "We play¬ 
ed fairly mistake-free, which is surpris¬ 
ing for this early in the season,” 
Rhodes stated. The game also 
marked the beginning of the injury 
and illness problems which plagued 



the hoopsters throughout their 
season. 

The record was evened when the 
Cougars traveled to the University of 
Montana to face the Grizzlies. The 
Cougars were outscored by 15 points 
at the free throw line. Sophomore 


Guarding the ball, as it goes out of bounds, is 
guard Linda Wulff, during the Cougar loss to 
Fresno State. (Photo by Ernest N. Warfel). Look¬ 
ing for the ball, senior Cassandra Overby posts 
low against Montana. (Photo by Elliott Ahola). 


1984 /Sports 151 










always... 

Marcia Miles took over the scoring 
duties by ending the game with 24 
points. 

Play opened on Friel Court with the 
Dial Classic Tournament, which 
attracted some nationally recog¬ 
nized teams this year. "I just think it's 
amazing that they are coming to Pull- 


“Eight of our 
losses this year 
were only six-point 
spreads and if we 
can win those types 
of games next year 
we will have more 
confidence. n 

— Harold Rhodes 


man," was the awed response ot 
Rhodes about the presence of the 
Oklahoma Sooners, and the Southern 
Illinois Salukis. In his reflections before 
the Classic, Rhodes evaluated team 
play and stated, "We are young right 
now and have seen signs of being, 
inconsistent, where we play great 
one game and then not in the next.” 
Concern was also ecxpressed over 
the health problems of the bench. 

In the opening game of the Classic 
the Lady Cougs qualified for the 
championship round with a win over 
Portland State University. They were 
troubled by the inconsistency pre¬ 
dicted by coach Rhodes and could 
not find what was needed to put 
together two. The Cougars lost the 


The jump shot is taken hy Holly Bertus over 
Connie Price of Southern Illinois. (Photo by Mike 
Salsbury). Cougar Robin Steele jockies for re¬ 
bounding position against Southern Illinois’ Char 
Warring. (Photo by Mike Salsbury). 











♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 


second night of the tournament to 
Southern Illinois, who advanced to 
the championship round after a 
hard-fought battle against Oklaho¬ 
ma. Marcia Miles was the only 
Cougar honored as a member of the 
Classic’s all-tournament team. South¬ 
ern Illinois coach Cindy Scott ack¬ 
nowledged Miles’ performance call¬ 
ing her, “the best shooter in the 
tournament.” 

It was then time for the rematch 
against Montana. The Cougars 
attempted to adjust their game 
strategy to counteract the "lack¬ 
adaisical performance” of their first 
meeting with the Grizzlies, but the 
changes were of little help as the 
Cougars dropped their season re¬ 
cord to 2-3. 

With the games against Montana 
over, the cagers set their sights on the 
Idaho Vandals. "We certainly had our 
chances to win, but right now we’re 
our worst enemies,” was Rhodes view 


of the 35 turnovers the Cougs made 
in their loss to Idaho. 

The Lady Cougs then traveled to 
Spokane, where they defeated Gon- 
zaga by 13. Marcia Miles led the scor¬ 
ing once again with 27 points, and 
senior Cassandra Overy displayed 
her experience in the rebounding 
and scoring departments. Nikki Mohr 
also made a 10-point contribution. 

In their next outing the Eagles of 
Eastern Washington University hand¬ 
ed them a sound 42-point defeat, the 
worst in Cougar women’s basketball 
history. The Cougs were kept to just 26 
percent from the field and with the 
EWU starters still in the game, the 
Cougs could not narrow the margin 
of their defeat. 

After the thrashing received in 
Cheney, the Cougars traveled to 
meet Peperdine and Fullerton State 
over the Christmas holiday. They 
dropped both games before head¬ 
ing to Idaho for another meeting with 


the Vandals. The Cougar’s full court 
press took its toll and the Vandals 
could not repeat their earlier victory. 
Leading Seattle University at all but 


'We certainly 
had our chances to 
win, but right now 
we are our own 
worst enemy.” 

— Harold Rhodes 


one point in the game, the Cougars 
took a win. Playing without Linda Wulff 
left the rest of the team to pick up the 
slack. Nikki Mohr added 10, Cassan¬ 
dra Overby 19, and the ever-present 










♦ ♦ ♦ B ♦ 

always... 

scoring of Marcia Miles added 23 
points towafd the victory. 

The 0-2 opening record in NorPac 
play was recorded when the Cougs 
lost their opening double-headers to 
Oregon State and Oregon. Dropping 
the decision to defending confer¬ 
ence champions Oregon State by 21, 
the Cougars bounced back against 
Oregon. But their rally was not quite 
enough, as they fell four short that 
game in play against the Ducks. 

It was then on the road to Califor¬ 
nia, once again, to face NorPac chal¬ 
lengers San Jose State and Califor¬ 
nia. The Cougs were out-rebounded 
as well as out-scored in San Jose, and 
ended down by nine points and 23 
rebounds at the buzzer. The meeting 


'We are young 
right now and show 
signs of being 
inconsistent, where 
we play great in 
one game and 
then not in the 
next.” 

— Harold Rhodes 


with league-leading University of 
California brought the expected re¬ 
sult, with the Berkeley Bears dominat¬ 
ing play. 

The Cougs jumped off to a good 
start against Fresno State and en¬ 
tered the locker room with a lead at 
the half, but foul problems led to their 
defeat, with the Cougars giving Fres¬ 
no State 33 attemps at the line to the 
Cougar nine. "The team’s biggest 
enemy may have been the officials," 
Rhodes commented after the game. 
“I don’t want to say the officials were 
bad, but it seems if they are going to 
call the small, picky fouls on us that 


154 Sports/1984 




♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


they should be called on them, too.” 

Better luck followed the Cougs in 
their meeting with University of Paci¬ 
fic. as they dominated play and 
scored their first NorPac victory of the 
season. The win snapped a six-game 
losing streak for the Cougs. Miles con- 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


tinued her scoring drive followed 
closely by that of Nikki Mohr. 

Another road trip followed for the 
Cougars and their seventh-place 
standing suffered as they were defe¬ 
ated by the University of Portland. The 
Cougs, once again, aided their 

















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


opponent’s effort by committing 43 
turnovers. Their battle with the 
Washington Huskies found them fair¬ 
ing no better as they dropped their 
second on the road. 

In the next two home games the 
lady cagers took a split. The meeting 
with the University of Santa Clara was 
lost by a mere four points. "I don’t 
think this team is as bad as our record 
indicates, many of our games could 
have gone either way,” commented 


7 think we have 
a good team, but 
to be a good team 
you have to able 
to beat other good 
teams." 

— Harold Rhodes 


coach Rhodes after the defeat. Play 
against the University of San Francis¬ 
co proved more productive as the 
Cougs tallied another win for the sea¬ 
son and their first win ever against the 
Lady Dons. "We never let the game 
get away from us,” Rhodes sid. "We 
knew we could win it.” The win raised 
their NorPac record to 27 and their 
overall record to 7-15. 

The Oregon schools dominated 
play on their home courts when the 
Cougars arrived. Oregon controlled 
the game and handed the Cougs a 
16-point loss. Scoring came from only 
four players. Linda Wulff, Cassandra 
Overby, Cheryl Mariani, and Marcia 
Miles combined to give the Cougars 
their final score of 63. Play in Corvallis 
was.no better than in Eugene and the 


Driving to the hoop against Oregon is junior Lin¬ 
da Wulff as she tries for two. (Photo by Ernest N. 
Warfel). Marcia Miles and Cheryl VanLoo of 
Portland State battle for the loose ball in their 
tournament meeting. (Photo by Elliott Ahola). 



Cougars fell 18 points short of Oregon 
State. 

The final game of the season 
matched the Cougars against cross¬ 
state rivals, the Washington Huskies, 
at Friel Court. The fourth-ranked Nor¬ 
Pac team gave playing time to most 
of its bench and still walked away 
with a 22-point victory margin. The 
lost ended the Cougar careers of 
seniors Cassandra Overby and 
Cheryl Mariani on a bittersweet note. 
Overby pulled down 10 rebounds 
while holding her U of W opponent to 
Just seven. The four assists contributed 
by Mariani upped her total to 110 for 
the season which broke the previous 


single season assist record. 

The Cougars may not have found 
the combinations necessary to win, 
but the young team, faced with many 
difficulties, showed what a little deter¬ 
mination could do. This year theiir ral¬ 
lies fell short, but there is always next 
season. To quote coach Harold 
Rhodes about his team, “I think we 
have a good team, but to be a good 
team you have to be able to beat 
other good teams.” Next year may 
find the other teams in the confer¬ 
ence looking at the Lady Cougars of 
Washington State from the losing end 
of the scoreboard. 


1984 /Sports 155 














Oh So 
Close 




156 Sports/1984 













■ 1 -- ■ """" 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


Even to those who follow the WSU 
gymnastics team closely, the per¬ 
formance turned in by the Cougar 
ladies was a pleasant surprise. 

Over the course of the season, 
many records were set by the young 
and talented team built by coach Al 
Sanders. 

“Some teams have fights or clashes 
but ours is like a family. Weall work as 
a team," was senior gymnast Lesa 


IP'**.. 


Stark’s observation of the team. In¬ 
juries for the Cougars began early 
and were to plague them throughout 
the season. 

The team opened its season in front 
of a home crowd at Bohler Gym. It 
soundly defeated its two competi¬ 
tors, Spokane Community College 
and Eastern Washington University. In 
this sport, where winning and losing is 
often determined by fractions of a 
point, the team outscored its nearest 
competitor by more than 20 points. 
Sarah Larson, a freshman, took top 
all-around honors at the meet and 
she was followed closely by three 
teammates, sweeping the top posi¬ 
tions. 

Even after receiving a severe cut 
on the leg, junior Kim Rogers re¬ 
mained in action. She was forced to 
perform watered-down routines, 
however, for the next meet against 
the University of Montana. The team 
finished on top with a point total of 
168.85, even though competing one 
short in the balance beam competi¬ 
tion. 

"It was good to see how well the 
team could handle the situation, and 
I think we did quite well," reflected 
Coach Sanders on the victory. For a 
second time. Sarah Larson took top 
all-around honors, with a strong per¬ 
formance by Kristen Jensen after a 
nearly two year absence due to in¬ 
jury. 

It was still competition on the road 
for the Cougars as they headed to 
Seattle for the University of Washing¬ 
ton Open. They competed with nine 
schools and came out in second 
place, behind the University of 
Washington Huskies, scoring 168.8 
points to the U of Ws 177.6. Kim Rogers 
tied for second place in the floor ex¬ 
ercise with a 9.2 and Karen Erickson 
aided the team effort with- her third 
place vault of 8.75. Unfortunately, the 
team was not up to its potential, with 


Competing hurt or ill for much of the season was 
typical of Cougar Gymnasts. Junior Kim Rogers 
(left) was injured early in the season, but per¬ 
formed well despite the hurt. (Photo by Ernest N. 
Warfel) 


three Cougar gymnasts suffering in¬ 
juries before the meet. 

A meeting with nationally ranked 
Oregon State University led to a close 
loss of 169.4 to 165.7 

"If I could have cancelled the 
meet I would have. However con¬ 
sidering the condition of everyone, 
the meet didn’t go that bad,” Sanders 
said. Senior Lisa Bollinger turned in a 
strong performance at the meet, as 
did teammates Kim Larson, Kathy 
Bovaird, Sarah Larson, and Sandra 
Haley. 


“This team is a lot 
better than most 
people think. We’ve 
gone through the flu, 
injuries and finals.” 

—Al Sanders 


Still battling illness, the cougs 
turned in a solid performance in a 
meet with San Diego State and Cal 
State-Northridge. The Cougars took 
second behind host San Diego. "They 
did an outstanding job,” was the sim¬ 
ple praise-filled statement by San¬ 
ders for his team. 

"The kids really did an outstanding 
job considering many of them are still 
really sore,” Sanders remarked after 
the team made a strong return to its 
winning ways against the University of 
Oregon. The nearly 60 point win mar¬ 
gin was led by Kathy Bovaird who 
took the all-around title after close 
competition with teammates Sarah 
Larson and Suzy Sawyer. Kim Rogers 
won the two events she competed in, 
while teammate Lesa Stark also 
made a strong showing. 

A chilly greeting welcomed three 
nationally ranked teams as they 
coverged on Pullman for the next 
meet. All three teams, Brigham Young 
University, University of California- 
Berkeley and Seattle Pacific Universi¬ 
ty, met with defeat. The lady Cougars, 
in their victory, set five individual and 
two team records. 

A final team score of 176.9 set a new 
high mark in the WSU books. Fresh- 


1984 /Sports 157 

















►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 


so close... 


man Sarah Larson took the best all- 
around title by beating the previous 
record of 36.3 by three-tenths of a 
point. She also broke the balance 
beam record with a score of 9.2. The 
9.3 performances of two Cougar 
gymnasts, Kathy Bovaird and Kim Ro¬ 
gers, replaced the existing floor exer¬ 
cise record, with Bovaird also finishing 
second in the all-around. Sopho¬ 
mores Suzy Sawyer and Dawn Cariker 
turned in consistent performances, as 
did senior Lesa Stark and the remain¬ 
der of the Cougar squad. 

"This team is a lot better then most 
people think," Sanders said. “We 
have gone through the flu, injuries 
and finals. They’re good." 

Competition against the 12th- 
ranked Washington Huskies, for the 


second time, proved more difficult 
for the Cougars as they fell three 
points short of another victory. Their 
usually solid performance on the un¬ 
even parallel bars was not with them 
this meet, while the often trouble¬ 
some balance beam resulted in sur¬ 
prisingly strong performances. The 
setting of two new school records by 
Kathy Bovaird was a bright spot in the 
meet. Both the schools’ vault and ba¬ 
lance beam records were estab¬ 
lished at 9.3 

The meet against Spokane Com¬ 
munity College was a rest for many 
Cougars, as Sanders gave his top 
three performers time off from com¬ 
petition, at the same time giving 
other members of the team an 
opportunity to compete in different 
events. 

In its final meet before the NorPac 
championships, the team took 
second in a four team field, led by the 


performances of Kathy Bovaird and 
Kim Larson. Stanford took first, fol¬ 
lowed by WSU, Cal-State Long Beach, 
and the host, San Jose State. The in¬ 
jured team competed with only five 
instead of the normal six on the ba- 


“Some teams have 
fights or clashes but 
ours is like a family, 
we all work as a 
team" 

—Lesa Stark 


lance beam. The "sure” eight points 
would have given the Cougars 
another victory instead of the loss. 

With their regular season over, the 
Cougar gymnasts headed to Ber- 



158 Sports/1984 

















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



keley for competition in the NorPac 
championships. 

The finishes of Bovaird and Larson 
in the NorPac championships were 
enough to send them on individual 


Few seniors graced the Cougar squad. One who 
did compete, Lisa Bollinger (left), was a steady 
performer for the Cougs, while freshmen, like 
Sarah Larson (right), often dominated competi¬ 
tion. (Photos hy Scott Oborn). 


competition at the NCAA regionals. 
There, under the guidence of assis¬ 
tant coach Diane Richie (Sanders 
was ill and did not make the trip), the 
two Cougars placed 25th and 28th in 
the field. 

"They did really well individually. 
Both had strong vaults and nice bar 
routines. The floor exercise was a little 
low and Sarah (Larson) had trouble 
staying on the beam, but they repre¬ 
sented the school well." Richie said. 

The Cougar gymnastics team 
competed strongly for the university 


this year. Any team can come out on 
top in this sport where scoring is so 
often close. As Richie said, "The com¬ 
petition in NorPac is getting closer. As 
far as teams go, Cal State, UCLA, the 
UW, or any other team in the league 
can come out on top." 

With a little luck behind them, the 
lady Cougars, who came so close this 
season, will be back stronger next 
year and finish even closer to the top. 

Kathy Gilbert 


1984 /Sports 159 











The Road to 
Nationals... 

A philosophy 
of success 



The successful season of the 
Washington State wrestling team can 
be seen as an extension of Coach 
Phil Parker's three-fold philosophy of 
success. Imagining and believing in 
your goal or dream is the first step of 
this philosophy. Steps two and three 
are working toward that goal and its 
eventual achievement. These three 
simple steps led five WSU wrestlers 
into competition at the NCAA Nation¬ 


al Championships as well as to the 
Washington State team title. Every 
year we’ve improved in terms of our 
season record, athletes, personnel 
and schedule," noted coach Phil Par¬ 
ker of the season ahead. 

Coming off a win over the WSU 
Alumni, the Cougars entered two 
days of competition at the Boise 
State Tournament. Although team 
scores were not kept, the team did 


well. Mike Dotson took a first in his 
division while Ted Parker and Bot 
Siegwarth took seconds. Two thirds 
and three fourth place finishes were 
also recorded by the Cougars. 

The first free-style dual meet of the 
year pitted WSU against Simon Frase 
of Canada, and ended in defeat de¬ 
spite a strong Cougar showing afte 
the disqualification of WSU’s Wendel 
Ellis. 


















»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


The Cougars bounced back from 
the defeat to place second in their 
next outing, the Clansman Invitation¬ 
al, with three Cougar grapplers, Bob 
Siegwarth, Steve Porter and Wendell 
Ellis, capturing firsts. 

Losses to Arizona State and Uni¬ 
versity of Nevada-Las Vegas fol¬ 
lowed in the next two Cougar dual 
meets before the team headed on to 
Caesar's Palace for its first taste of 
national competition. There, the men 
finished 19 out of a 44-team field and 
coach Parker expressed his view on 
the outcome with optimism. 
"Whenever you finish in the top 20 in a 
nation-wide competition you’re 
doing well, he said. 

The dual match losing streak con- 


“Every year we’ve 
improved in terms of 
our season record, 
athletes, personnel 
and schedule.” 

— Phil Parker 


tinued as the team dropped a fourth 
decision to Humboldt State of Califor- 
nia, a national wrestling power 
among small colleges. 

The Cougs took third place against 
stiff competition at the Oregon Tour¬ 
ney at Eugene before moving on to 
Mercer Island for the Northwest 
Tournament. Even after forfeiting two 
weight classes, the team still finished 
third on the island. In that competi¬ 
tion, wrestlers Ted Parker and Alphon- 
so Phillips went undefeated while 
teammate Michael Dotson went 4-0- 
1 and Siegwarth and Porter each lost 
one match. 

A dual meet victory came for the 
Cougars as they opened competi¬ 
tion on their home mat. In the final 
match of the competition Cougar 
Wendell Ellis pinned his Boise State 
opponent in only 58-seconds. 

Central Washington and the Uni¬ 
versity of Montana both met with a 
building Cougar threat as they were 
dominated by WSU with Central scor¬ 
ing only nine points and Montana 
eight, to extend the Cougar dual 



meet record. 

A victory over Eastern Washington 
extended that streak to four with the 
score ending at 36-8 while Portland 
State, by a score of 35-16, also fell 
victim of the growing Crimson Wave. 

Tragedy struck before the Cougar 
meet with Pac-10 rival University of 
Oregon as two Oregon wrestlers were 
killed and many others injured in a 
van accident. Some of the wrestlers 
suffered permanent injuries, with one 
paralyzed. 

Oregon State won the Portland 
State Invitational in which the 
Cougars placed third behind the 
second place showings of Siegwarth, 


The star wrestler. Alphonso Phillips (left), did 
well during the season and was picked for the 
nationals after Pac-lOChampionships in Corvallis. 
(Photo by Tracy A. Bull). Heavyweight, Wendell 
Ellis (above) was the only Cougar wrestler to bring 
a Pac-10 title back toPuliman. (Photo by Ernest N. 
Warfel). 


Parker and Ellis before continuing on 
in dual meet competition. 

Posting two wins, one over Southern 
Oregon and another against Pacific, 
but losing one to nationally ranked 
Oregon State, the Cougars raised 
their dual meet record over the 500 
mark to the 9-8. 

Returning to Ellensburg the next 
week, the Cougars faced off against 


1984/Sports 161 















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Success... 

Central Washington State. Downed 
14-0, the Cougar wrestlers took con¬ 
trol and won the next seven matches 
to eventually defeat the Wildcats 34- 
14. 

The final home match of the sea¬ 
son brought the Cougars together 
again with the University of Montana 
and once again they won. 

Winning the last nine of its 10 
matches, the Cougar team topped 
off the regular season with a lopsided 
victory over Eastern Washington. An 


ending score of 49-8 was recorded 
and the team also posted five pins 
during the match to bring its streak to 
10 of 11. 

With the regular season over, the 
Cougars headed to Oregon State 
University and the Pac-10 Cham¬ 
pionships. Here individual fates 
would decide who would make the 
trip to New Jersey and the NCAA’s. As 
expected, host Oregon State took 
the team title, followed by Arizona 
State with Washington State placing 
third. Wendell Ellis was the only 
Cougar to take a Pac-10 title, impro¬ 
ving upon his second place finish of 
last year. Ellis, a sophomore and big- 


“Wrestling is a part 
of me and now I feel I 
have to do it, but 
when it is all over and 
when I see some kids 
out on the mat, I am 
going to want to go 
out there with them/' 
— Alphonso Phillips 



162 Sports/1984 



















►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



gest of the Cougar grapplers, took 
the heavyweight decision over Rod 
Severn of Arizona State. The bright 
victory of Ellis outshown the dis¬ 
appointment of Cougar Ted Parker, 
who failed to meet his 126 pound 
weight and could not compete in the 
tournament. Second place finishes 
assured Bob Siegwarth and Steve 
Porter further competition while the 


In a bind. Cougar George Dukes (below) struggles 
to res'erse the situation. A concerned Phil Parker 
(right) led five of his Cougars to national competi¬ 
tion in the 84 season. (Photos bv Ernest N. 
VVarfel). 



outstanding performances of 
Michael Dotson and Alphonso Phillips 
made them the choice of Pac-10 
coaches to attend the NCAA’s also. 

After its strong showing at the con¬ 
ference championships the Cougar 
hopes were eliminated as they en¬ 
tered into national competition. 
Senior Bob Siegwarth was the only 
Cougar to survive the first round of the 
NCAA’s, but stumbled in round two, 
losing the decision 7-4. Due to their 
first-round opponents’ strong show¬ 
ings in the tournament, both Steve 
Porter and Wendell Ellis earned 
berths in the consolation rounds. 
Luck, however, evaded the Cougars 
as they stumbled in competition and 


the WSU wrestlers finished far back in 
the tournament. 

Losing only two seniors next year, 
coach Parker is optimistic about his 
team’s chances in the 1984-85 
season. 

"I feel we should reach step three 
next year,” he stated. "Dotson, Ellis 
and Porter are pioneers for Cougar 
wrestling in the future.” The experi¬ 
ence of his returning wrestlers and a 
strong recruiting season may be the 
deciding factors in the dream to be 
Pac-10 champions for the first time. 

We’ll be watching to see! 

Kathy Gilbert 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




1984 /Sports 163 














♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦◄ 

Splish, 

Splash 


The Cougar women's swimming After one of the best seasons ever where WSU placed third, 

and diving team faced new chal- in 1982-83, the Cougars started this The next weekend, the Cougars 
lenges and obstacles during the season faced with the challenge of headed for the west side of the 

1983-84 season which made this rebuilding a team that lost three top mountains for their first dual meet ac- 

team what Head Coach Debbie swimmers. tion. They finished with a split on the 

Pipher called the hardest working The Cougars started their team road as they slipped past the Uni¬ 
group she has ever had. competition with the Idaho Relays versify of Puget Sound, 58-54 and tel 















j to the University of Washington, 57-36. 
The final event, the 200 freestyle re- 
; lay, was the deciding factor in the 
meet against UPS as freshman Karen 
! Seresun came from behind to aid the 
Cougs in the victory. 

A week later, the Cougars stayed in 
Pullman to host Oregon State Uni¬ 
versity for the only home meet of the 
season. This meet turned out to be a 
somewhat strange victory. WSU had 
apparently lost the meet when their 
400-yard freestyle relay wass nipped 
by the Beavers in the meet’s final 
event. But, an Oregon State swimmer 
started a premature celebration by 
jumping into the pool before WSU’s 
number-two relay had finished. 
Under NCAA rules, any swimmer who 
enters the pool before all races are 
completed, disqualifies her team in 
that event. 

Instead of winning 75-64, the Beav¬ 
ers lost 71-68. 

After a break in competition, WSU 
met Palouse Rival University of Idaho. 
The Cougars fell to the Vandals 74-64 


Stroking for home is Cougar Sarah Emard against 
Oregon State in the Cougar swimming team's only 
home meet of the season. In the same meet, two 
Cougs and one Beaver swimmer get off to a fast 
start. (Photos by Michael Putnam) 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


in a squeaker. Junior Sarah Emard 
led the Cougrars against Ul by win¬ 
ning the 100 freestyle, 200 freestyle 
and 100 butterfly. Connie Michaelson 
was a double winner, taking the 200 
butterfly and 500 freestyle. 

Irvine, California was the next des¬ 
tination for the Cougars where they 
finished seventh in the Ca-lrvine In¬ 
vitational. 

The final dual meet was in Missoula, 
Montana where WSU was swamped 
by the University of Montana, 93-46. 
This brought WSU’s final dual meet re¬ 
cord to 2-3. 

Following the disappointing meet 
against Montana, the Cougars 
travelled to Corvallis, Oregon for the 
Oregon State Invitational. WSU, the 
defending champion, finised second 
with 504.5 points behind Oregon’s 
winning total of 559. 

After taking a week off from com¬ 
petition. the Cougars headed tor 
Eugene, Oregon for the Pacific West 
Championships and finished in 
seventh place. Theresa Goetz set a 
new school record for the 200-yard 
backstroke in Eugene and broke her 
own record in that same event the 
next weekend at the NorPac Cham¬ 
pionships in Seattle. 

The season was wrapped up with a 
seventh place finish at the Nor Pac 


Championships. Going into the meet 
the team was beset with illness and 
both divers were injured. 

"It was a disappointing way to end 
the season,” said Pipher. 

Emard, WSU’s top swimmer missed 


“This is probably 
the hardest working 
group I’ve had” 

— Debbie Pipher 


the championships because of a 
case of pneumonia. 

"She was having a good year untl 
she got so sick," Pipher said. “Our 
placement in the championships 
would have been higher if Sarah and 
our divers would have competed.” 

Despite the obstacle of sickness 
and having to rebuild her team after 
last year’s successful season, Pipher 
was pleased with the performance of 
her team and noted only two swim¬ 
mers are graduating, Goetz and Sue 
Mayes. 

“This is probably the hardest work¬ 
ing group I’ve had," Pipher said. 

— Michelle Webber 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


1984 /Sports 165 




























































































































































































































































Turning It Around 


“He came in and turned the prog¬ 
ram around." 

This cliche has been used many 
times in the world of sports but it 
seems especially fitting when Head 
Cougar Football Coach Jim Walden 
is referred to. 

Walden was awarded the Pac-IO’s 
Coach of the Year honors for the 
second time in three years following 
the Cougars' 7-4 1983 season. 

Many were surprised at the 
announcement of the award, which 
came on the heels of the Cougars’ 
17-6 upset victory against the Universi¬ 
ty of Washington Huskies. But those 
who follow the Cougars had no 
doubt that the right man had been 
chosen for the honor. 

“Winning an award of this sort 
means a lot,” Walden said. “It is be¬ 
cause of the people casting the 
votes. When the guys you go head- 
to-head with give you an award like 
this it feels good.” 

Walden began his coaching 
career as a high school coach for 
Amory High in his home state of Missis¬ 
sippi. After several successful sea¬ 
sons, he accepted an assistant 
coaching job for the Nebraska Cor- 
nhuskers. 

Walden’s next stop was in Florida 
where he was offensive backfield 


coach for the University of Miami. He 
then moved to Pullman to serve as 
WSU’s backfield coach. Former Athle¬ 
tic Director Sam Jankovich promoted 
Walden to the head coaching job in 
1977 and in his first three seasons he 
posted records of 4-6-1, 5-6 and 4-7. 

Many Cougars boosters started 
making noises about finding a new 
coach. Walden stayed, however, 
and in the 1981 season the Cougars 
posted an 8-3-1 mark; making their 
first bowl appearance since 1931. 
They lost to Brigham Young in the Holi¬ 
day Bowl but it was that season that 
he was first honored as Coach of the 
Year. 

The 1983 Cougars started the sea¬ 
son poorly; dropping their first three 
conference games of the season to 
Arizona, USC and UCLA. 

“The UCLA game was a turning 
point. We found that we could come 
back,” he said. 

Including Arizona State, the 
Cougars swept through the last five 
games of the season and finished 
with a 7-4 mark. 

Through his six seasons Walden 
said that there have been many 
highlights as well as some depressing 
moments. 

“It is always nice to beat your 
archrival and the good Lord has 


allowed us to do it twice,” he said, 
referring to last year’s 24-20 victory 
against the Huskies that preceded 
this year’s win. Both wins knocked the 
Huskies out of the Rose Bowl. 

Walden’s mind also wandered 
back to the 1979 contest against 
UCLA the first game played in the 
newly remodeled Martin Stadium. 

“I will always remember that game. 
We weren’t in the same class they 
were,” he said. "However, the timing 
just seemed to be right. It was home¬ 
coming, we were breaking in a new 
stadium and they hadn’t been here 
(Pullman) in 20 years.” 

The Cougars scored a 17-14 upset 
win over the Bruins in a game that will 
go down in Cougar football history. 

Walden shifted gears and remem¬ 
bered some disturbing times in his te¬ 
nure as Cougar coach including the 
1983 season. 

“I really expected more from this 
team,” he said. "They came back 
strong after a bad start. I am just sorry 
that they had to rally like that. We 
came so close to reaching our goal 
of eiglit wins — it’s just a shame.” 

Two others things disturbed Walden 
about the 1983 season. 

“The people here have been 
trained to expect mediocrity from the 
Cougar football team,” he said. “I 
want those expectations to change 
and I think it is up to us to change 
those opinions. 

“I think that not getting a bowl bid 
after the season we had is a 
tremendous slap in the face not only 
to our team but to the Pac-10 Confer¬ 
ence as well," he said. “There is not 
another major conference in the 
country where the number-three 
team is not going to a bowl.” 

Bowl game or not, Walden’s 1983 
Cougars surprised many people with 
their running offense and hard-nose 
defense. 

"The honor is really a private thing 
for me,” he said. "To talk much more 
about it would be taking from the 
guys that earned it - the team.” 

— Scott Jones 

1984 /Sports 167 





























♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



A Swing 
And 
A Miss 


An abundance of good steady 
players, but a lack of outstanding 
players, led to the Cougar men's ten¬ 
nis team mediocre 9-9 record. 

"We had good depth all the way 
down,” Cougar Head Coach Rex 
Davis said. "We just didn’t have the 
real strong top players that you need. 
The six players we had were all pretty 
even and, though it may sound funny, 
that isn't always the best thing to have 
in tennis." 

The Cougars jumped off to a 3-1 
start before making their annual 
spring break trip to California. There, 
the Cougars lost three straight match¬ 
es—to Santa Clara, San Jose State 
and Cal State-Hayward—before 
knocking off San Francisco State to 
even their record at 4-4. The University 
of San Francisco was next for the 
Cougars and the team responded 
with a 8-1 victory. Bill Treneer, John 
Click, John Tate, Ed Granger and Bill 
Stevens all picked up singles victories 
for the Cougars. 

After knocking off L-C State in Pull- 


Surprising everyone bv walking on and not only 
making the team but playing his way into the No. 3 
spot for most of the season was Cougar netter John 
Tate. The team finished with a 9-9 record due to a 
lack of top rate players, according to Coach Rex 
Davis, (pjiotos by Scott Oborn) 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


man, the Cougars took a hard- 
fought 5-4 match from the University 
of Portland. After singles play had 
finished, the two teams were tried at 
3-3. In doubles, the team of Treneer 
and Granger narrowly beat its oppo¬ 
nent, 7-5 and 7-6 and the freshman 
team of Burke Melville and Bill 
Stevens took its match, 6-3,6-1 to lock 


“We didn’t hove a 
real strong top 
player. We did 
have good depth 
all the way down.” 
— Rex Davis 


up the Cougar victory. 

"Melville and Stevens probably 
had the best seasons of anyone on 
the team," Davis said. "Bill Trenner, 
playing number one had a good 
season, but it seemed like he was al¬ 
ways getting stuck playing some- 
eone a little better. The experience 
he picked up will help us out down 
the line though.” 

With their record at 7-4, the 
Cougars went into a four-match skid. 
First, Nevada-Reno pulled out a 3-6 
victory. In that match the two teams 


were again tied after singles play, but 
the Cougars lost all three doubles 
matches and the match. Boise State 
visited Pullman and slammed the 
Cougars by a score of 8-1. Cross-state 
rival, Washington, next beat the 
Cougs, 8-1. Only Stevens, playing in 
the number three singles spot, was 
able to pick up a win. Against Whit¬ 
man, Steve Buckingham, Ed Granger 
and Bill Stevens all scored wins in 
singles play, but Whitman took two 
out of the three doubles matches to 
secure the win. 

The Cougars finally got back on the 
winning track with a victory over 
Northern Division opponent, Oregon. 
John Click, Steve Buckingham, Bill 
Stevens and Burke Melville again 
came through with wins in singles 
play. 

A win over Eastern Washington 
moved the Cougars’ record to 9-8, 
but a loss to Washington in the North¬ 
ern Division tournament at the end of 
the season ended the Cougars' 
hopes of finishing the season above 
the .500 mark. 

"Our 9-9 record indicates that we 
could have done better, but we just 
happened to have a season that was 
reasonably good but not as good as 
we would have liked to have had,” 
Davis said. “The weather was a factor. 
We had to fight that along with every¬ 
thing else." 

Dan Ivanis 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 


1984 /Sports 169 
















































































♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Although four of the 1984 Cougar 
women’s tennis players were "very 
good,” it was a lack of experience in 
the No. 5 and No. 6 spots that led to 
an 11-8 record. 

"We had four very good players 
and then we dropped off quite a bit 
at the last two spots,” Head Cougar 
Coach Rex Davis said. “We were kind 
of low in experience down there 


“We had four 
very good players 
and then we 
dropped down 
quite a bit 

— Rex Davis 


which led to our record.” 

The women started the season 
strongly winning their first five match¬ 
es against Eastern Washington, 6-3, 
Montana, 7-2, Pacific Lutheran, 6-3 
and 5-4 and Idaho, 5-4. 

Of the top four players, Brenda 
Tate, Erin Majury, Binky Lehto and 
Sheryl Traum, only Lehto suffered a 
singles defeat through the first five 
matches. Whitney Wright, Kristi Blank- 
enfeld and Debbie Ivaldi rotated at 
the last two positions but all had 
problems with consistency. 

The Cougars then entered the Nor¬ 
Pac Conference Round Robin in Pull¬ 
man. In the first match, the Cougars 
easily trounced the Oregon State 
Beavers, 9-0. The University of 
Washingtonn Huskies were too 
powerful and beat the Cougars 
handily wth a 8-1 score. Only the dou¬ 
bles team of Tate and Lehto were 


A Little Off 
The Mark 


able to score a victory against the 
Huskies. In the final match of the 
tournament, Majury, Lehto and Tate/ 
Lehto scored victories over the Uni¬ 
versity of Oregon Ducks but it wasn't 
enough and the Ducks won the 
match, 6-3. 

The Cougars next hit the road to 
California where they started poorly, 
bowing to Santa Clara, 2-7. Next 
came Cal State-Hayward whom the 
Cougars humiliated, 8-1. In the next 
match against San Francisco State, 
the top four women again swept their 
singles matches but SFS came back 
to win all three doubles competitions 
and the match, 5-4. The Cougars en¬ 
ded the road trip by defeating the 
University of San Francisco, 5-1. 

A second NorPac Round Robin was 
held, this time in Eugene, Oregon, 
and the Cougars started off the same 
as the last time, defeating Oregon 
State, 9-0. Oregon again proved to 


be the Cougars’ nemesis as Majury 
and Wright/Blankenfeld scored wins 
but the Ducks took the match, 7-2. 
Against Washington, the Cougars 
made it closer the second time 
around as Majury, Traum and Tate/ 
Lehto knocked off their Husky oppo¬ 
nents but Washington picked up the 
win by a 6-3 score. 

The Cougars ended the season by 
defeating Eastern Washington and 
Montana before falling to Montana 
State and Idaho. 

"I think the women overall had a 
pretty good season. Generally 
speaking I was pleased with the sea¬ 
son," Davis said. "Brenda Tate and 
Erin Majury both had good seasons 
at No. 1 and No. 2. We missed out on 
NorPac because Oregon beat us a 
couple of times when I thought we 
could beat them but we couldn’t 
quite pull it off.” 

— Dan Ivanis 



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When a team enters the 1984 sea¬ 
son as the defending Pac-10 cham¬ 
pion, finishes high in 1983 NCAA finals 
and has a dual meet winning streak 
of 39, there is not much space for 
improvement. The Cougar men’s 
track and field team, however, found 
that space and more in 1984. 

The squad extended its dual meet 
win streak to 49, repeated as confer¬ 
ence champion and took second 
behind the University of Oregon at 
the national championships in 
Eugene. Dominance is becoming 
commonplace for Cougar track en¬ 
thusiasts. 

The Cougars were picked by the 
experts to win the national title, but 
Oregon with a series of upset victories 
took the title while the locals finished 
a strong second. 

Julius Korir brought a national title 
back to the Palouse with his victory in 
the 5,000-meters. He was followed in 
second by Peter Koech who finished 
just under one second behind in that 
event. Koech nipped Oregon’s Jim 
Hill by just .02. Hill was expected to win 
the race, because he had not run 
any other races while Korir ran the 
steeplechase and Koech the 10,000- 
meters. 

Korir was timed in at 13:47.77 while 
Koech was clocked at 13:48.70 and 
Hill at 13:48.72. 

A Korir/Koech punch in the 5,000, 
however, was not enough to knock 
the Ducks out of first and the locals fell 


NATIONAL CHAMPION Julis K'orir (opposite 
page) wins the Pac-10 championship in Pullman in 
the 5,000 meters. (Photo by Tracy A. Bull) Jump¬ 
ing in the decathlon is Carlos Gamhetta (right) 
who finished seventh in the nation with 7,339 
points. (Photo hv Scott Oborn) 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ i 

The Terrible 
Twos 


"All we’re really 
concerned with is 
qualifying more 
athletes and 
getting more 
competition under 
our belts. ” 

— Rick Sloan 


to the Oregon for the first time in the 
season. Oregon took first with 113 
points to 94 for the Cougars. 

The Cougars once again are the 
national dual meet champions—an 
unofficial title — but Oregon used its 
homefield advantage and its faithful 
fans with 14,082 in the stands to pull 
away from the rest of the pack at the 
national championships. 

The victory, however, was not an 
easy one for the Ducks. Korir’s first in 
the 5,000 plus a second place finish 
by Lee Gordon in the 100-meters put 
the locals back into the title chase 
and had Oregon Coach Bill Dellinger 



1984 /Sports 173 

































Twos... 

worried. 

“I was really sweating at that point," 
Dellinger said after the Ducks had 
won the title. WSU was within two 
points at one time and had two men 
in the triple jump and one in the shot 
in scoring position. Oregon had two 
in the 1,500 meters and one in the 
pole vault to even out the tally. 

It boiled down to the Oregon 1,500- 
meter runners having to outscore the 
Cougar triple jumpers. The Oregon 
vaulter had to beat the Cougar shot 
putter. 

Dimitrios Koutsoukis, Cougar shot 
putter, was hurt, and only got the 
Cougars a ninth place, while Joseph 


Taiwo was an “impressive" second in 
the triple jump. Cougar jumper, Fran¬ 
cis Dodoo was also injured at the 
time and managed only another 
ninth. 

In the 1,500-meters, Cougar Omar 
Ortega failed to score any points in 
the race while Oregon's Joaquim 
Cruz took the title. Oregon's other run¬ 
ner placed high as the Ducks looked 
to pull away for the national title. 

It was the fifth time the Ducks had 
won the national title while the 
Cougars are still looking for their first 
outdoor championship. The Cougars 
have an indoor national title. 

Interestingly enough Cougar 
Coach John Chaplin predicted the 
“Ducks would go bananas in Eugene 
and win the track title. Their big 
advantage is the 14,000 maniacs in 


the stands... they yell and scream 
and a kid can’t help but get caught 
up in that." 

One of the Cougars left in the Ore¬ 
gon dust was Gabriel Tiacoh from the 
Ivory Coast who was the Pac-10 
champion in the 400-meters in Pull¬ 
man. He placed seventh in Eugene. 

The experts had picked Korir to win 
the 3,000-meter steeplechase, but he 
finished second to Weber State’s Far¬ 
ley Gerber. Korir, however, ran a life¬ 
time best at 8:19.85. 

In Pac-10 championship held in 
Pullman the Cougars took the title for 
the second year in a row. The 
Cougars collected the title with 157 
points to Oregon at 98 and USC at 94. 

Individual champions for the 
Cougars were James Cunningham in 
the high jump, the mile relay team, 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦1 


174 Sports/ 1984 















5ky walker, Brent Harken (above left), was a top 
iimper for the Cougars all year, but lost the Pac-10 
iitle to James Cunningham, another Cougar leap- 
tr. (Photo by Tracy A. Bull) Lee Gordon (right), 
Jiown during a relay race, was one of the surprises 
bis year, when he took second in the nation in the 
00-meters. (Photo by Scott Oborn). 


iacoh in the 400-meters, Taiwo in the 
Jriple jump, Korir in the steeplechase, 
(oech in the 10,000 meters and Korir 
n the 5,000 meters. 

Cougar Brent Harken had been ex¬ 
pected to win the Pac-10 high jump 
itle and have a good shot at the 
■rational title as well as the U.S. Olym¬ 
pic team. Harken had an off-season 
3 ven though he had cleared 7-6 in 
pn early meet. He made the high 
ump finals at the Olympic trials, but 
ailed to make the team. 

The Cougar jumpers, however, got 


►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


some glory when former Cougar high 
jumper Doug Nordquist made the Un¬ 
ited States Olympic team with a 
second place leap of 7-7. He finished 
behind Dwight Stones who set a new 
American record of 7-8. Nordquist 


“If the distance 
runners qualify 
that's fine. If they 
don’t that’s fine 
too.” 

— John Chaplin 


was the only Cougar to make the Un¬ 
ited States squad. Many other 
Cougars will compete for other Na¬ 
tions. 

Ten Cougar men traveled to the 
NCAA indoor track and field cham¬ 
pionships. Once there Koech 
brought back to Pullman a national 
chamionship in the 3,000-meters. The 


team finished third with a total of 28- 
points behind first place Arkansas 
with 38 points and Iowa State with 36 
points. 

The University of Washington plus 
Boise State came visiting to Mooberry 
Track and the Cougars scored victor¬ 
ies of 105-56 against the Dawgs and 
126-23 against Boise State. 

Another meet had them whippiing 
Oregon State and Idaho. 

The Cougars early in the season 
had traveled to Eugene and whip¬ 
ped the Oregon team 94-69 in dual 
competition. 

The flags that wave at the end of 
the track in Pullman are a tribute to all 
the athletes who have traveled here 
to compete in track and field for the 
Cougars. They come from all over the 
world and across the entire United 
States. They come to Pullman to learn 
track from John Chaplin, the man 
who put Pullman on the track map of 
the world. 

— by Troy D. Bull 





































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Living in the shadow of a men’s 
team, which has become dominant 
in the past several years, causes rec¬ 
ognition on your own part to be a 
difficult road to travel. The WSU’s 
women's track team has, since its 
conception, accepted this position 
wearily and has steadily worked to 
improve over the years, meeting the 
challenging standards set by their 
male counterparts. This year of com¬ 
petition saw many new records set by 


“The team has 
made some 
significant 
advances 

— Rob Cassleman 


the evolving team and also saw the 
contribution to the university of the 
schools’ first NCAA national women’s 
champion in any sport. 

The indoor season began in Idaho 
as the strong contingent of Cougar 
freshmen made their presence felt. 
“It was a strong start," noted head 
coach Jessica Cassleman after the 
meet. Freshman Roxy Davis took the 
55-meters, establishing a new school 
record for the event while classmate 
Mary Moore took the high jump with 
a record leap. Middle distance run¬ 
ners, Kathy Curran and Cheryl Living¬ 
stone took firsts in their events to aid 
the Cougar effort. 

It was then to competition in 
Cheney and there Mary Moore qual¬ 
ified for the NCAA indoor cham- 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Another 
Step Closer 


pionships with a leap of 5-11. She was 
followed by two teammates, Val 
Johnson and Justine Rutt, to sweep 
the event. Help was supplied from Oz 
as Cougar Kathy Lee, from Australia, 
won the 55-meter dash. 

Two competitions held in Moscow 
brought more of the same with the 
Cougs qualifying four more of its 
members for the NorPac cham¬ 
pionships. 

Another meet in Cheney was saw 
the Cougar ladies making another 
strong showing across the board be¬ 
fore heading to Oregon for more 
competition. There, the team hit a 
short lived lull as placings were lower 
then in previous meets with illness 
and meet organizational problems 
taking their toll. 

With the indoor season over those 


Cougars qualfying for NCAA indoor 
competition continued on. One 
Cougar star shown brighter then all 
the rest in the nation, and WSU’s first 
national women’s champion was 
crowned. With her leap of six feet, 
Mary Moore, a freshman from Issa- 
quah, bested her competition and 
brought national honors home to the 
Palouse. 

Coming off such a bright start, the 
women began their outdoor season 
in front of a home crowd at Mooberry 
Track. Seven Cougar women had 


Pushing each other to better times, Camille 
Rivard (left) and Cheryl Livingstone set new 
Cougar records in the middle distances. Sprinter 
Kathy Lee (below) came all the way from Australia 
to run at Pullman. (Photos courtesy of Sports In¬ 
formation). 



1984 /Sports 177 






















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



high jump and Camille Rivard-3,000- 
meters. The victory raised the teams 
season record to 2-1. 

At their next meet, an invitational,; 
the competition was expected to be 
tough. "The quality of competition at 
this meet will be excellent," Jessica 
Cassleman noted. She added "They 
have shown that against good com¬ 
petition that they can improve and 
be competitive.” Cassleman’s 
observations proved true as the 
women turned in an impressive per¬ 
formance, falling just short of the win 
but placing nine women in eighth 
events. 

Hosting Boise State, the Cougars 
once again showed their domi-l 


" They've shown 
that against good 
competition that 
they can improve 
and be 
competitive 
— Jessica 
Cassleman 


nance on the track, defeating the 
team with a score of 73-51 despite 
unfavorable weather conditions. 
Kathy Lee led the Cougar victory, tak¬ 
ing two events, while the rest of the 
Cougars placed strong in the meet. 

Records fell as the ladies con- ( 
tinued in competition at Eugene Ore¬ 
gon. Camille Rivard broke the five 
week old 1,500-meter record to claim 
the spot and fell just two seconds 
short of NCAA qualification while the 
schools’ two-mile relay record fell to 
the team of Jonassen, Hurson, Spaar- 
garen, and Rivard. A collection of 
personal records were also topped 
in competition. 

With a 3-1 dual meet record, the 
best in their history, the women 
hosted Oregon State in their final 
meet of the season. "Oregon State is 
Improved over last year, but I’m looki 
ing forward to a victory. It should be a 
close and even meet," coach Cas- 


Step... 

already qualified for the NorPac 
Championships by the start of the 
season. Two 1,500-meter runners, 
Cheryl Livingstone and Linda Spaar- 
garen had met qualifying standards 
with Sandy Heinrich in the long jump, 
Stephanie Armitage in the shot put 
and two Cougar high jumpers, Mary 
Moore and Val Johnson filling out the 
field of qualifiers. The non-scoring 
meet showcased the tallented 
young Cougar squad for the home 
crowd as many personal records 
were set. 

Meet two matched them against 
the defending NorPac champions 
Oregon, of the Ducks home field. "It’s 
one of our team goals to be competi¬ 
tive against Oregon,” coach Jessica 
Cassleman noted, but that spirit 
evaded the Cougars as they fell to 
Oregon 81-44. "I’m disappointed we 
didn’t do better in terms of score, but 


I’m excited about the way we com¬ 
peted," Cassleman said after the 
meet. Kari Jonassen set a new 
Cougar record running in the 1,500- 
meters for the first time while Camille 
Rivard met the qualifying standards 
for the NCAA championships in the 
800-meters. 

Coming off a strong meet at Stan¬ 
ford, the Cougar women entered 
competition at Boise with a new 
lineup. Coaches Cassleman switch¬ 
ed events for many of the Cougs giv¬ 
ing their athletes a break from the 
monotony of competition as well as 
an opportunity to show their prower in 
other events. Even with the changes, 
the Cougar ladies took the event 
over their host Boise State and Eastern 
Washington with scoring 79-64-35 re¬ 
spectively. Two school records fell as 
Cheryl Livingstone took the 5,000- 
meters in a time of 17:31.9 and long 
jumper Sandy Heinrich set the new 
record at 19-3 giving her a second. 
Firsts were also recorded by shot put¬ 
ter Stephanie Armitage, Mary Moore- 

















Competition was tough in the field events, hut 
Cougars, like Stephanie Armitage (left), turned in 
consistant performances. High jumper Mary 
Moore (above) cleared 62” in her best attempt of 
1984 and brought a national championship to 
WSU. (Photos courtesy of Sports Information). 


sleman noted. The close meet 
proved true and the Cougars added 
another victory to their record, raising 
it to 4 and 1. 

Fresno State was the location of the 
NorPac championships this year and 
the Cougars sent 19 individuals on for 


the post-season competition. 
Finishing fourth was an improvement 
over the sixth place finish of the year 
before for the Cougs. Lynn Saalfeld 
was the only conference champion 
for the Cougars as the took the triple 
jump while teammates Mary Moore 
finished in second in the high jump 
and the 1,600-meter relay team 
claimed a second as well to help in 
the team scoring effort. "We had a 
good season. The team has made 
some significant advances,” was the 
ending statement on the cougar sea¬ 


son by assistant coach Rob Cas- 
sleman. 

All that was left was competition at 
nationals, which proved to be less 
fruitful than the indoor competition 
with the Cougar ladies finishing near 
the bottom in team competition. 

Although the season ended on a 
down beat for the ladies this year, 
they have, as in the past, taken 
another step forward in establishing 
a second Cougar track dynasty. 

Kathy Gilbert 


1984 /Sports 179 













♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Concentration, 
Consistency 
and a lot of Luck 


Although not accomplishing all of the goals they had set 
for themselves, both the men's and women’s golf teams 
took steps in the right direction, according to Cougar Head 
Coach Kyle Moore. 

“I would have to say that we had a successful season no 
matter what the final results were,” Moore said. "We made 
some great strides in upgrading the program.” 

At the beginning of the season the men’s team had two 
goals in mind. One was to establish themselves as the best 
team in the Northwest and the other was to finish higher 
than eighth in the Pac-10 Championship Tournament. The 
Cougars did defeat Oregon State at the Portland State 
Invitational but on the average finished closely behind the 
Beavers, Washington and Oregon in tournament competi¬ 
tion. 


It wasn’t concentration that was lacking for the Cougar golf team but more a 
lack of consistency. LeAnne Mine (left) studies a putt during the WSU Invita¬ 
tional. Kim Larsen (right) improved tremendously as the season went on, 
according to Coach Kyle Moore. (Photos by Elliott Ahola) 



At the Pac-10 Championships, the Cougars set a new 
team record with a 3-under par round of 359 in the first 
round but quickly faltered and finished 10th in the tourna¬ 
ment. 

“We can’t let the tenth place finish get us down,” Moore 
said. “We made tremendous progress during the season. It h 
was a disappointing place to finish but we had some great 
scores and some great finishes.” 

The Cougars started the season shakily finishing fourth in 
the Air Force Invitational and then 20th (out of 21 teams) in/ 


“I would have to say we had a 
successful season no matter what 
the final results were." 

— Kyle Moore 


the Conquistador Invitational in Arizona. The Cougars 
bounced back quickly and took first in the WSU Spring 
Invitational, third in the Oregon Invitational, and seconds in 
the Bronco Invitational and Portland State Intercollegiate 
Tourney before the Conference championships. 

Team leaders for the season were junior Randy Fossum 
and senior Clint Wallman who were both in the chase for 
individual honors in almost every tournament the team 
competed in. Fossum finished with an average of 74.6 
strokes per round while Wallman was right behind at 75.1. 

The women's team, in only its first year of competition at 
the team level, finished last in every tournament it entered 
but, according to Moore, that was expected. 

"We only had four girls competing for us in tournaments 
instead of the usual five so we did not get to drop our low 
scores like the other teams did,” he said. 

Moore said at the beginning of the season that he did 
not expect the team to be competitive. 

“All I wanted to do with the women's team was get over 
the adversity that a first year program has to go through," i 
he said. "We went out and showed we could play. We were 
just trying to improve with each tournament and I think we 
accomplished that.” 

— Dan Ivanis 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


t 































♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Coming Through in the 

Clutch 


When you lose nine players off of a 
college baseball team and they all 
go to the professional ranks, the most 
a college coach can usually do is 
pray. Unless of course the coach in 
question is WSU’s Bobo Brayton. 

Nine players graduated to the pro¬ 
fessional level off of the 1983 Cougar 
baseball team, leaving Brayton with 
many inexperienced players and 
very little power at the plate. Brayton, 
however, was able to take the bunch 
of no-name players and build them 
into the first Cougar team, since 1978, 
to go to the regional playoffs. 

The 1984 Cougars did not blow a lot 
of opposing teams away, but, they 
did manage to tie Portland State Uni¬ 
versity for the Northern Division Crown 
and come back to win the first-ever 
Northern Division post-season tourna¬ 
ment, thereby, earning a berth in the 
NCAA Western Regional playoffs in 
Tempe, Arizona. The Cougars were 
eliminated in two games at the play¬ 
offs — falling to top-ranked Arizona 
State and tenth-ranked Stanford Uni¬ 
versity — but were impressive in both 
games. 

On the way to the playoffs, the 
Cougars made a lot of people look 
twice. 

"I think, with the guys we had, the 
whole thing came out pretty well,” 
Brayton said. “It is a real credit to the 
team. The players made the whole 
thing happen." 

Brayton said the difference be¬ 
tween this team and teams in the 
past was a “team attitude." 

“One thing we emphasized 
throughout the year was that if we 
were going to win we would have to 
play as a team,” he said. “We lost the 
guys that were going to hit .380 and 
we knew we weren't going to hit 60 
home runs like we have in the past. 


"We got kind of used to waiting for 
the big inning,” he said. "We knew we 
were going to have to change our 
way of thinking and go out and make 
things happen ourselves." 

Several players emerged from 
obscurity as team leaders. Mike Cos¬ 
tello, who took a year off from school, 
came back in 1984 and emerged as 
the Cougars’ top pitcher. Costello en- 


“Like I told the kids 
— we can’t just say 
we are going to do it, 
you guys have to get 
the job done and 
they got it done” 

— Bobo Brayton 


ded the season with a 9-2 record and 
an amazing 1.88 earned run aver¬ 
age. This allowed him a berth on the 
third-team All-America selection. 
John Skurla, a part-time player in 
1983, emerged as the team leader 
and was named Player of the Year for 
the Northern Division. Skurla had a 
hefty .349 average as well as leading 
the Cougars in home runs with nine. 
Dwayne Lalor, who was not expected 
to play much, ended up leading the 
Cougars with a .353 average. 

"You can see," Brayton said, "there 
were some bright spots. Skurla kind of 
carried us through part of the season. 
Lalor battled around out there at 
second base and Costello was out¬ 
standing about 99 percent of the 
time." 

Jeff Corbally, a little known player, 
also emerged as one of the stars. 
Corbally finished the season with a 


.318 average and early in the season 
set a Cougar record when he hit safe¬ 
ly in 20 consecutive games. 

"That is impressive when you con¬ 
sider that the previous record was set 
about 50 years ago. The record was 
16 games and Mike Miller tied it a 
couple of years ago but Corbally 
went and broke that by four games," 
Brayton said. 

The Cougars started the season 
slowly and, by the time they were 
ready to leave on their annual Cali¬ 
fornia road trip, their record stood at 
a mediocre 9-6. 

"We started out kind of slow,” 
Brayton said. “We lost Doug Tollman 
early in the season there and we had 
to do a lot of adjusting with the pitch¬ 
ing staff." 

While in California, the Cougars en¬ 
tered the University of California- 
Riverside Tournament, one of the 
most prestigious tournaments in the 
country and the tournament that the 
Cougars had won the year before. 
After beating San Diego in the open¬ 
er, 5-4, the Cougars knocked off Ful¬ 
lerton State, 7-2, Oral Roberts, 9-0, 
Cal-Riverside, 5-3, and Brigham 
Young, 6-4, before bowing to Seton 
Hall 9-10 in 11 innings. The Cougars 
came back to beat Oregon State, 
8-7, and advanced to the cham¬ 
pionship game of the tournament. 
The Cougar pitching, however, had 
already thinned out and San Diego 
State took the tournament crown with 
a 12-0 win. 

“The Riverside Tournament gave us 


Relying on pitching and defense was the Cougar 
style in tying lor the Northern Division Chain- 
pionship and advancing to the NCAA Regional 
Playoffs. Loren Hoppes anchored the team at 
shortstop, (photo by Elliott Ahola). 


182 Sports/1984 






















































Clutch... 

some confidence,” Broyton said. “We 
were a little shakey up to that point 
and we had been making some 
errors. You have to play good de¬ 
fense to win and part of defense is 
pitching. Costello shut down Oral 
Roberts. Guy Normand pitched a 
great game against Riverside and 
Rainey came In and did a good job 
against San Diego State.” 

Back in Washington, the Cougars 
dropped their conference opener to 
Eastern Washington, 3-5. Three non¬ 
conference wins followed with a rain- 
shortened 2-4 loss to Portland State. In 
their home opener, the Cougars 
knocked oft Eastern Washington and 
upped their conference record to 1- 
2. Following a loss to Lewis-Clark 
State, the Cougars swept the Universi¬ 
ty of Portland and split with Oregon 
State for a 4-3 conference record, 


From his spot behind first base. Assistant Coach 
Ralph Dick (top) made sure runners got into scor¬ 
ing position whenever possible. Senior catcher 
Rick Poznanski (bottom) makes the tag at home in 
a crucial game against Portland State. The umpire 
called the runner safe as PSU eventually won the 
game. (Photos by Elliott Abola) 



184 Sports/1984 

































Clutch... 

two games behind red-hot Portland 
State. Gonzaga University fell victim 
to the Cougars, but even a sweep of 
the Bulldogs could not move the 
Cougars any closer to PSU in the 
Northern Division standings. 

A split with Eastern and a sweep of 
Gonzaga moved the Cougars record 
to 9-4 in the conference standings, 
but Portland State also continued to 
win and the two game spread be¬ 
tween the teams grew larger as the 
regular season neared its end. 

On the road in Oregon, the 
Cougars split with the pesky Oregon 
State Beavers and swept the Universi¬ 
ty of Portland for a 12-5 record in the 
conference. A 34-15 record swept the 
University of Portland for a 12-5 record 


“We had to play 
good defense to win 
and we didn't play 
good defense at 
times.” 

— Bobo Brayton 


in the conference and a 34-15 record 
overall. Portland State had a day off 
so the Cougars were able to pull with¬ 
in 11/2 games of the league-leading 
Vikings. 

The Huskies visited Pullman next 
and, in the first games ever played 
under the new lights at Buck Bailey 
Field, the Cougars swept both games 
and pulled even with Portland State 
who was swept by Eastern 
Washington. 

The Cougars' destiny now lay in 
their own hands. They were tied for 
the lead with PSU and the Vikings 
were in town for a noon doublehead¬ 
er. In the first game, Shawn Hathaway 
picked up the win for the Cougars as 
the team took over the league lead 
with a 3-1 victory. It was short lived, 


Head Coach Bobo Brayton, in his 23rd year at the 
Cougar helm, had his share of troubles during the 
year including a relatively inexperienced team and 
some horrible officiating. (Photos by Elliott Ahola) 



1984/Sports 185 

















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Clutch... 

however, as PSU ripped the Cougars’ 
depleted pitching staff for nine runs 
in a 9-5 victory. 

Portland State had a makeup 
game scheduled with Portland the 
next day, after winning their first 
game, insuring at least a share of the 
league championship with the 
Cougars. 

In an experimental move, the 
Northern Division held a post-season 
tournament to determine which 
team would advance to the regional 
playoffs. In the tournament, the 


“We knew we were 
going to have to 
hit-and-run, and bunt, 
and move players 
along if we were 
going to win. We did 
that ." 

— Bobo Brayton 


Cougars nipped Eastern Washington, 
3-2, and swept a pair from Oregon 
State to take the tournament cham¬ 
pionship and earn a trip to Tempe. 

In the first game the Cougars faced 
the No. 1-ranked Arizona State Sun 
Devils. The Cougars gave up three 
runs to the Sun Devils early and never 
recovered. 

“Arizona State is a good defensive 
ball club,” Brayton said. “They just 
happened to get more runs than us.” 


The stopper out of the bullpen, Reed Rainey, (top 
left) set career and single-season records for saves. 
Here he comes in relief of Cougar starter Guv 
Normand in a tight game against the Washington 
Huskies. (Photo by Rusty Coe) John Skurla (bot¬ 
tom left) was voted Northern Division Player of 
the Year for Ins team-leading play. (Photo by Scott 
Obom) Dwayne Lalor(top right) was not expected 
to play much but ended up leading the Cougars in 
hitting while playing steady defense at second 
base. (Photo by Eiliott AhoIa)The Cougars’ lack of 
speed led to some big leads on the base paths. 
Lorek Hoppes (bottom right) barely makes it back 
to first against the Huskies. (Photo by Scott Obom) 


186 Sports /1984 




















Clutch... 

Hathaway went the distance, giv¬ 
ing up just five hits to the lOth-ranked 
Cardinals. 

“We just got better as the season 
went along," Brayton said. "I would 
have to say that this team played up 
to its potential. At times I don’t think it 


“One thing we 
really emphasized 
throughout the season 
was that we would 
have to play 
together.” 

— Bobo Brayton 


could have played any better than it 
did. One thing we didn’t have was 
any speed, but we did have good 
baserunners. Even the slow guys were 
picking up that extra base when 
somebody mishandled the ball. Only 
in a couple of games did we not play 
good enough to stay in it.” 

Dan Ivanis 



1984 /Sports 187 





















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A Shot in 
the Dark 


Probably the most obscure varsity 
sport existing on campus would be 
the one in which the WSU Ritle Team 
participates In. Many do not consider 
it a sport, but to those who know the 
concentration and precision re¬ 


quired by these student athletes, the 
opinion is extremely different. 

The NCAA registers rifle as a mens' 
athletic event, but here at Washing¬ 
ton State the team is a co-ed effort. 
The 38 members of the team come 


from various fields and background? 
to compete in this individualist^ 
sport. 

During competitive meets, twc 
teams of four are chosen to represent 
the university. Like all other studen 



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188 Sports/1984 



















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athletes, the members are required 
to meet certain standards. A physical 
is required as well as a passing grade 
point average, with 12 credit hours 
per semester. Besides the shooting 
practice of 8 to 12 hours each week, 
members are required to complete 
two hours of weight training weekly 
and attend relaxation therapy ses¬ 
sions. 

Why so much training for a sport so 
seemingly easy? Considering the 


A chance at the Olympics for WSU Rifle squad 
member, Paul McMartain (left) topped off an ex¬ 
cellent season. Teammate Elliott Aliola (right) 
puts his relaxation training to good use during 
competition (photos by Elliott Aliola). 


fact that a member must hold a 12-15 
pound rifle perfectly steady during a 
four hour competition, and attempt 
to hit the pin sized spot at the center 
of a target placed 50 feet away, the 
requirements are necessary, not only 
for strength, but also for mental calm. 

Unlike other seasonal sports, rifle 
competitions run continuously 
throughout the year, consisting of 12 
to 20 matches. 

The WSU squad is a member of the 
six team Inland Empire Rifle Confer¬ 
ence, and is coached by Sergeant 
Major Les Vance. 

"This is the best season we have 
ever had,” Vance noted of his team. 
Of their 11 matches this year, the 
Cougars tallied seven wins and, at a 
majority of their competitions, the 


second squad from WSU was also in 
the top three positions. Of the 5,800 
points possible per team at each 
competition, the Cougars had an ex¬ 
cellent average of 4,468 points. 

One Cougar shooter made it to the 
NCAA championship round. There, 
Paul Cornet placed Thirteenth in the 
nation. Teammates Paul McMartin 
and Tamara Medgard may repre¬ 
sent the nation at the 1984 Olympics. 
Both members of the Cougar squad 


7 think we have 
a good chance of 
placing in the top 
eight teams in the 
notion next 
season 

— Les Vance 


have been invited to compete in the 
Olympic trials. 

The rifle team, started three years 
ago, will be operating next year with¬ 
out the support of the WSU ROTC 
program. It supplied Les Vance as a 
coach, and as Vance terms it, “This is 
definitly the most interesting job I 
have ever had in my army career.” 

Vance sees the program expand¬ 
ing despite this occurrence, "Next 
year we will probably expand the 
competitive teams to four, allowing 
16 shooters the chance to compete,” 
he stated. Vance also added an opti- 
mistic prediction for next season 
saying, "I think we have a good 
chance of placing in the top eight 
teams in the nation next season if 
everyone returns, and we keep im¬ 
proving." 

Hopefully the predictions of coach 
Vance will come true. If they do, the 
rifle team may move from obscurity 
on the Cougar athletic sidelines and 
move a little closer to the limelight. 

Kathy Gilbert 


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1984 /Sports 189 




















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BACKGAMMON 

Scott Tanner 

BADMINTON 

Women’s Singles: Corliss Hoeffener 
Women's Doubles: Lan Nguyen/Corlis 
Hoeffener 

Men's Singles: Per Bendix Olsen 
Men’s Doubles: Boje/Olsen 
Mixed Doubles: Lan Nguyen/Boje 
Olsen 

BASKETBALL 

Men's Unlimited A: Instant Joke 
Men's Unlimited B: Team Flakes 
Men's 6' & Under A: Artoos 
Men’s 6’ & Under B: Comfortably 
Numb 

Coed A: Sleazy 
Coed B: Jack Birds 
Women's A: Clueless 
Women's B: Haulers 

3-ON-3 BASKETBALL (FALL) 

Women’s: Ferrisites 


Men's Unlimited: Residues 
Men's 6' & Under: Dicks 

BIKE RACE 

Men's: Stephen Else 
Women’s: Tami Hood 

BOXING 

Robert Nehring 
Tom Eilertson 
Rand Veal 
Todd Dempewolf 
Kelly McCarty 
Steve Felde 
Lawrence Ellis 
Bud Bittner 
Robert Siegwarth 
Lance Baker 

FOOTBALL 

Men’s Contact Co-Champs: Gossam¬ 
er Wings & Sigma Nu Stormriders 
Men's Contact: Men at Work 
Men's Non-Contact A: Revenge II in 
3D 


Men's Non-Contact B: Yankinophs 
Coed A: Stray Cats 
Coed B: Incest is Best 
Women's Contact: Private Stock 
Women's Non-Contact: Psycho C's 

FROSTBITE RUN 

Men: Jerry High 
Women: Leslie Duck 

GOLF TOURNAMENT 

Individual Winner: John Tate 
Team Winners: Harold Sorenson,! 
Steve Sedlacek, Henry Mott, and 
John Quintinski 

SCOTCH MIXER GOLF 

Colleen FraatzRand Veal 

POCKET BILLIARDS 

Men's Singles: Kevin Pierce 

Men's Doubles: Tom Arnold/Duane 

Nelson 

Women’s Doubles: Vicki Rydbom/ 
Karen Sauerland 


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190 Sports /1904 


















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Mixed Doubles: Pat Haywood/Lori 
Haywood 

POWER WEIGHTLIFTING 

Women's Squat: Joan McGrath 
Women's Bench: Anne Seelye 
Women's Deadlift: Joan McGrath 
Women's Overall: Joan McGrath 
Men's Squat: Raymond Howard 
Men's Bench: Philip Gabriel 
Men's Deadlift: Mathew Pierce 
Men's Overall: Raymond Howard 

RACQUETBALL 

Women: Kathy Markin 

Men's A: Stan Johnson 

Men's B: Mike Pevec 

Mixed Doubles: Mark Sidell/Leslie 

Lindskog 

SOCCER (FALL) 

Men's A: Phi Delt 1 
Men's B: Phi Kap Face Hacks 
Women's A: Some Peoples’ Kids 
Coed A: Ipswitch United 
Coed B: Architwerps 

SOCCER (SPRING) 

LCA United 

SOFTBALL 

Women’s A: Sha Na Pum 
Women's B: Cruisin’ 

Men’s A: Slugs 
Men's B: If It Flies, It Dies 
Coed A: Beek & Broads 
Coed B: Ya, But We Can Drink III 

SKI RACE 

Women: Diane Eidler 
Men: Mike Patterson 

COED RELAY SWIM MEET 

Freestyle (50): Semi Retired 
Breaststroke (50): Smoke on the Water 
Butterfly (50): Clueless Wonder 


Freestyle (100): Spences 
Breaststroke (100): M. Williams 
Medley (100): M. Williams 

TABLE TENNIS 

Women's Singles: Julie Satterfield 
Women's Doubles: Becky Goetz/Hen¬ 
dricks 

Men’s Singles: Ausif Mahmood 
Men's Doubles: Pay Foy 
Mixed Doubles: Ausif Mahmood/Cor- 
liss 

TRACK 

Women's Discus: Lisa Merrill 
Men's Discus: Jack Lyon 
Men’s Triple Jump: Greg Thomas 
Women's Shot Put: Lisa Merrill 
Men’s Shot Put: Mark Hensley 
Women's Long Jump: Carrie Sattler 
Men's Long Jump: Greg Thomas 
Men's Pole Vault: Richard Simeon 
Women's High Jump: Annette Muir 
Men's High Jump: Greg Thomas 
Men's Javelin: Jack Lyon 
Men’s 400 relay: Stallworth’s 
Men's 1500: Jerry High 
Men’s 500 dash: Tom Eilertson 
Women's 500 dash: Theresa Brenner 
Men's 100 dash: Greg Pagel 
Women's 100 dash: Threresa Brenner 
Men’s 110 high hurdles: Tom Cannell 
Men's 800 run: Jerry High 
Men’s 200 dash: Tom Eilertson 
Men's 300 int. hurdles: Greg Mathers 
Men's 3000 run: Mark Semrau 
Men's 1600 relay: Stallworth's 

TENNIS 

Women's Singles: Fran McSweeney 
Women's Doubles: Sandy Johnson/ 
Marcia Miles 

Men's Singles: Josh Hershfield 
Men’s Doubles: Josh Hershfield/Mark 
Heendricks 

Mixed Doubles: Fran McSweeney/AI 
Fleschig 


TRIATHLON 

Women: Cathy Chay 
Men: Kirk Adams 

TURKEY TROT 

Team: Vet School 

Men's Medalist: Carl Endelin 

Women’s Medalist: Nancy Miller 

VOLLEYBALL 

Men’s A: Pacman 
Men’s B: Scores the Limit 
Women's A: We Like It On Top 
Women's B: Comanauts 
Coed A: Free Ride 
Coed B: Bump Set Screw 

WRESTLING (COLLEGIATE) 

118: Brent Koller 
126: Jeff Kawaguchi 
134: Todd Perry 
142: Jim Miller 
150: Al Turnbow 
158: John Killian 
167: Paul Brundage 
177: Karl Kimball 
190: John Milton 
Unlimited: Brian Gilmore 

WRESTLING (FREESTYLE) 

125.5: Jim Hudak 
142.5: Jim Miller 
149.5: Tom Heutmaker 
156.5: Rob Bonnett 
163.5: Paul Brundage 
180.5: John Milton 
198.5: Riley Wilson 
220.5: Brian Gilmore 

WATER POLO 

A: Metabolites 
B: Aqua Dogs 

COED INNERTUBE WATER POLO 

A: Metabolites 
B: Aqua Dogs 


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1984/Sports 191 





192 Sports/1984 















































1984 /Sports 193 


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Athletic Faculty 


ATHLETIC FACULTY -Row One: Bill Foran, Mel 
Sanders, Lindsay Hughes, Naomi Lee, Gayle Fletch¬ 
er, Janet Johnson, Julie Heath, Tammi Bos, Harold 
Gibson, Linda Moore. Row Two: Dick Young, Jim 
Coleman, Prescott Smith, Rich Tucker, Rex Davis, 
Linda Raunig, Ken Woody, Evelyn Martson, Jackie 


Sue Curtis, Lola Gillespie, Pat Weldon. Kaye Jewel!. 
Row Three: Al Sanders, Lynn Rosenbach, Dave 
Elliott, Len Stevens, Steve Morton, Gary Gagnon, 
Margo Behler, Dianne Ritchie, Kyle Moore, Sue 
Steele. Row Four: Tom Osborne, Jim Livengood, 


Jon Fabris, Dave DeCiantis, Pam Farmer, Stu Jack- 
son, Derek Allister, Marcia Saneholtz, Les Vance, 
Rob Cassleman, Jessica Cassleman, Jim Walden, 
Debbie Lombardi, Marie Hovey, Harold Rhodes, 
Del Wight, Cindy DeGrosse, Jim Burrow. 


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194 Sports/1984 


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Cougar Athletic Trainers 


COUGAR ATHLETIC TRAINERS /W One: 
Doug Sebold (Program Director) Barrie Steele 
(Assistant Athletic Trainer), Mark Smaha (Head 
Athletic Trainer). Row Two: Scott Peck, Kristin 
Gray, Dana Tobin, Sue Schirman, Laura Koepke. 


Kris Tjemsland, JoLane Williams, Karen Schaefer, 
Diana Lcnning. Row Three: Lars Jorstad. George 
Minegishi, Lance Hutchins, Jay Williams. Todd 
McBride. Brian Danielson, Josh Hershfield. David 


Andrews, Mike Hawkins, Eddie Brewer, Larry 
Packard. Not Pictured: Jody Dickens (Assistant 
Athletic Trainer), Kim Perenick (Assistant Athletic 
Trainer). 



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Cougar Rally Squad 




RALLY SQLAD-/tow One: Butch. Row Two: Kim 
Kronnagel, Allison Smith, Julie Woodward, Jennifer 
Jansen, Julie Van Doren, Chrissy Carlson, Deena 
Ihry. Row Three: Steve Boe, Dan Druffel, Brian 
Sandelius, Dan Thomson, David Preedy, Bill Plum¬ 
mer, Damon Skyta. 


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1964 / Sports 195 














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Crimson Squad 



CRIMSON SQUAD-/?tfw One: Patty Warner, Sue Saboe, Tara Obryan. Row Two: Dave Dahl, Rob Vandiver. Inset: Carmen Carbone 

Michelle Crites, Twanda Smith. Carla Copenhagen, Webb, Tom Brazier, Paul Dire, Brian Rockwell. Jeff 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 


196 Sports/1984 












Coug Guys and Gals 



COUG GUYS AND GALS-Row One: Greg Fenich, 
Kris Stocker, Jenny Hall, Darian McLain, Mitch 
Bowman. RowTwo: Laurie Koloski, Gini Brislawn, 
Carrie Peterson (Public Relations), Ann Vanderlin- 


den, Dawn Bennett, Thea Gormanos (Vice Presi¬ 
dent). Mikki Fanning. Row Three: Malt Coe, Gary 
Steele (Treasurer), Ron Honner (Public Relations), 
Ron Fode (President), Jeff Robinson, Barry Dougan, 


Jeff Eller, Dave Pridemore, “Pickles” Connell, 
Wade Sparks. Not Pictured: Whitney Bennett, Clif 
Clk, Teri Forsland, Lisa Ludwig, Kyle Moore 
(Advisor). 


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Gray Squad 


GRAY SQUAD-/tow One: Tanzee Johnson, Chip McBroom, Sheryl Jackson, Mark Showalter, Carmen Carbone, Jesce Gonzales. 


1984 /Sports 197 





















198 Sports/1984 






































































































































































































































































































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ASWSU Ski Team 


SKI TEAM-flow One: Monica Schuster, Jan Davis, 
CeciChourre, Irv Terry, Nina Lippert. Chris Mellon, 
Joe Still, Carole Hill, Cameron Andrus. Row Two: 
Chris Tapfer (Coach), Eric Rudd, Michele Ander¬ 
son, Denise Podnar, Clay Schuemann, Cheryl Batty, 
Debi Dannert, Mara Haase. Gary Wiese. RowThree: 


Matt Laumen, Dave Talarico, Steve Boulanger, I.B. 
Sammy, Darcy Furseth, Heidi A. Bernstein, Michel¬ 
le McMillian, Scoodler Megee, Vince Vanderney, 
Popoff, Lorie “Rubberneck'‘ Layman. Row Four: 
Ann E. Wakefield, Frank R. Rowland, David Juha 


Hills, Juli A. Brodvik. Phil C. Ohl, Brian Smith, 
Tom V. Hayes, Rick C. Brown, Phil J. Dawg. Row 
Five: Kevin Canothers, Chuck Roose, Eric Strand, 
Kyle Ringo, Craig Schneider, John Hudson. Gary 
Emerick, Ron Scofield, Ole John Grevstad. 


1984 /Sports 199 


The 1983-84 season proved to be the best 
ever for the ASWSU SKI TEAM, since its 
revival several years ago. Under the lead¬ 
ership of coach Chris Tapfer, and behind 
the outstanding skiing of Mara Haase and 
Carole Hill, the women’s squad proved 
itself at the National Collegiate Ski Asso¬ 
ciation Championships by taking a second 
place National Title, four Gold Medals, 
three Bronze Medals, two All-American 
Honors, and the Salomon Company and 
Raichle-Molitor Company Awards for the 
Top Female Alpine and Nordic Skiers of 
the Year. The men’s squad, competing in 
its third consecutive Nationals for Nordic, 
placed eighth and also had the first Alpine 
skier ever representing WSU at the NCSA 
National Championships. At the Regional 
Championships, WSU skiers Chuck Gif¬ 
ford, Mara Haase, Carole Hill and Cam 
Andrus took five of the six individual Gold 
Medals available. 

With this combined strength, the ASWSU 
Ski Team proved itself to be the strongest 
non-varsity NCSA ski team in the country. 

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Mara Haase 


Carole Hill 


Gold medal-slalom, Gold medal-Giant 
slalom, Gold medal-Alpine combined, 
NCSA All-American, Raichle-Molitor 
Award-Top Female Alpine Skier of the 
Year. 


Gold medal-7.5km, Bronze medal-3.5km 
relay, NCSA All-American, Salomon 
Award-Top Female Nordic Skier of the 
Year. 




















200 Sports /1984 


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Water Polo Club 


WATER POLO CLUB-/?<?w’ One: Scott Gustafsen, 
Mark Collingham, Mike “Stud” Fry, Steve Robin¬ 
son, Zoltan Tusnadi (Coach). Row Two: Kelly Dil¬ 


lon. Dwayne Pearson, Doug Bambrick. Brian Zuehl- 
sdorff. Rich Dunton, Rick Kohler. Not Pictured: 


Brian Bjodstrup, Steve Koga. Brvan Lett, John 
Keller. 



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1984 / Sports 201 


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ASWSU Bowling Club 


BOWLING TEAM-/tow One: Terri Tomich, Dana 
Dobbs, Cally Cass, Cindy Swears. Row Two: Bruce 
Bogard, Felicia Kinney, Bob Little, Cindy Bradham, 
Paula Manalo, Mark Joplin, Scott Thomsen, Frank 


Ide, Steve South. Row Three: Michael Wallin, Don¬ 
na Callahan, Ray Corwin, Ray Wilson, Naoki 
Kamiya, Amy Stephens, Dan Vitcovich, Karen Siev- 


ers. Row Four: Randal Lathrop, Tom Robinson, Joe 
Hammond, Jeff Strom, Brian Stezler, Ron Thiery, 
Marty Jones, Rick Jones, Kevin Gaylord. 



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ASWSU Men’s Crew 



MEN’S CREW-Row One: Dave Snow. Jay Higgins. 
Thad O’Dell, Scott Wowah, Neil Ohata, Dave Cur¬ 
ran, Tim West, Randy iheda. Row Two: Aaron 
Sharp, Brian Petro, Chris Mandregan, Bob Nehring. 
John Sanders (commodore). Rob Little, Jay Holm- 


strom. Row Three: Brett Pertzer (J.V. coach), Ken 
Struckmeyer (Head Coach), Kash VanClecf (Frosh 
Coash), Mike McQuaid, Paul Hansel. Simon Nash, 
Mike Riordan, Ray McCrary, Doug Lindahl, Roger 
Crawford, Todd Hanson, Doug Wordell, John 


Hutchinson, Bruce Green, John Welch. Row Four: 
Eric Weseman, Rob MacDougall, Steve Vassey, 
Steve Small, Kirk Christensen, Jim Gressard, Tim 
Gattenby, Jess O’Dell, DanGard. Not Pictured: Bob 
Seigwarth, Nathaniel Symonds. 




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202 Sports /1984 



















ASWSU Women’s Crew 



WOMEN’S CREW -Row One: Kim Heggemess. 
Row Two: Sue VanLeuven, Anna Stowe, Nancy 
McFadden, Shay Kaun, Annie Calvin, Jenny Cossa- 
no. Robin Laughlin, Linda Blakesly, Mary Jansen, 


Alice Williams, Tracey Docherty, Tami Gill. Row 
Three: Rick “Flip” Ray (Head Coach), Brenda 
Frederick, Lisa Stivers (commodore), Mary Jane 
Sheenstra (commodore), Tracy Chrush. Mary Wid- 


der, Traci Olsen, Sara Bolson, Tammy Boggs, Dawn 
Sheneman, Laurie Di Domenico, Cheryl King, Karin 
Scarlett, Karen McKellar (Frosh Coach). 



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1984 / Sports 203 
















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ASWSU Women’s Soccer Club 



WOMEN’S SOCCER-/?0»v One: Habib Octolzpqt, 
Brunhilda Q. Schlep, Jan Segna, Lisa Slater, Patty 
Hazard. Heather Cummins. Germaine De Pinna. 


Shaela Leaver, Jane Doe. Row Two: Celia Yazzoli- 
no. Kelly Gillman, Carol Oas, Jenny Wagner, Sher- 
ilyn Traub, Constance Frey, Stacey Lane, Amy 


Reaves, Wendy Hine. 




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204 Sports /1984 




































ASWSU Women’s Rugby Club 



WOMEN’S RUGBY-/?™ One: Bill Rogers, Sheri 
White, Heidi Langloris, Anne Sparks, Brenda 
Whitesel, Cathy Craig, Gretchen Dykers, Deanne 


Kemp, Joe Lindoo. Row Two: Gay Klindworth, Julie 
Olsen, Robyn Jones, Nancy Brown. Hilary Young, 
Tami Blacker, Jenny Larsen, Jeanne DePaul, Lynn 


DeRuyter. Not Pictured: Miss P. Martin 


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ASWSU Men’s Rugby Club 



RUGBY CLUB-/?™ One: Brent R. Young, Pat J. 
Nagle, Troy A. Stultz, Steve H. Good, Mario Ver¬ 
gara, Van M. White, Lyle D. Hurd. Row Two: Jeff 
Salenjus, Jeff L. Black, Jon Gehle, Brooke D. 


Hamilton, Brian B.A. Chittick, Larry R. Gorman, 
Peter A. Thein. Row Three: Kurt C. Martinec. Mark 
A. Gallncci. Lloyd Ralphs, Joe R. Hanna. Row Four: 


Todd A. Boyd, Kelly D. Kerrone, Andy J. McCon¬ 
nell, Brad J. Fluetsch, Ken A. Emmil. 


1984 /Sports 205 





















































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Administration 


President Glenn Terrell.209 

Board of Regents. 212 

PROVOSTS 

Albert Yates.214 

V. Lane Rawlins.214 

CJ. Nyman.214 

Thomas L. Kennedy. 214 

Richard A. 1 lagood. 214 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

Jay Hartford.215 

Ernest Renfro.215 

Norm Coffman. 215 

Ken Abbey.215 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Stanton Schmid.216 

Connie Kravas.217 

Dennis I laarsager.217 

Ann Clark.217 

Thomas Sanders. 217 

Keith Lincoln. 217 

Dick Fry.217 

UNIVERSITY RELATED 

C. James Quann. 2 is 

Ross Armstrong. 2 is 

Stan Berry.218 


Oro N. Bull. 

Arthur Wint. 

James Crow. 

Vishnu Bhatia. 

Dallas Barnes. 

Janusz Kowalik. 

Joseph I lindman. 

STUDENT AFFA1RS/OTIIERS 

Arthur McCartan. 

George A. Bettas. 

K.J. Kravas. 

Lola J. Finch. 

Sidney Miller. 

Sally P. Savage. 

Dr. Betty Adams. 

Richard Young. 

Elaine Zakarison. 

Deb Nelson. 

Patti Gora. 

Mark Levy. 

Mathew Carey. 

David Cooper. 

Randy Jorgensen. 

Jack Burns. 

Anna Crider. 



219; 

219; 

219 

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22 



222 

222 

222 

222 



208 Administration /1984 






































































1984 / Administration 209 























210 Administration /1984 




Our 


Mr. T 

Big Brother 


1984, the year that George Orwell 
wrote into history, is upon us. Despite 
its notoriety, like all years that came 
before it, 1984 will pass day by day 
until it is simply a part of our memory. 
The influence and comparative im¬ 
pact of Orwell’s novel, however, is 
I everwhere and its death may be some¬ 
what slower in coming. 

If Washington State University was 
the site of the novel, rather than the 
fictitious Oceania, our “Big Brother” 
would be Glenn Terrell. His lead- 
I ership qualities and campus-wide pre- 
I sence, however, are as far as the com¬ 
parison goes. He does not oversha¬ 
dow university life in an imposing 
manner, but, instead, is an important 
component to the good of the 
campus. 

His Big Brother role is one that fos¬ 
ters a successful working environ¬ 
ment for students, faculty and staff. 
He also tries to constantly improve the 
university, overall. Much of this, of 
course, is a team effort of many indi¬ 


viduals, but Terrell, as president, 
plays an integral part in orchestrating 
it. 

Primarily, Glenn Terrell likes to 
keep in touch. His duties take him to 
the state legislature, alumni gather¬ 
ings, trips to Washington D.G. to meet 
with other university presidents or to 
dinners at various student living resi¬ 
dences. 

Terrell said, “The job of a universi¬ 
ty president is a continuous process of 
communicating with people.” 

Terrells communication shows in 
his actions. Often he can be seen 
cheering on the Gougars, his face easi¬ 
ly spotted in the crowd. He also takes 
time to stop and talk with students 
when he is on campus or walking 
down the mall to his home. He holds 
great pride in his memory of faces. 
Terrell, sometimes, spends his noon 
hour with a sack lunch while visiting 
the faculty of different departments. 

Terrell’s fifteen years as president 
have seen many changes at the uni¬ 



versity. He experienced the campus 
unrest of the early seventies, witnes¬ 
sed the improvement of various de¬ 
partments, and lived through the 
mahem of the Mount St. Helens’ ex¬ 
plosion. Of the monumental to the 
mundane events that occur in the day 
to day life of a university president, 
Terrell’s memories primarily include 
the personal association he has had 
with the students, faculty, staff and 
alumni. Mainly, he has a strong in¬ 
terest in people. 

What is Terrell’s basic philosophy 
of life? “To take things seriously, but 
not yourself.” With a decisive step and 
a smile on his face, Terrell seems to 
follow this idea in all that he does. 





















Board 

of 


Regents 


212 Administration /1984 




















Diversified Lot Makes Up the Board 


Various backgrounds and occupa¬ 
tions make up the group of people 
who serve on the Board of Regents. 
One is a rancher, one is a banker and 
another publishes a local newpaper. 
The members of the board live as far 
away as Bainbridge Island and as close 
as Othello. A deep interest in the 
problems, events and future of this 
university draws all these diverse peo¬ 
ple together. 

The seven members, serving on the 
board, are appointed by the Gov¬ 
ernor. They meet ten times during 
the year at different locations 
throughout the state. Many of the 
meetings are held at WSU, open for 
both students and faculty to attend. 

The Board of Regents has the re¬ 
sponsibility of being the governing 
branch of the university for major 
administrative decisions. They set 


policies, entrusting the president to 
implement them. They also act as a 
sounding board for the president and 
other administrative members. 

They deal with all academic mat¬ 
ters, such as establishing depart¬ 
ments, approving and awarding de¬ 
grees and determining special fees 
and monetary expenditures over 
$ 100 , 000 . 

Members of the board are invited to 
many university functions. Through¬ 
out the year, they try to attend 
whenever possible. Many come to 
commencement and individually par¬ 
ticipate in campus events. Dr. Vitt 
Ferrucci will participate in the Veter¬ 
inary School commencement, as he is 
also a graduate of that school. 

This hard working group’s only 
compensation is travel and lodging. 
Many are alumni, but they all hold a 


deep concern for the destiny of 
Washington State University. 

The members include: President 
Edwin J. McWilliams (President of 
Fidelity Service Corporation...WSU 
alum), R. D. “Dan” Leary (Publisher 
of the Othello Outlook), Dr. Vitt P. 
Ferrucci (Doctor of Veterinary Medi¬ 
cine...WSU alum), Thomas Hyslop 
(cattle rancher...WSU alum), Jeanne 
Olsen (Civic leader, active in the Belle- 
vue-Seattle area...WSU alum), and 
Kate B. Webster (Chairman of the 
Board of Children’s Orthopedic in 
Seattle). 

Gen De Vleming, Executive Assis¬ 
tant to President Glenn Terrell said, 
“Overall, we have had a really good 
Regents. They are a very dedicated 
group of people.” 

Wendy Ehringer 





1984 / Administration 213 










































Thomas L. Kennedy 
Associate Provost for Instruction 





214 Administration /1984 










































Business and Finance 



Jay Hartford 

V.P. of Business and Finance 



Norm Coffman 
Internal Auditor 


Ernest Renfro 
Controller 



Ken E. Abbey 
Asst. V.P. of Business 





1 984 / Administration 215 

















University 

Relations 


Stanton E. Schmid 

Vice President for University Relations 



New Division Encompasses University 


University Relations, a relatively 
new administrative division im¬ 
plemented in 1982, is designed to be a 
development program for Washing¬ 
ton State University. But wait a mi¬ 
nute, a Husky is heading up this orga¬ 
nization. 

Stanton E. Schmid, Vice President 
for University Relations, is indeed a 
University of Washington alum. 
Schmid obtained an undergraduate 
degree and a Juris Doctor, School of 
Law from UW. 

He also worked at U of W developing 
a program similar to our University 
Relations. Being a Husky, has not in¬ 
fluenced Schmid’s outlook though. 

“I’ve always been a W.S.U. fan. 
Both U of W and W.S.U. are integral 
to the quality of life in this state. I 
believe in higher education and that 
we’re all in it together. We tend to look 
at institutions on the football field or 


on the basketball court as a highly 
competitive thing. We can sometimes 
carry it to extremes and forget we Ye 
here to serve the state and to educate.” 

University Relations in an umbrella 
organization, which includes General 
Publications, KWSU-Television and 
Radio, Records and Gift processing, 
Alumni Association, Government and 
Community Relations, Office of De¬ 
velopment and WSU Foundation, In¬ 
structional TV Services and the News 
Bureau. Schmid’s job is to coordinate 
these groups and to aid in their de¬ 
velopment. 

Schmid said, “The challenge has 
been to first bring these elements 
together, and secondly develop short 
and long range plans. It is a matter of 
taking these different pieces and pull¬ 
ing them together under one coordin¬ 
ated approach.” 

The division of University Rela¬ 


tions is being designed to serve the 
needs of the institution. Building a 
stronger Alumni Association, creat¬ 
ing Records and Gift Processing, and 
restructuring the individual units 
have been some of the accomplish¬ 
ments of the UR programs. 

“It’s a tremendous challenge and a; 
tremendous opportunity - there's also 
a tremendous award in that chal¬ 
lenge,” said Schmid. 

Schmid’s work keeps him in contact 
with many aspects of University life. I 
He says he has found a certain un¬ 
iqueness to this campus. 

“One of the things that strikes you 
about this campus is the family spirit) 
here. You find it amongst the stu-I 
dents, faculty and staff. It extends out? 
to the alumni and friends of the in-1 
stitution. That special spirit is very im-l 
portant.” 

— Wendy Ehringerl 




216 Administration /1984 




















Connie Kravas 

Director of University Development 


Dennis Haarsager 

Director of Radio-Television Services 



Ann Clark Thomas H. Sanders 

Director of Records and Gift Processing Director of Publications and Printing 



Keith Lincoln 

Director of Alumni Relations 


Dick Fry 

Director of News Bureau 


1984 / Administration 217 



















University Related 




C. James Quann Ross Armstrong 

Registrar University Planning 





Stan Berry 
Admissions 


Nate Bull Arthur Wint 

G. M. Student Publications Affirmative Action 


218 Administration /1984 



























Dallas Barnes 
Director of Adp 


James Crow 

Performing Arts Coliseum 


Vishnu Bhatia 

Honors and International Prgms. 


Janusz Kowalik 
Systems and Computing 


Joseph Hindman 
CAP & Academic Standing 


1984 / Administration 219 





















Student Affairs 


Arthur McCartan 
Dean of Students 


George A. Bettas 
Residence Living 


K.J. Kravas 
Counseling Service 


220 Administration /1984 












Lola Finch 

Student Financial Aid 


Sid Miller 
Career Services 



Sally Savage 
Sr. Asst. Attorney Gen. 



Dr. Betty Adams 
Student Health Service 


1984 / Administration 221 



























Richard Young 
Alhletic Director 


Eiaine Zakarison 
Supportive Services 





Deb Nelson 

Area Director, Res. Living 


Patti Gora 

Area Director, Res. Living 


k 



Mark Levy 

Area Director, Res. Living 




222 Administration /1984 






















Matthew Carey 
CUB and ASWSU Act./Rec. 



David Cooper 
G.M. Students Book Corp. 





Randy Jorgensen 
Area Director, Res. Living 


Jack Burns 

Area Director, Fraternities 


Anna Crider 

Area Director, Sororities 


1984 / Administration 223 


























Lights, Camera, Action 


KWSU-TV offers television pro¬ 
duction experience to students of any 
major. Due to job pressures, however, 
only communications majors apply 
for work. 

KWSU-TV producer/director, 
Brian Murray,.explained that stu¬ 
dents working on their biggest stu¬ 
dent production, Grass Roots Jour¬ 
nal, face competition and high stress, 
not unlike that found in the broadcast 
production market. “We try to recre¬ 
ate what it is like in the outside world,” 
Murray said. 

Murray, a 33-year-old University of 
Wisconsin graduate, said that non¬ 
communications majors are welcome 
to work at the station. Because of hard 
work and required attitude of high 
professionalism, however, most non¬ 
communications majors are scared 
away, he added. 

Professionalism is constantly stres¬ 
sed by Murray, who is in charge of the 
hiring and organization of the P.M. 
Magazine-like show, Grass Roots 


Journal. “We do have students work¬ 
ing here, but this is not a student pro¬ 
duct or orgainzation. This is a profes¬ 
sional product that employs many stu¬ 
dents,” Murray said. 

According to Murray, most com¬ 
munications students working at 
KWSU-TV are serious about how it is 
run because it affects their 
future.“Any student from another 
major who is interested in working 
here will be out of luck, because of the 
high demands expected of all student 
workers,” Murray said. 

“A second rate job is never allowed, 
even under the guise of learning. 
That goes for all student workers 
here,” Murray said. 

Murray stated that by allowing stu¬ 
dents to produce GRJ, it gives them 
the opportunity to decide on whether 
or not they belong in the television 
production field. 

Murray said that it was just as im¬ 
portant to give students experience as 
it was to produce a high-quality televi¬ 


sion program. “If they don’t want ex¬ 
perience, they aren’t going to be 
found here. Frankly, that is why our 
crew is made up of communications 
majors,” Murray said. 

“The enthusiasm and talent of stu¬ 
dents here is what makes KWSU-TV 
so professional,” Murray said. 

Low funding is the second reasorl 
for the lack of communications ma¬ 
jors at KWSU-TV. Murray said that i j 
students aren’t attracted by offers o! 
on-the-job experience, the next thinp 
that they would look for is an enticing 
salary. 

Out of the 63 students on the GR 
staff, only the four student editor? 
and producers hold paid positions| 
Murray said that the 59 volunteer 1 
were a testimony to the drive for ex 
perience. 

“Many reporters, videographen! 
(camera operators), and researcher:! 
are receiving special problems 4911 
credits to supplement their expert! 
ence,” Murray said. “University ere 


224 Administration /1984 




















dits help to lessen the strain on our low 
budget of about $1,000 per show,” 
Murray added. 

The initial budget of $1,000 per 
show only covers videotape and trans¬ 
portation costs. Murray’s salary and 
equipment costs KWSU-TV extra. 

Murray said that GRJ relies on a 
backbone of 20 to 25 super-motivated 
students who spend an inordiate 
amount of time working on the 


program. 

To be accepted into the crew, any 
student would have to fit into “the 
system” by working hard and having a 
strong initiative to perform well. If 
these criteria cannot be maintained, 
the student would surely “wash out” 
and be replaced by someone with 
more motivation, Murray said. 

“The students are in a symbiotic re¬ 
lationship with the station. We need 


an energetic, talented and low cost 
work force. On the other hand, they 
need the experience of working at the 
station,” Murray said with a smile. 

“The exciting aspect of GRJ is that 
anyone can get involved without tak¬ 
ing any communications classes first. I 
don’t know why more students out¬ 
side of communications aren’t getting 
involved,” said KWSU-TV promo¬ 
tions manager, Barbara Dickinson. 

by Joseph Marsh 




Working in radio and television production here may take many different 
avenues. Joel Berhow, opposite page, runs a camera for KWSU-TV during a 
football game. He also works on the production crew of Grass Roots Journal. 
Equipment from radio-tv are used by the communication students for Cable 8 
News, a production of the communications department. Many of the profes¬ 
sionals with the KWSU staff work for the communications department 
teaching technical classes. On this page are views of the Cable 8 News team 
and a production crew. 


1984 / Administration 225 
















































Deans 


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND HOME ECONOMICS 

Dr. L.L. Boyd.230 

Dr. J.L. ozbun.230 

Dr. Paul Rassmussen.230 

Dr. A.D. Davison.231 

Dr. Larry King.231 

Dr. Robert Thomas....231 

Dr. J.O. Young.231 

Dr. Dean Fletcher.232 

Mrs. Jean Klopfer.232 

Dr. Dennis LeMaster.232 

Dr. Dorothy Price.232 

Dr. LeRoy Rogers.232 

Dr. Jack Zimmer.232 

Dr. Clark Brekke.233 

Dr. James Carlson.233 

Dr. E. Paul Catts.233 

Dr. James Engibous.233 

Dr. P.E. Kolattukudy.233 

Dr. C. Alan Pettibone.233 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND 
ECONOMICS 

Dr. Hal Kerr.234 

Dr. Rom Markin.234 

Dr. Cyril Morgan.234 

Dr. Glenn L. Johnson.235 

Dr. Ernst Stromsdorfer...235 

Dr. Terrv Umbreit.235 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Dr. Dale Anderson.236 

Dr. Georgia Hulac.237 

Dr. Inga Kromann Kelly.237 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERS 

Dr. Richard W. Crain. Jr.238 

Dr. O.A. “Gus" Plumb.238 

Dr. John A. Ringo.238 

Dr. Surinder K. Bhagat.239 

Dr. Barry L. Farmer.239 

Professor Jack T. Kimbrell.239 

Professor Robert J. Patton.239 

Dr. 1 larriett Rigas.239 

Dr. william J. Thomson.239 


GRADUATE SCI IOOL 

Dr. Carl Nyman.240 

COLLEGE OF NURSING 

Dr. Thelma Cleveland.242 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

Dr. Larry Simonsmeier.243 

DIVISION OF SCIENCES 

Dr. Edward Donaldson.244 

Dr. Gerald Edwards.244 

Dr. Howard Iiosick.244 

Dr. Robert Nilan.244 

Dr. Frederick Gilbert.245 

Dr. Andris Kleinhofs.245 

Dr. William Rayburn.245 

Dr. J. Denbigh Starkey.245 

Dr. Ron Adkins.246 

Dr. James Cochran.246 

Dr. Ivan Legg.246 

Dr. Thomas Lutz.246 

Dr. Herbert Nakata.246 

Dr. Gary Webster.246 

DIVISION OF ARTS 

Dr. John Brewer.247 

Dr. Lois DeFleur.247 

Dr. John Elwood.247 

Dr. Lee Freese.247 

Dr. Geoffrey Gamble.247 

Dr. Robert Potter.247 

Dr. Jack Carloye.248 

Dr. Ross Coates.248 

Dr. Ronald Hopkins.248 

Dr. John Pierce.248 

Dr. Susan Armitage.249 

Dr. Thomas I leuterman.249 

Dr. Robert Miller.249 

Dr.-David Stratton.249 

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Dr. Charles Barnes.250 

Dr. Richard Wescott.249 

Dr. Robert Wilson.249 

Dr. John Alexander.251 

Dr. John Dickinson.251 


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228 Deans/1984 





















































































1984 / Deans 229 










Dean of Agriculture and Home 
Economics 


Dr. Paul Rassmusson 
Hort. and Landscape Arch. 


Dr. L.L. Boyd 
Ag. Research Center 


230 Deans/1984 


Dr. J.L. Ozbun kkkkkkkkkkkk 

















Dr. A.D. Davison 
Plant Pathology 


Dr. Larry King 
Agricultural Engineering 


1984 / Deans 231 


Robert Thomas 
Chair. Information Dept. 


Dr. J.O. Young 
Cooperative Extension 








College of Agriculture and Home 
Economics 



Dr. Dean Fletcher 
Human Nutrition and Foods 

W 



Mrs. Jean Klopfer 
Clothing, l.D. & Textiles 


J 




Dr. Dorothy Price 
Child and Family Studies 


Dr. Dennis LeMaster 
Forestry and Range Mgt. 





Dr. Jack W. Zimmer 
General Ag. and Home Ec. 


Dr. LeRoy Rogers 
Agricultural Economics 


232 Deans/1984 



























Dr. P.E. Kolattukudy 
Inst, of Biological Chemistry 


Dr. James Carlson 
Animal Sciences 

1984 / Deans 233 


Dr. E. Paul Catts 
Entomology 


Dr. C. Alan Pettibone 
Resident Instruction 


Dr. James Engibous 
Agronomy and Soils 


Dr. Clark Brekke 
Food Science 




















College of Business 
and Economics 


Dr. Rom Markin 
Dean of Business 
and Economics 




Dr. Cyril Morgan 
Mang. & Admin. Systems 


Dr. Hal Kerr 

Business Administration 


234 Deans /1984 












Dr. Glenn Johnson 
m Accounting and Business Law 


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Dr. Ernie Stromsdorfer 
Chairman Economics 


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W. Terry G. Umbreit 

Acting Director Hotel/Restaurant Admin. 


1984/Deans 235 




















College of Education 



Dr. Dale Andersen 
Acting Dean, College of Education 

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Problems Challenge CAP 


The Curriculum Advisory Program 
has much responsibility in admitting, 
dropping and advising students. As a 
result of this responsibility, many 
problems arise within the program. 

The first problem that came to CAP 
Coordinator Joseph I. Hindman’s 
mind was the need for another staff 
position. “ We could use a staff posi¬ 
tion to cover the area of student reten¬ 


tion and advising students who are 
unable to certify in their majors,” 
Hindman said. 

Hindman defined “student reten¬ 
tion” as trying to get students with 
good academic standing to stay here 
instead of going somewhere else for 
school or dropping out of school. 

Teaching positions are more im¬ 
portant than my needed staff posi¬ 


tion, Hindman said. “This university 
is coming off a financial existence and 
we have experienced a cut back in 
teaching staff,” Hindman said. 

“This position would also counci 
students who cancel their enrollment: 
and train and monitor peer advisor; 
for the computer science and en 
gineering departments,” Hindmar 
said. 

“There is high priority for restoring 
these positions,” he said. “I woulc 
hate to have a position allocated at th< 


236 Deans/1984 




















Dr. Georgia Hulac 
Physical Education 



Dr. Inga Kromann-Kelly 
Education 





expense of instruction, even though I 
need it.” 

Hindman thinks major certification 
requirements in some departments 
are too vague, and many students can¬ 
not certify because they have not met 
the requirements. 

“We get continuously frustrated 
advising studnts who’s department of 
certification has requirements which 
are vague,” Hindman said. “It is diffi¬ 
cult to tell students they will not be 
able to certify.” 


“It would be nice if things were spel¬ 
led out very specifically so we can tell 
students what they need to do,” he 
said. “I know it is difficult for the de¬ 
partments because they only have cer¬ 
tain amounts of slots open for certi¬ 
fication.” 

Like everybody else, the CAP needs 
more money, Hindman said. “We are 
operating on a shoe string budget and 
don’t get the flexibility we would like,” 
Hindman said. 

“We could use more money for 


kkk 

computer programming and analysis 
to increase the efficiency of advising,” 
he said. 

“When we request for things they 
are pretty essential, but we also give 
them the administration a wish list,” 
he said. “We received our word pro¬ 
cessor from our wish list.” 

Despite all of the problems, Hind¬ 
man thinks the program runs 
smoothy. “It runs smoothly because 
our staff is so competent and consci¬ 
entious,” Hindman said. 

By Stephen Nakata 

1984 /Deans 237 







College of 
Engineering 

Dr. Richard Crain 
Acting Dean 

k t t k. t t k. k k 




Dr. O.A. Gus Plumb Dr. John A. Ringo 

Associate Dean Associate Dean 


238 Deans /1984 

















Dr. Surinder K. Bhagat 
Civil and Env. Engineering 




Dr. Harriett Rigas 
Elect. & Comp. Engineering 


Dr. Jack T. Kimbrell 
Mechanical Engineering 


Dr. Barry L. Farmer 
Materials Sci. & Engineering 


Dr. Robert J. Patton Dr. William J. Thomson 

Architecture Chemical Engineering 


1984 /Deans 239 




Dr. Carl Nyman 
Graduate School 



Grads Still Here 


In the year 1902, William Herford 
Laurence became the first individual 
to be granted a graduate degree from 
Washington State University. 

From 1902 until the 1930’s, there 
was a scattering of higher education 
degrees in economics, history, the sci¬ 
ences and English. Then, in the 
1930’s, schools began to emphasize 
the significance of graduate educa¬ 
tion and started a push to build up 
special programs. 

Since then, there has been a long 
line of scholars who have gained mas¬ 
ters and doctoral degrees from here. 
Today there are about 2,000 students 
enrolled in the graduate program, 
with 700 faculty members working 
with them. 

A doctoral student may choose 
from nine different degrees in 36 
academic fields. Some of these fields 
are zoophysiology, entomology, en¬ 
vironmental engineering, bacteriolo¬ 
gy, sociology, genetics, agronomy, 
and mathematics. 

The graduate school is headed by 
Dean C.J. Nyman. The university 
officials say the graduate school has 
been described as, “a select commun¬ 
ity of scholars, faculty and students 
dedicated to the extension of scho¬ 


larship and the advancement of 
knowledge for the ultimate common 
good of mankind.” 

Grad students come to a specific 
univerisity in order to study under su¬ 
perior educators and researchers in 
their chosen field. The educators, 
however, are not the only individuals 
who have the opportunity to meet the 
grad students. Most undergraduate 
know grad students as TAs or RAs 
from their undergrad classes. 

In a graduate program, a student is 
required to have a fairly extensive 
knowledge of the fundamental sub¬ 
ject matter of their field. This is neces¬ 
sary if they are to maintain their adv¬ 
anced work. Receiving a “C” in a 
graduate class is the same as failing. 

Before a grad student can complete 
a program leading to a master’s de¬ 
gree, he must have at least one 
academic year of full-time graduate 
study, or the equivalent. 

A doctorial degree is awarded for 
recognition of distinctive scholarship. 
It takes at least three years to gain a 
PhD, but sometimes it can take up to 
five years and more. 

Students admitted to the graduate 
school need at least a “B” average, or 
GPA of 3.0, in undergraduate work. 


Grad students are members of the 
WSU Graduate and Professional Stu¬ 
dents Association (GPSA). They elect 
their own president and other offic- | 
ers. The Joint Center for Graduate 
Study at Richland is a multi- 
institutional education center, admi¬ 
nistered jointly by this university, U. 
of Washington, and Oregon State. 
The center provides a means of de¬ 
livering graduate and upper-division 
education to the Hanford area profes¬ 
sionals and to the public in the Tri- I 
Cities area. 

Some of the main degrees granted 
there are Doctor of Philosophy, Doc¬ 
tor of Education and Master of Fine 
Arts. 

Many of the individuals working to¬ 
ward graduate degrees will someday 
be professors and researchers. They 
come from a variety of places, some 
directly from undergraduate work, 
others from foreign countries, and 
many from working in the “outside 
world”. 

Many complete only their core 
work, and then travel hundreds of 
miles each week to finish up that final 
required class. One man, working on 
his Doctor of Education degree, drove 


240 Deans /1984 

















from his superintendent of school’s 
job in Seattle, each week, to take clas¬ 
ses in Pullman. 

Not all students finish their de¬ 
grees. Some fail in orals or find their 
original research is not of the caliber it 
should be. 

Some of the grad students are mar¬ 
ried, and many of the spouses work to 
put their “better halves” through 
school. This means restricted fi¬ 


nances and little in the way of extra¬ 
curricular activities. 

After a year or two, the student 
finds himself faced with exams. 24 
hours of written testing is just the be¬ 
ginning, for next comes the oral ex¬ 
aminations. 

Graduate students invest a great 
amount of time in advanced classes, in 
teaching undergrads, and in 
thousands of hours of work in lab and 
other research. The university also 


makes major investments, thousands 
of dollars, for time, equipment and 
faculty support. 

So they come to Pullman, to a uni¬ 
versity which is driving to become one 
of the top 20 research schools in the 
United States. That is the dream of 
Dr. Glenn Terrell, who will retire in 
1985 from WSU. If the graduate stu¬ 
dents and the educators that instruct 
them have anything to say about it, it is 
a dream that will not fail. 



1984 /Deans 241 





Dr. Larry Simonsmeier 
College of Pharmacy 



Researching Drug Questions 


For alumni of the College of 
Pharmacy and professional pharma¬ 
cists around the Northwest, there is 
often only one place to turn for advice 
regarding drug treatment. 

The Drug Information Center, lo¬ 
cated in Wegner 155, is a source of 
information for pharmacists, physi¬ 
cians and others specializing in pro¬ 
fessional health service. The DIC staff 
specializes in answering questions re¬ 
lated to drugs and disease states. 

DIC Director Danial Baker said the 
center's main function is to supply 
answers to general questions regard¬ 
ing appropriate drug therapy, drug 
usefulness, drug interactions, in¬ 
travenous therapy, identification of 
foreign drugs, pharmacokinetic dos¬ 
ing and investigational drugs. Baker 
said there are limitations upon what 
questions will be answered by the 
DIC. 

“We will not answer questions re¬ 
garding the use of illicit drugs," Baker 
said. This is because the DIC is not 
staffed to answer a lot of questions, 
and those we will answer concern only 
prescription drugs." 

Baker said the DIC is often con¬ 


fused with the university’s Drug 
Analysis Lab, an extinct operation 
which was closed down two years ago 
due to university budget cuts. 

The DAL, then housed in the Col¬ 
lege of Pharmacy, was known for its 
“Drug I.D.” service, whereby students 
could bring in all kinds of drugs, in¬ 
cluding illicit types, and have them 
analyzed free. 

Baker said the staff of the DIC re¬ 
fuses to answer questions of drug mis¬ 
use or abuse. 

Baker received his doctorate in 
pharmacy (PharmD) from the Uni¬ 
versity of Minnesota in 1980. He 
worked as a professor of Pharmacy at 
the University of Oklahoma until he 
joined the faculty here in August. 

Aside from his job as DIC director, 
Baker also works as an assistant pro¬ 
fessor in the College of Pharmacy. He 
stays at the DIC throughout the day, 
except for the times when he is in¬ 
structing classes. 

He said the DIC answers each ques¬ 
tion by employing a five-rstep process. 

“First, we define what the question 
is," Baker said. “A lot of times, what 
someone asks is not really what he 


wants to know." 

The second step in the process, 
Baker said, is to review pertinent tex¬ 
tbooks and other sources of informa¬ 
tion. 

“We are lucky to have the VetMed 
Library right next door (in McCoy 
Hall)," Baker said. “If it were not 
there, we would not have such easy 
access to the information, and would 
have to spend a lot of money to get it at 
our disposal." 

He said this would mean the DIC 
would have to buy its own textbooks 
and microfilm. 

After media sources have been 
searched, the indexing services are 
checked for information. The inde¬ 
xing service at the DIC is a reference 
to 175 medical journals. The indexed 
journals, updated monthly at an 
annual cost of $3,000, are searched 
for articles that relate to the question. 

“The majority of the information 
we find in the journals cannot give a 
definitive answer to the questions/ 
Baker said. “So the fourth step in the 
process is combining our own know¬ 
ledge with what we find in the resear¬ 
ched materials." 


242 Deans /1984 
















Dr. Thelma Cleveland 
College of Nursing 





The fifth and final step in the pro¬ 
cess is to answer the question. “We 
do not give just one answer to each 
question/’ he said. “We give alterna¬ 
tive answers as well. A lot of the 
answers we give are verbal, and we 
back them up with written material.” 

Once a question is answered, Baker 
said, it is hoped that there will be some 
feedback to the DIC as to how well it 
performed in researching the ques¬ 
tion. 

The majority of questions to the 
DIC come from pharmacists in East¬ 
ern Washington. Some have come 
from Oregon, Idaho, Montana and 
Alaska, Baker said. 

“A lot of questions come from our 
alumni and other health professionals 
who have been told about the DIC by 
the alumni,” he said. 

Baker said the DIC receives three to 
four questions each day. Some ques¬ 
tions require extensive research and 
Baker sometimes finds himself spend¬ 
ing evening hours at the center. 

“Some questions are easy to 
answer,” he said. “Others require very 
in-depth searches.” 

At the time of the interview, Baker 


was working on a question regarding 
sugar in the blood. He said he had 
spent almost five hours searching for 
the answer. 

“Five hours is a lot of time com¬ 
pared to other questions,” Baker said. 

Other questions being researched 
by the DIC involve the identification 
of a California herbal medication and 
drug therapy for an entire family. 
Baker also had been asked by a 
pharmacist to identify the effects of 
illicit drugs on the blood of one of his 
patients. 

No formal operating budget for the 
DIC exists, Baker said, because it is 
funded indirectly. 

“The university does not have to 
pay anyone directly to be a DIC staff 
member,” Baker said, “because every¬ 
one works here as a secondary func¬ 
tion to their jobs as university profes¬ 
sors. 

“Setting a place like this up in a hos¬ 
pital would be expensive,” Baker said. 
“We save money because of the availa¬ 
bility of the research materials at the 
VetMed Library. We don’t have to 
fund that part of the research.” 

The only major expense paid by the 


DIC, Baker said, is the $3,000 fee for 
keeping the indexes updated. 

Baker said the DIC has a dual role 
in the community. 

“Our two functions are to educate 
and to serve the practitioner, but they 
are one in the same,” he said “Without 
a question from the practitioner, the 
DIC would not be able to fulfill its 
educational role.” 

He said the DIC benefits the Col¬ 
lege of Pharmacy because it is an on¬ 
going way for the university to supply 
service to its alumni (graduates of the 
College of Pharmacy). He said this is a 
strong aspect for public relations. 

“My main position is as a faculty 
member, and my secondary role is as 
the DIC’s director,” he said. “Since the 
DIC is an educational element, it fits 
in well with my faculty position.” 

— By Jim Goins 


1984 / Deans 243 






Division of Sciences 



Dr. Howard L. Hosick 
Zoology 


Dr. Gerald Edwards 
Botany 


244 Deans/1984 



























Dr. J. Denbigh Starkey 
Computer Science 


Dr. Andris Kleinhoff 
Genetics and Cell Biology 




Dr. Fred Gilbert Dr. William Rayburn 

Wildlife Biology General Biology 


1984 / Deans 245 


















Division of Sciences 


Dr. Ivan Legg 
Chemistry 






Dr. Herbert Nakata 
Bact. and Pub Health 


Dr. Gary Webster 
Geology 



Dr. Ron Adkins 
WAM1 


Dr. James Cochran Dr. Tom Lutz 

Pure and Applied Math. Astronomy 


246 Deans /1984 
















Division of Arts 



Dr. Lois Defleur 
Dean of Humanities 
and Social Sciences 





Dr. Geoffry Gamble 
Anthropology 


Dr. John Brewer 
Foreign Lang. & Lit. 



Dr. Robert Potter 
Speech 


Dr. Lee Freese 
Sociology 


Dr. John Elwood 
English 


1984 / Deans 247 

























Division of Arts 







Dr. John Pierce 
Pol. Sci. & Crim. Just. 



Dr. Ross Coates 
Fine Arts 




Dr. Jack Carloye 
Philosophy 


Dr. Ronald Hopkins 
Psychology 


248 Deans /1984 





























Dr. Thomas Heuterman 
Communications 




Dr. Robert Miller 
Music 




Dr. Sue Armitage 
Womens Studies 


1984 / Deans 249 


Dr. David Stratton 
History 
























Dr. Charles Barnes 
Chair Vcapp 


250 Deans/1984 


Dean of Veterinary Medicine 


Dr. Richard Wescott 
Vet. Micro/Path. 


Dr. Robert Wilson 

























1984/Deans 251 


College of Veterinary Medicine 


Until they graduate, veterinary 
medicine students, unlike most other 
students, are not allowed to practice 
what they learn in the classroom. 

Even graduation is not a guarantee 
they can practice until they pass their 
board exams. 

Ghery Pettit, a professor of veterin¬ 
ary medicine at WSU said, “Veterin¬ 
ary students are in a particularly 
vulnerable spot. Probably not legally, 
but in the eyes of the faculty of this 
school, they are even more vulnerable 
than those who are not veterinary stu¬ 
dents. 

“If a student enrolled in the College 
of Veterinary Medicine is out treating 
animals for a fee, then he or she is 
practicing without a license. They will 
probably be reprimanded more 
quickly than a student from another 
discipline. 

John Dickinson, Dean of the veter¬ 
inary school’s student services, said 
new enrollees in the school are 
advised not to practice without a 
license by the chairman of the veterin¬ 


ary clinic, Jack E. Alexander. 

Alexander said he advises new stu¬ 
dents that they can perform “menial 
farm chores” on animals, such as de¬ 
horning, castration, pregnancy test¬ 
ing and other minor surgical opera¬ 
tions. 

For educational purposes, he said 
there is no surgical practice denied 
students if it is within the supervision 
of a licensed veterinarian. 

But for students to go out and per¬ 
form spays and other minor animal 
surgeries on their own and charge 
fees for such work is a direct violation 
of the Washington State Practice Act. 

Alexander, who in his 2 years at 
WSU has never heard of any Practice 
Act violations by WSU students, said 
they may occasionally perform 
vacinations when they should not. 

Students may do work on their own 
pets on occasion said Linda Robinette 
a DVM at the Alpine Clinic in 
Pullman. 

She said she remembers the stan¬ 
dard warning lecture on Practice Act 


violations when she was a student of 
the College of Veterinary Medicine 
more than 15 years ago. 

“But it is natural for people to ask 
for help” for their animals from a per¬ 
son who they know is a veterinary 
medicine student. 

If veterinary medicine students 
yield to such temptation and violate 
the Practice Act they go before the 
Governor’s Veterinary Board of 
Washington State. 

The Board, a subordinate of the 
Washington State Department of 
Licensing and registration, investi¬ 
gates and holds hearings on regula¬ 
tory law, and recommends and adapts 
laws for administration of the Practice 
Act. 

Pettit is the only member of WSU 
veterinary medicine faculty to ever 
have been appointed to the board and 
has more than three years remaining 
to serve on his term. 

by Vei n Woodall 




Dr. John Dickerson 
Assoc. Dean of Academic 


Dr. John Alexander 
Vet. Clin. Med. & Surg. 





The Information Depot 
Cooperative Extension 




Cooperative Extension is a govern¬ 
ment organization that has offices in 
all 39 counties of Washington and is 
administered by WSU. With such a 
widespread organization headquar¬ 
tered here, it is suprising that so few 
people at WSU are even aware of its 
existence. Extension is allocated a tot¬ 
al of 332 positions statewide, 202 
faculty and 130 staff. The extension 
program received approximately 
$16.8 million in federal, state, local, 


and independent funding in fiscal 
1983. 

Cooperative Extension has its roots 
in the Morrill Act of 1862, which 
established WSU under the federal 
land-grant philosophy. Campus 
teaching efforts in Extension areas 
were heightened in 1887 with the 
funds provided by the Hatch Act. It 
wasn’t until the Smith-Lever Act in 
1914 that Cooperative Extension, as it 
is known today, came into being. The 


Smith-Lever Act provided federal 
funds, which allowed WSU to expand 
its teaching efforts to off-campus loca¬ 
tions. The faculty and staff members, 
who are located in the states counties, 
provide instruction to local citizens 
and act as liasons to relay the citizen’s 
research and educational needs back 
to the university. There are four 
program areas under which instruc¬ 
tion is provided. 



252 Deans/1984 


















The Agriculture and Natural Re¬ 
sources program provides scientific 
knowledge and processes to improve 
farm, ranch, and forest income. In¬ 
struction in this area emphasises 
proper management and marketing 
techniques. They also emphasis ways 
to minimize effects on the environ¬ 
ment. 

Family Living educational prog¬ 
rams provide information that allows 
economic levels to become sensitive 
to, and to participate, in public affairs. 
This program is of great use to elected 
officials and citizens who are seeking 
knowledge of public opinion and 


citizens to resolve a variety of home 
problems. Personal growth and de¬ 
velopment, nutrition, health, hous¬ 
ing, and home management are just a 
few of the areas that Family Living 
covers. 

The well known 4-H and Youth 
programs are also administered by 
Cooperative Extension. Young peo¬ 
ple are offered opportunities to ac¬ 
quire practical knowledge and skills in 
a large and diverse number of areas. 
These include natural resources, eco¬ 
nomics and business, animals, home 
economics, plants, mechanics, and so¬ 
cial and personal development. 


Community Resource Develop¬ 
ment educational programs help indi¬ 
viduals and groups of all social and 
affairs. It also promotes public deci¬ 
sion making. 

These program areas received con¬ 
siderable use statewide in fiscal 1982. 
Extension offices statewide reported 
that approximately 2.1 million con¬ 
tacts with clientele were made in that 
year alone. Despite this large number, 
Dorothy Ettl, the Extension Clothing 
Specialist in Ag Phase 2, says that 
Cooperative Extension is capable of 
handling a much larger load and 
would welcome the additional work. 




1984 / Deans 253 




























































k.k.Wkkk.k.k.k.k.kk.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k 


Dormie, Greek, 
or G.D.I.? 


Dorm Life.257 

Coman....,.258 

Community.260 

Davis.262 

Duncan Dunn.264 

Gannon.266 

Goldsworthy.270 

Kruegel.274 

McAllister.276 

McCroskey.280 

Neill.!.284 

Orton.286 

Regents Hill.291 

Rogers.296 

Scott.301 

Stephenson East.302 

WSU Fire Staff.310 

Stephenson North.312 

Stephenson South.319 

Stevens.326 

Stimson.328 

Streit.329 

Perham.332 

Waller.336 

Wilmer.338 

Greek Life.340 

Alpha Chi Omega.342 

Alpha Delta Pi.344 

Alpha Gamma Delta.346 

Alpha Omicron Pi.348 

Alpha Phi.350 

Chi Omega.352 

Delta Delta Delta.354 

Delta Gamma.356 

Gamma Phi Beta.358 

Kappa Alpha Theta.360 


Kappa Delta.362 

Kappa Kappa Gamma.364 

Pi Beta Phi.366 

Sigma Kappa.368 

The Games People Play.370 

Acacia. 374 

Alpha Gamma Rho.376 

Alpha Kappa Lambda.378 

Alpha Tau Omega.380 

Beta Theta Pi.382 

Delta Sigma Phi.384 

Delta Tau Delta.386 

Delta Upsilon.388 

Farmhouse.390 

Kappa Sigma.392 

Kappa Sigma.392 

Lambda Chi Alpha.394 

Phi Delta Theta.396 

Phi Gamma Delta.398 

Phi Kappa Sigma.400 

Phi Kappa Tau.402 

Phi Sigma Kappa.404 

Pi Kappa Alpha.406 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon.408 

Sigma Chi.410 

Sigma Nu.412 

Sigma Phi Epsilon.414 

Tau Kappa Epsilon.416 

Theta Chi.418 

Theta Xi.420 

Is It Really That Wonderful?.422 

Off Campus Dorm Section...423 

Chief Joseph Village, Chinook.430 

Columbia, Kamiak Apt.431 

Nez Perce, Observatory Court.432 

Steptoe, Terrace.433 




256 Living Groups /1984 

























































































Continuing in the tradition of dorm events, Orton 
residents decided to make Octoberfest a day to re¬ 
member. Excitement rushed through their veins as 
they pushed their bed down Main Street in the Bed 
race. Of course, they were far ahead of everyone — no 
one else had entered! It turned out to be another of the 
wild and memorable times included in dorm living. 



1984 / Living Groups 257 















\ m CtfMMiJfrkt 

COMAN FIRST FLOOR -Row One: Beth Wiley, 

Lesia Warren, Brenda Raney, Susan Boles, Jan 

“Alex Liefson” Dorbolo. Row Two: Sue Schirman, — 

Jolyn “Jo“ Reynolds, Debbie Neal, Colleen Redin¬ 
ger, Autumn “Beach Boy” Calkins. Hui Yen 
Carolyn (KOH), Lily Lee. 





COMAN SECOND FLOOR -Row One: Marla J. 
Aeschliman, Cecilia “Ces“ V. Soliman, Shaela M. 
Leaver, Linda Sue Irvine. Khursheed R. Mama. 
Mary E. Irvine. Row Two: Susan L. Brincken, Trang 
“Tracy” Tran, Jessica Hong, Sharon L. Friend. 
Dawn R. Raney, Molly J . Johnson. ErinC. Marshall. 
Row Three: Dobbsie A. Witherow, Elizabeth L. 
Schoedel, Tracy J. Long. Betsy Nye. Seila Dolan, 
Mighty T. Mouse, Debbie J. Maggs. Richie Q. Bear. 
Margie M. Goddard. 



258 Living Groups /1984 


























■ ■ ■ ■ 



COMAN THIRD FLOOR -Row One: Cathi 
“Kahlua” Hamlin, Barbara “Baab” Engel. Gwenn 
“Doll” Schlepp, Laura “Rasheed” Patti, Pam 
“Pimple Picker” Smith, Brucie “Bru” Spence, 
Katie Kilgrow. Row Two: Jill M. Richardson, Noelle 
C. DaCosta, Melissa A. Mesler, Corrk L. Howard, 
Terri M. Jacobson, Chris E. Cane, Julie L. Jensen. 
Row Three: Heidi Delaney, Lynda A. Reynolds. 
Sandra Haley, Krista J. Catlin, Kim Buur, Chris A. 
Hosking, Sandy “Spike” Loughry, Carol “Stub¬ 
bie” Aitcheson, Pam “Skeets” Dodge. 





COMAN FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: Amelia J 
Trueblood, Kimberly D. Shelton, Merry L. Byers, 
Amelia M. Besola, Mary E. Axtman, Dana R. 
Dobbs. Row Two: Sheridan “Fish” E. Harding, Cin¬ 
dy Pierce, Annette L. Lance. Margaret J. Olson, Lori 
A. Gagnon, Jennifer J. Barker, Shelly M. Gun- 
dersen, Linda M. Lasater, Kathy M. Jones. Francine 
M. Kluth, Mai T. Tran, Quyen M. Truong. Row 
Three: Mary E. Freeman, Lori F. Nakahara, Lisa A. 
Malstrom, Patty “Flash” A. Frick, Suzy “Flip” D. 
Hall, Nila A. Reitz. Row Four: Linda L. Lanker, 
Monica J. Huber, Deborah M. Martin, Velma J. 
Fountain, Karen L. Manring, Laurie L. Bulat. Not 
Pictured: Janine Goemmer. 


1984 / Living Groups 259 




















COMMUNITY EAST -/tow One: Tami Meister, 
Connie Heinrich, Eline Brown, Danielle Babbitt, 
Cindy Bradham; Michele Guisinger, Peggy A. Cos- 
sano, Kathryn Marvel. Row Two: Linda Parkman, 
Martha G. Olson, Tamara D. Chitty, Brenda L. 
Mueller, Kristin Campbell, Tamara L. Gill. Row 
Three: Nanci L. Adair, Nina A. Hagy, Jana M. Egan, 
Cindy G. Alexander, Mystique D. Grobe, Cindy T. 
Lauper. 




COMMUNITY WEST-/tow /*. Deborah L. 
Hoag, Janet L. Britebach, Nan L. Lim. Mira A. 
Yoon, Paula M. Nelson, Janr I. Wakefield, Aki 
Hirayama, AlissaL. Zellmer. / v Two .Charlotte A. 
Whitney, Shelly J. Robertso Colleen K. Koch, 
Shiela M. Carpenter. Diane 1. Raekes, Jane E. 
Strausz, Paula R. Straw, Beth . Greaves, Cindi D. 
Thordarson, Carole R. Hill, anne Schmidt. Row 
Three: Samantha S. Starr, .arbara J. Minnig, 
Carolyn A. Howard, Jill E. nr, Lucy J. Painter, 
Kris L. Crowell, Kimberly K (aut, Molly A. Gep- 
pert, Jolyn M. Rude, Kathy . Danielson. 









260 Living Groups /1984 














































v't ■ 

■ ■ 

COMMUNITY GOVERNMENT AND SPON- 
SORS -Row One: Jane E. Strausz, Nina A. Hagy, 
Diane M. Raekes, Kristin L. Campbell, Tamara L. 
Gill, Kathryn A. Marvel, Joanne M. Schmidt. Row 
Two: Paula M. Nelson, Shelly J. Robertson, Deborah 
L. Hoag, Janet L. Breitenbach, Michele A. Gusin- 
ger, Jolyn M. Rude, Paula R. Straw, Jill E. Stair. Not 
Pictured: Cindy Wadsworth, Sue Smith, Tara 
Stevens, Allison Marsden, Laura Dibbem, Jennifer 
Adair. 




CHITTY. TAMARA 
COSSANO. PEGGY 
EGAN. JANA 
ERTEL REBECCA 
FOSTER. ELIZABETH 
GOHRICK. LAURA 
GOHRICK. USA 
GROBE. MYSTIQUE 


GUISINGER. MICHELE 
HAGY. NINA 
HERGERT. JENNIFER 
HOWARD. CAROLYN 
LUDWIG. JANIE 
MARVEL. KATHRYN 
MEISTER. TAMARA 
NELSON. PAULA 


NOBLE. DEBRA 
OLSON. MARTHA 
ROBERTS RHONA 
SCHMIDT. JOANNE 
SIMPSON. STACY 
SNIDER CONNIE 
STRAUSZ JANE 
STARR. SAMANTHA 


THOMPSON TERESA 
TRUCANO. NANCY 
WALLACE. MARIE 
WHEELER. KRISTEN 
WHITNEY. CHARLOTTE 
WILSON. DEBRA 
YATES. KIM 
YOON. MIRA 



1984 / Living Groups 261 






















































■ ■ g g 


DAVIS FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS -Row 
One: Dianne M. Brown, Michelle D. Walker, Marcy 

L. Ackermann, Sonya S. Yee, Linda L. James, Laura 

M. Proses, Lorraine A. Hirata, Becky S. Eichelber- 
ger. Row Two .Cathy A. Coppock, Theresa A. Auvii, 
Lisa M. Pierce, Anne L. Harkonen, Mary M. Yea¬ 
ger, MerileeS. Austin, Nancy A. Klinefelter, LisaL. 
Pearson, Karen L. Brito, Lisa E. Majestic. Row 
Three: Main M. Brooks, Rose M. Monroe, Morley 
Marshall, Renee “Celibate” Koide, Mary “Mur¬ 
doch” Nichols, Melissa “Void” Harp, Pamela 
“You’ve Got To Be Kidding” Hughes, Sandra 
“Crusher” Rendle, Connie “Con-Man” Thompson, 
Suzanne “M.E.” Geppert, Anne “Space” Hendry, 
Amykay Trueblood, Kim “Kimmy-Jo” Mohoric. 



1 

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Q/AA- jfaOsrH/U 



DAVIS THIRD AND FOURTH FLOORS -Row 
One: Cheri L. Hastings, Shelley G. Strang, Kathy D. 
Stevenson, Judith A. Anderson, Maria E. Goodwin, 
Renee W. Bollinger, Stephanie M. Stoffer, Jammin’ 
Jan M. Hillestad, Brenda D. Tredwell. Row Two: 
“The Kell” S. Davenport, Caroline R. Wilson, Janet 
L. Tinsley, Teresa A. Tomany, Jackie M. Sell, Linda 
L. James, Becky S. Eichelberger, Andrea D. Drever, 
Mona L. Nicholas, Jean “Hippie” L. Hendry, Marie 
“Groupie” B. Reiley, Kristina “Deadhead” M. 
Ortongren. Row Three: Susan L. Peterson, Terry L. 
Gehlen, Ginger S. Fernandez, Ruth L. Trail, Barbara 
J. Sells, Karen L. Kenoyer, Joan K. Meyer, Sue 
Ellen Dechenne, Patricia A. Yurczyk, Cindy L. 
Schober, Colleen F. Mahoney, Kirsten A. Taylor. 



262 Living Groups /1984 




















isorsr an#C tfvv'i 




DAVIS SPONSORS-/tow One: Hippie L. Hendiy, 
Happy Camper S. Davenport, Jammin’ Jan M. Hill- 
estad, Kathy D. Stevenson. Row Two: Linda James 
(R.A.), Mary Nichols (Activities), Melissa Harp 
(PresJ, Anne Harkonen (Secretary), Becky 
Eichelberger (R. A.), Debbie Gladys Hawkins (Vice 
President). Row Three: Renee Koide C. (Sponsor), 
Jackie Sell M. (Sponsor), Morley Marshall (Spon¬ 
sor), Anne Hendry (Sponsor), Amykay Trueblood 
(Sponsor). 



EICHELBERGER. BECKY 
HARKONENE. ANNE 
HAWKINS, JANIS 
HENDRY, JEAN 
HILLESTAD. JAN 
JAMES. LINDA 
KLINEFELTER. NANCY 


MAJESTIC. LISA 
MEYERS. CATHY 
NICHOLS, MARY 
ORTENGREN, KRISTINA 
PIERCE. LISA 
RENDLE. SANDRA 
STOFFER. STEPHANIE 


1984 / Living Groups 263 








































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264 Living Groups /1984 





















BACON. HEIDI 
BENNETT KAREN 
BLAIR. TERRI 
BOOTH BRENDA 
BRIGHT. JULIE 
CLAGG DIANA 
CUNNINGHAM. DIANE 
DEFORD. NANCY 


DURR. BRENDA 
ENDSLEY POLLYANNA 
FRAKES JANET 
GETTE JOAN 
GERKING. GINA 
GILLIGAN KATHLEEN 
HAYEK ALINA 
LEACH. JULIANNE 


MCDOWELL TAMMY 
MULLER SUSAN 
MURPHY THERESA 
RATCLIFFE LAURIE 
ROPP. HEATHER 
SANTOS MELET 
SAUR LORI 
SCHMUNK TERI 


SHINN. JENNIFER 
SMITH. MICHELLE 
SWANLUND STEPHANIE 
THOMAS ELIZABETH 
TOWNER. HILARY 
VOSBURGH MARY 
WALKER LADONNA 
WOON. MAN 



Leaving the sweet com¬ 
forts of home, Martha 
Hellyer, pictured here, 
takes a step out the front 
door into the April 
showers. Duncan Dunn 
is a smaller dormitory 
on campus. Many of the 
residents have lived 


there for two or three, if 
not all, of their years at 
WSU. The residence 
offers a quiet atmos¬ 
phere with lots of 
friendly faces and many 
of the comforts we 
associate with “home.” 


1984 / Living Groups 265 










































GANNON FIRST FLOOR /tow One: Keith E. 
Ledford, Todd L. Hardin, Anthony T. McAvinew, 
Ray L. Steele, Spence “Beach Boy” Stimmel, John 
Wilkerson, Joseph F. Mauk, Watari, Kirk. Row Two: 
Timothy E. Potter, Sean T. Urquhart, Douglas R. 
Fitzsimmons, Mike A. Kight, Mark S. Bishop, Joel 
W. Fleming, Scot J. Buchanan, Kevin L. Fegert, 
Rod W. Rossi. Row Three: Greg S. Johannesen, Tim 
J. Trierweiler, Brad A. Kuhlman, Jeff D. Berard, 
Daniel F. Meyer, Todd A. McBride, Adam “Goon” 
Roberts, Steve R. Cushman, Greg R. Kline, Brad F. 
Farmer, Mike J. Sawyer, Tom J. Salatino, Mike K. 
Bastron, Jeff M. Price. Row Four: Charles F. Slayer, 
Steven P. Brown, Jeff J. Furrer, Mark T. Schmidt. 
Row Five: Robert M. Strom, Steve W. Nixon. 






GANNON SECOND FLOOR -Row One: Kuan 
Yean Cheah, John W. Kim, William S. Moore, 
Bruce G. Green, Brad “Idol” Folsom, Jim M. Trull, 
Dave C. Dietel, Lewis A. Conklin, Dan J. Barbieri. 
Row Two: Ragae Regan E. Smith, Robert “Doc” 
Hayden, Bryan “I Luv Foster’s” Corliss, Tom W. 
Pittsenbarger, John L. Totten, Timothy E. Potter, 
Michael D. Anderson, Daniel J. Rollinger, David J. 
Rainey, John M. Hanrahan, Ken G. Day. Row Three: 
Daniel J. Marshall, Michael J. Tracy, Michael 
“ZZZ-Thai-roller” Hovenkotter, Brent E. Neu, 
Greg S. Steindorf. Row Four: Graham Hurgabow, 
DuKao Knutson, Captain Carrothers, “The Buz¬ 
zard” Hill, Tyronne Hart, Adam Vantz, Mandeep 
Singh Anand, Myles Myers, James A. Byrd, Bruce 
VerBurg, Maynard Mallonee. Row Five: Ken W. 
Campbell, Scott A. McKee!. 




266 Living Groups /1984 





































GANNON THIRD FLOOR -Row One: Scott A 
Self, Kevin R. Pantzar, Eric G. Eggert, Tim A. 
Benson, Rob C. Becker, Craig P. Cooley, Melvin L. 
Lindauer, Mark N. Ihrig, Bunny J. Hunhoff, “Cap¬ 
tain” Dave J. Szambelan. Row Two: Kenneth G. 
Mathia, Jeffrey A. Lavey, Roger P. Sonnichsen, 
John R. Bromley, Gene F. Crow, Craig W. Massie, 
Jeffrey D. Stewart, Michael A. Klozar, Daniel A. 
Cole, Kim L. Huntamer. Row Three : Matthew D. 
Swenson, John D. Peterson, Chris A. Feryn, Glenn 
L. Gagnon, Jonathan P. Carr, Sig K. Cook, Marty A. 
Jones. Row Four: Douglas M. Malsch, Douglas M. 
Rarig, David L. Hedlund, Dan W. Brinson. Row 
Five: Shawn R. Zink, Tim P. Egerton. 




GANNON FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: Mark R 
Selby, Eric A. Philippart, Darrell H. Davis, Joseph 
A. Cacatian, Ken M. Tokita, KrisO. Durr, Jeffrey B. 
Hill. Row Two: Musa G. Mustafa, Jon Arrendale, 
Toby Charles, BediniaZ. Goooosteina, B.E. “Yes” 
Agressive, Jeff “Mac” McDonald, Dave E. Olson, 
Jay “Eatman” Russell II. Row Three: Jeff DeHaven, 
Sgt. Rock, Steve Kelley, Geoff Kelley, Jeff Brown, 
Todd Griffin, Keith Gardner. Row Four : Ken A. 
Tuoelker, Greg A. Colvin, Loren R. VanLoo, Gary 
R. Swindler, Jeff G. Knauf, Christoper J. Quinn, 
Shawn D. Nelson. Row Five: Ruck the Fussians, 
Nuke the Commies Rakes, Ted Zeppelin, Rainier 
State U.N. Curtiss. 



1984 / Living Groups 267 


























GANNON FIFTH FLOOR /W One: Stephen S 
Collins, John V. Wilgus, Dave K. Telstad, Jim 
“ZZ” Lee, Terry R. Renick, Joe “Top” Absalon- 
son, Dan S. Hamilton, Todd “Freddy” Bryan, John 
H. Nichols, Rob J. Thompson, Mark R. Weiss. Row 
Two: Howard Bender, Jonathan T. Duzan, Phil 
Daniel, Cougar Man, Bradley, A. Albro, David X. 
Power, Mitch R. Hayes, Bob “Loves Kate” Schus¬ 
ter, Kathi Z. Wolf, Kevin Z. Wolf (R.A.), Terry A. 
Hawes, Mark A. Stimmel, Gordy D. Carnes. Row 
Three: Greg Linklater, Andy Locati, Kent Randle, 
Greg Stacy, Dan LaVallee, Alin Boswell, Kevin 
Karls on, Mark Kottke, Stuart Ray, Karl Kuh- 
nhauscn. Row Four: Brian W. Johnson, Rodney N. 
Russell, Arnold F. Barlow, Donald J. Anderson, 
David Z. Alcorn, Robert E. Bigler. Row Five: Daniel 
A. Meyers, Dan R. Jansen, Steve “V.P.” Morgan, 
Barry G. Huse. 




GANNON SIXTH FLOOR -Row One: “Rock'n” 
Randy Vanhoff, StevenE. Kelly, Lumberjack E. No. 
I, Alexander “Shorty” J. Ryncarz II, Jim “South 
Lives” G. Smallwood, Ed “Breeder” Foulon, Rick 
“Wop” J. D'Alessandro, Joe M. Toorist, Joel H. 
Arensberg, Jeff W. Lundstrom. Row Two: Scott D. 
Ely, Eric E. Johnson, James E. Sullivan, Richard E. 
Woods, Hilda E. Van Hooser, Robert “R.A.J.R.” 
M. Bartlett, Tim “Said” C. Bloomster, Carleton H. 
Hirschel, Dung “Yo” H. Tran, Matthew M. Bond, 
Daniel T. Conway, Rick Klaus, Greg L. Lee, Brian 
D. McNeely. Row Three: Mark R. Tisler, Dr. Bob 
“Chip” Harris, Steve E. Bay, Ron C. Hodgson, 
Steve K. Dunlap, Todd A. Hanson, Mark “Biff” 
Southern, David T. Hervey, Eric S. Ellingson, 
Chuck E. Zalesky. Row Four: Mike A. Ryan, D.J. 
Forgaard, Phillip Leija, PcteC. Bigler, Mitchell Vib- 
bert, Eric J. Krejci, David H. Tryon, Wayne T. 
Gentry, John R. Villesvik, Jeff D. Barnhart. 



268 Living Groups /1984 























9U 



ioer<5> 



GANNON FLOOR PRESIDENTS Rmv One: Ken 
W. Campbell, David H. Power, Matthew M. Bond. 
Row Two: Craig W. Massie, Adam G. Roberts. 





GANNON GOVERNMENT-Row One: Chris A. 
Feryn (Treasurer), Robert C. Schuster (President), 
Steve L. Morgan (Secretary). Row Two: Matthew S. 
Stimmel, Mark A. Kottke, Mike A. Right, Mark S. 
Bishop. 


1984 / Living Groups 269 










GOLDSWORTHY FIRST FLOOR -Row One: 
Kyu D. Lee, Todd W. Perry, Jeffrey H. Johnson, 
Kenneth S. Johnson, Curtis R. Robillard, Vic “The 
Fisher”, Aaron C. Miller. Row Two: Todd E. 
Macomber, Doug J. Dingman, Gordon P. Reynaud, 
Samuel L. Moss, Kurt M. Wayerski, Jose Y. Rios, 
Lawrence Green, Stuart T. Moore, D.B. Cooper, 
Lance M. Kaneshiro, Guido Holt Steven A. Row 
Three: Joe J. Castleberry, E. Andrew Strub, Van T. 
Spohn, Roger J. Herb, Pete G. Tamis, Cleon J. Jones 
III, Richard M. Nixon, James R. Daubersmith, Dal¬ 
las A. Hewett, Scott J. Ellis, Zeleke Ewnetu. Row 
Four: Brian P. O’Reilly, John D. Bladeck, Bruce A. 
Folsom, Todd “Yoo” Stallworth, Anthony “Bonz” 
Keyser, John T. Regan. 







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GOLDSWORTHY SECOND FLOOR -Row One: 
Jeff A. Cox, Jim J. Krouse, Ron W. Scofield, Ole 
Jone K. Grevstad, Jeff I. Ellingsen, Max H. Norvell, 
Gonzo Haight, R. Thomas Shannon, Mike R. Boeve. 
Row Two: Anthony M. Jelic, Kenneth C. Martin, 
Mike A. Hagerth, Nathan C. Eleener, Tracy M. 
Crain, Fred W. Elliott, Daniel H. Sanders, Long H. 
Phan, Ron A. Trussell, Eric C. Gjelvik, Chris E. 
Bondy, Phat V. Tran, David P. Dovich. Row Three: 
Robin L. Rulffes, Kevin C. Dowden, Huey J. Harp, 
Rollen V. Jones, Alan M. Scott, Dave A. Snyder, 
Michael L. Forbis, TomT. Booze, Doug K. Speegle, 
Devin M. Lindstrand, Stevie L. Frasier, Dave H. 
Tilson. Row Four: Richard W. Simeon, Michael 
H.N. Carmical, Brad W. Both, Denes C. Vanparys 
Jr., Mike Reynoldson, David W. Miedema, Buddy 
Brown, Lance H. McAuley, Mark K. Matheson. 




270 Living Groups /1984 




























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GOLDSWORTHY THIRD FLOOR-tfow One: 
Rob D. Smith, Mark L. Wyckoff, Frank P. Douwes, 
David H. Olson, John E. Denaxas, Lewis G. Hinton, 
Robert L. Tate, Marty J. Shearer, Dan Engell. Row 
Two: William M. Barraugh, Rocky A. Mediati, Todd 
C. LaFontaine, Mike R. Paoletti, Rick T. Fowler, 
Tim A. Barela, Bobby Peterson, Doug J. Walth, 
Norm R. Haight, Rob C. Cain, Jeff Knight. Row 
Three: Paul E. Kenney, Clark V. Johnson, Glenn A. 
Schultheis, Robert W. Nims, Jeffrey E. Dye, Todd 
A. Madlener, Kevin R. Klapp, Mike E. Dolinar, 
Gerry W. Sanders, Don W. Davies. 





GOLDWORTHY FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: 
Tony J. White, Stephan Schier, Richard N. Flaget, 
DanR. Seely, Henry C. Kaufman, Joseph, B. Natter- 
er, John Hudson. Row Two: Jeffrey M. Schlenz, 
Duane E. Keys, Chris “Caveman” S. Andrews, 
Manny B. Fields, Tom J. Catey, Chuck R. “R.F.” 
Hinthome, Randy S. Spaniel, Dan L. Hasfurther, 
Thomas C. Graham, Brady M. Alexander. Row 
Three: Edric R. Daida, John “The Greyhound” 
Bacon, Darren J. Abellera, Jim A. Green, John R. 
Farnsworth, Ross R. West, Dean M. Knudtson, Rick 
M. Bruya. Row Four: Vincas S. Greene, Andy R. 
Simonds, David J. Rogers, Woody M. Packard, Chin 
O. Gong, Yiuwing Wong, Dave W. Look, Peter D. 
Jacobs, Joel E. Morton, Bill S. Stevens, Bill T. 
Holter, James H. Frey, Ian A. Willett, John K. 
Hutchinson, Gary R. Redding. 



1984 / Living Groups 271 



















GOLDSWORTHY FIFTH FLOOF Row One: Jef 
Brand, Don Anspach, Ken Masel, John M. Stubb, 
Steve Louie, Wayne “HTT” Winsor. RowTwo: Ron 
Cheney, Mark Johnson, “The Dancing Fools”: Jor- 
gua Smith, Ed Clarke, Eric Anderson, Craig 
Simanton; Scott Jones, Mike Madsen. Row Three: 
Monty Alder, Jon Baker, Bradley D. Hocking, Shan¬ 
non B. Curry, Dwayne Layton, Timmy “Hit” Hen¬ 
ley, Blain “Mr. C” Barton, Brad “Shaggy” Fryett, 
Richard Gaudinier, Rob Schauble. Row Four: Doug¬ 
las Smith, Randolph Staudenrus, Raymond C. 
Smith, Joseph Morrill, Robert K. Bruce, Michael G. 
Kisline, Robert L. McCann, Koby “J.R.” Kumasa- 
ka, Patrick J. Harder, Todd E. Cope. Row Five: 
Doug W. Schuster, Richard T. Koes. 



no 1 

lUNPJNG 



GOLDSWORTHY SIXTH FLOOR -Row One: Jon 
Lee Smith, Ernst H. Schubert, Tim “Spoon” Wil¬ 
kinson, Hank “Hoser” Markgraf, Don “Zed” Scan- 
sen, Dave “Wheels” Sheeler, Mike “Schooner” 
Frasier, Kirk “Skip” Renn, Long Phi Dang. Row 
Two: Paul “Lenny” C. Leonard, Mitch “Sphere” 
Hancock, Ted Rasmussen, Charlie Tomsett, Vincent 
M. Davis, Paul A. Bombino, Hiromi Okave, David 
J. McBride, Jeff “Stallion” S. Huisingh, John 
“Joe” G. Carey, Robert L. Horton, Brent “Joe Jr.” 
Young. Row Three: Steven B. Herrera, Arthur B. 
Taylor, Michael “General” Fleetwood, Tai Chi Le, 
JamesP. Plaatsman, James “Buffy” Stephens, Mark 
Rahner, Scott A. McDougall, Mark A. Aasland, 
Michael B. Williams, Dave R. Conran. Row Four: 
Glenn P. Esber, Melvin L. Wester, Don D. Hobuck, 
Rick D. Carlson, Greg D. Brink, Charles P. Tucker, 
Jim A. Jacobs. 






272 Living Groups /1984 


















]/>t ■ 

■ ■ 

GOLDSWORTHY GOVERNMENT -Row One: 
Rocky A. Mediati, David J. Rogers, Andy R. 
Simonds, Richard N. Flaget, Jim J. Krouse. Row 
Two: Glenn F. Fambarstur, Alvin “89” Garrett, 
Jeffrey M. Schlenz (Vice President), Melvin “Mel” 
Wester (President), Vic J. Fisher, Dan P. Engell, 
Brad W. Both. Row Three: Brian P. O’Reilly, Tor- 
gun E. Smith, Doug W. Schuster, Ken S. Masel. 




GOLDSWORTHY OFFICERS flmv One: Jeffrey 
M. Schlenz (Vice President), Mel L. Wester (Presi¬ 
dent), David J. Rogers (Treasurer). Row Two: Andy 
R. Simonds (Secretary), Vic J. Fisher (House Mana¬ 
ger), Rocco A. Mediati (Social Secretary). 


1984 / Living Groups 273 

























jpkt 




KRUEGEL FIRST FLOOR -Row One: Kevin M. 
White, Rob J. Eckroth, Thomas J. Dobias. Jon L. 
Lovitt, John T. Herrin, Mike H. Alcom. Row Two: 
Mark E. Luebbers, Mark R. Mielbrecht, Troy M. 
Martin. Lee A. Vogelman. Craig J. Callies. Matt M. 
Waldman, Doug R. Wordell. David P. Ouellette, 
Arthur T. Frost, Steven E. Stougard. Mary Fritz. 
Steven S. Covert, Frank G. Stone, Michael A. Totey. 
Mark E. Boucher, Bill N. Andersen. Row Four: 
Gregory A. Frick. Eric F. Elstrott, Keith T. Sharp, 
Tim J. Mildren. Darryl C. Gerber. Tariq Akmal. Jeff 
C. Mayeda, Alan Hall. Mike McFarland. Peter Bis- 
sell. 






<&cchj C 


KRUEGEL SECOND FLOOR -Row One: Dean R 
Ash, Cuong Truong, Steve Carlson, Dave H. Hud¬ 
dleston, Jeff Miner. Cat Bruiser. Gerald W. Gardner, 
Thomas “Bubba” Robinson, Phil “Banzai” 
Hisayasu. Row Two: Dave Faletti. Carl Wilson. Eric 
Slender, Eric Lauer, Jeff Kimball, Mike Mears, 
Keith Wallace. David O. Tyner, Harold Crook. Mark 
Phibbs. Row Three: General G. Mac Arthur. Douglas 
R. Crook, Captain Queeg, Robert L. Schilling. 
Alluicious J. Lipon, Rowz R. Williams, Mark J. 
Wehrle, Dave R. Starry. Glenn D. Berry, John C. 
Massenburg, Mike A. Leskovar. Bruce W. Barn- 
brick, Bryan Wilson. Row Four: Brian C. Burns, 
Allen R. Miedema. John P. Krussel, Carl M. Bach. 
Kevin D. Chaimberlain, Jeff J. Heilman. Ken G. 
Kirkland, John R. Elliott, Ray L. Haldeman, Todd F. 
Brown, Bruce H. Grant, Kevin M. Johnston. 



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274 Living Groups /1984 
















tkur<L m u 

KRUEGEL THIRD FLOOR -Row One: Scott B 
Ekman, Dean W. Karr, Terry A. Sax, Marc A. 
Everson. Sushil Deodhar. Mark R. Brown. Steven 
M. Lunde, Gregory L. Thomason. Kyle L. KJippert 
(R.A.). Row Two: Jim A. Cave, Jonny R. Rosman, 
CIgelstad, Robert Patrick. Roy Arington, Brian R. 
Anderson. Mark A. Przybylski. Row Three: John R. 
Hoback, Chris C. Moores, Mike W. Sloan. Alex V. 
Liu, Ian C. Dunn, Steve T. Bennett. Anthony G. 
Cain, Bill V. Flowers. Row Four: Scott A. Peck, 
Chris J. O’Brien. Ed L. Reeves, Scott J. Phibbs, 
Bruce A. Montgomery. Jon M. Musch, JeffT. Dark. 
Gary L. Ferson. 





hJ 




KRUEGEL FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: Keith J. 
Tuttle. CWris S. Wehrung, Wayne M. Nishioka. Stan 
D. Symms. Scott J. Rice, Face H. Kaalaas. Rory A. 
Routhe. Kevin M. Stansberry. Row Two: Eric J. 
Lenius, Steven L. Day, Kevin B. Hall, Hector C. 
Wilson. Fred S. Stimson. John C. Wardlaw. Paul D. 
Whitney, Darin C. Lenderink. Row Three: Tim Mea¬ 
ly, Brent Kabat, Steve D. Burchett. Wes Clare, Scott 
J. Amsden, Gordon Dick Wood. Charles Royer, 
Dude T.J. Schaefer. Mama S.C. Schaefer. Bud 
McTavish Schaefer. Row Four: K.C. Warner, 
Christopher W. Dean. Dave R. Einan. John A. 
Nolan. Greg A. Silva. Brian L. Madison. Bruce L. 
Alley, Gunter J. Gilberg. Ghan D. Tom. Stud A. 
Schaefer, Bomber D. Schaefer. 


1984 / Living Groups 275 

























MCALLISTER FIRST FLOOR-Row One: Annet 
te M. McCarty, Julie K. Everton, Laura S. Ander¬ 
son, Susan M. Shaw, Debbie D. Styers, Diane L. 
Oldfield. Row Two: Liz “Bunny” Gunnarsson, 
Katie “Cuffy” Scott, Cassy “Corky” Martin, 
Kaydee “Kiki” Robinson, Theresa Imlig (R.A.), 
Mary Winters, Charlene Turner, Douglas Fur, Sue 
Leon, Jan Tonkin, Melanie Shepard. Row Three: 
Natalie A. Crudge, Julie L. Taylor, Amy Hunter, 
Patricia A. Lonergan, Cyndie “Prep” Jackson, Jen¬ 
nifer “Prep” Hixson, Carrie “Muffy” Stacey, 
Sonya R. Marlton. Onette T. Wagner. 




MCALLISTER SECOND FLOOR-/tow One: Pat¬ 
ty J. Johnson, Pamela A. Fleming, Shannon M. 
Mullin, Teresa L. Sivak, Karen A. Orsi, Julie A. 
Peters, Bev M. Denby, Cherie Wallman, Kristin M. 
Schnell, Nancy L. Meisinger, Lola A. Reisenauer. 
Row Two: Martha R. Moore, Mary E. Palmquist, 
Cynthia L. Campbell, Althea Silva. Phebe A. 
Mason, Anna C. Jelmberg, Kim A. Richeson, Jackie 
M. Stepan. Tara J. Castrey, Phuong N.P. Le, Julie 
A. Virgil. Row Three: Julie A. Thompson, Tamara J. 
Passmore, Noreen K. Olson, Rebecca E. Peterson, 
Shannon D. Harvey, Laurie J. Heredia, Rachel D. 
Richardson, Colleen G. Carlsen, Cindy L. Fudge, 
Debra J. Orchard. 



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276 Living Groups /1984 




























1984 / Living Groups 277 




MrfUfi&cr 


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MCALLISTER FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: 
Kelly A. Davis, Mary Grace Helsper, Wendy D. 
McMonigle, Carolyn M. Johnson, Sarah L. Kahn, 
Anne J. Windishar, Colleen L. Rickman, Diane C. 
Ais-Aistrope. Row Two: Jolene R. Yano, Della R. 
Franklin, Arlene G. Vollmer, Merrie C. Caldwell, 
Shellie A. Molitor, Tammy M. Reed, Lynn K. John¬ 
son, Kimberly A. Miller, Martha J. Harrison, Celia 
A. Emrick, Melinda A. Rasmussen, Tanya K. Cre-, 
sap. Row Three: Sandra D. Morrow, Amy S. Wirtz, 
Karen M. Shoop, Lora L. Shoop, Sara “l Need 
Another Drink” Field, Carol “Have Another Drink” 
Judd. Katie “Let’s Play Quarters” Moulster, Shan¬ 
non’s Teddy. Cindy “Had Too Many” Wanless, 
Lisamarie Brems, Heidi L. Kristofferson. 


tturd. 


MCALLISTER THIRD FLOOR -Row One: Jill M 
Cowan, Stacey M. Gant. Heidi J. Schmidt. Tami V. 
Jacobsen, Lesa K. Magnuson, Glen R. Young, 
“Lady” Dog Young, Cindy L. Clement. Row Two: 
Patty A. Pearson, Kelly J. White, Jodi I Berg. Joyce 
A. VanBroekhoven, Kristin M. Lampa, Lynn D. 
Anderson, Mary F. Rewolinski, Lee Ann Beach, 
Kim A. Johnson. Row Three: Julie M. Kimbrell, 
Kimberly Becktold, Karri L. Gohm, Camie J. 
Henke, Barbara L. Horlander. Lisa A. Garrison, Lori 
R. Heinemann, Laura L. Garretson. Row Four: Peg¬ 
gy A. O’Boyle, Diane P. Sprute, Denise L. Daub, 
Heather E. Reiland, Jill E. Glasgow, LynnM. Setter- 
gren. 



















One: Mark A. Przybylski, Scott J. Rice, Chris J. 
O’Brien, Ed L. Reeves, Shellie A. Molitor. Scott J. 
Phibbs. 


KRUEGEL-MCALLISTER HOUSE COUNCIL 

AND STAFF-/?ow One: Mark A. Przybylski, Scott 
“Abduhl” Phibbs, Scott “Serief” Rice, Shellie A. 
Molitor, Ed L. Reeves, Chris “Mohamad” O’Brien. 
Row Two: Cindy A. Wanless, Heather E. Reiland, 
Merrie C. Caldwell, Lee Ann Beach, Kyle L. Klip- 
pert, Teresa L. Sivak, Cherie Wallman, Liz M. Gun- 
narsson, Sarabeth Field. Row Three: Jim M. Travis, 
Brent Kabat, David P. Ouellette, Douglas R. Crock, 
Heidi Kristofferson, Peggy O’Boyle, Marty Fritz, 
Allen R. Miedema, Jeff C. Mayeda. 


uroi/tf 

KRUEGEL-MCALLISTER EXECUTIVES-/?™ 
























AMSDEN, SCOTT J 
ANDERSEN. WILLIAM N. 
ANDERSON. BRIAN 
ASH. DEAN 
ASPLUND. NATHAN 
BERG. JODI 
BOUCHER, MARK 
BOZO, CINDY 


BURNS. BRIAN 
CALDWELL. MERRIE 
CALLIES. CRAIG 
CASEY, SHANNON L 
COVERT. STEVEN 
CRUDGE. NATALIE 
DEAN. CHRISTOPHER W. 
DECOHAR. SUSHIL 


ECKROTH. ROBERT 
EVERSON. MARC 
FIELD. SARA 
FONG. KAREN 
GARRISON. LISA A. 
GLASGOW. JILL 
GOWANS. PAM 
GUNNARSSON. ELISABETH 


HARRISON. MARTHA 
HAYNIE. TIMOTHY 
HEINEMANN. LORI 
HORLANDER. BARBARA 
JACKSON. CYNTHIA E. 
JELMBERG. ANNA 
JIRAVA. THOMAS 
KAALAAS, RICHARD 


KARR. DEAN 
KIMBALL. JEFFREY 
KIMBRELL. JULIE M. 
KO. JUSTIN 
LATHROP. RANDAL G. 
LEON, SUSAN 
MADISON. BRIAN 
MAGNUSON, LESA K. 


MARTIN. CASSANDRA 
MASON, PHEBE A. 
MCCARTY. ANNETTE 
MIEDEMA. ALLEN 
MOORES, CHRISTOPHER 
MORLEY. PAUL 
MOULSTER. KATHRYN 
MUNIZZA, JERRY 


MUSCH, JONATHON 
NISHIOKA. WAYNE 
O BOYLE. MARGARET 
REEVES. EDWARD 
REISENAUER. LOLA 
REWOLINSKI. MARY 
ROBINSON. KAYDEE 
ROSMAN. DANIEL 


ROYER. CHARLES 
SETTERGREN. LYNN 
SHARP. KEITH 
THOMASON. GREGORY 
THOMPSON. LISA 
THYME, ELIZABETH 
TONKIN, JANICE 
TRAN BACH-TUYET 


VIRGIL. JULIE A. 
VOGELMAN, LEE 
VOLLMER. ARLENE 
WAFFLE, LISA 
WHITE, KELLY 
WINDSOR. DAVID 
WINTERS. MARY 
YAMO. JOLENE 


1984 / Living Groups 279 

























































280 Living Groups /1984 


M 

McCROSKEY SOUTH-/tow One: Maggie G. Mar¬ 
tin, Anita K. Seymour, Viki V. Stanton, Melinda S. 
Chaffee, Angie M. Larsen, Lynn M. Leahy, Kimi E. 
Corrigan. Row Two: Yuette M. Armstrong, Gail 
Mori, Jo Gillam, Anne Telecky, Judy Smith, Susan 
J. Cooksey, Cecilia M. Van, Donna L. Taussig. Row 
Three: Dawn E. Stephens, Monica M. Plagge, Kath¬ 
leen M. Moyer, Marcie A. Gaddis, Sylvia S. Fry, 
Linda M. Rosario, Christina M. Rose, Barb J. Par¬ 
ker, Elizabeth K. Morgan, Janice M. Hade, Jill 
Haner. 


McCROSKEY NORTH-/tow One: Karen A. Mil¬ 
ler, Priscilla L. Dodds, Brenda “Babycakes” Bar¬ 
rett, Gina M. Mariotti, Jana “The Woman” Down¬ 
ing, Morphine Drugs McHugh, Crhissy “Drugs” 
Wojack, Beth “Buffy” Holand, Mary “Mare Pie” 
Hill, Becki “Maynard” Mills. Row Two: Jody M. 
Nelson, EllenC. Pruitt, Susan M. Channing, Janet L. 
DeShon, S. “Firmbottom” Furubotten, Dawn M. 
Christiansen, Donna A. Koch, Cynthia M. Lambert, 
Amy M. Smith. Row Three: Kathleen A. Petre, Jane 
Groh, Stacy Y. Cole, Lori K. Butler, Denise L. 
Davis, Henry “Hound-dog” Whitman, Susan A. 
Whitman, Christy J. Thompson, Karen B. Wichert, 
Kristi A. Johnson, Dianne M. Sivak. 





































BARRETT. BRENDA 
CORRIGAN. KIMBERLY 
DESHON, JANET 


GILLAM. JOSEPHINE 


FRY. PENNY 


GROH. JANE 


HANER, JILL 


HILL, MARY 
HOLAND. ELIZABETH 
KOCH. DONNA 
LAMBERT. CYNTHIA 
LORAN. MARY 
MARTIN. MAGGIE 
MYRE, JANIS 
SMITH, AMY 



Someone once said that dorm rooms 
could be equipped for everything. 
Pictured here is a freshman, Susan 
Mueller, a resident of McCroskey 


Hall. Her room has the necessary 
tools for college survival. The picture 
covers most of them: a lamp, window, 
desk, stereo, books, mirror, and of 


course toilet paper! Most freshmen 
living in residence halls try to make 
their rooms as creative and comfort¬ 
able as possible. 


1984 / Living Groups 281 


























Stevens Fire Safety 


Contradicting statements arose 
during an investigation of the safety 
of fire detection equipment used in 
Stevens Hall. 

Stevens, a womens residence hall, 
was brought to the attention of Food 
and Housing as being five years be¬ 
hind the state fire code. 

Following several promises of sys¬ 
tem updating and room phones, 
Anne Freeman, a resident, began 
looking into the problem last August. 
“I started phone calls in August as to 
why the project hadn’t been started. 
We were told by Food and Housing in 
1982 that it would begin then,” said 
Freeman. 

Residents became concerned about 
the safety of their hall when it was 
discovered in August that the hall did 
not meet the fire code followed by the 
university fire department. 

Dan Sender, fire chief, said they fol¬ 
low the 1979 Uniform Building code 
which states, under fire-warning and 
sprinkler systems, sec. 1210 (a), Fire 
warning systems: “every dwelling unit 
and every guest room in a hotel or 
lodging house used for sleeping pur¬ 
poses shall be provided with smoke 
detectors conforming to U.B.C. Stan¬ 
dard No. 43-6.” 

William Bierbaum, director of 
Food and Housing, said, “The uni¬ 
versity does not follow the 1979 code. 
The women of Stevens Hall are per¬ 
fectly safe with the protecto wire they 
have, there's no need for for smoke 
detectors.” Bierbaum was unsure of 
the code the university does follow. 

Protecto wire, that is in most older 
buildings, runs across the ceiling. It is 
heat sensitive and will trip the alarm in 
the building, but is not connected to 
the central alarm at the fire station. 
The protecto wire in Stevens has been 
painted over several times. 

Krista Dabakis, hall director at 
Stevens, said, “It’s a shame that the 
residents had to point things out. I 
don’t think it will ever take a loss of 
life, but I’d like to see something open 
some eyes. The residents are paying 
to live in a safe building.” 

A source within the safety depart¬ 
ment also said that the 1979 code is the 
one they follow. Adding it was good 


that the women produced some ac¬ 
tion, it should not have been necessary 
for them to have to complain. The 
ultimate responsibility falls on Food 
and Housing. 

In early October, Food and Hous¬ 
ing quietly installed battery-operated 
smoke detectors in Stevens Hall. In¬ 
stallation was done a few weeks before 
the fire department came to do a 
room-to-room safety inspection. 

Pres. Terrell, who became aware of 
the matter when a group of women 
took their complaints to him, said, “I 
sympathized with their situation; 
whenever there’s a safety matter, we 
like to jump in there right away.” 
Smoke detectors were installed one 
week later, after the meeting with the 
women. 

The project that was scheduled to 
begin in 1982 consisted of total re¬ 
wiring, installation of room phones 
and a system that, in case of fire, 
would automatically alert the fire de¬ 
partment. The project began in late 
January. 

Ken Abbey, assistant vice president 
of business and finance, gave approv¬ 
al to begin the project during the 
school year. “I was concerned about 
the security of the women in the hall. 
These are outside contractors, and we 
felt it would be better for everyone to 
wait. Conveniece and security were 
the main factors,” said Abbey. 

Other reasons given for delaying 
the project was the reason of room 
phones. They are the main focus of 
the project. 

Abbey stated that room phones are 
not a safety tool, so suspension could 
have been put off. Bierbaum agreed 
with Abbey about phones not being a 
safety tool. 

Sender, however, said that room 
phones are a definite safety feature. “I 
think phones are very important for 
safety. If you’re trapped in the room 
and had a phone, a call could be 
placed so we’d know where to look,” 
said Semler. 

Money was another factor consi¬ 
dered in the project. 

Funding for hall safety inspections 
by the fire department has depleted. 
Semler said it’s unfortunate the 


money is gone, but with an upgraded 
system they won’t worry as much. He 
added since Stevens is so old, it can be 
thought of as more of a safety risk. 

Bierbaum’s solution to safety 
checks was for the hall director and 



282 Living Groups /1984 


■ 
















resident advisors to do them. “They 
have a much better opportunity to 
watch over the hall. Ultimately, every¬ 
thing that happens in the hall is the 
responsibility of the hall director,” 
said Bierbaum. 

Abbey stated, “The hall director 
and R.A. should assume some respon¬ 
sibility, such as warning the women 
about do’s and don’ts. But technically 
they just aren’t trained.” 

Dabakis said, “As the hall director 


I’m not ready to inspect rooms, we are 
not trained in that area. The job I have 
here is my professional job and 
doesn’t include fire inspection.” 

The overall cost of the project itself 
was questioned. According to Bier¬ 
baum the entire upgrading of Stevens 
Hall would cost $ 185,000. Abbey gave 
the figure of $139,400. 

Abbey stated that Stevens hall is not 
the most economical hall to run, it is 
not the most expensive either. Said 


Abbey, “We’re upgrading the system 
— making it better. As far as what 
code is used I don’t know what to say. 
A new and safer code may come out 
tomorrow. It may be passed by the 
state. But that does not mean it will be 
adopted.” 

— by Linda Beardsley 



II 



1 !j 7I«F ; J 

II 

I 1 HH ■■ | 



| | 'll Mi 1 | 



I 1 III III 


Ill 

I j 



L | ffM* 1 


L 

« --' - *+ 

- 

f 


1984 / Living Groups 283 










































NEILL FIRST FLOOR -Row One: Karol L. Talbot, 
Susan L. Wentz, Thope A. Matabo, Lisa A. West- 
gard, Lisa A. Roegner, Marie H. Harnett. Tammy 
Mow, Nancy Weston. Elizabeth Stephanick, Christ¬ 
ine M. Perry, Helen Mary Owen, Mary Hansen. Row 
Three: Marcia D. Knopp, Melody M. Hackney, 
Laura J. Carney. Christina S.L. Tang, Kamitha Asa- 
wakul, Michiko Ochiai. 


■ (JuM J?■ ■ 




//tM. ■ ■ 


NEILL SECOND FLOOR -Row One: Don “Zor- 
ro” Harto, Jim “Beer” Miller. Row Two: Peter Ku, 
Kaurin L. Olsen (President), Ken C. Keyes, Chai 
Peng Wong. Jacob T. Cherian (R.A.), Jon W.T. 
Inouye, Ranjay Gulati, James M. Watanabe. Row 
Three: Tooraj Aflatooni, Rodney E. Benoit, Thomas 

M. Creasia, Sean McQuillen, John F. Cederholdm 
Pete Tu, Mickey ? Mouse, Glynn F. Stevens, Tony 
G. Vergel, Henry Kwan, Anil K. Chokshi, Jonathan 

N. A. Egilla, Mike E. Shanholtz. Row Four: Michael 
Yap, Demetris N. Miscourides, Anand P. Shaha- 
mad, Gerld H. Benson, Brett L. Thovson, Andy 
Clarke, Nimo Tirimanne, Scott R. Knapp, Mike 
Crossen, Steve Behler, William A. Welch. 




1984 / Living Groups 284 















■ ■ //oMl ■ ■ 



mmf/dJJl (fuiu4iu 


NEILL THIRD FLOOR-Row One: Naoko 
Yamashita. Heather J. Crook, Michelle L. McLaren, 
Michele M. Santos, Yuko Azuma, Jeanna Hoyt, 
Annette Pedersen Cherie L. Maahs. Yuki Fukuzumi. 
Row Two: Christy Mathieson. Mama Carlson, 
Gwendolyn Urcia, Theresa Liu, Sian-Tjoe Ong, 
Seha Rahmat, Charlotte Molrang, Patricia Danaher, 
Don “Juan” Harto. Row Three: Helen Kay Dowden, 
Melissa Ann Swan, Liz M. Hudon. Diane Marriott, 
Elise M. Baggen. Ellen M. Dyke, Inge Paulini. 





u:‘n 3 /%■ 




u Li 

J T/ Wl 


NEILL FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: T. Jerry Mis- 
kovsky, Habib Ullah. Row Two: Rhett P. Doumitt, 
Curtis B. Durrant, Hisao Shimizu, Kim Boje, Per 
Bendix Olsen, Michael Finkel, Jeff R. Feemster. To 
Tony N. EI-Khoury. Row Three: Bryan D. Smith, 
Todd G. Hannus, James D. Parkin, Hai V. Nguyen, 
Brad D. Clayton, Pete K. Vandewater, Mark A. 
Wheeler, Robin Wulff, Paul A. Morel, Terry L. 
Donlin. Michael Strobclt, Nils M. Solsvik, Gregory 
R. Day, Terry Popravak, Steve Bork, Scott Kahler, 
John R. Sanfellipo, Rastus T. Flagbone, Todd 
Thaemert, Mike Odell. 


285 Living Groups /1984 






















ORTON SECOND FLOOR -Row One: Chris M. 
Trotter, Lavon Kraus, Randy A. Duckworth. Lisa A. 
Borst, Kelly P. Erickson. Carol L. King, Nancy A. 
Gator. Laura and Michele’s Pleasure Palace, Chris 
“Slave” Knudson, Aaron F. Brown. Row Two: J.J. 
Greive, Jillian VanderVeer, Chris Garza, Sarah Mor¬ 
gan, Tandy C. Berg. Leanne M. Hine, Bill Perrcy, 
Rich A. Taylor, Carlos “Porky” Pizarro. Row 
Three: Roxy Foxy, Val Veluptuous, Mayhem, 
LauraMae Alferd, Eric Turner. Todd Kappl. 
Raymond R. Wilson. Todd Hasfjord, Jesse Smith. 
Denny Hallctt. Row Four: Mike J. Pcnnachi, Martin 
L. Sweet. Terry “Five Inch” A. Kinley. Steve “No 
Nuts” H. Fleaps, Andrew “Captain K-Fish” C. 
Crawford, Gordon “Flash “ Benjamin, Chris Carr. 
Vitcovich (Johnny-Wad ) Danny, Mike Delaurenti, 
Neil V. Curry. Valerie Rice. 



ORTON FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: Ron 
“Phantom Rider” Anderson, Ray “Amo's Guard” 
Carle. Chris R. Kascberg. Tiffany W. Hyde. Dennis 
“Fred” Crollard. Kelly A. Lindell. Tammy “Carol” 
Rowland. Annette F. Rzany, Pat F. Dunn, Tommy 
“Hawaiian” Ho. Row' Two: Craig A. Caro. Peter 
V.C. Hickey. Grunhurd. Rob L. Alsbury, Mike Be¬ 
gin. Todd P. Arnold. Jeff R. Tweedy. David Yager. 
Matt E. Miller. The Doy and Ozzy. Row Three: June 
M. Haltori. Jcnclle S. Wirkkala, JeffS. Fisher, Amy 
K. Long. Steve Potter. Kris D. Rothert. Stephanie A. 
Richards. Dana Lees. Sandra A. Bellinger. 




QlffrW (fritr-Hu 


286 Living Groups /1984 


















ORTON FIFTH FLOOR /ton One: Alan Birdsell. 
Erika M. Humes. Tami L. Baird, Debbi Takehiro. 
Raymond L. Moffatte Jr., Andre M. Horne. Jeff 
“Pepsi” Lytle. Row Two: Juli A. Reynvaan. LoriG. 
Nething, Anne M. Marcus. Judy R. Barrett. MaryJo 
E. Black. Stephen D. Todd. John P. Babich, Ramona 
Runyan, Jack E. Dosey. Betsy L. Howell. Karin E. 
Zamora. Row Three: Mark F. Vickers. Andy M. 
Haralson, Ronad J. Toczek, N. Joy McGilton. Sue 
Y. Kim, Joanne M. Samaniego. Molly M. Brehm, 
Jossandra N. Jones. Cheryl L. Tuffs. Scott and Louie 
E. Blaske, Terry Lind. J.L. Page. Row Four: Peter 
A. Hunter, Carol A. Vanelli, Len A. Ottow. Eric C. 
Johnson. Jennifer E. Sweigert. Ronald K. Killcbrcw, 
RogerS. Wright. FredT. Davis, Rich A. Gushman. 






ORTON SIXTH FLOOR-tf^r One: Sophia J. 
Christman, Lorrie D. Roab. Row Two: Rebecca V. 
Serquinia. Derek S. Nylund. Steven N. Pahre. Patty 
A. Pederson, Tim G. Marske. Row Three: Joseph A. 
Lenhard. Jeff S. Barrett, Stephanie L. Carr. Nina 
Murari, Lisa Gourdine. Michael D. Dctering. Thor 
K. Thompson. Taylor W. Hutt, Charles K. Manson. 
Row Four: Larry J. Tazuma, Kari L. Quinn, Brett A. 
Bodenhamer. Tammie M. Holcomb. Teresa A. Hen¬ 
ning. Mary A. Baillie, Dinae N. Brandes, Suzi P. 
Gallagher, Roger A. Lee. 


1984 / Living Groups 287 


















ORTON SEVENTH FLOOR-tfmv One: David S 
Cass. Kirsten E. Lochtie, Jane R. Hartwell. Ann E. 
Krause, Debbie C. O’Brien. Eddy A. Trottier. Lisa 
D. Maples. Martha M. Trzecieski, Steven R. Felde. 
Sherryl M. Stranne, Alice E. Wessitsh, Nancy L. 
Brocard. Scott M. Bruce. Jillian M. VanderVeer. 
Christopher W. Jordan. Row Two: Geoffrey J. Hoff¬ 
man, Chris J. Lilley, John L. Christensen. John F. 
Kennedy, Roger F. Patten, Dillsi T. Tarik. Kandy K. 
Gies, Donna M. Provenzo, Tonya Linn Stanfield. 
Shawn M. Adams, Bobbi J. Miller (R.A.), J. Allen 
Cripe, Todd G. Dempewolf. Row Three: Carl Clark, 
Eric Wheeler, Battle Buck. Steve Fickes. Chris E. 
Horn, Jeff Thomas. Todd Pomeroy. David Waymen* 
Shanda. Curt Hawkins, Doug Wilson. Linda 
Blakesley, Ken Behm. 




ORTON EIGHTH FLOOR -Row One: Beth A 
Crimps, Tim E. Schilling, Kathy A. Hillman. Bob E. 
Kile. Megan J. Lougheed, James B. Menor. Jodi L. 
Russell. Row Two: Phyllis J. Shepherd, Donald W. 
Blackstone. Kayla B. Sommerfeld, John R. Loggis 
Jr., Todd E. Nelson, Glen M. Charlton, Rob 
“Swivel Hips” Gamble, Butch “Lawless” Cassidy, 
Jesse James. Eric Jack Gough. Row Three: Susan M. 
Gardner, Rosemarie Ellis, Liz M. Hawley, Linda M. 
LeNoue, John A. Tyrrell, Mike “Dual” Brothers. 
Ed “Dead” Savage. Kristin A. Crain, Tracey J. 
Seeley, James J. Meehan, “Big” Cardell Simmons. 
Row Four: Bruce “Jesus” A. Vilander, Scott A. 
Stoneking, Wendy L. Keehnel, Chris “Gilligan” 
Bence, Ginger Gilmore, Sheri “Duckie” L. Wyatt, 
Andrea T. Raney, Shane P. Magdall, Marty A. 
Ward, Darla M. Smarz, Loran K. Heinen. 



288 Living Groups /1984 
















ORTON NINTH FLOOR -Row One: Sharon 
“Spider” Weinberg, Leann Boettcher, Vance You- 
mans IV, Mr. Jumbo. Row Two: Paul R. Ballata, 
Karen R. Poppe, Johnny E. Proton, Kelli “Starvin' 
Marvin” Heida, Kelley McArthur, Ceci “Chich" J. 
Chourre, Lee “Louie” K. Wilson, Duane “Mugsy” 
C. Nixon, Karla K. Newson. Pam “Spam” C. 
Lehan, Stephanie “Beby" L. Kugel. Row Three: 
Eric W. Sanford, Scott M. Swift, Eric A. Morgan, 
Roy L. Etheridge, “Love God” Scott L. Kline, G. 
Keith Ebersole, Kathryn A. Schofstoll, John H. Tate. 
Susan “Choosen” Bellero, Shari Glover. Row Four: 
Leif R. Sandaas. Bob Mull, Keith Erickson. Roger 
Rasmussen, Kris R. Stewart, Matt A. Palahniuk, 
Robert E. Pucher, Nigel L. Hennis. 




ORTON TENTH FLOOR -Row One: Wendy J 
Sonnemann, Stefan Tarzan, Colleen Green Cook, 
Sean Hatch, Shell Fayette, Tami G. Schluter. Row 
Two: Mike J. Riordan, Greg A. Koepke, Dave K. 
McGlothlin, Darwin D. Webb, Dianne M. Codding- 
ton, Doreen A. Koch, Ray E. Byrd Jr., Julia S. 
Mueller, Brian R. Moss, Mee Mee Kiong, E. Jon 
Hubbell. Row Three: Richard R. Moffett, Erin J. 
Roach, Todd S. Dezellem, D’lynn E. Tarver, Glenn 
W. Owen Jr.. Nancy D. Miller, Jill M. Nielsen, 
Jessica L. Mack, Mary L. Widder. Ed W. Westjohn. 
Row Four: C. Tyler Hopkins, David Wilson. 



1S84 / Living Groups 289 























ORTON ELEVENTH FLOOR-/?™ One: Shaula 

K. Zink. Donna J. Maclean. Row Two: Cloris Walk¬ 
ing. Shelley M. Stallone, Renee E. Reindeer, Sydney 
C. Greenbush. Tracy B. Tomlinson, Cindy L. 
Chandler, Brad M. Bourgette. Carl S. Wommack, 
Ryan L. Hatch, Matt E. Willison, Kimmie L. Hon¬ 
eywell, Pete A. Parsons, Julie A. Adams, May M. 
Thompson. Row Three: Carey Ann McCarthy. Julee 

L. Conger, Charles V. Young, Jim Bob Stevens. 
Keith D. Maxwell. Becky J. Goetz, Todd C. Camer¬ 
on, Dan J. Moore, Tracey L. Mitcham, Bradley D. 
Irving, Joseph D. Taylor. Row Four: Steve P. DeSor- 
di, Scott A. Cobain. Jeff C. Fahselt, Jeff M. Kincaid. 
Caroline A. Cervarich, Jon R. LeVee. Lisa C. Mack¬ 
ey, Ken S. Hayes, Kevin M. Felton. Victoria L. 
Malloy, Deanna L. Gardiner, Larry R. Huisingh. 



■ ■ Qtrhffl Gwt ■ ■ 


ORTON GOVERNMENT-/?™' One: Erika M 
Humes. Steve D. Todd. Ryan L. Hatch. Peter A. 
Parsons. E. Jon Hubbell. Row Two: Tami G. Schlu- 
ter, Darla M. Smarz, Anne M. Marcus, David W. 
Wilson, Jessica L. Mack, Barbie Gorham. Shell 
Fayette, Bradley D. Irving. Kenneth S. Hayes. John 
R. Loggins Jr.. Teresa A. Henning, Lori D. Raab. 
Row Three: Jeff R. Lytle, Kelli M. Heida. G. Keith 
Ebersole, Wendy J. Sonnemann, Kevin M. Felton, 
Kathy A. Schofstoll, Eric Lee Parker, Diane Lazear. 
Bobbi J. Miller, Chris “Gilligan” Bence, Patty A. 
Pederson. Amy K. Long, Julia S. Mueller. Dana 
Lees. Jeff R. Tweedy. Row Four: Stefan Tarzan. 
Darwin P. Webb. Ginger L. Gilmore. Andrea T. 
Rainey. Kimmie L. Honeywell, Sean M. Hatch, 
Randy A. Duckworth, JeffS. Barrett, Jon R. LeVee. 
Jill M. Nielsen, Larry R. Huisingh. 



290 Living Groups /1984 


























REGENTS HILL FIRST FLOOR B WING /tow 
One: Anne K. Sharp, “Bodacious” Bailey, 
“Jewels” F. Higgins, Britt K. Laursen. Caroline 
“Line” R. Dodgson, Bcv A. Inman, Patricia J. 
Hickle, Lisa A. Gregg, Monica I. Hanlin, Marie 
“Suzi Skiier” E. Fredericks. RowTwo: Suzanne L. 
“Killer” Kilbom. Sarah A. Eerkes. Elisa M. Home. 
Row Three: Margretha D. Perry, Deborah B. Pajar- 
do, Becky S. Peters, Jodie M. Hanesworth. Jill E. 
Hunt. Julie R. Vert, Mish L. Gambriell, Rebecca L. 
Geiger. Row Four: Shelly L. Kurtenbach, Patty M. 
Dost, Cherie E. Batte, Valerie J. Bomkamp, Kristie 
E. Studeman, Kathryn E. Key, Karen A. Mears, Ann 
D. Dobler. 






55 



two 


$ 


REGENTS HILL SECOND FLOOR B WING 

Row One: Sharon and her Floorlings, Lorena 
“Edgu” B. Rothwell, Kristi “Edgu” S. Blanken- 
feld, “D.D.” D. Beardsley. “K.K.” R. Enyeart, 
Laura “G.H.” J. Kinnunen. RowTwo: Siri “San” 
Francisco, Andrea Smith. Alisonian, Agaronnamee, 
Sharon “Babbles” Colfelt, Annie “Crew” Calvin, 
Veronica “Rowdy” Parker. Row Three: Mary Ann 
“Mouse” Unger. Row Four: Barb Busch. Monica 
Pollock, Cyndie Fowler. Linda “Spanky” Spaar- 
garen, Jill “Stymie” Sannes, Mary “D.Janet” Lux, 
Lori “Bell Solo” Debruync, Sharon “Mom” McIn¬ 
tosh (R.A.). Sandy “Bunny” Russell. Tena “Mrs. 
T” Ahrens, Tish “Pucky” Russell. 


1984 / Living Groups 291 






























REGENTS HILL THIRD FLOOR B WING -Row 




One: Beth Nixon, Amy L. Rider, Kris A. Traaen, 
Kris M. Olivadoti, Betty “Babs” A. Bouffant, 
Melissa A. Emerson, Bertha A. Bermuda. Row Two: 
Susan M. Cavanagh, C. S. Murdock, Kay L. 
Woodard, Kristina M. Wagner, Sue M. Tjarnberg, 
Tilly M. Castry, Karen K. Staats. Carol R. Shawley, 
Catherine Quillian, Aileen L. Dover. Marika A. Row 
Three: Carol L. Miller, Joleen M. Olson, Stephani R. 
Huber, Kelly J. Sell, Leanne M. Watts, Kristi A. 
Wallin, Madeline M. Zech. 




REGENTS HILL FOURTH FLOOR B WING 

RowOne: Brenda J. Frederick, Jill M. Ironside, Max 
P. Bear, Linda L. Perry, Linda L. Lee, “Goober”. 
Maple L. Lee, Stacy A. Requa. Jane M. May, Claire 
L. Fithian. Row Two: Germaine M. DePinna, Sheila 
A. Cosacchi, Sarah A. Jacques, Joyce R. Butler, 
Dorothy P. Tan, Mona K. Felton, Belinda L. McCor¬ 
mick, Ann E. Loonarn, Sophia J. Loren, Jane E. 
Fonda, Rondilyn C. Edwards, Lori D.S. Dahlquist, 
Amy L. Bradbury, Linda C. Emtman. Karen L. 
Michelsen. Susan M.T. Johnson. RowThree: Sue A. 
Wilkinson, Kate A. Braden, Andrea L. Cardon, 
Katherine A. Cheney. Julie M. Kuhnhausen. Tracy 
R. Johnson, Laura J. Taylor, Denise “Dingy” De- 
ngel. Jacey J. Still, Katherine E. Greene, Bea Lee 
Applemeyer. 



292 Living Groups/1984 















REGENTS HILL FIRST FLOOR C WING-/?™ 

One: Rhonda “Smurf” Anderson. Row Two: Laura 
K. Nelson, “Jewels” M. Kamphuis. AndreaC. Nel¬ 
son, Crystal G. Dixon. Kathy “Muscle” Russell, Jac 
“Boogie” Miles. Kathy M. Miller. Nancy J. Mil- 
liken. Row Three: Darlene A. Grashuis, Connie J. 
Gorder. Cathy M. Bennett, Nancy E. Terry. Laurie 
A. Smith, Susie K. Omberg, Chris D. Baumgartner. 
Row Four: Mary A. Koch, Tracey L. Docherty, Lisa 
K. Davis, Mary A. Rice, Shelly “Q-Bert” Wray, 
Shari “Lobp” Lupien. Amy “Animal” Arsenault. 
Row Five: Mona Viereck, Jane Delvo, Jennifer 
Swenson, Heidi VanderWilde, Cheryl Urban, Lesa 
Kingston, Nancy Palmer (R.A.). 



REGENTS HILL SECOND FLOOR C WING- 
Row One: Jill P. Gorman, Cindy J. Aspitarte, Bar¬ 
bara J. Freeh, Camille M. Rivard, Patty E. Babich, 
Debbie L. Moore, Lucy A. Lotto, Tanya E. Peterson, 
Nona E. Pepper. Row Two: Janna M. Johnson. Susan 
M. Foley, Karen A. Zimmermann, Cheryl L. Burns. 
Kim A. Leirdahl, Jenny F. Devin, Christy L. Becker, 
Meg E. Steele, Shannon E. Blazina. Jan E. Davis, 
Corinna L. Chapo. Row Three: Noelle Rice. Andrea 
H. Streng, Lynn M. Kelleran, Elizabeth C, Lawton, 
Keri A. Stewart. Paula R. Pleas, Lynn C. Millard. 
Lisa K. Kronvall, Linda L. Libbey, Janet L. Saurage, 
Paula S. Boyden, Heidi R. Grossman, Karen B. 
Thalle. 


1984 / Living Groups 293 








REGENTS HILL THIRD FLOOR C WING-Kmc 

One: Traci A. Johnson. Kim S. Williams, Nancy L. 
Brown. Jennifer A. Rigdon, JoAnn T. Schaefer, 
Anna L. Spunaugle. Jennifer L. Straub. Row Two: 
Lyn M. Coupe, Ann L. Leighty, Tracy L. Skaer. 
Susan J. Fort. Teresa M. Knowles. Christine A. 
Languein, Tammy C. Steele. Row Three: Loretta A. 
Tuell. Brigette J. Frederick. Pamela V. Davis. Betsy 
L. Sahr. Patti J. Serrette. Marcia L. King. Gretchen 
F. Fuller. Barbara M. Marvin. Row Four: Whitney 
E. Wright. Lynn M. Cromer. Tara M. Quigley. 
Laurel L. Smith. Lynn K. Scott, Debbie J. Stiner. 
Cleo M. Hansen, Paige L. Kenney, Karen R. Frazee. 


U'WU - (h 



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Ls 




r 


REGENTS HILL FOURTH FLOOR C WING 

Row One: Keri Lindstrand, Diane E. Lamb, Tami M. 
Danileson, Amanda S. Rustine, Anne L. 
Fredenburg, Jacque M. Tauscher. Row Two: Patricia 
Tuell. Ashlie Solomon. Sindi Somers. Barbara Skin¬ 
ner. Amy Newmeyer, Brenda Shaw. Karen Gilden 
Laurie A. Tobey. Renee C. Williamson. Mary Ah 
ern, Natalie Holmes, Dolly Goedhart. Mia Potter 
Lisa Kopf, Susan M. Warner, Kristen L. Sather 
Karen D. Kukuk, Mia S. Potter, Frances H. Mullan 
Jacqueline Ganutan, Dolly Goedhart. Sandy Kor- 
tright. Alicia L. Walton, Laura K. Mooney. Kathy 
A. Wendt. Tami R. Thurlow. Paula R. Pleas. Trina 
L. Rank. 





294 Living Groups /1984 










REGENTS HILL GOVERNMENT -Row One: 
Ann L. Leighty (Communications Manager). Don A. 
Moritz (Mascot). Row Two: Tracy L. Skaer (Advi¬ 
sor). Frances H. Mullan (Vice President). Jenny F. 
Devin (President), Jennifer Straub (Secretary). Nan¬ 
cy Palmer (Advisor). 



REGENTS HILL STAF F-Row One: Diane E. 
Lamb (R.A/). Row Two: Nancy Palmer (R.A.). 
Sharon McIntosh (R. A ), Don A. Moritz (Hall Direc¬ 
tor), Tracy L. Skaer (R.A.). Lucy A. Lotto (R.A.). 
Row Three: Lori A. Dahlquist (R.A.). Ann D. Dob- 
ler (R.A.). 


1984 / Living Groups 295 
























ROGERS SECOND FLOOR -Row One: Scott E. 
Evans, Kevin S. Wolfe. ERik D. Danielson, Erol G. 
Pilgrim, Stephen “Krank” Korenkiewicz, Nick 
“Vicki Obb” Obrastoff, Andrew Q. Taylor, Christ¬ 
opher “ R. A. ’ ’ C. Moran, Coltrane Roberts, Mike C. 
Baker-Cakeman, Mike C. Raitz, Russell J. Perkin- 
son, Cullen S. Tollbom. Row Three: Josh N. Keck, 
Robin G. Bales, Bob W. Hanning, Ted T. Omduff, 
Brian “Buckwheat” M. Phillips, Bill R. Wilkinso^, 
Todd J. Hartman, Glenn S. Steiner, Bruce J. John¬ 
son, Brian L. McMullin, John W. Wood. Row Four: 
Nick J. Tuttle, Rick L. Wolfe, Pat C. Mazure, Carl 
A. Elwell, Tim Grosse, Ronald E. Jenkins, Calkins 
W. Cary, Leonard A. Brandt, Scott B. Hinrichs, 
Shawn R. Potts, Dwain M. Oster. 



■ ijurcL 



ROGERS THIRD FLOOR-Row One: Pete 
“BMX” Petersen, Larry Home, Mike Anderson, 
Rick Larsen, Laszlo Bedegi, Dave Hutton, Wes 
(Lee) Yerty, Andre’ Carter. Row Two: Sotirios 
Moutsanas, Chris Z. Skolrud, John D. Leitzinger, 
Michael Singhose, Colin Foster. Row Three: Chad 
Saelens, Dan Dabrock, Tim Hatfield, Michael Bar¬ 
rett, Douglas “Spock” Loundagin, George “Cap” 
Pigman, Scott Goold. Row Four: Zachary B. Moore, 
Lawrence L. Gusa, Scott A. Mitchell, Jim D. Wick- 
man, Mark J. Stenberg, Tom M. Walloch, Brock M. 
Vann, Erich P. Grueter. 



296 Living Groups /1984 






























ROGERS FOURTH FLOOR-/?ow One: Jeffrey L. 
Alfonso, Bruce W. Mueller, Mike B. Webster, Jon- 
ny F. Howeiler, Larry Z. Medulla Slim C. Whit¬ 
mans Tim A. Pillo, Curt J. Cartier, Steve Joffe. Row 
Two: Don L. Brady, Rob R. Turner, Greg S. Jones, 
Tom J. Backstrom, Scott A. Johnson, Brian J. 
Raught, Michael S. Dierken, Greg A. Kahler, Brian 
C. Eibanks. Row Three: Kelly S. Patrick, Ken L. 
Dotson, Craig W. Aldritch, Bob J. Baschen, Richard 
A. Adsitt, Glenn A. Barley, Jeffrey C. Meade, Har¬ 
ley E. Ostlund. Row Four: Cliff H. Quisenberry, Jeff 
J. Akridge, Scott A. Grella, Dave L. English, Mike 
S. Fatal, Terrence L. Hatcher, Dave O. Porter. 





ROGERS FIFTH FLOOR-/?™ One: Dave W 
Bartholf, Bill L. Frank, Rick R. Galbraith, Naldo R. 
Vasquez. Row Two: Rex T. Schultz, Kevin A. 
Smith, Preston W. Shuman, Erik R. Wiitala, Devin 
J. Dekker, Jeff “Bolt” Cockill, Rob K. Arnold, 
Jamie R. Straus, David M. Fudge. Row Three: 
Timothy M. Karwal, Timothy J. Shortell, Matt C. 
Moreland, Scott L. Wooten, Bill R. Niegemann, 
Mark B. Perry, David L. Ulfers, Jim E. Oatey, 
Wayne Akerson, Tim Marks, Nick D. Murphy. Row 
Four: Timothy R. Kraabel, Roger W. Landes, 
Richard A. Salzetti, Richard O. Starr, Todd O. De¬ 
nny, Jeff L. Parmenter, Tony C. Bright, James B. 
Howe, Robert W. Laws, Steve M. Scott. 


1984 / Living Groups 297 









































ROGERS SIXTH FLOOR fow One: Bradford L. 
Davis, Rodney L. Whiting, Jim A. Fasulo, Salam 
“J.P.” Johnson, Abdul “J.P.” VanSickle, Muha- 
mad “L.D. Silver” Leber, Biff ‘‘L.D. Holder” 
Morrow, Orange Crush Hamrick. Row Two: Ed 
Lenth, Rob Robinson, Scott Smith, Terry Golom- 
beck, Andy “Pozzy” Moser, Douglas G. May, Mike 
A. Dooley, Johnboy X. Walton, Robert Reller. Row 
Three: Dave B. Truckey, Kevin S. Bratcher, James 
G. Gradwoil, James M. Filsinger, Scott G. Sutton, 
Bill S. Casey, Robert D. Wigen, Brian J. Norris, 
Kurt N. Petersen, Garth D. Reese. Row Four: Todd 
Kammers, Scott N. Starbuck, Kerry D. Catt, John T. 
Harding, Dan W. Moore, John M. Melgaard, Erick 
M. Karlsen, Brett A. Eliason, Willie J. Knezvich, 
Bryan S. McLean, Steve M. Wren, Randy S. Price. 







ROGERS SEVENTH FLOOR -Row One: Scott 
Higginbotham, Scott Stewart, Mike L. Larabee, 
Gary Rhoades, Todd Mount, Brian Lee, Monty 
Evans, Steve Hopkins, Shannon V. Pitts, Mark 
“Buck” D. Palmer, Rolf T. Williams. Row Two: 
Carl R. Kirkpatrick, Marcus H. Vonderhofen, Scott 
R. Williams, Michael J. Pellitteri, Jeff R.A. Allen, 
James A. Metcalf, Rob O. Balmer, Jerry Cochran, 
Mark E. Hollis, Tod A. Byquist, Dave W. Bordors, 
Michael E. Williams. Row Three: Dan J. Murray, 
Stefan D. Xaudaro, Brian K. Willett, Stephen E. 
Overman, Brian E. Gilmore III, Rick E. Jones, 
George L. Hylton, Craig P. Codiga, Charles E. Wil¬ 
son. Row Four: Phil “Moses” O. Van Heyningen, 
Kevin L. Owens, Scrowdem “69” Sam, Captain 
“71” Bligh, Scott “Sammy H” Jones, Chuck H 
Ward, Matt “Buck” Tilschner, Derek W. Janke, 
Brian E. Wakefield. 



298 Living Groups /1984 
















1984 / Living Groups 299 


i 

l! 


ROGERS EIGHTH FLOOR-Row One: John C. 
Steach, Brian S. Robison, Pat G. Caldwell, Steve D. 
Johnson, James E. Shillam. Row Two: Micah J. 
Olson, Ken R. Tews, Dana L. Durand, Rich D. Buel, 
Hans J. Meyer, Jon A. Oliver, John L. Okemah, 
Greg T. Kirk, Leland E. Stice, Robert A. Brewer. 
Row Three: David M. Sheen, Steven D. Roewer, 
Craig A. Peterson, Jerry C. Reeve, John L. Varner, 
Michael W. Meriino, Tom Q. McCarthey, Joe J. 
Borg, John C. Calvin, David J. Pallo, Tim A. Bard- 
well, Tony D. Autrey. Row Four: Michael R. Plum- 
lee, Steve A. Harbinson, Andrew M. Rathbun, 
Michael R. Light, George T. Redey, John R. Gage, 
Steven C. Stosich, D. Lowe.Miller, Todd E. Macom- 
ber, Vince L. Jackson, Eric D. Moushegian, William 
M. Verigin Jr., Paul D. Weis. 




ROGERS NINTH FLOOR Row One: Jeffrey D. 
Peterson, Dr. Ted Ethridge, Marc “Lorretta” Bums, 
Mike Armstrong, Larry “Zonk” Alexander, Kip A. 
Goerge, Kevin K. Leung, James P. Mullally. Row 
Two: David C.C. Fu, Ame K. Lewis, Ricky S.K. 
Yuen, Steven A. Card, Michael J. Wallin, Scott K. 
Bucher, Yon Kipper J. Sammers, David G. Sebert, 
Craig M. Johnson, Craig A. Seal, Kurt P. Dally, 
Rodney H. Hill, ChiaChoon Lim, Sidmond Q. Fins- 
ter, Steven J. Dunn, Jess Odell, “VoyerG.F. Mas¬ 
ter”, Douglas Harro, Nate M. Asplund. Row Three: 
Joseph L. Kent, Rick N. Arestand, John J. Doda, 
Larry S. Tappan, Ryan K. Brown, Warren A. Cooke, 
Kevin J. Nichols, William J. Guckenburg, M. Bates, 
Darrel R. Dick, StevenM. Madsen, Bernard 
“Voyeurmaster” Goldberg, Harmon “Gumby” 
Gaines, Maurice “Voyeurmaster” Feldstein. 










ROGERS TENTH FLOOR-/tow One: Gus Jo 
Apostol, Kirkus A. Hille, Greg “Master” Mills, 
Perry “I need more money” Cooper, Bryan B.C. 
Cummings, David J. Frame, Roger A. Lemire, Steve 
G. DiDomenico, JimP. Fox, ChrisC. Nienhuis. Row 
Two: Wes Nichols, David Stack, Richard Dalton, 
William Luton, Karlin Dodd, Peter Roberto, Rex 
Prater, Mitchell Rohlinger, Anthony Culanag, Scott 
Strayer, Neil Johnson. Row Three: Hugh J. Carney, 
Allan S. Townsend, Paul E. Dahlke, Bill D. McCre¬ 
ary, Mike R. Hoffman, Mark E. Swanlund, Brett E. 
Thompson, Dave S. Caudill, William H. Watson, 
Marc W. Olson. Row Four: S. Marc Talen, Gerald 
Jay Anhom, Steve R. Murphy, Daniel A. Uskoski 
Rob J. Sorensen, Dean M. Hamilton, Mark N. Da- 
quila, Thomas J. Croll, Patrick “CT” Tan, Chuck J. 
Willis, John K. Welch, Ben D. Quinby. 






ROGERS ELEVENTH FLOOR-/tow One: JeffS. 


Dorn, Eric W. Hogan, Michael A. Prigge. RowTwo: 
David W. Mendez, K.C. Puaa, David P. Balsiger, 
Richard W. Wells, Greggory L. Huisingh, Dave A. 
Norman, Tim W. Schlender, Arthur W. Brooking, ^ 
Eric G. Weseman, Dane J. Williams. Row Three/ 
Kevin “Skip” White, Timothy J. Camp, Scott C. 
Rosenkrauz, Aaron P. Sharp, Scott C. Pilet, Kevin 
A. Corliss, Bryan R. Behymer, Thad L. O’Dell, 
Todd L. Wacker, Peter W. Droubay, Wayne E. Bak- 
ker. Row Four: GeneT. Straughan, Mark A. Brown, 
Darryl L. Underwood, Benny P. Neumann, Jon R. 
Phillips, John S. Lovrovich, David B. Pecchia, 
Christopher R. Flores, Jeff R. Deering, Kevin L. 
David, James P. Brown. 



300 Living Groups /1984 

















SCOTT FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS-flow 
One: Rob Shaw, Jan Dorbolo, Tom Lo, Mike Dono¬ 
hue, Chris Hatch, Brian Little, Binh Tran, Jo S. 
Eriksen. Row Two: Thomas R. Myers, Rick Rob¬ 
bers, The Lone Ranger, Bruce W. Blayden, Douglas 

R. Wagner, Robert Stavig, Paul Q. Cachero, Kirk 
Bunyan Tesdahl, Dung Tan Huynh, Kevin R. Ord, 
Jeffrey L. Harris. Row Three: Mr. “T”,Tonto, Scott 
‘i Thought I Graduated” Tanner, Dave ”Mr. M” 
Antal, Jodery Goble, Ward Cleaver, Kenneth D. 
Carlton, Tony H. Luk. Row Four: Raoul S. Titus, 
Dean J. Rumpza, Steve D. Sherling, Wes 
Stonecypher, Iver A. Matheson, Stan D. Getz. 





third cv/uL 



SCOTT THIRD AND FOURTH FLOORS -Row 
One: Steven R. Prichard. Row Two: Michael K. 
Hagan, K. Scott Sampson, Kevin J. Cole, Dan E. 
Herron, Dwayne K.R.P. Pappas, John “The Duke” 
Hayes, Kit Skip Duncan, Matthew G. Dalton, Scott 
D. MacQuarrie. Row Three: Andy J. Schmidt, 
Hiroshi Tanami, MikeGreif, Chris A. Ross, Steve R. 
Jones, Chung Wa Ho, Abraham Gonzalez, David B. 
Mann, Hans, J. Hambersain, KirkT. Roetcisoender, 
Joe R. Marsh, Gary D. Baker, Neal J. Fowler, Steve 

S. Meharg. Row Four: Kevin M. Jennings, Rodney 
O. Gross, Mike J. Paoletti, Jeff E. Simmons, Don 
Fugate, Ole Knudson, Donald K. Adamsono, Walter 
LaCount, Zaphod Beeblebrox, Randy W. Bell, Marc 

T. Norikane, Eric W. Rudd, Gregg N. Stavig, Tim E. 
Silvis, Mike R. Carlile, Robert M. Froemke. 





m 


1984 / Living Groups 301 






























STEPHENSON EAST SECOND FLOOR/tou 
One: Jill Christensen, Kindra Cutler. Row Two: 
Gwen Dehning, Sally Yorkston, Michelle Sugges, 
Robin Adair, Jacki Stanke, Diane Thayer. Row 
Three: Judith Dillard. Shelly Willis, Debbie Win- 
berg, Kimberly Schenck, Denise Johnson, Patti Jo 
Nowoj. 





STEPHENSON EAST THIRD YLOOR-Row One: 
Kris “Headbanger” Rosien, Stacey J. Bohlke, Janna 
D. Halverson, Kristy “Miller Beer” Miller, Janet 
“J-Nut“ Newby. Row Two: Jackie “Princess” Scol- 
lan, Robin M. Bender, Stephanie F. Sasaki, Michelle 
D. Kyriazis, Kristi J. Burgess. Row Three: Kathleen 
“Footloose” Downing, Mitzi “Fancy Free” De- 
Moss, Carlita “Woki” Dumo, Georyl L. Greenwalt, 
Kendall Siefferman. Emily “Em” Walden. Row 
Four: Judith M. Dillard, Julie A. Barlow, Dawn M. 
Konetchy, Joy Atherton, Celia “W.O.P.” Yazzo- 
lino. 



302 Living Groups /1984 














STEPHENSON EAST FOURTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Melody “O.D.” Meyer, Kirsten A. Stuntz, 
Jennifer L. Case, Angie M. Atherton. Row Two: 
Char M. Johnson, Karen S. Weidmann, Kristin M. 
Fleisch. Row Three: Jenni S. Padgett, Toni Bauer, 
Denise Michelle Eaton, Julie D. Phamess, Loryn P. 
Hatch, Kristy M. Kappenman. Row Four: Susan Ann 
Patterson. Denise L. Podnar, Jacqueline L. Jarrell, 
Lisa A. Myers, Dawn M. Turner, Renee Kelly. 



STEPHENSON EAST FIFTH FLOOR -Row One: 
“The great” R. Lynch, Deb “C.J.” Craig. Row 
Two: Sharon Gartrell, Julie Tibbs, Cheryl Shepard, 
Colleen Ellis, Ardeana Ellis. Row Three: Stephanie 
Schweikert, Sherri Peters, Denise Eaton, Janna 
Mueller, Shauna Evans. Row Four: Anta M. Ealy, 
Lilinda M. Marks, Nancy R. Gleesing, Linda J. 
Hanson, Melissa A. Hitt, Lisa A. Slenes, Kelly M. 
Brooks. 


1984 / Living Groups 303 






















STEPHENSON EAST SIXTH FLOOR -Row One: 
Shelon D. Freeney, Gwendolyn B. Edwards. Row 
Two: Mindy Markin, Runell A. Young, Vicky 
Mathews, Kristen C. Floan, Catherine M. Braddock, 
JiJlAnn M. Jensen, Shannen E. Rounds. Row Three: 
Renee D. Bullock, Sheryl A. Thomas, Megyn L. 
Williams, Beth R. Nordahl. Cheryl L. Grendahl, 
Cindy A. Leach, Kris E. McClary. Row Four: Heidi 
Adami, Lisa Burks, Shnannon Francis, Shnancy 
Egan, Shmisa Stcdman, Shnelly Link. Karen 
Glueck, Teri Warren. 



■ ■ 'Zfephmsm a Z 


STEPHENSON EAST SEVENTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Lisa M. Aguirre, Julie A. Carlson, Vicki R. 
Garraway, Mickey M. Mouse. Row Two: Tracy A. 
Johnson, Jerri L. Linder, Debbie J. Williamson, 
Nina S. Aguilar, Dana A. Wasden, Marla K. Myers. 
Row Three: Jennifer Christiansen. Kasey Olwell, 
Kassic Peters, Karen Funkhouser, Anastasia Mor¬ 
gan, Julie Burks. Row Four: Dianne Cox, Jody 
Clark, Sherry Owens, Kelly LaRocque. Jillann M. 
Jensen, Molly Lindemeyer, Jessica Vania. 



304 Living Groups /1984 
















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STEPHENSON EAST EIGHTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Robin Peltier, Debbie Hallen. Row Two: Lisa 
A. Valentine, Laura L. Valentine. Dru “Scopey” 
Coursey. Mandy (A.J.) Beall, B.J. K. James. Tracy 
“Spicoli” Chrush. Angelika “Gigi” Welman. Row 
Three: Cindy M. Schorno, Lana J. Yenne, Kimberly 
A. Ferbrache, Julie A. Bergstrom. Suzi S., Kerri L. 
Piche\ Margie E. Dressel, Rhonda J. Turner. 




STEPHENSON EAST NINTH FLOOR -Row One: 
Dean R. Duitsman. Row Two: Suzi L. Gubb, Kathi 
R. Kincaid, Rene’S. Bennett, Colleen R. Molsberry. 
Allison R. Fort. Row Three: Michelle L. Murray, 
Kim A. Wood. Suzy J. Green, Lisa A. Slater, 
Michele M. Wascher, Sarah L. Riley, Lori L. Otto, 
Kathy K. Yano, Judy R. Ochsner, Cindy E. Dede- 
rick. Jill H. Hoepfinger. Patty M. Culleeny. Row 
Four: Carol D. Torgerson, B.J. K. James, Mindy J. 
Dederick, Dana D. Carter. Jennifer L. Antion, Pam 
A. Freemon. 


1984 / Living Groups 305 





















STEPHENSON EAST TENTH FLOOR-/?™ 
One: Michelle Y. Gauban, Tammara L. Dalke, Pete 
Aanna. Row Two: Kiltie D. Ralph, Kim J. Cool, 
Raven J. Young, Toni L. Storm, Drug “L.S.D." 
Adict, Rock N. Roll, Lee E. Hendricks, Diana L. 
Johnson. Row Three: Bron K. Gorman, Chris M. 
Biever. Natalie A. Stephenson, Sheri C. Butaud, 
Shawn A. Raboum. Beverly A. James,. Mary A. 
Chitton, Gini L. Aaron, Julie L. Collins. Row Four: 
Liz “Jabba” Townsend, Laura “Loopner" Ball. 



I m Zast dwwFkj ■ I 


STEPHENSON EAST ELEVENTH FLOOR- 
Row One: Margaret Lee Mahlik, Shelley C. Baird, 
Lindsey M. Hardenburgh, Kristie L. Gross, Kelly R. 
Wolfe, Kimberly A. Engle, Janal T. Taniguchi. Row 
Two: Janie L. Johnson, Melinda L. Ncu, Alison J. 
Jaeger, Laura M. Mathison, Julie N. Becker, Shawn 
A. Raboum, Laurie A. Iverson, Shirley L. Martin, 
Lori L. Nicely. Row Three: Elizabeth F. Buldhaupt, 
Susan E. Sandbach. Anita K. Crockett. Elaine W. 
Yang, Jana Edgren, Jacquie Stewart. Annette Mark- 
vart, Cathy Reim. 



306 Living Groups /1984 






























STEPHENSON EAST TWELVTH FLOOR Row 


One: Krista K. Haverly, Row Two: Sue Henry, Karin 
K. Pfaeltzer, Tracey L. Ellis, Patty S. Johnson, 
Karen A. Betz, Kellee S. Mill, Kristi M. Kosmata, 
Lori Lee Bishop. Row Three: Lisa Knoepfel. Juli 
Cartozian, Tracy Sexton, Stacia Sayan, Shari 
Edgren, Dana Horton, Polly Detwilcr, Carmen 
Stark, Jackie Balzer, Tracy West, Jill Knobel. Kris¬ 
ten Aspaas, Deslie Coppinger Nancy Wasley. Kathy 
Crews. 


I m ■ I 



STEPHENSON EAST THIRTEENTH FLOOR 

Row On((: Lori A. Hunter, Virginia A. Stewart. Sue 
(and Seafirst) M. Smith, Kris A. Anderson, Jencvc 
M. Stolte. Row Two: Shulagh Hunt. Janet Shonka, 
Mitsi McAllister, Lynn Romsos. Row Three: Wendy 
R. Swanson, Shari M. Heberling, Carrie L. Mar- 
quardt, Grace R. Galam, Brenda K. McChesney, 
Rondi M. Lusk, Velma L. Palma,Susan K. Couglan, 
Jennifer A. Coward, Denise L. Erickson. Row Four: 
Christine M. Bums. Sheri L. Wallace, Maria E. 
Koenig. Anne M. Manning, AnnemarieT. Clemen. 
Margy M. Erskine, Jackie L. Balzer. 


1984 / Living Groups 307 












308 Living Groups /1984 


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STEPHENSON EAST RA’S AND EXECS-Row 
One: Karen Betz, (Programming;) Georyl Green- 
wait, (Head Sponsor;) Maria E. Koenig, (Sponsor;) 
Shari M. Heberling, (Sponsor;) Dana A. Carter, 
(Secretary;) Anne M. Manning, Center Council. Row 
Two: Anta M. Ealy, Jill H. Hoepfinger. Diana L. 
Johnson, Liz T end, (President;) Sheila Gaynor, 
(Social rep.;) Jy Meyer, (Vice President.) Row 
Three: Judith M. Dillard, (R.A.;) Jacqueline L. Bal- 
zer, (R.A.;) Shawn A. Raboum, (R.A.;) Denise 
Michelle Eaton, (R.A.;) Mindy J. Dederick (R.A.;) 
Lynn Starr, (R.H.D.) 




STEPHENSON EAST SPONSORS/tow One . S. 
Tracy West, Georyl L. Greenwalt. Karen A. Betz, 
Jenny L. Case, Dazzeling Dru Coursey. Row Two: 
Anta M. Ealy, Lindsey M. Hardenburgh, Dana A. 
Wasden. Marla K. Myers, Michelle L. Murray, Bron 
K. Gorman, Jackie L. Balzer. Row Three: Diana L. 
Johnson, Linda J. Hanson, KrisH.B. Rosien, Carlita 
W. Dumo, Jackie Anne Scollan. Jill H. Hoepfinger, 
Robin J. Adair, Krista L. Matthiesen. 

















* - 


kk 


SHEPARD. CHERYL 
STANKE. JACLYN 
STARK. CARMEN 
THAYER. DIANE 
TIBBS. JULIE 
TRUE. JOYCE 
VANIA, JESSICA A. 


WAKEFIELO. ANN 
WASCHECK. MICHELLE 
WILLIS. SHELLY 
YANG. ELAINE 
YOUNG. RAVEN 
YOUNG. RUNELL 


DEDERICK, CINDY 
DEDERICK. MINDY 
DEMOSS. MITZI 
DIJULIO. LORI 
DOWNING. KATHLEEN 
EDGREN, JANA 
EDGREN. SHARI 
EGAN. NANCY 


ERICKSON. JOYCE 
FLOAN. KRISTEN 
GEHLE. ELIZABETH 
GREENWALT, GEORYL 
HADDOCK. BOBBIE 
HANSON. LINOA J 
HENRY. SUE 
HOEPFINGER. JILL 


INTERMILL. TERESA 
IVERSON. LAURIE 
JANETT. ANNE 
JOHNSON. CHARLENE 
KINCAID, KATHI 
LINOER. JERRI 
LINK. KELLY 
LUSK. RONDI 


MANNING. ANNE 
MARKIN, ME LINOA 
MATHEWS, VICTORIA 
MCCHESNEY, BRENDA 
METCALF, LYNELLE 
MILLER. KRISTY 
MOLSBERRY. COLLEEN 
NEWBY, JANET 


OTTO. LORI 
PFAELTZER. KARIN 
POWERS. KRISTA 
RABOURN. SHAWN 
RAMAGE. BONNIE 
RILEY. SARAH 
ROUNDS. SHANNON 
SCHLUTER, TAMARA 


1984 / Living Groups 309 


























































WSU FIRE DEPT.-Row One: Jerry T. Gwin, Bruce 
A. Folsom, Richard M. Cowas, Bryan T. Roof, 
Layne R. Hilpert, Pumper the Dog, Dean R. Harm, 


Scott D. Hamrick, TimG. Sears, Delmis P. Spivey. 
Robert L. Pysher. Row Two: Rick T. O’Connor, 


Mike J. Heston, Mark W. Easterwood, Scott C. 
Rosenkranz, David D. Leggett, Jeff T. Rogers. 



310 Living Groups /1984 




























“What do you want to be when you 
grow up?” 

This is a question posed by many 
adults to young children. Kids are fas¬ 
cinated with the prospect of being 
doctors, rock stars, pilots, cowboys, 
policemen and, of course, firemen. 
One of the great aspects of college life 
is that it gives you a chance to grow up 
and experiment with different career 
pursuits. 

In any case, the Washingtonn State 
University Fire Department is full of 
little boys who grew up and had their 
dream realized. These men are Fire¬ 
fighters, as well as full-time students. 

These unsung heroes — well, 
maybe that’s going a little overboard 
— all attend WSU. Their majors 
range from History, Criminal Justice 
and Civil Engineering to graduate 
work. The sixteen men in residence at 
the station do, however, miss the cre¬ 
dit they deserve. 

When the roster needs to be filled, 
applicants are compiled. Potentials 
must first of all be enrolled full time, 
ideally be freshmen or sophomores in 
order to commit to four semesters of 
work, go through an interview pro¬ 
cess and pass the physical agility test. 
The last is not that easy of a task. 
Women have applied, and there are 
women who can pass the test, but in 


the last few years none have worked at 
the station. 

The station is part of the Safety Di¬ 
vision of WSU. The staff includes Fire 
Chief Dan Semler and six full-tme fire 
officers. They handle training and 
administrative work, as well as help 
respond to calls. The student firefigh¬ 
ters are trained during the summer 
and, within a year, gain their 
Emergency Medical Technical certi¬ 
fication. 

Firefighter Delmis Spivey said, “I 
enjoy working with the guys and the 
living situation creates a lot of unity. 
We’ve got a combination of fraternity 
and dorm life.” The station houses a 
central living area, a kitchen and a 
room for every two men. A cook 
serves the firefighters during the 
week and, like most fraternities, they 
fend for themselves on the weekends 
with assigned cook duty. Everyone 
participates in cleaning and station 
maintenance. 

The job is part time, with each man 
on duty on a rotating five-day cycle. 
They are trained in equipment hand¬ 


ling, standard operating procedures, 
fire control, high-rise fires, chemicals 
and hazardous materials — as well as 
some work with aerial ladders or 
ambulance driving. 

Spivey, who worked for the Bothell 
Fire Department, said, “I’ve gained 
many experiences I couldn’t gain else¬ 
where. You realize there are different 
ways of doing things and they vary 
from department to department.” 

The guys do many activities 
together outside the station. Usually 
they get a football and softball team 
going each year. They also have a for¬ 
mal Christmas dinner, a spring picnic 
or go to campus events such as con¬ 
certs. 

Although not all the men at the fire 
station have aspirations of becoming 
firefighters when they leave WSU, 
many really enjoy the experience. 
Spivey noted that, “Firemen are kind 
of crazy, everyone’s wanting to run 
out of a burning building and you’re 
running in.” 

by Wendy Ehringer 



1984 / Living Groups 311 





























STEPHENSON NORTH SECOND FLOOR -Row 
One: Dawn M. Bialek. Sue A. Hart. Row Two: 
Cherry L. Caba'nilla. Jennifer L. Moon. Sandy Shin, 
Michelle K. Maw, Bernadette E. Garman, Sandy L. 
Kimery, Cindy Wagner. Row Three : Tami S. Hick- 
am, Michelle A. McBee, Debbie A. Blunck. Ellen 

A. Hewitt. Carolyn J. Rice, Karen A. Boyles, Marit 

B. Ringness, Laurel L. Bennett. 



■ ■ ? /Vfet Hu 



STEPHENSON NORTH THIRD FLOOR S 

One: Susan Pulley, Eileen Sorensen. Carol Carrillo, 
Pattie Speir, Maria "Ria” Gonzakz, Tracy (and 
Gail) Dejka. Row Two: Linda C. Afflerbach, 
Maryanna Simonzi, Jann Lowe, Connie F. Miller, 
Cheri Harrison, Debbie Blunck. Row Three: Valerie 
D. Boe. Doreen M. Thomassen, Sheila R. Hereth. 



312 Living Groups /1984 


















STEPHENSON NORTH FOURTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Carole A. Lingard, Katie M. Buhler. Row Two: 
Deanna L. Nelson, Christie M. Jackson, Kay B. 
Higginson, Shelli L. Meares, Victoria A. Suryan, 
Susan Hunt, La Nae L. Slater, Karen A. LeMoine 
Marcia M. Welch. Row Three: Laura Bates, Julie 
Weller, Stacey Youmans, Jennifer Stack, Tari Les¬ 
ser, Mary Raverman, Kristi Cox. 




STEPHENSON NORTH FIFTH FLOOR /?mv 



One: Angela Carpinito, Shelly K. Casteel. Row Two: 
Leslie K. Gladish, Michelle 6. Koch, Tina M. New- 
house, Catherine M. Pagel, Susan K. Calhoun, De¬ 
nise M. Anderson. Row Three: Jeania Rae Williams, 
Pauline D. Bickford, Cathy A. Floyd, Laura L. 
Haines, Hollie L. Blehm, Mary L. Pecchia, Sharon 
H. Uhlrich, Kristi A. Hopf. Row Four: Caroline A. 
Homberg, Glenna M. Rice, Lisa M. Karasek, Laura 
A. Bates, Suz F. Sturholm, Kellie L. Gaddis, Nance 
J. Brown, Andrea L. Beck. 


1984 / Living Groups 313 










hlvudL. 



STEPHENSON NORTH SIXTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Brenda “'Bird" L. Durr, Montha Chea, Jeanne 
M. Miller. Michelle "The Unknown Towel" Bruno. 
Laura Tiberio. Row Two: Stephanie M. Breaker. 
Zelda D. Cascbolt. Kris D. Olsen, Leanne C. Cran- 
fill. Florence S. Tamura. Joni "Joz" J. Rutter, Laura 
J. Arcia, Patty E. Finley. Michelle R. Frazier. Jennif¬ 
er A. Horton. Row Three: Sherry Hughes. Cynthia 
Hayes. Jcri Lane Slaacn. Janet Dow'ty, Suz 
Sturholm, Dana Casey. Karin Himmer. Michele 
Nilsen. 






STEPHENSON NORTH SEVENTH FLOOR 

Row One: Judy L. Taylor. Janie E. Easter. Florence 
S. Tamura. Sondra K. Stahl. Julie A. Cook. Jackie 
A. Devish. Deborah A. Doan. Suz E. Fordyce. Row 
Two: Diana L. Scherberg. Lisa M. Rivers. Susan 
Rytand, Rissy L. Denmarls. Lynn M. Pavletich. 
Michele M. Wright. Theresa M. Schultheis, Candi 
G. Moore. Row Three: Mavis J. Lamb, Traci J. 
Nagel, Vanessa A. Crockford, Susan L. Wyrick. 
Mary A. Jung, Robin A. Woods, Patty K. Nelson. 








314 Living Groups /1984 



















you just 



STEPHENSON NORTH EIGHTH FLOOR Rom 

One: Janet L. Lursen, Michelle A. Hecker, Mary C. 
McCartney. Row Two: Amy S. Lehmann, Beth A. 
Gehle, Sherri E. Bierlein, Tami A. Weinreich. Karen 
M. VanBruwaene, Teresa D. Tomlinson. Cici M. 
Laurent, Patricia M. Tiberio, Becky “D.Q.” 
McKinney. Row Three: Suzanne M. Creelnian, 
Susan I. Romfo, Tracy A. Stamey, Amy L. Robert¬ 
son, Charie M. Halpin, Trish M. Olson. Sharon 
“Kreemer” Dooley, ErinC. Sullivan, Vikki “Enter¬ 
tainer” Teerink, Ellen L. Rux. Row Four: Karma 
Linde, Dorinda Bartleson. 






■ ■■■■ 

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■ 

■ 


■ ■■■ 


STEPHENSON NORTH NINTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Barbie Thrall, Cathy Radach. Susan Teresa 
Harper, Carey Lynn Dillon, Teresa PosaKony, Shar¬ 
on Lee, Michele Woods. Row Two: Dinese A. 
Brewster. Janet L. Yunker, Stephanie J. Allen, Suzy 
J. Maekawa, Cathy L. Bozanic, Jan M. Segna. 
Dorinda Bartleson. Row Three: Shaysann Kaun, 
Sheila R. McCann, Danielle E. Strand, Stacy Olson, 
Kara McBroom. 


1984 / Living Groups 315 








g Kphjmvwi MwJk. 4iWflU 


STEPHENSON NORTH TENTH FLOOR-fimv 

One: Debbie K. Grade. Denise A. Saffell. Candy 
Wells. Joan Throm. Row Two: Carolyn A. Oliveri. 
Anne D. Pavlos. Michele M. Anderson. Liane B. 
Olsen, Shannon L. Weil. Deanne L. Kemp. Roxann 
R. Rose. Diane M. Macchiarella. Row Three: Suzan- 
na Williams, Karen L. Smith. Pam Haven. Charlene 
R. Kerr. Shelley Prissinotti. Kelley McCarthy. Enet- 
ta L. Rogers. Row Four: Leanne E. Olsen. Charles 
G. Bronson. 






STEPHENSON NORTH ELEVENTH FLOOR- 

RowOne: Jill ‘Oh!” Riley. Debbie “Dog” Galanti. 
Colene “Breath” McBeth, Lisa “Moaner” Herron. 
Mary-Jo “Ho-Ho” Bradley. Ruth Arabas. Karri 
Motomatsu. Row Two: Linda “Granny” J. Fly. Jen¬ 
ny L. Zoellick, Mary “Merry” Krofchek, Wendy 
“Shmen” Williams, Tracy “Candy” McMann. Jen¬ 
nifer “Chloe Joe” Ennis, Karri A. Johnson. Row 
77?r?c\ TrinaM. Morgenthaler, MachelleM. Burpee. 
Barbara L. Wood. Linda “Cookie” Smith. Teresa 
A. Cobb, Christine E. Frolich, Andrea L. Knecht. 
Charlene R. Kerr. Row Four: Joanne L. Van- 
Deursen, Caryn L. Gant. Cherie L. Foerste, Laura A. 
Ellis, Gail J. Harvester, Debbie E. Bartlett, Lauri A. 
Sanford. Donna L. Lufkin. 




316 Living Groups /1984 

























STEPHENSON NORTH TWELFTH FLOOR 

Row One: Stephanie A. Allen, Mary Ellen Walsh. 
Robin Laughlin. Laura L. Dahl. Cindy R. Dye. Patty 
J. Shepard. Julie A. Myer. Row Two: Lynda H. 
Nikula. Laura L. Johnson. Grace D. Dasingcr. Kathy 
J. Baur, Julie D. Lingard, Kathie T. Tallman. Noel- 
lynn A. Pepos. Judith A. Warner, Cindy L. Haba. 
Erica L. Hirschmann. 





STEPHENSON NORTH THIRTEENTH 
FLOOR-Row One: M’lisa L. Ross, Camille Morten- 
sen, DeIMjyia Y. Settles, Shea Thompson, Deanne 
L. Gibson. Row Two: Heidi A. Whitaker, Kimberly 
J. Christensen, Gretchen J. Henderson, Gaylinn M. 
Berg, Shannon E. Zimmer, Jennifer L. Sweet. Row 
Three: Kathy T. Ishimitsu, Jeri V. Davis, Gina 
Nomellini, Jennifer Blume, Jeanne Bergh, Cathy 
Gocus, Linda Bum, Robin Schaeperkoetter. 


1984 / Living Groups 317 






















318 Living Groups /1984 




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HU II 


urn 


< 2fcph#nttr) 

STEPHENSON NORTH GOVERNMENT AND 
STAFF-/?™ One: Suz F. Sturholm (President), Tra¬ 
cy A. Simpson (Head Sponsor), Denise Moritz (In¬ 
tramural Representative), Karin Himmer (Social 
Programmer). Row Two: Lisa Rivers (Center Council 
Representative), Pamela Haven (Scholarship Chair¬ 
man), Karri Motomatsu (Standards Board Chair¬ 
man), Karri Johnson (Vice President), Sharon 
Hughes (Educational Programmer), Erica Hirs- 
chmann (Co-social Programmer), Cathy Floyd 
(Secretary), Catherine Pagel (Center Council Repre¬ 
sentative). Row Three: Dorinda L. Bartleson, Bar¬ 
bara L. Wood, Laura A. Bates, Char Calrissian, 

Florence S. Tamura, Stephanie L. Witt, Debbie 
Blunck, Donna L. Lufkin. 


H&Uh' (fov't 




STEPHENSON NORTH SPONSORS-Row One: 
Amy S. Lehmann, Joni J. Rutter, Cynthia A. Park, 
Michelle D. Koch, Shannon L. Weil. Row Two: 
Sondra K. Stahl, Stephanie A. Allen, Judith A. War¬ 
ner, Shelli L. Meares, Victoria Suryan, Michelle 
Bruno, Diana Setterberg. Row Three: Mary Krof- 
chek, Amy L. Robertson, Andrea L. Knecht, Carol 
Carrillo, Leslie K. Gladish, JenniferL. Moon, Karen 
A. Boyles, Pattie K. Speir, Teresa PosaKony. 




















%/UjChJU ■ 





STEPHENSON SOUTH SECOND FLOOR-/tow 
One: Kurt E. Pfeifer, Chris T. Kertson, Dave 
“Shakespeare” Casebier, Scott “Holmes” Lee, 
Mark Boersma. Row Two: Dave Graves, Richard 
Farmer, Jimbo Hock, Chris “Paws” Eckard. Mark 
Aaron Rogers, Wayne R. Rice, Jeff A. Freund. Row 
Three: David K. Abbott, Bill J. Kimball, Jeff D. 
Jensen, David W. Perkins, Scott M. Wierenga, 
Robert E. Straka, Gary L. Laubach, 






STEPHENSON SOUTH THIRD FLOOR-fimv 

One: Greg 1. Linden, ‘ ‘ Pigman ’ ’, Marly H. B. Crow, 
“Evil” Eaton, Bill Harder, Scott R. Spaulding, 
Joseph B. Kinstschi. Row Two: Mike E. Dinning, 
Steven “Intense” B. Bauer, Wade A. Taylor, Mike 
J. Simms, Mark Aaron Rogers, Timothy C. Gott¬ 
fried, Don Atkins. Row Three: Jamey F. Hyatt, Jack 
E. Brandt, Arthur F. Avey, Shane G. Fox, Jim N. 
Aikin, Tom “The Wadd” C. Chambers, Kurt J. 
Harder. 



1984 / Living Groups 319 









(fvurHo 


STEPHENSON SOUTH FOURTH FLOOR /tow 
One: Brian Cook. Sam. Jeff Kahler. Row Two: Barry 
Brown. Brian Petro, Mark Scuderi, Steve Diloreto. 
Aaron Rogers. Matt Snope. John Jaquish. Dick Voll- 
mer, Tony Carlson. Row Three: Chuck Bigham, Jose 
Flores, Scott Geiger, Scott A. Wike. Row Four: John 
P. Rubero, Scott D. McElhoe, Ken D. Webert. 
Father G. Beaver. Mark E. Pervinich, Jeff J. Marty, 
Daniel S. Bouck, Steven D. Otto. Randy Hoff. 







STEPHENSON SOUTH FIFTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Tris K. Thayer, Mark “Shu” W. Shumaker. 
Row Two: John D. Hunter, David T. Kimrey, Eric A. 
Nyberg, Keith Johnston, Mike Hendrick, John 
Songster, Lynn T. Fred, Scott D. Marvel. Row 
Three: Jon M. Mathison, Scott P. Stansberry, Randy 
L. Schafer, Rod E. Nemitz, Karri F.J. Anderson. 
Row Four: Mitch G.Q. Fremling, Rand G.Q. Ing¬ 
ham. John D. Blackard. David F. Webber, Peter D. 
Krystad, Juan E. Oehninger, Donald D. Herington, 
Brad S. Todd, Kevin B. Nelson. 



I 


l 


I 


I 



320 Living Groups /1984 

























^ftfker\w\ 



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STEPHENSON SOUTH SIXTH FLOOR flmv 
One: Kevin Paul Hanson, Gary Striker. Randy “Fin¬ 
gers” Stubbs, Chris Barrett, Tris T.K. Thayer, Per 
Bmos Sunde. Row Two: Allan G. Dull, John D. 
Abendroth, Daniel C. Dixon, David M. Gaede, Wal¬ 
ter L. Ford, Eddy Y. Chen, Daniel R. Rothaus, 
Darryl S. Jacobsen, Terry C. Bevier, Reed R. 
Schmitt, Wilson W.K. Goh, The Shadow. Row 
Three: Nathan E. Carpenter. Tom O. Saelid. Doyle 
E. Schmidt, D.C. Brown, Harold A. McEachen, Jim 
M. Burgess, Eric V. Stolte, Miles G. Jackson. Row 
Four: fed D. Stumpf, Steve J. Rodbury, Pete D. 
Hanna, Gary W. Opfer. 





STEPHENSON SOUTH SEVENTH FLOOR 

Row One: Mike T. Krouse. Kyle H. Taylor. Scott A. 
Colby, John Grotte. Jon P. Creagan , Scott J. Wan¬ 
ner, Doug T. Weber, Dale E. Good water. Row Two: 
Eric Lobsinger, Kenneth W. Lee, Frederick B.A. 
Squicciarini. Clay D. Martin, T. Haynes H. Amett, 
David M. Roberts. Kurt L. Klingman, Randy J. 
Pearson. Row Three: Kent Klingman. Steve Thomp¬ 
son, Mark Henriksen, Peter Lovejoy. Mike 
Andrews, Dan Simon, Loren Foster, Robert Reed. 


1984 / Living Groups 321 









STEPHENSON SOUTH EIGHTH FLOOR-/?™ 
One: "Mountaineering Man" Krouse. Dirty Rouen 
Killer. Munch Kin No. I. Munch Kin No. 2. Eat It 
and Die. Elmer Fudd. Rick Singer. Pete "Jock" 
Loposer. Row Two: Chris H. Youngblood. Gregor)' 
Pillard Sanders. Jim "Jake" Jaquish. Jeff Potesky. 
Row Three: "Bender". Tommy Gun Cookman. 
James Cusworth. "Killer" Karl Stiemert, Surfer 
Ray. Dan Gard. Lonny A. Eachus. Matt Bob Lyons. 





STEPHENSON SOUTH NINTH FLOOR -Row 
One: Mark J. Eldredge. Greg W. Lascheid. Donald 
J. Dclzer. Bon Scott. Row Two: Brian D. Hoskcn. 
John C. Nagel. Warren R. Kring. Daniel J. Vekved. 
Edward "Ned" C. Clawson. Fredwood R. Kncbel. 
Christopher P. Milligan. James D. Solberg. James 
Douglas Morrison. Row Three: Todd Jones. Richard 
Erickson. Hans Warkentin. Steve Soran. Phillip 
"Woody" Jose. Keith Brown. Kevin Larsen, John 
Agnew. 



322 Living Groups /1984 
















STEPHENSON SOUTH TENTH FLOOR-tfmv 

One: Ryan Wacker. Terry Wilson. Row Two: Selsor. 
Greenlund. Kossmo, Smith. Ruzicka. Hayden. 
Pierce. Row Three: Ross. Tidball. Olson. Allen. 
Ray, Beggs. Washington. Summers. Row Four: 
Mar. Gunstone. Lopez. Row Five: Hayes. Schul- 
theis, Schille, Novy, Blanstan. Stark. Drehcr. 




STEPHENSON SOUTH ELEVENTH FLOOR 

Row One: Elmer Fudd. I Zod. Turk. Row Two: 
Kareem N. Dossa. Eric D. Connely. Jerry D. Hig¬ 
gins. Stanley W. Augustyniewicz, Mare M. Egeilon, 
Guy M. Zero. Doug Kidd. Row Three: B.J. Naucier. 
Eric Dahl. Rydes. Robert Chaput. The Stud. Lee 
Chapel. Dave Vannice. Row Four: See-chek Ton. 
Kwok M. Cheong. Bob D. Tucker. Mike Hunt. Anu 
Goel. M. J. Commodore Steve Scholfstoll. 


1984 / Living Groups 323 























STEPHENSON SOUTH TWELFTH FLOOR 

Row One: Jeff “Fector” Schlect, Steve D. Fordham. 
Row Two: Randy C. Harris, Bob R. Johnston, Andy 
C. Reaves, John “Nomo” Nomellini, Mike E. Bar¬ 
ry, Phil L. Ohl, Mitch ‘Baby Killer'' Roach, Tong 
“Mung” Leon. Row Three: Lewis E. Griggs. Scott 
A. Sinclair, Greg L. Livengood, Rick A. Nixon. 
“Mr. Brick” A. Sunn Bay, Luke A. Mung, Greg S. 
Hunter. Row Four: Mick S. Wiskerchen, John C. 
Tater, Steve G. Minnick, Chris “W.W.” Nathe, 
Dave A. Robinson. Bruce A. Straughn, Mark A. 
Wasemiller. 








STEPHENSON SOUTH GOVERNMENT -Row 
One: Todd W. Stevenson. Kevin W. Allen. Lee Ray 
Fenton, Marc V. Dilommaso, Mark W. Shumaker, 
Gary L. Laubach, Mike T. Krouse, David W. Per¬ 
kins. Row Two: John D. Jaquish, Eric V. Stolte, Per 
5lh Sunde, Kevin A. Pierce, Doug Greenlund, Mark 
A. Rogers, Tris Thayer, David F. Webber. Row 
Three: Jimbo Aikin. John C. Tate, Scott A. Sinclair, 
Mark E. Pervinich, Russ “The Bucks” Pearson. 
Row Four: Richard E. Vollmer, Peter W. Rosenberg, 
Pat “Pretty Boy” Stark, Mitch Fremling, Turk, Jim 
Hackler, Kent Klingman. Lee Redd. 



324 Living Groups /1984 












ALLEN. KEVIN 
CARLSON. SCOTT 
CASEBIER. DAVID 
CHAPEL. LEE 



CHAPUT. ROBERT 
DITTOMMASO. MARC 
DREHER, DOUGLAS 
ESTEFAN.JEFFEREY 
ESTES. ROBERT 


FADLER. RICHARD 
FREUND. JEFFERY 
GOODWATER. DALE 
GOH, WILSON WEE KIEN 
GRONHOVD. DAVID 


HALL, JAMES 
HANSON. KEVIN 
HARDER. HANS 
HAYDEN. PHIL 
HOSKEN, BRIAN 


HUNTER. GREG 
JACKSON, MILES 
JACOBSEN. DARRYL 
KUNGMAN, KURT 
KNAUF. JEFFERY 


KNEEBEL. FREDERICK 
KORSMO, DEAN 
LEVY. MICHAEL 
LOWRY. MICHAEL 
MEAD. PAT 


PEARSON. RUSSELL 
RAAB, STEVEN 
RAINEY. DAVID 
ROACH, MITCH 
ROSMAN. RANDALL 


SCHOFSTOLL. STEVEN 
STIEMERT. KARL 
STUBBS. RANDY 
TAN. CHEK-SEE 
THAYER. KRIS 


TJOELKER. STEVEN 
TODD. JEFF A. 
WACKER. RYAN 
WAMMER. SCOTT 
ZERO, GUY M. 


The Stephenson South dormi¬ 
tory, which recently abandoned its 
sponsor system, is now ready to im¬ 
plement a hall government to re¬ 
place it. 

“The council will give a sense of 
direction to the rest of the hall, but 
they will have no power to mandate 
policy or have the responsibility to 
carry out actions,” said Hall Direc¬ 
tor Peter Rosenberg. 

The abandonment of the spon¬ 
sor system was chiefly due to a 
“break-down in communication,” 
he said. Floor needs and hall gov¬ 
ernment needs were not being 
communicated to each other and 
alienation and isolation between 
them was the result, stated Rosen¬ 
berg. 

The philosophy behind the new 
government raises the issue of self¬ 
responsibility. Rosenberg said, 
“Before, the students stayed in 
their rooms and waited to be im¬ 
pacted” by government decisions. 
“There is no way to ever mandate 
involvement” on the part of the stu¬ 
dents, but the opportunity to be¬ 
come involved is now present, he 
added. 

The new hall government will 
consist of an 11-man council, 
according to the constitutional 
change proposals drafted by resi¬ 
dents within the hall. There will be 
a representative from each floor 
and the hall director (in an advisory 
role). 

“We are taking a large risk,” 
Rosenberg said. “There will be no 
rewards offered for becoming in¬ 
volved,” except those of a personal 
nature. 

If the new structure of the gov¬ 
ernment does not work, “we will 
change the structure rather than 
the philosophy behind it,” he said. 

The new government will be set 
up after spring break on a pro¬ 
visional basis. The existing execu¬ 
tive government will “nurture it 
along” and ease the council into the 
position of governing, said Rosen¬ 
berg. 

by Jay Garner 



1984 / Living Groups 325 


















fiirst rturcL a J 


STEVENS FIRST AND THIRD FLOORS -Row 
One: Myong-Hui Bradshaw, Kremiere Jackson, 
Dana Maki, Sheila Wolf, Candy Allen. Jennifer Wil- 
dung, Debbie Dyer. Row Two: Lorinc L. Shaver, 
Carol A. Gallagher, Lynny L. Ludtka, Ginny K. 
Williams, Jama J. Duckworth, Patricia A. 
McKnight. Helen Oster, Sara K. Harkonen, Connie 
M. Craig, Denise I. Hood. Row Three: Linda Ann 
Beardsley, Diana E. Ferguson, Sharolyn S. Schlepp, 
Lori L. Way. Kristen E. Brenner, Pamela K. Soren¬ 
sen, Kate R. Gomaer, Linda L. Neill, Kelli S. Camp¬ 
bell. Joanne G. Robinson. Row Four: Lynn M. 
Downing, Rosanne Kenedy, Bettie I. Towner, Kath¬ 
leen D. Obenrland, Kristi J. Knapp, Heidi J. Mitch¬ 
ell, Katie Stout, Krista J. Dabakis. Karen S. Ficken- 
wirth. Natalie A. Hanford, Bcv L. Meadows, Cory 
R. Dent, Elonna M. Lester. Lorraine E. Reedy. 












STEVENS GROUND AND SECOND FLOORS 

Row One: Cheryl Rae “D.J.” McKay, Fran M. 
Reichert. Row Two: Elaine C. Carpenter, Nilufcr 
Banaji, Charlee M. McRill, Chenclle R. Howard. 
Connie M. Meyers, Shelitha M. Murton, Mary Jane 
Levi, Darlene Gleason. Sherry L. Stumpf. Row 
Three: Jayna Story, Dclona Lang, Margaret Erdly, 
Jackie Duram, Jcri Barker, Michelle Malinosky, 
Susan Packer. Nadine Lucke, Karen Lewis. Jody 
Notch. Row Four: Susan L. Shirley, Carol A. Nctro. 
Kellie A. Boggs, Linda Roos Underwood. Christine 
C. Eggc, Tracy “Jeff” Jeffries, Darcie A. Evans. 
Barbara Cole, Zoe L. Robinson, Gena D. Vahey, 
Kaylcen R. Mitchell, Sue Eastman, Anne M. Free¬ 
man, Anne Kathleen Hesse. 



326 Living Groups /1984 




























ALLEN CANOY 
BANAJI NILUFER 
BRENNER KRISTEN 
CARPENTER ELAINE 



DOWNING LYNN 
DYER DEBORAH 
EASTMAN SUSAN 
EVANS DARCIE 
GUMAER KATHLEEN 





SCHINK. SUSAN 
SCHLEPP SHAROLYN 
SHIRLEY. SUSAN 
SMITH. SHANNON 
STORY JAYNA 


TOUJNER BETTIE 
UNDERWOOD LINDA 
VAHEY GENA 
WILLIAMS VIRGINIA 
WOLF SHEILA 


HARKONEN SARA 
HESSE ANNE 
HOWARD CHENELLE 
KENEDY ROSANNE 
LANG OELONA 
MCKNIGHT. PATRICIA 


MEYERS. CONNIE 
MITCHELL. KAYLEEN 
NETRO CAROL 
PACKER SUSAN 
ROBINSON SHERI 
ROBINSON ZOE 



Homecoming, as usual, 
brings all kinds of com¬ 
petition, fun, and festi¬ 
vities. This year Stevens 
and Waller joined 
together in the adven¬ 
turous games. Pictured 
are residents support¬ 
ing their living group. 


1984 / Living Groups 327 































STIMSON-/tow One: Wes “Wild Weasel” Clare. 
Row Two: Tony Lee, Rich Kaalaas, Brent L. Kabat, 
Gregg “Pleeg” Borselli, Tim “The Dynamo” Mea¬ 
ly, Gordon Wood, Chris “Hector Wilson” Babcock, 
Jim “Smak The Dog” Fillis, Dan the Man, Scott 
“Scooter” Rice. Row Three: Greg Silva, Kevin B. 


Hall, Stan “Neanderthal” Symms, Thomas “Tur¬ 
tle” Ghan, Keith “Flyslayer” Tuttle, Kevin Stans¬ 
berry, Julie Kimbrell, Chris Dean, Airman Squat 
Amsden, Eric Lenius. Row Four: Cousin Ralphy 
Schaefer, K.C. Warner, Helicopter Man, Gunther 
Schaefer, Charles Royer, Chris “Jarhead” 


Wehrung, Nancy Koppel, Bruce “B.A.” Alley, 
Brother Schaefer, Old Man Schaefer, Clyde McTav- 
ish, Brian “Bugs Forever” Madison, Jerri “I’m 
With Bugs Forever” Linder, Tom “Pm A Pop-off” 
Jirava, Ian “Biggy” Mickelson, Terry Day. 



328 Living Groups /1984 































STREIT FIRST FLOOR -Row One: David B 
Mason, Chris L. Henesy, Kenny J. Stanford, Jeff 
“Juan” P. Carr, Andrew J. Peterson, Ray “Sugar 
Lips” W. Madden, Barry M. Byington, Edward T. 
Casper. Row Two: Doug Engel, Greg Naito, Brian 
Vasey, David P. Gehringer, Robert M. Tate, Frank 
L. Younce, Darin J. Rasussen, Bill J. Thomas, Ben 
L. Camey, David S.F. Ng. Row Three: Ki B. Ha, 
Todd F. Garlick, John Weed. Row Four: Mike Max- 
son, Kevin B. Selby, Dave J. Lasater, Mr. Camas, 
Jesus Zues, Big Desk, Brad A. Bronsch, Dave W. 
Torgerson, “The Blade” Greenlee, Paul Recanzone, 
Rank Junk, Jim Maher, Scott Collier, Ziad A. Arafat. 


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STREIT SECOND FLOOR -Row One: J. Bryan 
Lett, Dean Turuija, Jon M. Amdal, S. Maydew, 
Michael Musil. Row Two: Michael Klein, Jon 
Kuhnhenn, Pat Ritter, Norm Trolson, Steve Man¬ 
ning, Greg “Spikey” Johnson, Eric “Gomer” Pat¬ 
ten, John Naab, John J. Manuel, Jesse “He-man” 
Cruz, Jeff “Boom Boom” Cossett. Row Three: 
Wendell Ellis, Gary Bolt, Richard Pryor, Mike She¬ 
pard, Jack May, Chuck Ballou, Dana Kimborowicz, 
Brenda “Redemann” Kuvkendall, David Redemann 
“Pineapple I Row Four: Tim Polen, Butch White- 
head, Marck Robinson, Steven “Manong” Jandoc, 
Bobby Smith, Clark T. Goff, Tom J. Brown, Dave 
Mills. 


1984 / Living Groups 329 































































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STREIT THIRD FLOOR-^ow One: Dempsey 
“Killer” Ortega, Bob “Killer” Hanle, Paul “Kil¬ 
ler” Krause. Row Two: Linda “Killer” Shoemaker, 
Todd “Killer” Wood, Janies “Killer” Dean, 
Andrew “Killer” Schmidt, Milkman “Killer” Fro- 
land, Ski Bum “Killer” Cook, Jeff “Killer” Rober¬ 
son, Todd “Killer” MOrtensen, Ronchy “Killer” 
Walcher, Russell Hester, Tod “Kid Gig” Arndt. 
Row Three: Michael “Killer” Lee, Ronald “Killer” 
Nelson, James “Killer” Bumett, Tom “Killer” 
Darling, Mike “Killer” McRoberts, Brad “Killer” 
Smith, Tim Kunka, Jim “Killer” Reid, Gary “Baby- 
face” Niklason, Kurt “Killer” Rehfeld, Skip “Lef¬ 
ty” Austin. Row Four: Craig “Killer” Brougher, 
Michael “Killer” Larson, Rueben “Killer” Mayes, 
Pete “Killer” Proehl, Scott “Killer” Fisher, Dave 
“Killer” Degel, Dennis and Heinrick “Killer” 
Michael, Pat “Killer” Hennessey, Sundance “Kil¬ 
ler” Kid, Kyle “Hart” Smith. 





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STREIT FOURTH FLOOR /tow One: Dewey H 
Blocker, Yul L. Witherspoon, Jacinto G. Navarrete, 
Greg Henion. RobT.W. Busch, Bill Ulmonen, Dale 
W. King. Row Two: Brian Buchmore, Jim Klundt, 
C. Luke Poole, John Grieve, Tim Smith, Robert 
VanHullc, Rich Radcliffe. Row Three: Edward D. 
York, Rob W. Kuffncr, Alan J. Wakcley, Paul J. 
Swenson, Dave W. Petersen, Ken C. Braunstein, 
Mark R. Fisher, Steve H. Sparkman, Gregory D. 
ARthur, Michael A. Zellers, Scott M. Sylvester, 
Greg J. Mueller. 


330 Living Groups /1984 











































































STREIT FIFTH FLOOR-/?™ One: David F 
McDaniel, Bill F. Kelliher, Brady J. Wilson, Nicker 
J. Hastings, Mick D. Burrows, Eric S. Evanson, Paul 
M. McLoid, Tim W. Osborn, David C. Boice. Row 
Two: Barrett Fuller, Matthew S. Baker, Chris Coro¬ 
nado, PatrickT. Knight, Ross A. McAllister, Mike J. 
Loomis, Kevin Shaw, Bob E. Davis, James M. Con¬ 
ger. Row Three: Stanley G. Law, Todd M. Webster, 
Taui, David M. Abicht, Donald LaBomme, David 
Cerjan, Ken J. Hodges, Bob M. Herman, Andy 
Burch, Jerry J. Hynes. Row Four :Michael A. Brock- 
way, Junior Tupuola, Dede D. Moore, Junior Tauta- 
latasi, Steven “Vordon” Smith, Chris J. Kelly, 
Shawn Kreifels, Stephen P. Bricker, Rick Wyatt, 
Tom Duffy. 



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STREIT SIXTH FLOOR-/?™ One: Terry U. 
White. Row Two: Zachary Smalls, Kelvin “KB” 
Bridges, Darrin “Cacoon” Rowan, Jerald Waters, 
Bobby “Wiz” Emerson, Efrem Raymond Fields. 
Row Three: Miguel Avila, Alexander M. Jenkins, 
Todd M. Korpi, Craig G. Schneider, Yung “Butch” 
Ford, John D. Bengelsdorf, Jeff Tisdale. Row Four: 
Darin R. Campbell. “Clarence”, Tim “Hold The” 
Vaper, Kevin “Eags” Eager, Darryl Wayne “Shot¬ 
gun” Richmond. Row Five: Scott Griffis, Ray Ho¬ 
ward, Jeff Lamson, Alan Boatman, Mike Scott, 
Todd Adams, Brian “Ozzy” Daly, Tod “Willie” 
Wiggs, Randy Pullar, Todd Worms. 



1984 / Living Groups 331 



























































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PERHAM FIRST FLOOR/tow One: Kim A. 
Robicheaux, Si!vie A. Coffelt. Row Two: Justinp G. 
Rutt, Patricia A. Dimmitt, Grunt P. Weirdino, Groan 
V. Weirdino, Lisa A. Braun, Kimberly K. Easter- 
day, Diane “Di” Murray, Michele M. Yenney. Row 
Three: Anna Marie Velotta, Beet Wolfe, Allison 
Dow, Ruth Parsons, Barbie Albert Maura Malone, 
Lisa “Sting” Drill. Lisa “Teeth” Skari, Dana 
“Tick” Grandey. 






PERHAM SECOND FLOOR-tfmv One: Diana L. 
Schroedl. Row Two: Mary Ainslie, Kristi Carsten- 
sen, Laura A. Koepke, Hagar, Allison Harding Nick¬ 
els, Brenda Redemann Kuykendall, Leann M. 
Schiele, Candi Caine. Row Three: Deb Power, Crys¬ 
tal Wang, Diane Kraupa, Shelly Myers, Hebe 
“Heyba-beyba” Slivka, Molly Rathbun, Patty 
Bunker, Gail Komoto, Kris Baker, Terri Hade. Row 
Four: Gina “Ginate” F. Sandri, Jeannie M. Connor, 
Patty L. O’Neill, Lisa M. Weibel, Pam J. Blair, 
Nancy “All Nighter” Mantyla, Trace “Suds” L. 
Kenderesi, Karen “Chug-a-lug” A. Caviezel, Jody 
L. Rathbun, Kim J. Cross, Traci D. Simmerman. 



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iTVlenol 


332 Living Groups /1984 























































































ijur<L 



PERHAM THIRD FLOOR-/tow One: Stephanie 

L. Peppley, Angel “Jazz” McFarland, Sis “Jazz” 
Leighton, Mikeianne Burk, Kristi, Hobbs. RowTwo: 
Jill A. Price, Stephanie L. Bettger, Cathy D. Gordon, 
Jolene A. McDougall, Pam J. Campbell, Liz A. 
Baeta. Row Three: Lyn Lawrence, Laura Williams, 
Kellie Hayes, Teri Fisher, Nancy Williams, Kate 
Johnson, Barb Klansnic, Karen Houby. Row Four: 
Jennifer L. Nelson, Glenda K. Jaeger, Kathy L. 
Grimes, Jill L. Schelling, Emily V. Rogers, Stepha¬ 
nie K. Kalasz, Tracy C. Foster. Row Five: Karen E. 
Borozan, Megan T. Campbell, Molly A. Jones, Tina 

M. Krogh, Wendi J. Hiltwein, Laura D. Jocobsen, 
Lisa A. Nystrom, Mindy J. Stiltner, Kathy 
Hagemeyer, Nikki J. Mohr, Louie N. Mohr, Heather 
M. Dixon. 


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PERHAM FOURTH FLOOR-ffcm One: Andrea 

L. Burks. Corinda L. Woods, Marlene B. Anderson, 
Patty R. Wallace, Roxie A. Davis, Dawn E. Gallin- 
ger. Row Two: Lisa Cranefield, Michelle A. Bear- 
demphl. Jan “Man" Beman. TequilaT. Tequila, Joy 
“Boy" L. Kamrin, Conehead R. Levy, “Squeezy" 

M. Johnson, Kathy J. Dixon, Bath S. Taub. Row 
Three: Anita Kuhn. Julie "Banana Bread" Zappone, 
Leah M. Ramos, “Punk Baby", Cin Schilb. Kristen 
L. Olson, Mikhail Baryshnika, Toni “Invisible” 
Taruscio, Kathy Marynard Burdick, Leslie Karim 
McGuire, Karen Blair. Barbara Graham. Row Four: 
Beth “Bubba” Glaze. Kandi Thompson, Carmen 
Davis, Mary Gibbons, Tina R. Richardson, Dawn 
Kopp, Elaine "Senator” Lyter-Smith, Gina Baffico, 
Roxana Cruz. 


1984 / Living Groups 333 




















































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PERHAM FIFTH FLOOR-tfmv One: Sharilyn J. 
Fleming, Sheri C. McNeely, Connie “Poopkins” 
McNeely, Sallie “Poopkins” Ferber, Cristi “Poop- 
kins” Casperson. Row Two: Sue Anderson, Bridget 
“Widget” A.M. Wood. Robin M. Tate. Janet 
“A M.” Broeckel, Bethy Ann McKee, Azita L. 
Karimi, Kristi E. Haney, Sarah A. Henderson. Row 
Three: Roxie L. Sampson, Cara L. Anderson, Kris 
A. Conde, Lisa and Beaver VanCampen. Berna 
“One of the Fun Things” Salgado, Dianne Knott. 
Joan M. Oxford, Brenda Thomas. Dana Thomas. 
Kellie L. Vanhoff, Nancy L. Reneich. Row Four: 
Dondi Stedham, Kelly Biegert. Carolann Muller. 
Lisa Loney, Michelle Maack. Terisa Hawk. Robin L. 
Stomieroski, Jillana G. Horan, Libby Rohman. Kelly 
P. Schroder. 



U ■ /• 


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PERHAM SIXTH FLOOR -Row One: “Bare It” 
Bates, Mary “The Grape”, Leann “Rose” Taylor. 
Row Two: Sarah “Killer” Munroe, Charlene 
“Monk” Bujacich, Kelli McNall, Lora Hoeck, Julie 
McCafferty, Linda Dougherty, Lanni MacKenzie. 
Row Three: Anna Maria Albergetti, Laura C. Castril- 
li. Kelly R. Gillman. Holly L. Gucker, Laura A. 
Craig, Jan J. Fennimore, Fran G. Fleener, Leslie G. 
Gerbert, Stefani L. Peters. Belinda A. Gosser, Kelly 
J. Bailey. Row Four: Julia L. Besola, Reby A. 
Mayor, Bonnie F. Dickson, Baby Maynard and 
DeeAnn J. Zurkammer, Monica J. Dugas, Mary K. 
Moore, Charlotte M. Copin, Tonya A. Conley, Kay 
S. DeBroeck, Debbie A. Patrick, Barbara T.T. 
Whalen. Linda K. Wren, Sandi L. Cok. 




334 Living Groups /1984 


























































■ (fDV'i~ m m 



STREIT/PERHAM GOVERNMENT (Execu¬ 
tives)-/?^ One: Laura Ann Koepke. Megan T. 
Campbell, Fran G. Fleener, Linda K. Wren. Row 
Two: Wendell Ellis, Clif “Stressedout” Jackson. 
Shelley M. Yenney, Kelli G. Campbell, Cin “Used 
and Abused” Schilb. Row Three: Gregory B. Hen- 
ion, Greg Johnson (D-Board Chair), Virginia J. 
Titus. 



STREIT/PERHAM STAFF-Row One: George 
“Beat Us” Warren, Juan Ahmad Jones, “Sly Tortil¬ 
la’ ’ Villa Ortega, “Sly Tortilla Jr. ’ ’ Petrito Mathers, 
Bert Issac Thrasher. Row Two: Dawn M. Kopp, 
Becky “Prep" Baerveldt, Debbie Dowers, Teri 
“Total Woman” Fishlips, Krash Conde, Beasy A. 
Gosser. Row Three: Mike Shepard, C. Luke Poole. 



1984 / Living Groups 335 


































































■ ■ U/r m ■ 


WALLER FIRST FLOOR -Row One: Lori C. 
Wischman, Jeff W. Richards, Steve “Gofer” P. 
Reilley. Rob F. Ritchie, Oscar M. Blaser, Richard L. 
Patten, Jim B. Larsen. Row Two: Tom K. Glasenapp, 
Troy R. Hosier, Kary J. Hagen, Chris S. Hummel, 
Susie D. English, David L. Johnson Jr. Row Three: 
Greg G. Mullins, P. John Adams, Matt E. Hale, Erik 
T. Ruud. Gary W. Hofmann, Chuck T. Bradley, 
Dave J. Mundt, Greg P. Tauscheck. Mark J. Nadvor- 
nick, Kris J. Ott, Nick D. Santelle. Row Four: Jon 
Barrett, Mike D. Kalahar, Jim Macklow, Kevin Bar¬ 
ber. David Block. Gerald Miller, David Funk, 
Michael Patrick, Oscar Groveh, Paul Harris, Kevin 
Rutkowski, Brian Van Doren, Richard Skidmore. 



iW'VSI 










WALLER SECOND FLOOR-/?™ One: Mazen 
Peter Nazzal, Rick H. Gerard, Mark A. Ellis, Mary- 
Anne Bellezza (Hall Director), Daniel Gidlof, Ron 
Takeshita, Tony R. Zempel. Row Two: Mark 
Wilhelm Brennan, Greg J. Wetterhus, Wayne C. 
Welde, Tim T. Pearson, Martin B. Frantz. Gary 
Dobish. Row Three: “Flower” Hempel, Bill Popp, 
John Mercer, Scott Robins, Yannis Houpis-Spock, 
Dennis C. Grant, Mike Bekey, Doug Joseph. Row 
Four: David W. Deivers, Eric G. Eades, Paul “Gig¬ 
gles” Darcy, Jeff Carpenter, The Mad Hacker, Eric 
“Where’s The Coffee?” Glaas, Allan B. Loken, 
Andy B. Lloyd, Marty “Casper” Jones, Terry O. 
Golombek. 



336 Living Groups /1984 






















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WALLER THIRD FLOOR-/?™ One: Brian C. 
Rucker, Mike D. Nichols, Dave L. Creager, Craig 
Sjostrom, Osmer Thebird, Mert Eastman, Rob 
Stone, Bill Davis, Allen Opfer, Chris Feely. Hans 
Loechelt. Carl Cox, Glenn Wood. Row Two: Clancy 
M. Coughlin, Robert N. McKellar. Richard J.U. 
Camacho, Jerry P. Simmons, Steen B. Smith. 
Michael P. Mosman, Sharad P. Dorai Raj. Richard 
W. Custer, Bob R. Collins, Jack R. Lyon. Phil S. 
Hoard, Steve B. Adler, Tod A. O’Driscoll, Ed 
Reyers. 


HfdUbUr (frurHo 


WALLER FOURTH FLOOR -Row One: Glenn B 
Warren, Steve B. Ricker, Darian Jenkins, Michael T. 
Pettyjohn, Dave B. Souvenir, Joel A. Hobson. Eric 
G. Petersen, Rick Grove. Tim "Mo-T" Fox (R.A.), 
J.R. “Jo-Mo" Hufana, Myrlino "Mo-Funk" Hufa- 
na. Anil "Mo-Tambien" Abraham. Row Two: Bruce 
W. Hutton, Todd F. Rehm, Darryl S. Hall, Brent A. 
Banister. Mike S. Krahmer, Gary "Mo Jei" Daniel¬ 
son, Kevin "Mo Fo" Fennell. Rich "Mo B.S."' 
Mann. Row Three: Jay B. Salmon, Jerry Hcmrich, 
Larry P. Kinney, Bill A. Bogen. David A. Porter, 
Barrett B. Burns, AtharN. Pasha, Damon D. Gulick. 


1984 / Living Groups 337 































































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WILMER FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS -Row 



One: Karen A. Thomson, JenniferL. Cossano, Crys¬ 
tal M. McDaniel, Dianne E. Christianson, Joan M. 
Boyd. Row Two: Debbie K. Emtman, Kristi R. Flam¬ 
ing, Lori A. Schroeder, Karie L. Kuamme, Beth A. 
Bryce, Janet S. Archer, Tina R. Walker, Susan R. 
Butcher, Gayla R. Haugen, Andrea R. Cleveland, 
Stella E. Okigbo. Row Three: Elizabeth G. Peterson, 
Eileen M. Kunz, Caron A. Roth, Teresa L. Sher¬ 
wood, Julie A. Rowe, Brooke A. Thomsen, Karin L. 
Henson, Connie M. Lockhart, Karen A. Corbett, 
Cheryl L. Thiel, Elizabeth A. Dibbem, Cindy A. 
lunger. Row Four: Kimberly K. Crist, Cindi Ross, 
Sandra D. Warren, Nancy L. Van Farowe, Jane D. 
Bowers, Melana K. Schimke, Wendy J. Wharton, 
Cheryl S. Wetterhus, Misti A. Townsend, Tammy 
A. Rappuhn, Trena G. Griggs, Mary L. Cooper, 
Janine L. Chappell, Jane L. Smith. 



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WILMER THIRD AND FOURTH FLOORS -Row 
One: Linda L. Farr, Joy A. Phillips, Carole F. 
Carpenter, Amy E. Brix. RowTwo: Tami Auckland, 
Courtney Schweppe, Heidi Hill, Lisa Absalonson, 
Laura Johnson, Betsy Davis, Diane Kolb, Victoria 
Warren, Kymberlee A. Franklin, Kathy O’Connor. 
Row Three: Meg A. Larson, Juanita J. Wolff, Kathy 
Jo Wachter, Maura E. Flynn, Paula D. Repman, 
LenorJ. Carlisle, Susan M. Pheasant, Kim J. Lessor. 
Row Four: Carol A. Nicholson, Diane E. Lasch, 
Janet L. Quirk, Martha MacDonald, Sydne J. Vallan- 
digham, Darcy J. Brandt, Tina-Liz M. Meadows, 
Chris Carbone, Kelly S. Lessor. 





338 Living Groups /1984 


1 * '!■ 

















































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c 


WILMER SPONSORS-/?™ One: Susan R. Butch¬ 
er, Kymberlee A. Franklin, Kathy A. O’Connor. 
Row Two: Sandra D. Warren (R.A.), Mary M. Rob- 
sahm, Betsy Davis, Tamara A. Rappuhn. 













> .-r 




WILMER EXECUTIVES-/?™ One: Diane L. 
Kolb, Joy A. Phillips, Mary M. Robsahm. Row Two: 
Kymberlee A. Franklin, Andrea R. Cleveland, Misti 
L. Townsend, Sandra D. Warren, Kathryn A. 
Welch, Betsy A. Davis. 


1984 / Living Groups 339 






















^ k. k 



Greek living, what is it all about? 
Greeks’ lifestyles are as varied as the 
colors of the polo shirts and vaurnets 
that they wear. Everyone hears about 
the exchanges, dances, and happy 
hours which they host, but Greek life 
encompasses many things that are not 
noted by the casual observer. 

Socially, there are exchanges on 
Wednesday nights, where sororities 
attend parties at fraternities. There is 
a theme, say Rags-to-Riches or Punk, 
and everyone dresses accordingly. 

Another popular social event is the 
happy hour. These weekend affairs 
are sponsored by f raternities general¬ 
ly as a money-making project. In the 
past, all students were welcome to 
attend. However, due to a new liquor 
policy, in order to host a happy hour, 
the fraternity must obtain a guest list. 
In addition to this, no guest under 21 
years of age is allowed to be served at 
the bar. 


Is It 

Worth It? 


Greeks are also taught etiquette so 
that they can impress their guests and 
not feel uncomfortable at formal 
occasions. Restrictions, placed on 
one’s social life by the fraternity or 
sorority form part of this etiquette 
training. These rules range from pro¬ 
hibiting alcohol in the house to elimi¬ 
nating late night kitchen loitering. 

Academically, Greeks receive a lot 
of help. There are study tables to 
attend and friends who live in the 
same house that can assist in studying 
for an exam or writing a paper. The 
house usually provides a place to 
study, but unfortunately distractions 
force the serious studier to Holland or 
Science Libraries. 

One distinguishing factor of Greek 
life is the misunderstood test file. Lest 
files are not used as a method of 
cheating; they provide only back¬ 
ground information on the professor 
and the types of questions that he may 
ask. 

Academics and the well-publicized 
social life are what attract most stu¬ 
dents to the Greek life, but it is the 
in-house activities that make people 


stay. The houses have programs in 
which the new members, or pledges as 
they are more commonly known, re¬ 
ceive a “big brother’’ or “sister”. Big 
brothers and sisters are older mem¬ 
bers and help the younger brother or 
sister with the assorted problems that 
newcomers face. 

Fraternities also have big sisters, but 
this program is not confined to 
Greeks only; any girl can participate. 
She serves as a surrogate sister for the 
fraternity man, developing a close 
friendship akin to that of true siblings. 

Living in a Greek house immediate¬ 
ly gives people a large f amily of about 
sixty inseparable companions. Since 
the living conditions demand that the 
members interact on a daily basis, 
people learn to get along with each 
other regardless of their differences. 

The house places responsibilities on 
each of its members in various ways 
also. Each Greek house has a cabinet 
of executive council members among 
various leadership positions. Pledges 
are expected to perform daily house 
duties, and wall be penalized for lack 
of completion. Another responsibility 
that can never be taken lightly is the 
fact that Greeks are representatives of 
their houses and they are expected to 
act according to whatever regulations 
the house imposes on its members. 

Greeks must deal w'ith stereotyping, 
as do all other students. Greeks, Dor- 
mies, and G.D.I.’s don’t like to admit 
it, but they are all quite the same when 
they begin college — it’s the living 
arrangements that change students. 
Greeks tend to forget that other stu¬ 
dents exist and confine all of their 
activities to in-house or Greek func¬ 
tions. This is a shame because it re¬ 
flects poorly on the Greek system and 
limits the chance for the Greeks to 
meet the remaining 13,000 non- 
Greek students on campus. 

Although the Greek system may not 
be for everyone, it obviously has many 
advantages. The social life, academic 
gain, and house activities inevitably 
draw students to choose Greek life as 
their living arrangement during col- 
'ege. 




340 Living Groups /1984 
























Left: Drinks in hand, Darci Childers and Debbie Haynes enjoy a function at Pi 
Kappa Alpha. Below: No kitchen loitering, but chefs are a must. Front Row: 
Steve Larsen and Jeff Adams. Back Row: Bill Treneer, Doug Brownlee, Dean 
Moothart, and Mack Horton. Center: Bedroom or Living room? A bedroom at 
Phi Sigma Kappa has been reconstructed for a convenient, three-person living 
quarter. Bottom: Formal dinner, Kevin Dagget wines and dines Colleen Carlsen. 
Lynn Eerkes and Konnie Kittelson in background. 





















At0ui cM 19/ne^y 


Oh what a year for A-Chi-O!! It was 
time to “Party Woo!” at the Ballroom 
Blitz and time to have “mandatory 
fun, fun, fun.” Thanks so much 
ADPi’s and Kappa Sig’s, it was a blast! 
Tami learned to beware of snow and 
ice ... maybe next year for the down- 
hills and figure skating cham¬ 
pionships!?! Stair jumpin’ Borgford 
had her annual affair with the central 


staircase ... really Tess!! Do you have 
your key Buckwheat?! Crazy seniors 
(we all know who) and the L.D. parties 
— we’ll miss you! Christmas, Santa, 
the Elves and Reindeer ... little sisters 
... family. MTV anyone? ... *V.H. and 
Eddie ... Joe and Rick were “Foolin’” 
about the pledge dance ... “Whatev¬ 
er!” ... T here was dancin’ in the streets 
with AGR’s and our “Backyard Bash.” 


New Year’s Knockout, Cruisin’ in 
style with AKL’s and rallies in the 
alley. Spring bar-b-que’s, candle pas¬ 
ses and those special moments with 
sisters you love so much. It was a fun- 
filled year at Omega chapter. Full of 
unforgetable memories. You’re the 
greatest Alpha Chi!!! 


ADAMS. TRUDI 
AHLQUIST. ANITA 
ARMBRUSTER. GAIL 
AUCKLAND. TAMRA 
BALLARD. DIANE 
BARRETT HEIDI 
BAYER. ELIZABETH 
BORGFORD. THERESA 



342 Living Groups /1984 

























DECKER. LESLIE 
DRONENBERG. RHONDA 
DUNN. KRIS 
EMERSON. RITA 
ENGLISH. SUSAN 
FINK MAURENE 
FOURNIER. LISA 


GADEHOLT. KIRSTEN 
GEFFE. TAMARA 
GEHRING. KARLYN 
GERDES. CHRISTINA 
GILE. BARBARA 
GROPPER MARY 
HATTAN. KAREN 



HUDELSON. DIANE 
HYDE. TRACY 
IDLER. DIANE 
IHRY. DEENA 
IHRY. MARCI 
JACKSON. DAYNA 
JOSEPH. SUSAN 
KEEFER. JODY 


KELLEY. COLLEEN 
KRAUS. CATHRYN 
KROGH. TINA 
LAMEY. MICHELE 
LARSON. MEGAN 
LONERGAN. VICTORIA 
LYNCH. ELIZABETH 
MALONE. HEIDI 


I 



MARTIN. MARY 
MARTINIS. ANNE 
MCKAY. LAURIE 
MCNEELEY. CONNIE 
MORGAN. NANI 
NOODS. THERESE 
NORMAN. JONI 
OLEARY. AMY 


PALLETT. KELLY 
RAGAN. TAMI 
RASMUSSEN. MELINDA 
RATHBUN. JODY 
ROE. SARAH 
ROMFO. ANGELA 
SAGERS. HEIDI 
SCHUMACHER. JENNIFER 


SCHMACHER. LESLIE 
SHIMABUKURO. KATHRYN 
SILJEG. DEBORAH 
SIMS. KARIN 
SITES. SHEILA 
SMITH. JESSICA 
STANGELAND. DEBBIE 
STEINER. DARCY 


TATE. REBECCA 
THAYER. CAROL 
TRACY. MEGHAN 
WALLACE. TRACY 
WEIR. KAREN 
WILDER. CINDY 
WILSON. LISA 
ZOLD. SUSAN 


1984 / Living Groups 343 







































































Z\t0tAs PUf&s P( 






■' 






Sooo ... ADPi’s! Unique, diverse 
and fun ... (Proven by a National 
Sisterhood award-Palm Beach!) Ex¬ 
cuse me, Meridith? Where’s the paper 
towel dress? 21 Club. Homecoming 
with Beta’s (sometimes you just have 
to say ...) Pledge sneak ... Mr. Mike ... 


Dairy Queen? Thanks, pledges for 
the Welcome Aboard the ADPi 
Pledge Dance (study tables, weak 
coconuts). 21 Club ... Norm ... BLITZ 
with Kappa Sig’s and AChiO’s ... Mrs. 
Williams ... Verla ... Thanks to the big 
brothers for early awakenings ... Kona 


Tan ... 21 Club ... ADPi ski team ... 
“He ain’t not linear dude” ... Daven¬ 
port Formal — The Black Diamond 
Ball... Sundeck ... Cruise with KD’s ... 
And, after all that’s been said anc. 
done you’re just the part of us we can’t 
let go ... 


344 Living Groups /1984 
















ADAMS. ELIZABETH 
AMSDEN. LORI 
ANDERSON. LYNN 
ARNOLD. NANCY 
BORNSTEIN. HEIDI 
BRODHUN. KARIE 
BUSSE. JENNIFER 



COSS. TERESA 
DIGLERIA, LISA 
EASTER, JANE 
FARRELL, DEANNA 
FILER. JEANNE 
FUNK, ANNA 
FURSETH. DARCY 
GIBB. GAIL 


GOHLERT. GRETCHEN 
GRILLO, JULIE 
GROBE. MYSTIQUE 
GUYER. LINDA 
HALVORSON. KAREN 
HANNA, GRETCHEN 
HANSON, TENA 
HARRIS, MARIE 


HEHR. LORI 
HUGHES, NINETTE 
INGRAM. TERRY 
JONES. JENNIFER 
KANZLER. KIM 
KEENEY. LAURA 
KILBER, TAMARA 
KILPATRICK. ERIN 


KOONTZ. DARCY 
KRUMWIEDE. KATHRYN 
LARSON. ALLISON 
LAYMAN. LORI 
LINDAHL. SUSAN 
LJPPERT, NINA 
MAKI, SUELLEN 
MCGRAW, MEREDITH 


MCMILLIAN. MICHELLE 
MORlCE, LESLI 
MORREL. JENNIFER 
MOSES. BARBARA 
NELSON. DAWN 
NELSON, KRISTIN 
OLSON. JOLEEN 
OLSON, KATHERINE 


PARKER, BARBARA 
PLESE. KIM 
POPOFF, CATHERINE 
RIDENHOUR. LISA 
ROGERS. SHEILA 
ROWLAND. TAMARA 
RUETER, LOUISE 
SABO. DEBORAH 


SCHORSCH. YVETTE 
SHAW, MELINDA 
SHEARD, DOROTHY 
SHEARD. LAURA 
SIKORA. DIANE 
SIMMERMAN. TRACI 
SLAAEN. JERI 
SMITH. STEPHANIE 


STILTNER. CAROL 
TAYLOR. CAROL 
VARNES. SUSAN 
VESSEY. KRISTEN 
WAGNER, CYNTHIA 
WEAVER, DEBBIE 
YOUNG. MARGARET 


1984 / Living Groups 345 





































































































AtfA#- OfMm-' ^ 





After three short months of sum¬ 
mer vacation, AGD’s were anxious to 
return to their Pullman home on B 
Street. Waiting for them would be a 
redecorated house, quite different 
from the one they said Good-bye to in 
June. The first big social bash of the 
year was a bus trip to Spokane with the 
men of Phi Delta Theta to cheer on 
the Gougar football team. What was 
more fun, the road trip or the game? 
Soon we traveled up to Spokane once 
again but this time it was for the 1983 
Pledge Dance. The Spokane Sheraton 
was the scene with Lights, Camera, 
Action being the theme. We all were 


kept busy this fall selling our “Men of 
Washington State” calendars. Pro¬ 
ceeds went towards our altruistic pro¬ 
ject, Juvenile Diabetes. The spunky 
1983 pledge class proudly took 
second place in the Lambda Chi 
Alpha Watermelon Bust. Homecom¬ 
ing was a memorable one with the 
Pikes. We did “The Bruin Ruin” all 
week long and had the best pool party 
ever — complete with life guards and 
a portable pool. Before we knew it 
winter was upon us and we were 
happily celebrating the first annual 
Snowfall function in the parking lot. 
Several neighbors joined in on the fun 


and we all decided this should de¬ 
finitely by an annual event. The snow 
didn’t dampen our spirits when De¬ 
cember rolled around and it was time 
to serenade for Christmas Fireside 
formal dates with carols and special 
holiday wish. Spring was just around 
the corner as we celebrated our 
annual Tri-Ad with the women of 
Gamma Phi Beta and Delta Gamma. 
Soon waiting for the first beam of sun 
to hit Coeur d’Alene Lake where we’ll 
be setting sails with the women of Pi 
Beta Phi. 


ADAMSON. KAREN 
ALLEN. DEBORAH 
BARR. BETSY 
BATTIN. APRYL 
BEACOCK. GAYLE 
BOCCIA, KELLY 
BRANDES. DIANE 
BRANDVOLD. TERESA 


BREARD. LYNN 
CHRISTIANSON. DESSIREE 
CLEIN. LAURA 
COWARD. JENNIFER 
CRANDELL, DEBBIE 
DARSOW. CYNTHIA 
DAVIS. MARY 
DAVIS. WENDY 



346 Living Groups /1984 















I 





DOANE. COLLEEN 
DRUMMOND. HEIDI 
ELEY, KERRI 
ENGEL. DIANE 
FEIRING. WENDY 
FERLUGA. CATHRYN 


FIKSDAL. SHARON 
FISCHER. MARGARET 
FLETCHER. STACI 
GISH. SHANNON 
GONZALEZ. FABIOLA 
GOWER. LISA 
GREENWOOD. KACIE 



HULL. JANELLE 
JENSON. JANE 
JOHNSON. DEBBIE 
JOHNSON. KRISTIN 
JORDAN. TINA 
JURICH. SUZANNE 
KERST, ELIZABETH 
LAGASSE. JILL 



LARSEN. KIM 
LAWTON, CYNTHIA 
MACPHERSON, ANNE 
MADISON, KIMBERLY 
MALNATI. MARY 
MANFRED, PATRICIA 
MARTIN. NANCY 
MARTIN. SHIRLEY 


MAXWELL. ERIN 
MCCAIN. EARLENE 
MONROE. STACEY 
MONTECUCCO. JANET 
MURPHY. MARY 
NICELY. LORI 
OBRIEN. MOLLY 
PEARSON. SUSAN 


PEWITT. SHERYL 
RANK, TRINA 
ROGERS. KATHLEEN 
SCHULT, LISA 
SERWOLD. JOAN 
SHATTUCK. ANN 
SIEGEL JOAN 
STONE, JULIE 


1984 / Living Groups 347 
























s({phu fC 





AOPi’s in 1984 — Freakazoids, 
Jackson Dancing and let’s hear it for 
Liza Colby! Did you flip in? Don’t 
forget to sign your house duty ... 
JWH, we’re still number one!!! Let it 
Whip ... It’s just a Dead Giveaway — 
Here’s to Greek Row with 150 watts 
per channel!!! Salad, salad, salad ... 
jane Fonda in the living room ... Only 
a Rose I Give You ... Summer in 
March at Kona-Tan! Cavanaughs Inn 


at the Park — We got your number ... 
and your keys! AOPi/Theta Chi to the 
Sky!!! We love our Sigma Chi 
Sweetheart! You’re out of-line — pick 
up your dishes and clean the micro- 
wave! Gotta love those MC/NM’s! We 
are Family! Dominos and Dooleys ... 
Songfest with the Sigma Nu’s ... It’s 
Almost Like Being In Love!!! We’re in 
Pandamonium! Cheers to the eleven 
members of the Coug Mug Club, 


Dime Beers and the Wheel of Tor¬ 
ture! The House Dance that NO ONE 
remembers? ... Couch potatoes and 
MTV — you veg’s!!! No one’s home, 
they’re all on the roof — who’s on 
Alum Alert? Study Buddies — go for 
those grades! AOPi’s are psyched for 
Wheatfield, Barbeques and Spring 
Sunshine! Beautimus Maximus!!! 
Don’t forget to flip out!!! 


348 Living Groups /1984 












BAUMGARTEL. SUZY 
BYRNE, ERIN 
CLAUDON. LORI 
DOLAN. MAUREEN 




ELSENSOHN, JULIE 
ELSENSOHN. SHARI 
FEWKES. TARA 
GECK. RHONDA 
GRADY. KATHLEEN 





PHILLIPS. CYNTHIA 
RASMUSSON. LINDA 
REYNOLDS, ClNOY 
RHOADS. JENNIFER 
ROBINSON. KELLYANN 
SCHUSTER. KELLIE 


KJOSE. TERESA 
MANO. JANICE 
MCKAY. JULIE 
MCMANUS. MICHELLE 
MYERS. SHELLY 
NELSON. JODIE 
NEWGARD. DIANE 


NICHOLAS. MONA 
NOBLE. LYNN 
ONEILL. SHEILA 
OVELAND. CHAR 
PARKER. KRISTIN 
PARSONS, RUTH 
PHARNESS. JULIE 


1984 / Living Groups 349 



















”We are the A Phis, give us a 
CHEER! Best house on campus no- 
one else comes near. We have the 
friendship and fraternity, we’ve been 
down, but now we’re coming up you’ll 
surely see — that we’re always happy, 
friendly and kind, whenever you look 
no-one sweeter you will find. 
So...come on down and meet us for 
you’ll see that we are true, we’re the A 
Phis from WAZZU!!” 


The above is an original Alpha Phi 
pep song that truly depicts our pride 
and enthusiasm. Alpha Phi’s are ac¬ 
tive in and around campus, too, with 
members in Mortarboard, Order of 
Omega, Society of Women Engineers, 
Association of Women Students, 
Grass Roots Journal, Sigma Iota, 
SPURS, and Honors Program...and 
let’s not forget our athletes...crew, 
swim team, varsity cross country, Fish 


Fans, intramurals and our exclusive 
“living room” aerobic dancers!! 
Thanks to Phi Kaps for the barbeque, 
Phi Taus and Homecoming (fourth 
place in banner contest!!), and FIJI 
for such a fun Christmas exchange. 
Lastly, a very sincere thank-you to our 
Brothers of Bordeaux, who sweep our I 
sidewalks of snow, mow our lawns,I 
play Santa and are terrific last minute 
dance dates. 


350 Living Groups /1984 























DELAY. CYNTHIA 
ENGLISH. LESLIE 
FALK. KRISTIN 
FOWLER. LCMS 


GIANGRASSO. LUJEANA 
HANFORD, SARALYN 
HEDBERG. KRIS 
ISAKSEN. KIRSTEN 



KIEFFER. KRISTINE 
KWANT. MAUREEN 
LINDGREN. HEIDI 
LIPINSKI, DIANE 
LONGWAY. JOANN 



MARTINS. CASSY 
NEHR, TAMARA 
O'HARA. SANDRA 
PARSONS, LORI 
PETERS. SUSAN 



WAIGHT, BRENDA 
WALKER. NORRIE 


1984 / Living Groups 351 

















1983-84 was a great year for Chi 
Omega. The Chi-O’s began their fall 
with a new pledge class of 32 great 
girls. Early in the fall, Chi-O partici¬ 
pated in TKE Waterfollies for sun 
and lots of fun. The Chi Omega 
pledge class took first place in Lamb¬ 
da Chi Watermelon Bust. Good job 
girls! Homecoming with Delta Up- 
silon was 4 ‘pretty much sweet and 
stuff.” This proved to be the best 
Homecoming ever. DU’s, you’re all 
bolts! In December, the Chi O’s had 
their annual pledge dance. This year 
it was a “Vacation” with a tacky tourist 
theme. Tacky costumes and decora¬ 
tions were everywhere to be found. 


352 Living Groups /1984 


Christmas was celebrated at Chi Ome¬ 
ga with every tradition upheld. The 
seniors decorated the house, juniors 
held the yule log ceremony and soph¬ 
omores put on the annual Christmas 
party. 

In February, the Chi-O’s held their 
Third Annual Kidnap Function. 
Dates were kidnapped to Best West¬ 
ern in Moscow and everyone had a 
great time. Initiation was also held in 
February and proved to be an inspir¬ 
ing week for both new and old mem¬ 
bers. 

Springtime events began with a 
great Greek Week 1984! The first 
annual Chi-O-Kappa Cruise was held 


in the spring — thanks so much, Kap¬ 
pas, for all the fun! 

Chi Omega has many active mem¬ 
bers around campus. Chi-O’s are in 
the Political Union, Coug Squad, 
Marketing Club, Advertising Club, 
Clothing and Textiles Club, Orcheses, 
Panhellenic, Association of Women 
Students, Little Sister Programs, and 
so much more. This year many candle 
passing ceremonies for pinnings and 
engagements were enjoyed by Chi 
Omega. Thank you, Chi-O’s, for all of 
the great times and memories shared 
this year. These are times treasured 
and will be remembered forever! 


Clu 























AMSBAUGH. BETH 
ANDREWS. DEBORAH 
ATKINS. MARY 
BUSCH. KIMBERLY 
CHIAROVANO. TONI 
CHRISTENSON. ROXANNE 
CHRISTIANSEN. SUSIE 



CLANCY. COLLEEN 
CRABB, DIANE 
DAHL. LAURA 
DUTTON. KIM 
EIHL. HEATHER 
FORDE. KIRSTEN 
FRINK. CHRIS 
GALLAGHER, LINDA 


GILL. HEIDI 
GILMARTIN. LISA 
GRANT. COLLEEN 
GRASHUIS, DARLENE 
GRAY. SHARON 
GRENDAHL. CHERYL 
GRIGG. KELLY 
HAGEN. MAIRALEE 


HALLER. MOLLY 
HAMRO. SUSAN 
HANSEN. KAREN 
HEALY, SHANNON 
HECKER. MICHELLE 
HOLMES. LIBBY 
HOPKINS, TRACY 
JACKSON. SHERYL 


JONES. JULIE 
KELLEY. KATHLEEN 
KILBORN. PAIGE 
KNIGHT. LORI 
KULAAS. STACY 
KULFAN. CHRISTINE 
LAMB. ERIN 
LEFRANCOIS. JAN 


LEIRDAHL. KIMBERLY 
LIPPENS, JULIE 
MARINKOVICH, DOBRILLA 
MELLON. CHRISTINE 
MENIN. DEBRA 
MITCHELL. DEBRA 
MURRAY. SUZANNE 
NAATZ. MARTY 


NISBET. TERRY 
NORICK. KELLI 
PELTIER. TRACY 
PENNYLEGION, MARY 
QUAM. LISA 
QUAMME. BARBARA 
REIMAN. RENEE 
REVERMAN, MARY 


RICHEY, DENISE 
ROBINSON, JULIA 
ROCKNESS, LISA 
RORVICK. ALISA 
ROTH. CHRISTIE 
ROTH, GABRIELLE 
SKARPERUD. KRISTEN 
SIGMAR, SUSAN 


STANFORD. SUSAN 
STOWE, ANNA 
TEERINK, VICKIE 
TAYER. KAREN 
THOMAS. LAUREL 
UKURA, ROBERTA 
WACHTLER, LAURA 
WIDENER, SHANNON 


1984 / Living Groups 353 






















Thrasher!” Congratulations to 
Gretchan and her dad: winner of the 
1983 Pumpkin Carving Contest. Look 
out Santa, as the Tri-Delta elves sere¬ 
nade their way into Christmas. And 
who would forget the “Sleighride 
Together With You” Pledge Dance? 
Congratulations to the new officers — 
we’re counting on you. Remember 
our 2nd Annual Orange Crush? “I 
gotta Crush with a Capital C — Do ya 
wanna dance with me?” Thank you 
M.K. for all your musical contribu¬ 


tions to Theta Nu. Way to go Kim for 
winning the raffle! Congratulations 
Karyn for being elected Panhellenic 
President. And, Congratulations New 
Initiates — Welcome to the Bonds! 
Then came spring: Greek Week and 
“See ya on the Sundeck!” The Tri- 
Delt’s “catch the rays” at the 2nd 
Annual “Delta Dune Days.” Thank 
you Tri-Delta for the laughter and 
“Sharing of Dreams.” You’re my sis¬ 
ter, my sister, my friend!” 


354 Living Groups /1984 


“Hey! Tri-Delt’s, you’re so fine...” 
Whether we’re sitting on our brand 
new front steps, or taking our “stance” 
for “The best RUSH ever!” Thanks to 
our beloved Heidi who helped us 
“Rally.” And “you gotta love” our 
1983-84 Pledge Class! What “Awe¬ 
some” pledges you are. Thanks to the 
SAE’s for a “Saaweet” Homecoming 
and to the AGR’s and KD’s for a terri¬ 
fic TRIAD. Then there are those wild 
and crazy seniors: Jo Mama teach you 
to talk that way? Watch our 











ANDRIESEN. KARYN 
BARLOW. JULIE 
BOROZAN. USA 
CARBAUGH. JOAN 
CARLSON. JODI 
CARLSON. KELLI 



CHARLIE 

COVINGTON. JENNIFER 
DAVIDSON. TEANA 
DEHNING. GWEN 
DONNELLY. MICKI 
DRIER. LEZLIE 
EASTON. MARY 
EDWARDS. CLAIRE 


EHRINGER. WENDY 
ELLIGSEN. LAURrE 
FICKE. LYNETTE 
FLINT. KIMBERLY 
FRANCIS. SHANNON 
FREDERICK. KAREN 
FURUBOTTEN. SHARI 
HAMLIN. JEANINE 


HICKS. ALLISON 
HORNE. ELISA 
HUNTINGTON, DEBRA 
ISAKSEN. LAURIE 
JANSSEN. ELIZABETH 
JENNINGS. SUZANNE 
JOHNSON. VALERIE 
JOLLY. KIM 


JORGENSEN. MARDI 
JUDSON. BETH 
KARASEK. LISA 
KASEBERG. CINDY 
KING. CHERI 
LAMBERT. MARY 
LEWIS. MELISSA 
LEWIS. SHELLY 


LOLCAMA. ROBIN 
MARiOTTI. GINA 
MCDONALD. JANNINE 
MCGEE-FURRER. JENNY 
MCGOUGH. MEGAN 
MILLER. TERRI 
MILLETT. DENEE 
MORGAN. JULIE 


NEWSOM. NANCY 
OBERG. JENNIFER 
PETTIT. MERIDEE 
QUIGLEY. COLLEEN 
REYNOLDS. STEPHANIE 
RICHARDSON. SANDY 
ROBERTS. PEGGY 
RODE . JILL 


ROWE. GRETCHEN 
SANDERS. ROBIN 
SAUKKONEN. TRACY 
SHARP. SALLY 
SINCLAIR. EDEN 
SIZELOVE. LISA 
STAHL. LAURA 


STACEY. KIMBERLEY 
STEWART, AMY 
STONE. CAROLYN 
THOMAS. CHRISDEE 
WILCOX. KRISTY 
WILLIAMS. JOANNE 


1984 / Living Groups 355 












































































■C - N.'Uk 

1 |E .1 




WF* imi 


if 



IBP* ^ 


m jK _ .i 
















r 





We'll remember.... 

Our favorite men: Gumby, Mr. 
Bota, Eddie Murphy and Splash 
Uddenburg. Tally Ho Club, All My 
Kids, Hey lody, lody with ATO’s and 
sundeck action. Who can forget the 
disappearing DG’s, wine in a BOX 
and the Dunes. Our favorite song, 


“Boogie in Your Butt,” and the great 
intercom messages: “Banana bread in 
the pantry,” “Everyone come down! 
They’re here!” “Dinner’s ready.” The 
Sunshine box, no cod.es, Deboo and 
Keboo! the unanswered questions: 
“Where’s the Beef?” What didn’t the 
Seniors take from the house? Have 


you saved a can today? WHERE’S 
THE PILLOWS??? Beware of the 
clowns, what are you trying to say any¬ 
way? Jane’s dinner rolls only have 45 
calories. Veda Delta Gamma. 

But, you’ll remember...THE 
SMILE OF A DEE GEE!!!! 


356 Living Groups /1984 




















ALTMAN, PAMELA 
ANGEL. KIM 
BARTON, JILL 
BENDER, KATHLEEN 
BENTON. SUSAN 
BURNS. LAURA 


DERUWE. ROBIN 
DOWIE. KIMBERLY 
DRONEN, TRACY 
DUPUIS. DOREEN 
EDWARDS. COLLEEN 
EVANS. JENNIFER 
GALANTI, DEBBIE 
GREEN. ROBIN 


GRIBBLE. TAMESE 
HART. STACY 
HAUN. TRISHA 
HERRON. MONA 
HOCHHALTER. TERESA 
HOSS. MICHELLE 
HOWELL. SHAWN 
JACKLIN. GAYLE 


KARST, KATHLEEN 
KASER, LAURA 
KIDOER, LINDA 
KLOSTERHOFF. ANDREA 
LINGARD. CAROLE 
LUCAS, MARGARET 
MANNING. SUZANNE 
MATHIESON. MARCY 


MCBETH. COLENE 
MCCOY. LORI 
MEYERS, CYNTHIA 
MORIARTY. KARA 
MUNNICH. CHERl 
NAPOLI. DINA 
OKAZAKI. CHRISTINE 
OLDHAM. LYNN 


PETERSON. KATRINA 
RICHARDS. TRACY 
ROLOFF. OARCI 
ROTH. GRETCHEN 
SANDS, SHELLY 
SHANNON. KELLI 
SKENE, SHANNON 


1984 / Living Groups 357 


SPENCER. DIANE 
SPENCER, TAMI 
SPRINCIN. EDY 
STACK. JENNIFER 
STEVENSON. SHERRIE 
THOMAS. SHERYL 
WEBB. LISA 


WEST. TERESA 
WILSON. LISA 
WOHLMAN. ROBIN 
WOLFE. KIM 
WOOD, JULIE 
WREN, PAMELA 
ZIMMERMAN. MARY 





































ANDERSON, AMY 
BARTON. KATHLEEN 
BENNETT, DAWN 
BERQET, MICHELLE 
BIALEK, DAWN 
BINDER. LYNN 
BOLANG. LISA 
CARLSON. KAREN 



358 Living Groups /1984 





























CAVIEZEL. KAREN 
CHRISMAN. JESSICA 
COULTER, ROSE 
CRAMER. CRISTI 
DANIELSON. KATHLEEN 
DEGMAN. KAREN 



HALVORSEN. PATRICE 
HENNIG. DIANE 
HOGUE. LAURIE 
HOOKE. JAYME 
HOOPER. KERRY 
HUFFMAN. KARA 
HURSON. MARY 
HURSON. MAUREEN 


JACOBSEN. GRETCHEN 
JAKOTICK. IVA-MAflIE 
JOHNSON. REGINA 
JONAS. ANDREA 
JURRIES, JODI 
KAIMAKlS. LISA 
KARIMI. AZITA 
KOLSKI. LAURIE 


KREIN. BRENDA 
UNFORD, JANET 
URABEE, UURA 
UVIGNE. ALLISON 
UWRENSON. VICKIE 
LEFFLER. HEIDI 
LOVETT. LEIGH 
LUST. MARGUERITE 


MASLEY. SUSAN 
MAYS. KATHERINE 
MEIER. BARBARA 
MEIER. JACQUELINE 
MONZELOWSKY, DIANE 
MURRAY. RENA 
NELSON. KAROLYN 
NEWBERRY, KIM 


O NEAL. LORI 
PENNER. TAMMAY 
PHEUN, UUREL 
QUIGLEY. TARA 
RICE. NOELLE 
SANTAROSA. JULIE 
SANTAROSA. TRACEY 
SATHER, KRISTEN 


SCHOBER, CINDY 
SERESUN. KAREN 
SERESUN, KELLY 
SPEARMAN, SONNY 
STEWART, LISA 
STOUT. MERRIDY 
STRENG. ANDREA 
THERRIAULT. KATHY 


THOENNES, NANCY 
TRUITT. DIANNA 
TYLER. CYNTHIA 
VANDOREN. JULIE 
WILLIAMS, LYNDA 
WOODWARD, JULIE 
WOODWARD. VALERIE 
YOUNG. PATTY 


1984 / Living Groups 359 




























































She’s a Theta Lady, She’s a sure fire 
baby ... suitcases of excitement 
(BOOM!), bowls of Theta corn (POP!) 
... guess who at the Beach Party ... 
Theta babies make headlines during 
the Bust ... Blue Kats score ... dah dit 


dah dit dit ... inspiration courtesy of 
Mr. Rogers and Boy Feegee ... YEAH! 
HOEDOWN TRIAD and thumper 
with Kappa’s and Pi Phi’s ... Chal¬ 
lenges behind closed doors ... the last 
of a long tradition: Christmas Formal 


1983 ... She’s a Theta Lady, she’s on 
Rally Squad, Coug Guys and Gals, 
Honors, Mortar Board, SPURS, SPA, 
ASWSU Committees, Orchesis, And 
on and on. She’s your Little Sister, you 
Big Sis, your FRIEND. 




ANDERSON, COLLEEN 
BAUER. GRETCHEN 
BAUGH, PATRICIA 
BLOMQUIST, MELANIE 
BOCEK. MOLLY 
BOLLINGER, LISA 
BOOK, SANDRA 
BRUNNER JACKIE 


BUSSEY. LAURA 
CAMP. MELISSA 
CARBONE. CHRISTINE 
CARISSIMO, KARNA 
CARISSIMO, TAUNIA 
CARPENTER, JENNIFER 
CASE. KERRYN 
CLARKE, ELLEN 



360 Living Groups /1984 


wmr 





























DAVIS. ERIN 
DEMOND. LINDA 
DEVLEMING. KAREN 
DICKERSON. KIMBERLY 
EARL. CASSANDRA 
EDWARDS. RONDILYN 
FANNING. KATHLEEN 


FUHR. JOAN 
GOFF, ELIZABETH 
GORMANOS. THEA 
GORMANOS. VASSIE 
GRAY. HEATHER 
GREEN. DEE ANN 
HAYES. JILL 



HOLMS. TAMMY 
HUBBARD. KIMBERLY 
ISAACS. KAREN 
JOHNSON. KAY" 

LAW. ROBIN 
LOWELL KRISTIN 
LUX. MARY 

MARTINSON, KIRSTFN 


MAYFIELD. SHAWN 
MCALLISTER. JODI 
MCCONNELL, KELLY 
MCNABB. SHARON 
MEYER. KIM 
MIDDENDORF, BETH 
NILAN. PATRICIA 
OBRIEN. DANA 


OLSEN. KATHLEEN 
OSBORNE.KAREN 
PENROD. KARYN 
PETERSON. LEANNE 
PLATT. ELIZABETH 
PRICE. ANN 
PRINCE, SUZANNE 
REMBOLD. KIRA 


ROACH. JAMISON 
SAHR. ELIZABETH 
SASAKI. STEPHANIE 
SCHROEOER. REBECCA 
SCHULTHEIS. KIM 
SCHULTHEIS. THERESA 
SHOWALTER. JULIE 
SLECHTA, JANNA 


SMITH. ALLISON 
SMITH. JANE 
SMITH. LAURIE 
SMITH. VIRGINIA 
STEVENS. KAREN 
STIRRETT, HOLLY 
THOMPSON. LAURA 
THOMPSON. LORRAINE 


URBAN, CHERYL 
VIERECK, MONA 
VITUMS. HEIDI 
WALLER. ANN 
WAX. LANI 
WHEATON. LEEANN 
WHITE. KAREN 
YOLER. LAURIE 


1984 / Living Groups 361 












































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Kappa Delta keeps that winning 
tradition...Practice, practice, practice 
brings 37 pledges during Rush...TKE 
Waterfollies champions — Go TKE 
lightning...Homecoming ’83, No. 1, Pi 
Sigma Kappa Delta go — go! Hey 
have fun — it’s mandatory!...Triad 


with Tri-Delts and AGR’s...Pledges 
put on “Bermuda Bash’’...Little sis’s 
make Big sis’s go on a “chug-a-thon” 
for paddles...Sophomore P.J. dan¬ 
ce...“Let’s make it a'theme so we can 
wear Bermudas’’...Pledges give house 
new T.V. for better MTV and “All My 


Ghildren” pleasure...Gelebrity Alan 
Thicke named KD “Daggerman” for 
1984...White Rose formal attended by 
one and all...Gruise with ADPi’s is 
floating madness!!...What an awe¬ 
some year! How could next year be 
any better? I’m sure we’ll find a way! 


362 Living Groups /1984 

































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ACUFF. JACKIE 
ADDLEMAN. CHERYL 
BABBITT. TERESA 
BABCOCK. SUSY 
BROOKIE. KIMBERLY 
BROOKS. CHARLOTTE 


BUCHEA. COLLETTE 
BURDICK, KATHERINE 
BUXTON. CHERYL 
CASCIO. DANA 
CATON, NANCY 
CERQUI. MICHELE 
COOKER. ALISON 


DANNERT. DEBRA 
DAVIS. ELLEN 
DECHENNE. CYNTHIA 
DEHAAN. NANCY 
DOUGLAS. SUSIE 
FAULSTICH. JULIE 
FERBRACHE. KIMBERLY 



FOSTER. LYNN 
GLASGOW. BRENDA 
GLAZE. ELIZABETH 
GRAHAM. ONDREA 
GREENE. BARBARA 
GREENE. JULIE 
GROSSO. ANDREA 
GRUMME. KARIN 


HANSEN, KINDRA 
HASKO. KIMBERLY 
HOLMBERG. CAROLINE 
JENTGES. CATHY 
JOHNSON. SUZANNE 
KISLER. KARI 
KLOBUCHER. MARCl'E 
LANE. MAUREEN 


LA VERY. NAIDA 
LYON. DONNA 
LYTER-SMITH. ELAINE 
MAHONEY. COLLEEN 
MARKHAM. TANYA 
MARTINIS. SUSAN 
MCCARTHY. SANDRA 
MERGENS. DEBRA 


MOONEY. SHAWN 
NELSON. JENNIFER 
NORDAHL. BETH 
PALMER. ANN 
POPESCU. REAGAN 
PULSE. KIM 
REEVES, CASSIE 


ROOT. BARBARA 
SCHNEJDMILLER. GENA 
SPRUGEL. LYNNE 
SZUCH. JENENE 
SZYMANSKI. JOYCE 
THOMPSON. KAREN 


THOMPSON. PAULA 
THORTON. SHANNON 
VAN. CECILIA 
WELLS. ADRIENNE 
WIER. WENDY 
WING, NANSI 


1984 / Living Groups 363 
































































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“Variety is the spice of Kappa” — 
variety is perhaps the best way to de¬ 
scribe a housef ul of active, on-the-go 
girls like Kappa’s. While one Kappa is 
out making hot shots on the tennis 
court (Jonah), another is atop the sun¬ 
roof basking in the sun (Lynn). Still 
another may be found in a more stu¬ 
dious atmosphere maintaining a great 
GPA (Pam). “Just a reminder” 
though, despite their busy schedules, 
Kappa’s do find time to be together 
with their sisters. Popular meeting 
times include 12:00 noon for “All My 
Children,” back alley blow-off func¬ 
tions and crazy Kappa dances. Gotta 
love those handsome Kappa dates in 
their formal attire at KKG’s pledge 
dance — and the more casual setting 
— the luau at the well-known Pullman 
Moose Lodge. Or the springtime 
cruise — thanks for a good one Chi- 
O’s! Let the Kappa’s “entertain you” 


at Mom’s Weekend, Dad’s Weekend 
and other concerts throughout the 
year as Crimson Company members 
Annie, Laura B., Laura G., and Patty 
sing and dance for you. Kappa efforts 
go beyond the dance floor. The Kap¬ 
pa’s did fare quite well in the athletic 
department — congrats to a number 
one soccer team! Kappa’s are not a 
one-sport team — they proved their 
skills in basketball, football and soft- 
ball as well. Those girls don’t look so 
harmless with their mouthpieces — 
(Kuhnny to Bethel for six!) Also, 
three cheers for those Kappa’s on the 
sidelines who cheered the Cougs on — 
WSU cheerleaders Sue, .Michelle and 
Carmen. 1^83-84 kept the Kappa’s in 
full swing with important new edi¬ 
tions — rush welcomed 30 “spirited” 
pledges of multiple talents, name 
“composite stealing.” The traditional 
“house dog” was hard to come by but 


thanks to Woody, Joanne and Schaef¬ 
er, the Kappa’s didn’t remain “pet¬ 
less,” they provided a home for a tank¬ 
ful of goldfish. Kappa’s did have their 
more serious moments with a money¬ 
making activity, a balloon brigade to 
help support Pullman United Way. 
(Winners of the raffle were mainly of 
those balloons which managed to drift 
beyond the first row of stadium seats 

— oh well, Lori!) The “apathetic 
seniors” hardly lived up to their name, 
they had plenty of spunk and rarely 
failed to study participate in house 
activities, particularly consumption of • 
study treats. Well, how can you dis¬ 
tinguish a Kappa from any other 
sorority girl? — She’s probably dres¬ 
sed in sweats from a little too much 
“Kappa delight” but more important¬ 
ly, she has a smile that radiates a uni¬ 
que quality of friendship and loyalty 

— nothing but a true “blue” Kappa! 


ALLEN. CYNTHIA 
ANDERSON. REBECCA 
BARTKO. KIMBERLY 
8ATTERTON. DEBBIE 
8ATTERT0N. LAURIE 
BEINNER. KAREN 
BENNETT. ANN 
BETHEL. ELIZABETH 





364 Living Groups /1984 























BLOMQUIST, SUSAN 
BOON. JILL 

BRUMBLAY, JENNIFER 
BUCHANON. PATRICIA 
BURATTO. ANN 
BURMA. KARIN 



CADD. SUSAN 
CAHOON, THERESA 
CAPRIOLA. LAURIE 
CARBONE. CARMEN 
COBB, MELANIE 
COLLINS. DEANNA 
CRAPSER. SANDRA 


CRITES. MICHELLE 
EAKIN, JULIE 
ELLIOTT. MARY 
EMERSON. MELISSA 
ERICKSON. DENISE 
FORT. ROBIN 
GARRETSON. LAURA 






STUR2A. JACQUELINE 
SUMMERS. ALICE 
THOMSON. CYNTHIA 
THOMSON. KAREN 
VANDERLINDEN, ANN 
WARFIELD. PATRICIA 
WARINNER, MARY 


GlLLlS. JULIA 
GREEK. CAROL 
HANSEN. CAROL 
HARDER. LISA 
IRSFELD. KARIN 
KNAPP. GRETCHEN 
KRUSE. ELIZABETH 
LANE. ANDREA 


MAIER. TAMMY 
MAYS. SHARI 
MCCAW. KIMBERLY 
MILLER. CAROL 
MILLER. KATHI 
MONSON. ANN 
OS80RNE. ERIN 
OWENS. MOLLY 


PARKER. LISA 
PARSONS. AMY 
PEARSON. MICHELLE 
PETERSON. CARRIE 
POLENSKE. DIANE 
RIKALO. JODY 
ROGERS. JANENE 
ROSMAN. JONELLE 


SAINDON. AMY 
SCHAEFER. JANELLE 
SCHINK. LINDA 
SCHWENGER. JILL 
SHIDELER. KAREN 
SNIDER. WENDY 
SORENSEN. PAMELA 
STILL. JACEY 


1984 / Living Groups 365 

















































Pi Phi ... an angel in disguise! Rush 
starting on the golf course and ending 
in the orphanage ... GMPGB night 
and the fraternity serenades in our 
PJ’s ... the time with the Kappa’s and 
Theta’s at Triad ... Homecoming with 
Phi Delt’s ... Beta Thanksgiving din¬ 


ner ... our wonderful Ring Ching 
Steve ... Senior Ride ... Beau and 
Arrow Pledge Dance... Junior Jama... 
Senior Impulse ... and Cruise with 
AGD’s. She is involved around cam¬ 
pus in SPURS, Order of Omega, 
Panhellenic Executive Council, and 


the Cougar Yell Squad ... She is an 
individualist ... Pi Phi is a house of 
individuals unified in friendships, 
striving to uphold the ideals of Pi Beta[ 
Phi. 


366 Living Groups /1984 





























BEARDSLEY. DEEANN 
BERRY, LAURIE 
CAMMACK, HEIDI 
CASTLEBERRY. KELLI 
COLWELL. KRISTI 
COPENHAGEN. CARLA 



DAVIS. PAULA 
DEBRUYNE. LORI 
DICKERSON. LISA 
DIGERNESS. SHARI 
DOBLER. KRISTIN 
DORRANCE. LINDA 
ENYEART. KAREN 


FANNING. MIKKI 
FREUEN. CATHERINE 
GILBERT, JANE 
GOODMAN. CYNTHIA 
HALL. ELISABETH 
HALL. JENNIFER 
HAUGE. LORNA 





PENNINGTON. ROBIN 
PIKE. MICHELLE 
PRATT. ROBIN 
RANGER, CHRISTIN 
RAY. KIMBERLY 
RICE. JAM I 
ROMNEY. JULIA 


SANNES. JILL 
SCHMITZ. MARGARET 
SCHWARTZ. KELLY 
SKAGEN, JOAN 
SMITH. LORI 
STACHOFSKY. JILL 
STOCKER. KRISTIN 





HAYES. KELLIE 
HOLMSTROM. SONJA 
JAREMKO, LISA 
JOHNSON. JOAN 
JOHNSON. ROBIN 
JORVE. KATHY 
JUSTIN. JENNIFER 
KAFER JOAN 


KELLY. PATRICIA 
KNAPP. JULIE 
KREMER. ELIZABETH 
LAGERLUND. CHRISTY 
LAMOTTE, ANDREA 
LEVINE. AMY 
LILES. CARLA 
MANNING. SARAH 


MARTIN. HAYLEY 
MARX. JENNY 
MCBRIDE. JENNIFER 
MCGOWAN. TRACEY 
MORFORD. KRISTIN 
NELSON. MARLA 
OVERSTREET. AMY 
OVERSTREET, LORI 


1984 / Living Groups 367 

































































Sigma Kappas! 1983 In Review ... 

New landscaping and a vibrant 
Rush Week, giving us a prize-winning 
crew of eager new Pledges kicked off 
Fall 1983 ... 

Before long ... TKE’s Waterfollies, 
our studying started, our Pledges 
snuck out of Watermellon Bust to 
Spokane, our Dads come to visit and 
root on the Cougs and our Founder’s 
Day celebration in November with 
our T.C. Jan ... 

Selling endless boxes of M&M’s and 


putting on our annual Spaghetti Din¬ 
ner, our Pledge Class swept us off our 
feet at “Violets in the Snow” — our 
pledge formal at Best Western in Mos¬ 
cow ... 

Senior “Elfs” brought Sigma Christ¬ 
mas Cheer as they “Decked our Halls” 
and Santa even made an appearance 
at our Sigma Kappa X-mas party! 

... -Things kept up hoppin’ in the 
house ... house chores, night phone 
duty, seniors shoveling snow ... not to 
mention Soaps, MTV, Evening Aero¬ 


bics and Candle Passings. 

“Sig’s and Delt’s were HERE TC 
SAY” at Homecoming and “She’s go 
the legs of Betty Grable ...” led our pii 
serenade and Inspiration Week. 

Soon came more exchanges ... A sk; 
trip to Schweitzer ... Sigma Safari! .. 
Moms Weekend and Cruise! 

... What a year Sig Kaps! 

“She’s Always Up and Jumpin’, A 
ways On The Go ... Cause She’s a Si 
Kap!” 


368 Living Groups /1984 

















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BENSON, CARRIE 
BLAKE. JUDY 
BOYD. DIANA 



BROUILLARD. MARY 
BUNCE. BARBARA 
CHEESMAN. MARY 
CODDINGTON. SARA 
COOK. CAROL 


COOK. MARTHA 
CROSS. LEANNA 
CURTIS. JOAN 
DELONG. KIM 
DOR GAN, ANDREA 
FRALEY. USA 




FRYZEK. DAWN 
GATES. MARGARET 
GILLILAND. ERIN 
GOTTSCHALK. CRYSTAL 
GRIFFITH. CHRISTINE 
HASSA. KRISTINE 
HENDRICKSEN, CHRlSTI 


HENDRICKSON. MELINDA 
HILES. MELANI 
HIVELY. CONSTANCE 
HUNTZINGER. SARAH 
JAUSORO. GINA 
JOHNSON. JILL 
KECK. CATHERINE 


KELLY. FELECIA 
KILL ION. CAROLYN 
KLIPHARDT. LENA 
LEONARD. EDITH 
MATHEWS. KELLEY 
MCCARTNEY. KAROLYN 
MCNALL, KELLI 



TIDWELL. NANCY 
TWIBELL. CARRIE 
TWINING. LAURA 
WINDER. GAIL 


1984 / Living Groups 369 








































370 Living Groups /1984 


The Games People Play 


strong participants. Fraternities and 
sororities pair up for the entire week 
prior to the Homecoming football 
game and practice for the “Home -1 
coming Games 1 '. These games include 
the chariot race, skin the snake, tug-o- 
war, yelling competition, and yard 
displays promoting the homecoming I 
slogan. The Greeks go as far as paint¬ 
ing their faces in crimson and grey j 
and designing team shirts to impress 
the judges for the spirit competition. 

The teamwork continues as the 
Greeks participate in intramural' 
sports. Although, intramurals are 
open to all students, Greek f s dominate 6 
in the majority of events, whether its a 
mens, a womens, or a co-ed team. 

Although the Greeks participate 
heavily in athletic competition, their 
activities include much more than 
merely sports. During Dad's I 
Weekend and Mom's Weekend the 
Greeks post huge signs in order to 
welcome their parents to campus, j 
This thrills the parents upon their 
arrival to WSU and also keeps the 
spirit running high in the Greek 
houses. 

The most exciting Greek event ar -! 
rives each spring though, when Greek 
Week rolls into the semester. Tradi¬ 
tionally, each day of the week has a 
special spirit event, such as Greek Let¬ 
ter Day, and Scholarship Day. One 
night of the week, all the houses are 
involved in a dinner exchange where 
12 members of a house are guests in 
another Greek house. The week in -! 
eludes the Superstar Competition, 
Wheel Exchange, and community ser¬ 
vices. The superstar competition is 
made up of different events each 
year, such as an obstacle course, a Pep¬ 
si chugging contest, rope climbing, 


Left: Make Way! An AOPi player blocks for 
her teammate during the Annual Watermelon 
Bust football game. 


Games people play,- You take it or 
leave it 

Things that they say, Just don't make 
it right 

If I'm tellin' you the truth right now, 
do you believe it 

Games people play in the middle of 
the night 

-Alan Parsons Project 


WSU fraternities and sororities 
participate and sponsor many activi¬ 
ties throughout the school year. 
These activities range from extra¬ 
curricular sports to serious fund¬ 
raisers. 

At the beginning of the year, home¬ 
coming always kicks off a great com¬ 
petitive week in which the Greeks are 


























Games... 

and various races. The chosen super- 
stars of each house represent their 
house in these events. 

Saturday morning the Greeks com¬ 
plete various community services 
from recycling materials to cleaning 
up the city. 

The wheel exchange is held on 
Saturday night. It resembles a big 
happy hour , but is organized in a 
manner that all the houses will meet at 
one time during the evening. Two to 
three fraternities remain at one of the 
seven base houses , while two to three 
of the sororities rotate in hourly shifts 
to the base houses. 

At last, the entire week is wrapped 
up with an awards presentation. Va¬ 
rious awards , including pledge of the 
year , outstanding community service, 
and overall competition winners are 
announced. 

Almost all of the houses have their 
individual activities as well. The 
Greeks sponsor a number of charity 
fund-raisers in which the whole uni¬ 
versity if often invited to participate. 
Some of the more notable events in¬ 
clude; ATO’s Dance Marathon , Kap¬ 
pa Sig’s Apple Bowl Run Against 
Cancer , and Sig Ep’s Heart Fund 
Run to name a few. ATO’s hold a 52 
hour dance marathon in early spring 
to raise money for the Eastern 
Washington Epilepsy Society. The 
proceeds from the marathon supple¬ 
ment the society’s budget by as much 
as one third of the yearly sum. The 
ATO’s at W.S.U. have been sponsor¬ 
ing this event for 10 years in the hope 
of raising funds for epilepsy treat¬ 
ment and increasing public awareness 
about the nervous-system disorder. 


Above: The Winner! The checkered flag is 
dropped at the Beta 500 Soapbox Derby. Be¬ 
low: On Your Mark... Runners in the Sigma 
Phi Epsilon Heart Fund Run begin the 7.6 
mile trip from Moscow to Pullman. 



kkkkktkkkkktkttttttt 




1984 / Living Groups 371 


















Games... 


The Kappa Sig’s Apple Bowl Run 
Against Cancer is another of the big 
charity events sponsored by Greeks. 
Kappa Sig’s from W.S.U. and U ofW 
volunteer for the cross-state relay run 
to the host university's stadium. Run¬ 
ners collect cash sponsorship by going 
door-to-door, in addition to dona¬ 
tions from the general public. This 
year they raised over $15,000 toward 
research on cancer. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon has sponsored a 
Heart Fund Run every spring for run¬ 
ners, both from the Pullman com¬ 
munity as well as the univeristy. The 
run covers a 7.6 mile length. All run¬ 
ners receive T-shirts and prizes are 
awarded to the male and female with 


the top times. This year the run netted 
$1,200 for the Heart Association. 

Other houses contribute to selected 
charities also Phi Gamma Delta and 
A-Chi-O’s earned over $1,000 in the 
March of Dimes walk this year. Kappa 
Delta holds a yearly “swing-a-thon" 
on the swings in Reany Park for the 
Children’s Hospital in Richmond, 
Va., AOPi’s donated $425 to the 
Arthritis Foundation, their national 
philanthropy, Lambda Chi’s donated 
2600 cans of food to the Epton House 
association, and Beta's held their 
annual soapbox derby with proceeds 
going towards Multiple Sclerosis. 

The Greeks stage events for fun 
and entertainment as well as for char¬ 


ities. The first big occasion of the year 
is the Lambda Chi “Watermelon 
Bust.” this is a week long affair in 
which sororities compete against each 
other in various events for the overall 
championship. The events include: a 
watermelon quest where the girls are 
given riddles to help them search the 
campus looking for a hidden water¬ 
melons, a football tournament, a can¬ 
ned food drive, and a party for the 
victors at the end of the week. 

The Tekes have an annual function 
dubbed “The Water Follies," again 
only for the sororities. They have 
competitions, parites, and naming of 
the TKE Waterfollies queen at this 
week-long event. 



nongan 


A IDO STORE 

** VILLAGE 



1 1 

- VI 

11 A 




372 Living Groups /1984 


















Betas hold their annual Beta 500, 
Soapbox Derby each year on Colora¬ 
do Street by Regents Hill. Anyone is 
invited to participate in the races, and 
afterwards they have a dance with live 
bands on their side lawn to celebrate. 

The oldest annual Greek event is 
AKL y s Sorority Softball Tourna¬ 
ment, at 16 years. The occasion is 
marked by a formal dinner hosting 
the captains of each team, beer chug¬ 
ging practices at the Spruce and other 
fine drinking establishments, the soft- 

i ball tourney itself, and an all Greek 
happy hour at the end of the week. 

A hay ride, serenades, dances, and 
“firewatch” highlight AGR’s week- 
long Barn Daze . Held in May every 
year, it begins with the freshman 
building a rail fence around the yard, 
setting up an old covered wagon, and 
starting a fire in a cauldron in the 
front yard. Sorority girls ritually try to 
tear down the fence on Monday night; 
so it is guarded by water-balloon 
armed pledges. Wednesday night 
they take a hay ride with the bigsis’s to 
Klemgard Park, where they roast 
marshmellows and sing songs by the 
fires. Friday night is the “firewatch ”, a 
house-only barbeque party held on an 
alumni's farm nearby. The final 
night, Saturday, features AGR’s Barn 
Dance, the highlight of their year. 


Phi Delfs “Waterbust” is the last of 
the Greek sponsored events held dur¬ 
ing the year. Held at Boyer Park in 
late May, “Waterbust” is a pre¬ 
summer and pre-finals bash. Four live 
bands, endless beer, parachuters, 
hangliders, a volleyball tournament, 
and (usually) lots of sun are featured 
at this end of the year function. 

The Greeks host a multitude of 
fund-raisers and events during the 
course of the year, not to mention the 
university sponsored activities, which 
involve them. The continuing theme 
of teamwork and unity, which the 
Greek system seems to promote, is 
never more evident than in the activi¬ 
ties in which they participate. 


Left Page: JUMP! Participants of the ATO 
Dance Marathon enjoy the music by Van 
Halen as they “Dance To Give Them A 
Chance”. Above: Beer or Bust? Phi-Delt’s 
Waterbust ended the 1984 Greek activities. 
Right: Don’t Trip! After putting his head on a 
baseball bat and spinning around, a Delta Tau 
Delta member concentrates on completing the 
obstacle course during the Superstar Com¬ 
petition of Greek Week. 


A special thanks to the Greek houses and people 
who took the time to supply the facts and trivia for the 
Greek section. 







1984 / Living Groups 373 




























T.M.S.! Orangutang Training on 
V.D.’s Blanket! In your ????! The 
Couch Potatoes! Ebudah, There once 
was a girl named Dot ...! BLFCC! 
Squaw Bay Lives! Teddy Kennedy 


and the Hairy Aarses, A smile here, a 
smile there brings a happy face every¬ 
where, Lean her against the wall, we’ll 
have a Who beefed? Turn around 
fat thighs, the biggest thighs you’ve 


ever seen are at Acacia. Harsh toke 
bud, Narly, Get out of my face, Riding 
the porcelain pony, Driving the big 
white semi, Questions? Drink your 
face off. 


374 Living Groups /1984 














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BERGHOUT. CHRIS 
BERGHOUT, JOHN 
BERGHOUT, PAUL 
BRENTIN, PATRICK 



SCOTT, DANIEL 
SETTLE. SCOTT 
STEWART. JOHN 
SWENSON. ARNE 


VIERTHALER. PETER 
WISCHMAN. JOHN 
WITTER, JOHN 
WITTMAN. ROBERT 


DAHL. KEVIN 
DELLA, DAVID 
DUNN. DAVID 
DUNSMORE. KENNETH 
DUSKIN. TODD 
GEIST, SCOTT 


GILLILAND. CRAIG 
GOSSE. GENE 
GRAFF, RICHARD 
HAMMER, WILLIAM 
HAYES, JOHN 
HOLTEN. DAN 


JEFFREY, ROBERT 
JOHNSON. AJ 
JOHNSON, MARK 
KENNA, BRIAN 
KENNEDY, BRYAN 
l.EIBSOHN, BRIAN 


LINDBERG, THOMAS 
LOOFBURROW, DAVID 
MALCOLM 
MCDOUGAL. TOM 
MCNABB, TIMOTHY 
MONLUX, STANTON 


MORROW. JAMES 
MORROW, MICHAEL 
MOSS, WILLIAM 
OBRASTROFF, MIKE 
PAULSON. CRAIG 
RECTOR, JAMES 



1984 / Living Groups 375 




























































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Alpha Gamma Rho in 1984 — what 
a year it’s been for WSU’s only agricul- 
ture social-professional fraternity- 
...new and exciting activities along 
with brotherhood, pride and tradition 
— always growing and moving up 
with that good of AGR spirit. First of 
all, thanks alumni for a super remod¬ 
elling job and a great time with the 
over 200 people who attended our 
first annual Alumni Weekend, you 
guys are super! This fall kicked off in 
a big way with the 29 best pledges on 
campus, and talk about enthusiasm, 
from their “Free For All” Pledge 
Dance, a wild sneak to Lake Coeur 
d’Alene and a whole bunch of new 
members after initiation, the “boys” 
are now right at home. The house 
grew some more with the crowning of 
our first Goddess of Demeter at the 
Christmas Fireside...“We love you 
Karen,” the rest of the contestants and 
our big Sisses — thanks for being our 


friends. Speaking of Big Sisses, those 
Rho-Mates are the best! From their 
“Dying to Meet You Under the Cov¬ 
ers” sleeping dorm dance, to early 
morning breakfasts to ski trips to Sil- 
verhorn (not to mention Osburn and 
Wallace) we love you all too! Socially, 
the AGR’s drove into high gear with a 
quad to get things starred (thanks 
AGD’s, Pi Phi’s and ATO’s), our First 
Triad with the KD’s and Tri-Delt’s 
was a blast, not to mention the func¬ 
tions; remember golfing and dancing 
in the streets with the Alpha Chi’s, and 
that unforgettable Baby Miller Hunt 
with our Valentines the AOPi’s, just to 
name a few, thanks gals, they were 
exce]lent! Anchorsplash was awesome 
DG’s, we were the defending champs, 
“Grease” was the word for songfest 
with the Pi Phi’s...more good times. 
Tradtional Pink Rose Formal in Mos¬ 
cow and the 48th Annual Barn Dance 
were also huge successes. Mom’s and 


Dad’s Weekends were special times, as 
always, and thanks Moms for the new 
TV. Believe it or not, the chapter was 
also geared to scholarship and lead¬ 
ership in ’84. We were first in grades 
last spring and sent several chapter 
leaders to an Officer Training Semi¬ 
nar in Reno. AGR’s were involved all 
over campus, from ASWSU commit¬ 
tees, to IFC, Greek Week, intramural 
sports (we made the waterpolo semi¬ 
finals) to heading many organizations 
in the College of Agriculture and 
Home Economics. Almost forgot, we 
added four more new members to our 
house this year: Marion, the sweetest 
cook in the world, Rocky, our Golden 
Retriever and everyone’s best buddy, 
and Myron and Hiram the kittens. 
That was our year, we grew as a house 
(capacity’s up), as friends, and in our 
brotherhood; we wish you all the best 
and we’re looking forward to an even 
better year in ’85. 


376 Living Groups /1984 




















PEYSER. TODD 
RICE, CURTIS 
RICHARDS. STEVEN 
TELFORD. BRETT 
TIPTON. WENDELL 




VERHEY, PETER 
WARREN. WILLIAM 
WEBER. RICHARD 
WOLTERS, TERRY 
ZIMMER. MIKE 


FLETCHER. TODD 
FRITCH, ERIC 
FURNESS, IAN 
GUSKE, LOREN 
HABERMAN, BRENT 
HALVORSON. ROBERT 
HARRIS. JAY 


HARRIS, JOE 
HENNING. MARK 
HIMMELBERGER, DON 
JOHNSON. JEFF 
KELLER. THADDEUS 
KING, ROY 
KOLLER. BRENT 


KOLLER, MONTY 
LANGE, DAVE 
MARLOW. BRADLEY 
MCDOWELL. ALLEN 
MCKAY. GREGORY 
MINS HALL, RICH 
MITZEL, DAVID 


1984 / Living Groups 377 

















































































































Never a bore in ’84 for AKL: Back 
to school Keg-circle up and let it flow!! 
... AKL takeover at Triad 83 ... Once 
again, the food is edible thanks, Bev ... 
What versatility: Order of Omega; 
KUGRjocks, LaCrosse, Rugby, Army 
Rangers (Hey Guy aand John, where’s 
the war?) ... Glen and Dave, the 4.0 


brothers, way to go!! ... Wrecking 
crew is on the way out ... Miller Gang 
shall triumph ... Trouble in Shangri- 
la? ... Boville Run (Streetsigns? What 
streetsigns?) ... Awesome Rush Yields 
Prime Pledges ... Member’s Dance, it 
was hell at AKL ... Animal House! Re¬ 
visited (Great spodie, Huh?) ... Soft- 


ball Tourney — more fun than any 
human deserves to have ... An era is 
coming to an end ... Who knows what 
the future holds? ... We’rejust here to 
ride the rainbow ... Don’t touch that 
dial, more to come in ’85!! 


378 Living Groups /1984 
























kkkkl 




RENNEY. BRIAN 
RIGGINS. DANA 
ROSS. JAMES 
ROSSER. GUY 
ROVAI, STEPHEN 
ROY. ERIC 


DUKE. FRED 
FULTON. BRUCE 
GOSS. SCOTT 
HALLER. MARK 
HEILIG, KERRY 
HEMENWAY. DOUGLASS 
HEPPELL, STEPHEN 


HILL. MICHAEL 
HOWARD. GREG 
HOWELL, MICHAEL 
LAVALLIE, JOSEPH JR. 
LESLIE. BRIAN 
LINDGREN. DAVE 
MACKIE. ROBERT 


MCMURRAY. EDWARD 
MILLER. THOMAS 
MURPHY. DANIEL 
OLNEY. TONY 
OLSON. BRETT 
PETERSON. BRAD 
PONTI, DARIN 


1984 / Living Groups 379 











































































Congratulations are in order for a 
few Taus. Rick Ellingsen-IFC Vice 
President, Order of Omega; Mike 
Connell-IFC Public Relations, Order 
of Omega, Coug Guys and Gals; Kelly 
Stopher-Order of Omega, IFC Rush 
Committee; Varisty Athletics — Dan 
Lynch (All Pac-10), Charlie Flager 
(2nd Team All Pac-10), Pat Lynch 
(Academic All Pac-10 and an amazing 
interception), John Winslow, Mike 
Dreyer, and Jeff Christenson; Wrest¬ 
ling — Michael Dotson and Rick Ell- 


ingsen; Tennis — Ron Ellingsen and 
John Click; and those amazing mana¬ 
gers — Jim Bartko and Garth Moore: 
Pinnings — Ron Hendrickson, Ron 
Jewett, Darren Nnolan, Ron Ellign- 
sen, and Greg Fothergill: A special 
thanks to the musical efforts of Dave 
Talarico and Kelly Moore; and, an 
outstanding contribution to the house 
— Greg Witter and Darren Nolan. 

Thanks Kappas for a terrific 
Homecoming — our banner was the 
best! Tri-Delt’s — Awesome Songfest! 


Highlight of the Year: We pledge 
26 outstanding young men and one 
moose! What happened to Mandingo 
this year? Lambda Chi’s and Sigma 
Nu’s — Triad was great, but a Phi Delt 
(Beinner) had the best looking date; 
Temple — take another drink! Arny 

— Desenex man! Clarke and Gerety 

— Chi-O’s decided to press charges; 
Dings On Class? Thanks Ward and 
Company — nice happy walk! And 
Finally, Bwaaad, Quit Picking!! 


380 Living Groups /1984 





























POE. ALAN 
POE. CHARLES 
POOL. DAVID 
RAVER. TODD 
RICE. EDWARD 
SCHMIDTGALL, MARK 
SCHWARTZ. WILLIAM 


SELLS. JEFF 
STOPHER. KELLY 
STOPHER. KEVIN 
TALARICO. DAVID 
TEMPLE. ROBERT 
WALKER. GEOFFREY 
WINSLOW. ROBERT 


ARMSTRONG. DAVIO 
BAILEY. BRAD 
BARKER. JEFF 
BARTKO. JAMES 
BETHUNE. BRADLEY 
BLATTNER. JOSEPH 


CHRISTENSON. JEFF 
CLARKE. DAVE 
COLLINS, RICHARD 
CONLEY. SCOTT 
CONNELL. MICHAEL 
COZZETTO. STEVE 
DAVIS. RONNIE 


DOTSON. MICHAEL 
EASTER. DOUGLAS 
ELLINGSEN. DAVIO 
ELLINGSEN. RONALD 
FITZSIMMONS. MARK 
FOTHERGILL. GREGORY 
FOTHERGILL. STEVE 




GAFFNEY. MICHAEL 
GERETY, RICK 
GOUDY. PHILIP 
GRIESS. KENNETH 
GROESCHEL. PETER 
GRUBER. BILL 
HEINTZ. JAY 

HENDRICKSON. RONALD 


HOGGER. MARTIN 
JENSEN. ARNE 
JEWETT. RONALD 
JOHNSON. KEVIN 
JONES. TODD 
KELLY. BRETT 
KENNEDY. MICHAEL 
LENZ. LARRY 


MACDONALD. DANIEL 
MATSCH. WAYNE 
MOCK. DAVID 
MOORE. GARTH 
NOLAN. DARREN 
PATRICK. MICHAEL 
PHILL. DAVID 
PICHA, RUSS 


WITTER. GREG 
WYCHE. TIM 
WYCHE. TODD 
YAMASHITA. MASATO 
YANO. ART 
YEOMANS, TIMOTHY 


1984 / Living Groups 381 







































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This is totally absurd. 


382 


Living Groups /1984 


•I* 





















FORSLUND. WILLIAM 
HALLESY. KRIS 
HOOD. JIM 
HORNE. SCOTT 
KAUFFMAN. LESTER 
KELLY, KIRK 



KIMBALL. KARL 
KNOWLES. MARK 
KOIDAL. MICHAEL 
LAMB. ROBERT 
LAVERY. BRIAN 
LUMLEY, BRENT 
MALLOCH. STEVEN 


MORK. JOHN 
MYERS. RUSS 
O NEILL. EDWARDS 
ORINT. NEIL 
PAGE. ROBERT 
PAPPAS. JAMES 
PEPPEL. DUANE 


PRICE. ERIK 
PRINS. DOUG 
PRINS. STEVE 
ROBBINS, TODD 
SCEA. GREGORY 
SCHERZINGER. RICHARD 


1984 / Living Groups 383 








































QdfaU- PfaP 



Another year at Delta Sig’s has gone 
by, we’re still here and going strong. 
Once again we characterized the year 
with the usual events: the Coeur 
d’Alene Cruise, Triad at Giovi’s, 
Carnation (this time in Lewiston) and 
the infamous Pledge Dance Beach 
Party...a few sharks, but luckily both 
the seafood and clam-digging proved 
to be excellent. The backyard barbe- 
que was played by Otis Sow and the 
Muttons...Roast Beast for Rush and 
Dad’s,...hooray! Sailor’s Ball, another 
splashdown in the spodie, saw water¬ 
falls and submarines, Acapulco “cliff 
diving” and bobbing for fruit! Could 
it ever be as fun?!! We survived the 


Christmas flood without an ark (Col. 
J. probably weathered it out on the 
barge) and the house is looking better 
than ever (thanks to a “piece of the 
rock”). The first annual Silverhorn ski 
trip was outstanding, although expen¬ 
sive. Ten bucks never seems to go 
quite as far as it used to. The “Oper¬ 
ators” were movin’ some roundball 
but it was the James Watt Fan Club 
that took the courts by storm. The 
usual football games were also there; 
did we beat the Huskies...again?...or 
were we singin’ in the rain in front of 
Hec Ed just because the puddles were 
deep enough to dance in? The 
brothers raced with half-cases this 


spring...how long is five minutes any¬ 
way? Speaking of races, how about 
down Colorado Hill with the DG’s 
again this year? Thanks ladies! Espe¬ 
cially for Homecoming...and finally 
coming home...from Boville! What a 
year it has been, the furniture ejection 
parties (now if we could get Pruden¬ 
tial to pay for that!) and the tunnelers 
discovered that thee is more to Cam¬ 
pus Caverns than Barley and Hops. 
Congrats and many more to all the 
DSP’s who have distinguished them¬ 
selves in the past and will continue to 
do so in the future! Keep looking 
ahead guys! 


384 Living Groups /1984 












ADAMS. MICHAEL 
ALLEN. DOUGLAS 
ANDERSON. JOHN 
BAKER. CHRISTOPHER 
BERG, HERBERT 
BIGLER, DEREK 


BREWER. KENNETH 
BRODECK. KEN 
BURKS. BRUCE 
BURNS. BRAD 
CARVER. DWANE 
CAWLEY. BRENT 


CLIFTON. NEIL 
CLOGSTON. DAVID 
COATES, PHILLIP 
COLLINGHAM. MARK 
CRAWFORD. KEVIN 
DITZLER, JOHN 


DOBSON. STEVEN 
ENRIGHT, JOHN 
ENRIGHT. MICHAEL 
GRAVES, DONALD 
HANSEN, KENNETH 
HANSEN. MARK 


HARDER. CONRAD 
HARRIS. ROBERT 
HENRIE. MATTHEW 
HOOPER. KEN 
HUGHES. JOHN 
JELLISON. CHRISTOPHER 


JOHNSON. JACK 
KOHLMAN, TERRY 
KONISHI. KEVIN 
KRAGERUD. BRET 
ULLENESS. WILLIAM 
LORENZ. JEFFREY 


MADDUX. PERRY 
MCALISTER. MARK 
MOLVER. ERIC 
MORRISON, DAVID 
PETERSON, MARK 
PHIPPS. JAY 


PICATTI. DOUG 
POLITAKIS. CHRISTOPHER 
POTTER, TIMOTHY 
PRIDEMORE, DAVID 
OUATIER. BILL 
RAYMOND, JOHN 


ROBERTSON, RANDALL 
STULTZ. TROY 
TAYLOR. GREG 
TRIESCH. MARK 
WRIGHT. CHRIS 
ZIMMERMAN. MARK 


1984 / Living Groups 385 


































ffatticface pejfas 



What’s Vanesa’s number? Nice but 
Gross. Chinless Wonder, clean my 
towel. Take the Broomstick 
Balow...Red sheets. Have another 
drink, Spak, the chapter alcoholic. 
Pledge sneak — Lewiston, grab her 
65-year-old Breast, Weed. Chinese 
Downhill Cline — the aggressive 
skier, Brew dews with Schmidt...plan 
C — Little. What’s foreplay, Fred? 
Buttqueeb. Buffy’s a Porch Monkey. 
Wake me up ten minutes before din¬ 
ner? What a Levlo...let’s R.F. Grant. 
Lewiston, H.S. Wheeer’s Kizzy? Angle 
parking only...427 Big Block. She 


386 Living Groups /1984 


likes me more. NFC...Elaine, I’ve go 
Halston 151 on baby...Why do they 
call it the Clap, Arne? The cave floor, 
thanks babe. Wes Loomis — Chapter 
President. Thanks Dan, the Pledge 
Class of ’87...Kingpin — where’s Potsy 
and Pfeifer...wine bottle. Lance — 
Lost Weekend. Freeze — Exec. 
Jump...VH, Yeast for Dessert — 
Brau. Let’s deal with it. Spark it up 
Groff. Hang up, it’s for Willis. Got a 
dip/...ooooh, Harder. Geek-my friend 
did it. Nice stach Levi...MI gets 
roached again...Where’s Barb — 
Russ. Paglialunga — Fa la la. “Don’t be 


a heel, play the wheel...Don’t be 
flake , beat my shake.” Rat’s the New 
dude...Keesh. You’re bugging me 
and what not. Nice Car, cave, T.D. — 
new low. “BETA’S IN THE NIGH! 
’’...Nice story — Wick. T.J. — Where’. 
Petra? Have a B.T. Mike, you cool 
better...Thanks, Mike. MTV — 
“Please feel sorry for me.” Part* 
T.V...Hey shinascrew — Nice 
Woman. Greg Massey — Supe: 
Pledge...Commando’s, “They callet 
me Pussy, so I shot them” — 
Chachi...I love you, I hate you. Th* 
Delt Safari...Schmidty’s on ice. 





































kWLWLkLWkkWkkLkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk 


BEHRMANN. FREDERICK 
BETTINGER. JOHN 
BRAUER. ROBERT 
CHRIST. ALFRED 


CLINE. JOHN 
COREY. RUSSELL 
DRUMMOND. JAY 
DRUMMEY. TERRENCE 
EWING. GRANT 


FASONE. DONALD 
FITZGERALD. PAUL 
FRY. MICHAEL 
GROSSI. THOMAS 
GULLIKSON. JEFFREY 
HARDER. MICHAEL 



SANDELL. TYLER 
SANDQUUIST. MARK 
SCHINMANN. KEVIN 
SCHWISOW. SCOTT 
SHERRELL. KIRK 


4fl 


SPAK, PATRICK 
TYSON. ARTHUR 
VALENTINE. THOMAS 
WHITEHEAD. JEFFREY 


HILUARD. CHUCK 
HOLT. ARNE 
JANUCHOWSKI. JON 
JOHNSON. THOMAS 
KUKLISH. DAVID 
LARSON. KEITH 
LEVI. JOHN 


LEWIS. RICHARD 
LINDGREN. GARY 
LITTLE. DAVID 
LOOMIS. WESLEY 
LOWE. DOUGLAS 
MARTINSON. ALAN 
MASSEY. GREG 


NELSON. ROBERT 
NORWOOD. DAVID 
OL8ERDING. GLEN 
PAGLIALUNGA, DEAN 
RICHERT. LANCE 
RODDY. MIKE 
ROGERS. DANIEL 



WICKLINE, MICHAEL 
WICKLINE. PAUL 
WILLIS, PATRICK 




1984/Living Groups 387 
































k.tk.kkkk.k.ktk.k.ktk.tk.k.k.k.k. 


QtOfas (J&'Zti&YLS kkk 



‘‘Apparently you thought we 
wouldn’t have a really happening type 
of year.” Beer slides and caveman din¬ 
ners lead to a pretty much sweet 
Homecoming Chi-O’s. How’bout that 
yard display? Nice try Cort. Pledges 
pummel Kutch, great sneak! 18 mi¬ 
nute keg — good effort! “Hey Russ 
and Jim, how’s Carson? Really? That’s 
great. Thanks for swingin’ by.” Big sis 
pumpkin massacre...Clean yourselves 
up and then pop off. 105 towel par¬ 


ties...Christmas lights in November? 
Marion and Liza punt Tad on “The 
Kids.” Blind Date Function — Ricky, 
where’d your date run off to? DFW 
Snowball team. Biff! We know who 
the best team was. Awesome PJ 
Dance. Opie, what was goin’ through 
your head in Wallace? That’s nasty 
baby! New Pledges “Jump” all over 
those jobs. Initiates ~ Where’s the 
sheep? Ya Mo Be. There with AGD’s 
for a crazy Greek Week. What a tug- 


of-war team...or not. Super Jeff. Zig- 
gy Stardust and The Spiders from 
Mars. Songfest ’84 — sing it by your¬ 
self Dave. Somebody find me a baby 
seal. Jud makes a big splash. Anyone 
for a game of softball? Someone get 
Earl a cup of tea, and put a little lemon 
in it. Incredible year! Ya gots to know 
what I mean. 


388 Living Groups /1984 












ALDRIDGE. JEFF 
ANTUSH. STEPHEN 
BEACOCK, RUSSELL 
BELL. TIM 

BERHOW. ANDREW 
BOYCE. MARK 
BOUTILLIER. JAMES 



CHANCE. MARK 
CHEEK. CRAIG 
COX. RANDY 
CUMMINGS. BRYAN 
DAHLQUIST. JEFF 
DEAN, MARK 
DELEN. LUKAS 
DOBISH. GARY 


EGGERT. G. ERIC 
FERGUSON. GREGORY 
FEIDER. DARREN 
FRITH, BRIAN 
GORDON. GARY 
GREENWOOD. KELLY 
GRUWELL. STEVEN 
HARBOTTLE. JERRY 


HARGIN. WILLIAM 
HENDRICKSON. JEFF 
HOOVER. SCOTT 
HOUSTON. EARL 
HUCK. TODD 
HUNT. JOHN 
JENKINS. JEFFREY 
JENSEN, DRENE 


JOHN. KENNETH 
JOHNSON. CORT 
KUTSCH. DUANE 
LOSS. JOHN 
MARTIN. DAVE 
MCCHESNEY, TERRY 
MCCLINTOCK, WILLIAM 
MCLAUGHLIN. ERIC 


MEADOWCROFT, KEITH 
MELTON, JEFFREY 
MELTON, TIM 
MERCADO, RICHARD 
MESICK. JAMES 
MONSON. WILLIAM 
MURPHY, TIMOTHY 
NEAVILL. JAMES 


NELSON. MARK 
OSTREM. TODD 
PALMER. DAVE 
PLUMMER. GRANT 
PORTER. SWAIN 
PREECE. JUDSON 
PYEATT, JEFFREY 
REAVES, JAMES 


ROMSTEAD, D.R. 
ROWELL, TODD 
RUPPERT. JOHN 
SCHROEDER, STEVEN 
SCHUELER, MICHAEL 
SPLANE. WILLIAM 
STEIGER. RAYMOND 
STOCKMAN. WILLIAM 


THOMAS. DEAN 
TOWNSEND. PETER 
TUCKER. LEO 
WAGNER. ROBERT 
WEBER. MARCUS 
WEINBENDER, MATTHEW 
WILSON. DAVID 
WINTERROTH. JEFFREY 


1984 / Living Groups 389 




















































kkkkkk 



Farmhouse, or Funny-Farmhouse? 
We all remember Raoul’s heavy- 
handed fertilizing that burned up the 
lawn then somehow made it look its 
best for rush ... The downstairs sleep¬ 
ing porch (PIT) raids: pitchers of wa¬ 
ter, Firecrackers ... The annual house 
us, Annex snowball fight, complete 
with beer between rounds ... The oval 
office that could not produce a “Presi- 


dent’s Corner” ... House grades: The 
President’s Dishonor Role lives ... 
Practical Jokes: Ron’s face when he 
saw his rabbit’s new wave hairdo: a 
pledge sneak that left crickets in the 
sleeping dorm: mistakenly seating a 
distinguished dinner guest in front of 
pie topped with sour cream! Eight 
spring pledges one must have witnes¬ 
sed a food fight in his first visit ... 


Sunday dinners (Ugh!) Let’s call 
American Pie! Thursday — Hillstreet 
Blues Party ... The marriage bug that 
ended with a “Mattress-Ride,” leaving 
we-know-who with a peanut-butter 
moustache ... Intramurals-FC 
Wheels, The Flying Chinaman, The 
Brew Crew, and the Awesome Curve 
Coeds ... A fun year of new and old 
traditions. 


390 Living Groups /1984 


































FELDMAN. MARK 
FONG.PETER 
GREEN. DAVID 
HAMILTON. MYLES 
HANSEN. ANTHONY 


HART. PHILLIP 
HENDERSON. DALE 
HURD. ROGER 
JOHN. SAMUEL 
KUROSU, DARIN 


LANGAN, MARK 
LAUINGER, JOSEPH 
LEE. HENRY 
MIELKE. ROBERT 
MINER. JEFFREY 


MONAHAN. THOMAS 
MOORE. ROGER 
MURRAY. TIMOTHY 
REGAN. JOHN 
SEMRAU. JOHN 


SILVA. CHRISTOPHER 
SINNOTT. DOUG 
SKAGGS. RONALD 
STAN WAY. FRANK 
THAYER. DAVID 


THOMPSON. MICHAEL 
TIDWELL. BRAD 
WASHKOSKA. TODD 
WATRUS. KEVIN 
WHITE. KEVIN 


1984 / Living Groups 391 







































As our own Edward R. Murrow 
would say, “This is Kappa Sigma...” 
And indeed it is! Can we talk? About 
good friends and good times? We’ll 
start with our 75th anniversary at 
WAZZU. There were alums from all 
over the land, and who says you’re 
over the hill when you leave college? 
They reminisced and parties, and 
geez, if the gals were as good in the 
40’s and 50’s as these guys made them 
out to be, we were a//born too late! We 
ran across state in the annual Apple 
Bowl Run, and despite having more 
fun than is decent, we raised $20,000 
for a great cause. Had a blast doing 
Homecoming with the Gamma Phi’s 
and when all was said and done, a 


beautiful friendship had been 
formed. It was rekindled on the Bovil- 
le Run, which isn’t a run at all, but a 
party on wheels. What keeps those 
girls going? And the parties ... oh the 
parties! Trading clothes with the 
AOPi’s couldn’t have been better ... 
And who on this planet could forget 
the Caveman Function with the Kap¬ 
pa’s? There was the Pearl Harbor 
function with the Chi-O’s, and yes, 
there were those that got bombed ... 
And how about those Pi Phi’s from 
Idaho? Right over the state line and 
into our hearts! 

All took pride in our status as Top 
Ten Chapter in the nation, the cam¬ 
pus felt our impact in leadership posi¬ 


tions, clubs and committees, Rally 
Squad, and varsity sports. 

But most of all, 1984 will live fore¬ 
ver in our hearts because we truly en¬ 
joyed one another’s company ... 
What’s better than sitting up till three 
talking about girls, or sports, or telling 
high school tales? And of course that 
ultimate example of Americana: 
shootin’ the breeze at the Coug over 
the pitcher. 

And there ahead of us is the f uture, 
and the questions it poses. Will any¬ 
one quit saying “dude?” Will the 
“Blues” return? Will we ever pledge a 
person named Ben? Will Rex EVER 
fall in love? Will Honner? Stay tuned 
... ’85 is looking awfully good! 


ALPAUGH. JOHN 
0ARSTOW. SCOTT 
BLANC. TIMOTHY 
BOYCE. RICHARD 
BOYDSTON. ANTHONY 
BRACKETT. GREG 
BAAUTI. DAVID 
BUTAUD. CHRIS 



392 Living Groups /1984 




















kkkkkkkkkkkh 


BUTAUD. GREG 
CHALICH, MICHAEL 
DOUG AN. BARRY 
DUFT. WILLIAM 
DUNN. JOHN 
FALCON. WILLIAM 


FEDJE. SCOTT 
FINKLE, CRAIG 
GAITHER, JOEL 
GUISINGER. CRAIG 
HABRYLE. LEE 
HAGHIGHI, SHAHRIAR 
HANSON. PETER 


HARPSTER. SCOTT 
HAWKINS. MICHAEL 
HECKER. JEFFREY 
HOGLUND. KRIS 
HOGLUND. ROBERT 
HONNER. RONALD 
HOOPER. CRAIG 



HOOPER. JEFFREY 
JACKLIN. GLENN 
JOHNSON. ERIC 
JOHNSON. JEFFREY 
KELLAM. TERENCE 
LARSEN. JOHN 
LETENDRE. GUY 
LLOYD. RICHARD 


MARSHALL. GARY 
MCLAUGHLIN. PAUL 
MIRKOVICH. JOHN 
MURPHY. PATRICK 
NANGLE. PATRICK 
NESS. GREGORY 
NYSTROM. KEITH 
PELLERIN. THOMAS 


PETERSON. BRUCE 
PHILBRICK. DAREY 
PIRKLE. LANCE 
POTTS. CHARLES 
POWER. JUSTIN 
REBER. SCOTT 
REX 

RICHARDSON. THOMAS 


ROBINSON. JEFFREY 
ROMANESCHI. BRENT 
ROVETTO. MARK 
SANOELIUS. BRIAN 
SCALZO. DAVID 
SCHIMKE. ROB 
SCHNELZ. JONATHAN 
SCHOBER. TIMOTHY 


SCHROEDER. MICHAEL 
SCHUMSKY. STEVE 
SETZ. ERIC 
STOLLER. BRUCE 
STRAZZARA. CHARLES 
STRUBLE. JEFFREY 
STUBBEN. DAVID 
TAYLOR. PATRICK 


THORPE. JAMES 
TUTTLE. JEFFREY 
VANDENOYSSEL. JAMES 
VANDENDYSSEL. JEFF 
VANVOORHIS, KENNETH 
VAWTER, ANDREW 
WADE. PATRICK 
YATES. JOHN 


1984 / Living Groups 393 






































































Bam-Bam, asshole of every week. 
VViz, have ya’ got a tree for sale? Galli- 
gan — how’s the right hand? Spanky, 
Buckwheat loves ya’ — and wants to 
dance with yo’ date. Hey, let’s go to 
Atlanta and check out KUGR. Who 
loves ya’ baby? 


394 Living Groups /1984 


Lambda Ghi — who’s your guy? We 
answer our phone after two rings. We 
are a very unique bunch of guys. Our 
dog is great. ZAX will be with us fore¬ 
ver as long as he stays healthy. It must 
be tough to resist those beautiful girl 
dogs! A friend of the house, almost 
another brother. Lumpy — what a 


great guy. Hey, let’s go shopping with 
your VISA. Hey guys, I’d like to intro¬ 
duce you to Shannon — by the way, 
put on some Michael Jackson and 
check it out. Robin, you’ve been a 
great Crescent Girl — Thanx for ev¬ 
erything, we love ya’! Lemon and 
Lime — how about some Mayonnaise. 































AUSTIN. STEVEN 
BAKER. BRAD 
BASIL. MICHAEL 
BECKER. MARK 


kk 


kk 


kkkkkkkkkkkk 



BELL. ROBERT 
BENNETT, DAVID 
BONE. KENNETH 
CHOATE, DAVID 
CORBALLY. JEFFREY 
DITTER. MIKE 



FEINSTEIN. JEFFREY 
FLOYD. TODD 
GALENO. PAUL 
GLOVER, DANIEL 
GLOVER. WILLIAM 
GREEN. JAMES 
GUDBRANSON. GREG 


GUSTAFSON. DAN 
HAGGEN, BRAD 
HONAN, JAMES 
HORNER. GREGORY 
HORNER. MICHAEL 
HOWELL. JOHN 
HUDSON. KENT 


HUIZINGA. STEVEN 
HULL. BILL 
KERO. DAVID 
KLINGER, JEFFREY 
LARSEN. WARD 
LUDWIG. ERICH 
MADSON. TIM 


MCCAUSLAND. MIKE 
MYATT, SEAN 
NEVAN, CHRISTOPHER 
NORDI. RICHARD 
O'CONNOR, CHAD 
OSBORN. TIMOTHY 
PAGEL. GREGORY 


PAGEL. VICTOR 
PECKENPAUGH. ROBERT 
PETERSEN. DAVID 
PRICE. SCOTT 
RAMSEY. SCOTT 
ROCKWELL, BRIAN 
SCHMICK. TODD 


SCHNABEL. FRANK 
SCHWISOW. RODNEY 
SIDELL, SCOTT 
SOMMER, JOHN 
STARK. ROBERT 
TILLMON. ANTHONY 
VANDENKOLK, MICHAEL 


VANDERWALL. MARK 
WELCH, RONALD 
WHITTLES. LEE 
WOOD. DAVID 
WOODS. PATRICK 
WORTHINGTON. RYAN 
ZAX 


1984 / Living Groups 395 




















































pkt Dtlfa-lUfcu 





It was a year of inspired accom¬ 
plishment for all Phi’s. Beginning 
with a Rush that lead to pledging 22 
very “studly dudes” and then leading 
into a busy year, the functions were 
“sweet” and the studying was occa¬ 
sionally “brutal,” but the Phi’s always 


reached the “peak.” There were 
phone messages on U-dub “station¬ 
ery” and “wild four man” parties. 
There were bus loads for Spokane 
football games and pajamaclad nights 
of “dancin’ in the streets.” There was 
an eight-house exchange and who can 


forget the all-famous Miami Triad (o 
was that Biad). There were “baked* 
days at the ‘‘dunes’’ and hot nights ii 
“scow.” In all that Phi’s do, one ma' 
always be assured that the candles o 
PHI DELTA THETA will burn or 
forever... 


396 Living Groups /1984 
















E ANDREWS. DAVJD 
AUVIL. GRADY 
BALMELLI. MICHAEL 
canova, JOSH 
CARLSON, DAVID 


CHITTICK. BRIAN 
COOKE. JAMES 
COOKE. WILLIAMS 
CORDT. CHRISTOPHER 
COXEY, GREG 
DURETTO. MICHAEL 




FICKE, LEE 
FINHOLM. JAMES 
FISCHER. BRUCE 
FLYNN. PATRICK 
FOSEID. PAUL 
GELLOS. CHRISTOPHER 
GILBERT, GREG 


GLASE. JOHN 
GOLD. EDWARD 
GOULD. PAUL 
GRAY. GARRETT 
GRIFFIN. CHRIS 
GRIM. JAMES 
HACKETT. MICHAEL 




HARRIS. JOEL 
HEUTMAKER. THOMAS 
HOLLINGSWORTH. DAVE 
HOSKIN, SCOTT 
ISAACSON. PETER 
JONES, COREY 
KALANQUIN. DEAN 
KOSIANCIC, TERRENCE 


KYCEK. ALAN 
LANGE, RONALD 
LANNING, JAMES 
LARSON, DAN 
LINDEMAN. MICHAEL 
MALONEY. EDWARD 
MANLEY, PAUL 
MCCRARY. RAYMOND 


MCGINNIS. THOMAS 
MEANS, PAUL 
MELTON. JAY 
MURPHY. JEFFREY 
MUTH, CRAIG 
O DELL. ROBERT 
OLSEN, JOHN 
OORDT. CHRIS 


PARKER, PAUL 
PELLY. CALEB 
PHILPOTT, MICHAEL 
PROTEAU. THOMAS 
QUINN. THOMAS 
ROBERTS. BRAD 
ROBINSON. ROB 
ROGERS. SCOTT 


ROOT. TOM 
SCOTT. BOWEN 
STILL. CRAIG 
SUNDSTEN. MARK 
SWARTZ. STEPHEN 
TRANUM, TQD 
URBAN. MICHAEL 
WINQUIST. MALRITZ 


1984 / Living Groups 397 










































































































The construction of a Fiji. Gus, will 
you be here this weekend? We need a 
bathroom ... Is the construction ever 
going to be done or do we have to sell a 
computer disk so Rosie has more than 
Woody to cook? Harmon, are you 
awake? Jay, you’re too herbal... Cleao 


has NGU and Ronny’s running’ ... 
Blowitt, did your sister score this 
weekend ... Johnson, pre-school is 
out, make your selection ... Bringing 
in the Pig... there goes 87. The pump¬ 
kins died ... Will the speds ever recov¬ 


er. Vic, Terry made out the check ... 
Ginger’s waiting ... got a lift? Dave, 
how’s the noise committee coming? 
JR, you’re still asleep ... Steve moves 
that Raz moves ... get out of here Don, 
we love you. 


398 Living Groups /1984 























SERGE. MATT 
BRAZIER. THOMAS 
BROWITT, JAMES 
BROWN. GREGORY 
CARLSON. CHRISTOPHER 


CHAMBERS. PETER 
CURTIS. MICHAEL 
OEFREES. MARK 
DONAHOU, JOSEPH 
DUNSMOOR. SHAWN 
ESTEP. PETER 



NORTON-RIEOEL. 
GREGORY 
O'TOOLE. JOHN 
PETERS. DAVID 
PUTH. THOMAS 
RAZ. DONALD 


ROWLAND. FRANK 
SANDERS. GARY 
SARGENT. JOHN 
SCHORSCH. JAMES 
SMITH. DAVID 


FERGUSON. KEN 
GHAN. JEFFREY 
HEDEEN. ERIC 
HIGGINS. JAY 
HULL. BENNETT 
IRWIN. MICHAEL 
ISAACSON. DENNIS 


JACOBSON. WILLIAM 
KERN. BRYAN 
KLEIN. BRIAN 
KOVALENKO. PETE 
KROMMINGA. JON 
KROMMINGA. LEE 
LEFFEL, CHRIS 


LEHMAN. ERIC 
LEISY. RAY 
LUNDBERG. JEFFREY 
MACKOVICH. RONALD 
MILLER. JAMES 
MOUCK, JEFF 
MUELLER. TERRY 
MYERS, STEPHEN 


SMITH. PHILLIP 
STOCKER. KEITH 
STOFFER. GREG 
WYTKO. THOMAS 


1984 / Living Groups 399 





















































!?W 





Now when a Phi Kap Man walks 
down the street you say, “Now there’s 
a guy I’d like to meet.” What an ex¬ 
perience. Our first year in the new 
house. Quarters taste good. Right G? 
Romping and stomping at the Barn 
Bash. Three-day ski trip was a big suc¬ 
cess with plenty of sun and snow. 
Hanky Shpanky and his pet horse. 
What a team! Soccer team took IM 


championships and remained unde¬ 
feated. California Exchange: had fun 
touring the state with the AOPi’s. 
Mark doing his imitation of Richard 
Pryor doing a Swan dive. Saving seats 
at football and basketball games. 
Member sneak to Delta Chi. Aaron 
went 0 for 3. The Little Sis’s had fun 
with their housecleaning antics. First 
Annual Jungle Juice Extravaganza. 


Good times at the Big Bro/Little Bro 
Drink-off. Pledges held a car bash 
then held a Pledge Dance. We froze 
our butt’s off at the Member/Pledge 
football games. On Feb. 21st we cele¬ 
brated our third anniversary of being 
on this campus. Here’s to hoping that 
Mr. X had a good-time up at Eastern 
that one cold winter morning. 


400 Living Groups /1984 












CHAPMAN. BRETT 
DEPHELPS. MICHAEL 
FREEMAN. ROY 



LUCKEY. WESLEY 
MACDOUGALL. ROBERT 
NELSON. CURTIS 
NEUMILLER, ROBERT 


PAULSON. DAVID 
PETERSON. MICHAEL 
REBAR. PATRICK 



INGRAM. DOUGLASS 
JONAS. SCOTT 
KIM. YONG NAM 
LARDIZABAL. SCOTT 
LARSEN. CHIRSTIAN 


1984 / Living Groups 401 













































C* 



Doyoyoing ... 24 new recruits at 
Kamiak, here’s to brother who? ... It’s 
never too late ... Boxer Bash 83 — 
Who’s mashing with my date? ... 
FREEBIRD, time to gator. First 
annual Miss Sportpack ... Congrats 
Karen ... Drool, is it live or Memorex? 
... Pledge sneak-Beav, we’re sorry ab¬ 
out your truck...Who swallowed the 
goldfish at the Pledge Dance ... Ron, 
where’s your KD Pledge Dance Date? 
... Chester, How ’bout them Mariners? 
... Michael’s just sooo sensitive ... Hey 


402 Living Groups /1984 


Boy! ... Schweitzer — Who’s left at 
home? 6 guys. (9 cases of beer.) Every¬ 
thing is under control ... LET’S GO 
SURFIN’!! SURFIN’ IN ZIM¬ 
BABWE! ... Impact-Close Call Spik- 
er? ... Too drunk to drive home from 
Othello so let’s go to Ellensburg ... 
What’s for Chunk? Dad, when do we 
get to meet our new mom? Have some 
brownies, make some chili... PULL!... 
I LOVE YOU GUYS! Rock? Cruise? 
The white bomb rides again? Formal 
on May 18th? I hope we get some ASH 


... Pay your housebills! Beaver, Pledge 
of the Year ... If you think I’d come 
out with the Buckwheat wig on you’re 
in for an MF Surprise! ... Donald 
(Krawpa, Krawpa) Pie Time! 
McQuaid, Back Booth! Let’s go Gol- 
fin! ... 22’8%”! 6.93m. Movin’ — 
Yeah! Groovin’ — Yeah! Ze be zib idi 
deobah — Yeah! ... Biffy, Where’s the 
Rabbit? ... Find ’em!... It can not be 
more unique than to be a PHI TAU!!! 




















AMBLE, JOHN 
ANTTILA. GEORGE 
ASHBURN, GARY 
ATTEBERRY, KEVIN 
BRIEVIK. HANS 
BURRIS. EBEN 


CHESS. JAMES 
CLEMENT, ALBERT 
COCKBURN, STEVEN 
COE. STANLEY 
CONE. RONALD 
CUTLER. JACE 


DAVIES. JOHN 
DOANE. JAMES 
DUBOIS. JAMES 
ELLIS. JEFFREY 
GOLDEN. WILLIAM 
GREEN. RONALD 


GROSS. MINER 
HEJKKINEN, THOMAS 
JESSEN. JOHN 
JONES. D BRENT 
JURGENSEN, ERIC 
KNIGHT. MAURICE 


KRAUPA, DON 
MATHISON. JAY 
MCCORD. CHRISTOPHER 
MCDONALD, TODD 
MCOUAID. MICHAEL 
MCVAY, SCOTT 


MILLER. GARY 
MILLER, RONALD 
MUELLER, JEFFREY 
MUNSEY, KYLE 
PARROTT. MIKE 
PARSH, DAVID 


PEDERSON, ROBERT 
PENNING. MATTHEW 
PETHICK. BILL 
PHILLIPS. WILLIAM 
PITTMAN. DAVE 
PUGH. MARK 


RALPH II 
RAMELS, PETER 
RENGSTORFF, MIKE 
RUTLEDGE. D MASON 
SCHELLBERG, TIMOTHY 
SNOVER. MICHAEL 


VILHAUER, PETER 
WACHTER. TIMOTHY 
WEIR, KEVIN 
WHITING. ROBERT 
YULE. GREGORY 
2DILAR, JAMES 


1984 / Living Groups 403 







































































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% r 1 y 


In 1983-84 Phi Sigs got Rad! Out¬ 
standing Chapter Award brought 
back from New Orleans; Homecom¬ 
ing: “You bit off more than you can 
chew — Phi Sigs/KD’s walked all over 
you.” Our astronaut visits; Recipe 
Club: “How ’bout them Cougs and 
hex ’em Swam!” The stussy didn’t 
run, but Boof set pizza making re¬ 
cords; Canadian football! It sucks! 


Pledge dance and Cocktail party; 
Love stinks, Spontaneity, 
GOOOOOOOD! House meetings at 
6:00. “You Mo Be Dare?” It just 
doesn’t matter! Beacon’s Preach’n; 
Generas for sale! P.Y.F.H.B. Dor¬ 
man’s exchanges? Look behind the 
couch, Ahmann; Whaaaat Wick?!! 
Ready Break! Have a good one; 
Spring semester for Willie; Study 


bitch! S.C.A.B. society. But leave the 
goal posts alone, “Let’s go to the 
Coug,” B&B night. Pudding races; 
Thursday nights on Tuesdays; 
BAAAA; Mell Dude! Sco O! S’up? 
Happy Hour; S’appnen? Pledge Class 
of’82’s food fight; Darin is sebrious or 
somesing; Hard work and good times; 
Sanks! 


404 Living Groups /1984 
























ACCORNERO. MICHAEL 
ADAMS. JEFFREY 
AHMANN. GREGORY 
AHMANN, JEFFREY 
ANDERSON. KEN 
ANDERSON. SCOTT 
AVERY. DWIGHT 


BLUMENSHEIN. MICHAEL 
BROWN. THOMAS 
COWAN. ROBERT 
DAGGET. KEVIN 
DARLINGTON. DOUG 
DEAN. BRETT 
DUNN. CHARLES 


EERKES. LYNN 
ENGLE. CHRISTOPHER 
ERNSDORFF. GARY 
FUHRER. DARIN 
GETTMAN. GREGG 
GEYER. PETER 
GILBERT. LEE 


GOODWIN. GRANT 
GREEN. CHRISTOPHER 
HADER. WADE 
HARRIS. DAVID 
HAWK. JAMES 
HEFFRON. JOHN 
HOOD. GREGORY 


HORTON. MACK 
JOHNSON. CHARLES 
KELLY. CHRIS 
LARSEN, STEVEN 
LARSON. ERIC 
LIVINGSTON. DOUGLAS 
LOWE. STEVEN 


LUCKEY, OMAR 
LYKE. JAMES 
MARKS. DANIEL 
MCPHERSON. STEVEN 
MCVEY, DAVID 
MITCHELL. ROBERT 
MOCKETT. PAUL 


MONTGOMERY. MICHAEL 
MOOTHART, DEAN 
OLIVER. JON 
PETRICH. STEVEN 
PETTIT. MORRIS 
ROBEN. MICHAEL 
ROEDER, JAIMIE 


SAMPSELL. MATTHEW 
SELSTEAD. GREG 
SPRINGER, THOMAS 
STANLEY. JEFFREY 
STEWART. JEFFREY 
TRENEER. WILLIAM 
UTZMAN. GLEN 


VANWORMER. SCOTT 
VIRTUE. MARK 
WARREN. MICHAEL 
WICK, PETER 
WILSON. NICHOLAS 
WOODS. JOHN 
WORLEY. RON 


1984 / Living Groups 405 












































































































































P( /PLph #-—' 





Remember the first week after 
rush? 26 kegs!! Number one social 
fraternity! But, what happened to Bill 
Condisoti? What a dicksmoker! Was 
Leonard talking to Bill? If so, he sure 
did listen, but who wouldn’t? Oh well, 


wanna cut the cards? No? Come at me, 
brother of low morals; you anger me. 
I’m glad you’ve got lots of money, 
Gracey, because you’re so scuzy you 
make my...(No. 1 all time song!) Itter 
bitter skitter bitter itter (Gracey) Not 


too much though, it takes a 2.4!! Ha, 
Ha, Cowboys, go silver and black 
attack! Prettyboy and Babyface, watch 
out thermostats!!...The noon crew is 
growing larger and larger every day- 
...PiKA, you’re number 1 all the way!! 



406 Living Groups /1984 



























BROWN. STEVEN 
CAPPETTO. TONY 
CARMODY. DANIEL 
CHAPLIN. JOEL 
COMBES. BRIAN 
COOLEY. MARK 
CROWE. DICK 
DAHL. KEVIN 


DAVIS. LARRY 
DEHNING. BRENT 
DEMPSEY. PATRICK 
DETWILER. DOUG 
DICKERSON. ANTHONY 
DIETSCH. GREGORY 
DOSSA, KAREEM 
EDWARDS. MATTHEW 


FIEDER, TODD 
FORSBERG. ROBERT 
FORTMANN. SCOTT 
GILFRY. PAUL 
GINN. ALEXANDER 
GRANGER. EDWARD 
GRAY. STEPHEN 
HAYES. DAVID 


HENN. DAVE 
HEYN. MARTIN 
HINTON. STEVE 
HUTCHINSON. JOHN 
JOHNSON. JAMES 
KAPPES. MICHAEL 
KELLEY. MICHAEL 
KNOTTS. GILBERT 


KNUTZEN. ROGER 
KRANTZ. DANIEL 
LENT. MARK 
LEONARD. DONALD 
LIKES. JEFFREY 
LINDSEY. WILLIAM 
LITTLE. JONATHON 
MANION. MARK 


MANKE, MATTHEW 
MASSEY. JAMES 
MAY. JAMES 
MCCULLOUGH. MICHAEL 
MEDALIA, STEVEN 
MOUNT. TODD 
MOYNIHAN. THOMAS 
MULDER. MATTHEW 


MURPHY. EDWARD 
NASON. MICHAEL 
NELSON. DUANE 
NEWMAN. STEVE 
NICKLES. PAUL 
OSWOLD. TRACEY 
PARKER. DOUGLASS 
PAZASKI. KEVIN 


PEMBERTON. DEREK 
REINHOLT. JAMES 
REYNAUD. GORDON 
RHODES. GARY 
RICHARDS. WILLIAM 
ROBERTS. RICHARD 
SCHLAGER. JAMES 
SHATTUCK. JEFFREY 


STECK, JAY 
STIRRETT. STEVE 
SUITS. BRYAN 
TAVIS. ROBERT 
THOMAS. STU 
TRUSSELL. KEVIN 
VENERA. BOB 
WITTLER. JEFFREY 


1984 / Living Groups 407 































































































Granpa Cavs, Redfeather, Capes- 
baby, Sniper man without neck. Bo, 
Fortuitous Phone, Lord Kovi, Stu- 
head, BirdlegsTippy, Vig,T.J. Reem- 
er, Morg, Pancho, Harry, J.B., Be- 
lushi, Booboo man with dog hair. Su¬ 
per Dave, Erobicise midnight pizza, 
Popcan and Peggy — where’s your 50 
bucks, Action, Duke, Doc, Gabco 


LovePecks, Crab, Gillohomo, Norm, 
Badness, Chewbacca, Arnie revolving 
resume', Das Speigs, Portch the zoo 
keeper, Ziprock, Mo, Scooter man 
without date, D.W. Loverod, Skip the 
Dip, Jorg the Dip, Hap the 4th Dip, 
Monkey in the lobby Bloomage, 
Gooby, Pipeline, Kickstand, Neck- 
bolts Frankie, Maggie, MaC, Denny 


Pogo, Doctor? Bobby, Wimpy, Doker, 
Ty, Waterbucket, Stud the Still, Bildo/ 
boogar, Disco Donny, Flash — Cap¬ 
tain Positive, Tad, Jay Bird, Sandbag, 
Snagglepus, Gorge, Elmer Fudd, 
Fishlips Rocket, Glasshouse, Skye 
mini ears, Hammer, Don Jumping 
Majors, Brandoof, Spiro, Lars, and 
Olga Storm and her dog Chi. 


408 Living Groups /1984 
























TASOFF, JEFFREY 
THIES. RANDY 
WALTARI. KEVIN 
WILLIAMSON, SKIP 



FRASER. ROBERT 
FULLER. DANIEL 
GIBB. TYLER 
HALE. CHRISTOPHER 
HAYS. MICHAEL 
HEATH. ROBERT 
HENSLEY. MARK 


HILL. ROBBIE 
HOBSON. BRANDON 
JOHNSON. SCOTT 
JOHNSON. TED 
JORGENSON. JOHN 
KALKOFEN. DONALD 
KEMP, KENNETH 


LANGTON, THOMAS 
LINDBERG. ERIC 
MAYEDA. STEVEN 
MCBRIDE. TOM 
MCLAIN. WARD 
MORGAN. STACY 
PENNINGTON. CARL 


1984 / Living Groups 409 



















































'^’cpritL' CJhX 





1983-84. Hey Sigma Chi, Big 
Brother is watching you. Speaking of 
Big Brother, JFK and Kipper, did you 
get to watch anybody? Bobby T., 
shame on you ... Shame on BT? Hed- 
lund and Whiplash, Shame on You, 
How’s your grades? Pretty Sneaky 
(RJ) ... We may not be first in grades 
but then again is WSU all grades? Uh 


Uh, Sigma Chi has always believed 
that a college education goes beyond 
academics. Crack a book Ipper! 1984 
was the year of' the vandal (in more 
ways than one). Oh really ... more like 
the year of the E.P. (Tuk). Mick 
thought ’84 was the year of the club¬ 
bings. Speaking of clubbings, Shue 
made ’84 the year of the fine (tried 


anyway). Hot Rod, the year of the 
Ponch? The year of the mirror for 
Coxxxx. OB and Joe, ’83-’84 sure 
wasn’t your best year but you gave it a 
hell of a try! WSU lifter, Sweet P., 
congratulations, you made it! Shaps, 
the year of 1980-81 ... nope, way to go! 
Well, we all agree that 1984 was the 
year of the SIGMA CHI’s! 


410 Living Groups /1984 





















ALONZO. ROD 
ANDERSON. BRIAN 
ANDERSON. GREGG 
8UCHEA. BRUCE 



CALHOUN. DAVE 
CAVALETTO. ALLEN 
CLAUSS 

DAVENNY. JEFFREY 
ELLISON. JAMES 



FAGG. KIP 
FANGEN. RICHARD 
FRAZIER. JOHN 
FRINK. DAN 
FULTON. BRADFORD 
GALLANT. ROBERT 


GEORGE. CHRISTOPHER 
GESSEL. TROY 
GETCHELL. SCOTT 
GIESA. ERIK 
HALE. JOHN 
HEDLUND. BRIAN 


HUBLOU. JON 
IPPOLITO, MICHAEL 
KIDDER, DAVE 
KOST. PETER 
KRAFT. DAVID 
KRAFT. JEFF 


MAENHOUT. MAURY 
NIXON. MICHAEL 
O'BRIEN. MICHAEL 
PAYNE. DAVID 
PERRIGOUE. JEFF 
PERRY. MICHAEL 


PORTNOY. MICKEY 
SANCHEZ. R J 
SANDSTROM. CURT 
SANDSTROM. DERIK 
SAUNDERSON.STEPHEN 
SCHNEIDER, ERIC 


SCHUETT. JEFFREY 
SHAPLEY. MICHAEL 
STILL. JOSEPH 
TAKACS. ANTHONY 
THOMPSON. ROBERT 
VANDALL. JAMIE 


1984 / Living Groups 411 



























































































The 1983-84 school year at Sigma 
Nu was filled with some great mo¬ 
ments. Rush as usual was always fun. 
Sully and the fire escape maneuver 
will always be known as a classic. Who 
could forget Gillman, “Tumbling” out 
of the tree at the pledge sneak. Fly was 
the guy we could always count on to 


keep the front lawn clean. The Great 
Bill Guyer was good for horrible 
house meeting jokes. And of course 
we were all just “psyched” to get 
“peaked” with Jonsey. Collins had the 
most nick-names a person could have, 
isn’t that right Round Ronny. Chase 
and Poorman by next year will com¬ 


pletely own Dominos Pizza. And 
hopefully someday Griepp will de¬ 
velop a body. But the one thing that 
happened in this year that 1 feel we 
can all identify with is the turtle oath, 
“turtles are good, turtles are fun, tur¬ 
tles are a kick in the pants ... for 
people.” 


412 Living Groups /1984 




















k k k k k kkWk k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k kk k k k k k k k 




ACEY. DENNIS 
AUER. JONATHAN 
BARRETT. MARK 
BATTERTON. TRACY 
BEACH. BRIAN 
BISSELL. BRADLEY 




THOMAS. MARK 
VIK. SCOTT 
WEBB. STEVE 
WERNER. KIRK 
WILKES, BRIAN 
WOLFE. THOMAAS 
WRIGHT, CHARLIE 


CORWIN. KEVIN 
COURY, DAVID 
DEHORN. DAVID 
DEJONG. ERIC 
DEVLEMING. STEVEN 
DIJULIO, MATTHEW 
DINGMAN. DOUGLAS 
DOANE. DAVID 


EMMIL, KEN 
EVANS. JAMES 
FILICETTI, JOSEPH 
FLY, JACK 
FODE, RONALD 
FORRESTER. LAWRENCE 
GERBER. DOUGLAS 
GILLMAN, DAVID 


GREGORY, ROBERT 
GRIEPP, DAVID 
GUYER. JOHN 
HOUGAN. JOHN 
HUDON. RICH 
HUMMEL. JAY 
HURLBUT. JOHN 
IRWIN. EDWARD 


JACKSON, KEITH 
JAMES. JEFF 
LEDFORD. BOB 
MCGOUGH. DANIEL 
MONROE. MICHAEL 
O KELLEY. DARIN 
O NEILL, TODD 
PARFITT. SCOTT 


PARKER, ROD 
PARKHILL, DAVID 
PATRICK. MARK 
PEARCE. JOHN 
PEARCE, PATRICK 
PERRY, ALEX 
POORMAN, MATTHEW 
RITTER. HERBERT 


1984 / Living Groups 413 

































































Eptilw 



During this last year at Sigma Phi 
Epsilon, we have shared many good 
things. The fall pledge sneak was a 
fantastic time, but the best part of that 
weekend was tap-hits at eight o’clock 


414 Living Groups /1984 


in the morning on Sunday. Our 
Pledge Dance was a fantastic success 
and everyone had a great time, if they 
remember it. Even though we did not 
get many athletic trophies, it was still a 


good time. All of us are pleased with 
all of our new pledges, officers and 
cabinet, and we are looking forward 
to next year. 


















CONSALUS. CARL 
COOK, WILLIAM 
CRITCHLOW, MARK 
DORAN, SHANE 
ERICKSON, MICHAEL 
GALLUCCI. MARK 
GROSS JOSEPH 


GUINN. SCOTT 
GYPE. RICHARD 
HAGERTY. STEVEN 
HEDGING, TERRY 
HURD, LYLE 
JACOB, RICK 
JOHNSON. AARON 


JOHNSON, KENT 
JORGENSON, RANDY 
KANGAS. TIMOTHY 
KLINKENBERG, PAUL 
KLOBUCHER, JOHN 
KNOX, TOM 
KRAUSE. TERRY 


LABLOND, RICHARD 
LARIMER. DOUGLAS 
LEGG. RANDY 
MARSH. JAMES 
MARTIN. DAVID 
MASON, JOHN 
MCDOUGALL, JAY 


MILLER. STEVE 
NULL, DANIEL 
OSTBERG. STEFAN 
PIPER. KYLE 
RAFTIS. DAVID 
RAYMOND, MATTHEW 
RODEWALD, BRETT 



4 



WALTON, DON 
WAYERSKI, TORY 
WEST, ERIC 
WHEELER. MARK 
WHITE, VAN 


1984 / Living Groups 415 


















Got to be a Teke — Workweek + 
Beer = crooked boards ... Rush — 
wetnight at the smoker ... “Look at all 
these girls” ... Water Follies ... How 
did we spend so much on one party? ... 
“A Pool? Great!” Hey who are all 
those naked people? ... Pre-functions, 


Post-functions, Can’t function ... 
BEER SLIDES ... Pledge sneak, Sorry 
Kappa Delta’s ... BoxerBash, R.C. 
Ball, Happy hours... Housework ugh! 
#?!@# ... Casino ... We raked! ... Lit¬ 
tle Sisters, gotta love ’em ... Sports, 
Initiation ... Dancing in the Coug ... 


Pledge Grades ... you stud) 
machines!!! Pledge Dance ... well 
great glasses anyway ... Announce* 
ments! Crew out ... Summer rules! 
Roof Jumps, Vacation! 


416 Living Groups /1984 

































ARBANAS. CARL 
BARBO. BRAD 
BERG.BRYCE 
BOGGS. JEFFREY 


BORCHERT. PAUL 
BUCKINGHAM. STEVE 
BUNNELL. THOMAS 
CLARK. MICHAEL 
CUSHING. SCOTT 


DINKINS. STEVEN 
DOG 

FAHEY. LAWRENCE 
GIANOULAKIS. STEVEN 
GORDON. BRADLEY 
GREBENC. DOUGLAS 



STANLEY. JAMES 
TOMPKINS. MICHAEL 
TOOMB. JOHN 
VANDERVELDEN, ERIC 


VARGA, DOUGLAS 
VINCENT. JOEL 
WILKINSON. JAMES 


GRIEB. ROGER 
HENDERSON, GREGG 
HENDERSON. KENNETH 
HOARD. DANIEL 
HOOVER. PIERCE 
HOPKINS. JAMES 
JACOBS. PETER 


JOHNSTON. BRYAN 
KENNEDY. KIPP 
KIVIMAKI. JOHN 
KUNZ, MICHAEL 
LIONETTI, DONALD 
LOHUIS. JAMES 
MAAS. BRIAN 


MAGEE. MICHAEL 
MARTIN. RICHARD 
MASON. DONALD 
MCDONALD. SEAN 
MCEVOV. DAN 
MOWLDS. RICHARD 
ORTEIG, DEAN 


1984 / Living Groups 417 


























dkjftuCkt 





418 


Living Groups /1984 


















1 


1984 / Living Groups 419 




ALFANO. MARK 
ALFANO. MICHAEL 
AMES. TODD 
BEAL, THOMAS 
BELMONDO. BRAD 
BERNARD. THOMAS 


BLATTER. ERWIN 
BOE. STEPHEN 
CAN NELL. JOHN 
CANNELL. TOM 
CERVARICH. JOHN 
CHEESMAN. MONTY 
CHESTNUT. DARIN 


CLAUSEN. SCOTT 
DAHL. DAVID 
DAY. CHRISTOPHER 
DOUGLASS. BRAD 
EVANS. SCOTT 
FORSHAG. GEOFFREY 
GALLINGER. GARY 


HAMILTON. TERRY 
HATCHER. JAMES 
HAUB. STEVEN 
HERRIN. SHELDON 
HINCK. STEVE 
HIRSCH. RONALD 
HOPE. JERRY 


HUNT. REED 
HUNTER. PAUL 
JOHNSTON, DAVID 
JONES. EDMUND 
KAY. BRIAN 
KEARNEY, SHAWN 
KEATING. MARK 


KLETT. STEVEN 
KING, BRUCE 
LANE. PATRICK 
LEVERETT. HERSCHEL 
LIEBERG. SCOTT 
LOWERY. CARTER 
LUNDQUIST. CHARLES 


MACWHIRTER. BRUCE 
MEANY. DAVID 
MEANY, PAUL 
MESSENGER. CRAIG 
MOORE. JEFF 
MORGAN. DAVID 
MORRIS, KEVIN 


NELSON. BLAKE 
NJOS. JON 
NOBLE. JOHN 
PAIGE. STEVE 
PORTER. JEFFREY 
RATH. JOHN 
RIDER. CURTIS 


ROJAS. ANTHONY 
SKYTA. DAMON 
SURDYK. LARRY 
SURDYK. LEON 
WALL. STEVE 
WASiSCO. DOUG 



























































420 Living Groups /1984 

















KREAGER. DON 
LENZ. RANDALL 
UNDE. TERRY 
MARTIN, TIMOTHY 


MCAULIFFE. ROBERT 
MEYER. MICHAEL 
MOSTAFAVINASSAB. M R. 
PITZER. JON 


1984 / Living Groups 421 




































































Is it Really Wonderful? 



College life means leaving home for the first time. Some 
lucky college students even move into apartments. 

Many first-time apartment dwellers achieve a euphoric 
feeling at the beginning of their new lifestyle, but is it such a 
perfect life? Many students discover that apartment life isn’t 
all it’s cracked up to be. Unanticipated everyday problems 
arise during the term of the apartment lease. 

Problems such as a roommate who parties too often or not 
enough, a roommate who borrows the other’s property 
without asking, or an excessively neat or slobby roommate 
are common. 

It has often been said that one should never live with a 
close friend if the friendship is to last. This point, often 
argued about, has been proven to be true in many instances. 

Friday night party buddies are fine for Friday night, but 
when it comes to later living with that person, forget it. An 
excuse will always be found to party when two partiers live 
together. 

A problem may also arise if a partier lives with a non- 
partier, especially if the partying roommate brings friends 
over to drink while the “straight” roommate tries to study. 

Borrowing without asking is a common problem in room¬ 
mate relations. Some people find it very upsetting to see 
their clothes on another person without their knowledge. 
“Gee, that’s a real nice sweater you’re wearing, where in the 
world did you find such a beautiful thing?” one asks. 

The last source of roommate problems, which is by far the 
most common, is an excessively clean or sloppy roommate. 
A few books left on the couch for a short while should be no 
reason for a Felix Unger type to freak . If, after a few hours, 
they haven’t been moved, a simple “Would you mind put¬ 
ting your books away?” will do. 

If a roommate lets dirt accummulate to a point where 
cockroaches start walking around, then it’s time for a heart- 
to-heart talk with the problem roommate. If that doesn’t 
work, find a new roommate. 

After an evaluation has been made, assess the pros and 
cons of the “wonderful apartment life.” Is it really that 
wonderful? 

— by Gina Jausoro 


Coman 


AXTMAN. MARY 
BESOLA AMELIA 
BRINCKEN. SUSAN 


DELANEY. HEIDI 
DOBBS. DANA 
GUNDERSON. SHELLY 


HOWARD. CORRIE 
JACKSON. KIMBER 
JEE. LILY 
















Coman 


LASATER. LINDA 
MARGARET. JEAN 
MARTIN. DEBORAH 
NAKAHARA. LORI 
OPOKU. HELENA 
RANEY. DAWN 
SCHOEDEL. ELIZABETH 




ABSALONSON. JOE 
AMOS. KIRK 
ANDERSON. MICHAEL 
ARENSBERG. JOEL 
BIGLER. PETER 
BLOOMSTER. TIMOTHY 


Cannon 



!■ 


BROWN. JEFFREY 
BRYAN. TODD 
CACATIAN. JOSEPH 
CARNES. GORDON 
CARR. JONATHAN 
COLVIN. GREGORY 
ELLINGSON. ERIC 





HAMILTON. DANIEL 
HAYDEN. ROBERT 
HILL. JEFFREY 
HIRSCHEL. CARLE TON 
JACKY. LANCE 
JOHNSON. ERIC 
KIGHT. MICHAEL 


KLAUS. RICHARD 
KUNE. GREG 
KUHLMAN, BRAD 
LEE. GREGORY 
LEE, JIM 
MOORE. KELLY 
RYNCARZ. ALEXANDER 



.Qo!*woRT}iy. 


ANSPACH. DON 
CANON. GEORGE 
DA IDA, EDRIC 
ENGELL. DANIEL 
GRAHAM. THOMAS 
HASFURTHER. DANIEL 
HATHAWAY. SHAWN 
HENSLEY. TIM 


HINTON, LEWIS 
HUISINGH. JEFFREY 
JENKINS. JON 
KENNEY. PAUL 
KISHLINE. MIKE 
KNIGHT. JEFF 
KEOS. RICHARD 
KUMASAKA. KOBY 



424 Living Groups /1984 




















































PLAATSMAN. JAMES 
RAINS. JEFFREY 
REYNAUD. GORDON 
RUSSELL. DAVID 
SCHUSTER. DOUG 
SHEARER. MARTY 
SIMANTON. CRAIG 
SMITH. DOUGLAS 


SMITH. JON 
SMITH. TORGUN 
SPEEGLE. DOUGLAS 
STUBB. JOHN 
TATE. ROBERT 
TAYLOR. ARTHUR 
WALTH. DOUGLASS 
WINSOR. WAYNE 


NEill HaII 



HABIB. ULLAH 
HACKNEY. MERRY 
HANNUS. TOOD 
HO SOI JUNKO 
KNOPP. MARCIA 
KU. PETER 
MARSHALL. DAVID 
MIWA. YOSHIYA 


MORRIS. NATHAN 
NAKAMURA. KOSHI 
ODELL. MICHAEL 
OHLUND. DIANA 
ONG. SIAN 
SANTOS. MICHELE 
TIRIMANNE. NIMO 
YAMSHITA. NAOKO 


I 


■ 


Ortoin 



ABBOTT. DANIEL 
ALFRED. LAURA 
BARRETT. JEFFREY 
BORST. LISA 
BREHM. MOLLY 
CLARKE. JEFF 
CODDINGTON. DIANNE 
DESMARAIS. DAMON 


DETERING. MICHAEL 
DILLSI. TARIK 
DUCKWORTH. RANDY 
EBERSOLE. KEITH 
FELTON. KEVIN 
FONG. JOE 
GARDINER. DEANNA 
GOOSEY. JACK 


GRUNHURD. SCOTT 
HAYES. KENNETH 
HEIDA. KELLI 
HENNIS. NIGEL 
HOLCOMB. TAMMIE 
HONEYWELL. KIMBERLY 
HUNTER. PETER 
IRVING. BRADLEY 






































































Orton 


JONES, JOSSANDRA 
KIONG, MEE 
KUMPULA. DONALD 
LONGSTON, CHRIS 
MARSKE. TIM 
MUELLER, JULIA 
NELSON. TODD 
PALAHNIUK. MATT 


PENNACHI. MICHAEL 
POMEROY. TODD 
RAINEY. ANDREA 
RUSSELL. JODI 
SCHOFSTOLL. KATHRYN 
SERQUINIA, REBECCA 
SHEPHERD. PHYLLIS 
SOTKA. MARILYN 


TAZUMA. LARRY 
THOMPSON. MARY 
TODD, STEPHEN 
TYRRELL, JOHN 
VICKERS. MARK 
VILANDER, LAURA 
WILSON. RAYMOND 
WIRKKALA. JENELLES 



BAFFICO GINA 
BATES. HOLLY 
BESOLA. JULIA 
BROECKEL. JANET 
BUJAC'lCH. CHARLENE 
CONDE. KRIS 


CONLEY. TONYA 
CUMMINS. HEATHER 
GROSSER. BELINDA 
LARSON. JONICA 
MAXON. SUZANNE 
MAYOR. REBECCA 


MCFARLAND. ANGEL 
NYSTROM. LISA 
PRICE,JILL 
STILTNER. MINDY 
TITUS, VIRGINIA 
VANCAMPEN. LISA 



RE.QENTS.HjU 




ABBOTT. MARTHA 
ARSENAULT. AMY 
CHAMBERS, SUSAN 
DANIELSON. TAMARA 
DAVIS. LISA 
EMTMAN. LINDA 
FLEMING. SUSIE 
FOLEY, SUSAN 


FREDENBURG. ANNE 
FREDERICK. BRENDA 
GEIGER. REBECCA 
GREENE. KATHERINE 
GROSSMAN. HEIDI 
HUBER. STEPHANI 
JADERHOLM, JULIE 
KEY. KATHRYN 



426 Living Groups /1984 























































LINDSTRAND. KERI 
LOONAM. ANN 
MAY, JANE 
NELSON. ANDREA 
NELSON. LAURA 
OM0ERG. SUSAN 


li 



PAJARDO. DEBORAH 
PERRY. MARGETHA 
RIGDON. JENNIFER 
SCOTT. KIM 
SPEARMAN, KATHY 
SPUNAUGLE. ANNA 
STEPHENS. AMY 


STINER. DEBORAH 
STUDEMAN. KRISTIE 
TUELL. LORETTA 
VAN ZANDT, COURTNEY 
WAGNER. KRISTINA 
WALLIN, KRISTI 
WIGHT, CYNTHIA 


Rogers 



ALEXANDRA. LARRY 
AMUNDSEN, JOHN 
ARMSTRONG, MICHAEL 
BEDEGI. LASZLO 
BEHYMER, BRYAN 
BRADLEY. STEVEN 
BRENDGARD, WILLIAM 
BRIGHT. TONY 


BUSHNELL. DAVID 
CALVIN. JOHN 
DANIELSON. ERIK 
DIDOMENICO. STEVE 
DRUMMOND. DUANE 
DUNN. STEVEN 
FASULO, JIM 
GUSA. LAWRENCE 


HORGAN, CHRIS 
HOWE. JAMES 
HUISINGH. GREGGORY 
JANKE. DEREK 
JOFFE. STEVEN 
KIRK. GREGORY 
KORENKIEWICZ, S.L, 
LIGHT. MICHAEL 


LIM. CHIA 
MAOSEN. STEVEN 
MAY. DOUGLAS 
MERLINO. MICHAEL 
MILLIGAN. WILLIAM 
MOORE. ZACHARY 
MURRAY. DANIEL 
O DELL, JESS 


ODELL. THAD 
PALMER. MARK 
PHILLIPS. BRIAN 
PILET. SCOTT 
PITTS. SHANNON 
REDEY. GEORGE 
REESE. GARTH 
ROBERTS. COLTRANE 


SEAL. CRAIG 
SHARP. AARON 
SINGHOSE. MICHAEL 
STIEMERT. ERIC 
SUMMERS. KIP 
TAYLOR. ANDY 
WALLIN. MICHAEL 
WELCH. JOHN 


1984 / Living Groups 427 


















































WESEMAN. ERIC 
WIGEN. ROBERT 
WIITALA. ERIK 
WILKINSON. WILLIAM 
WOLFE. KEVIN 
WOLL, ROGER 
XAUDARO, STEFAN 
YUEN. RICKY 





f 


Scott 


ADAMS. STEVEN 
ALDEN. JEFFREY 
BORSELLL MARK 
CARLTON. KENNETH 
DALTON. MATTHEW 
GOBLE. JODERY 
GONZALEZ. ABRAHAM 


HILLEY. DONALD 
JACKSON. PAUL 
JONES. STEVE 
LACOUNT. WALTER 
MEHARG. STEPHEN 
SIMMONS. JEFFERY 
TITUS, RAOUL 
WALEN. MICHAEL 





S.TEp.H ENSON_ N.ORtIh 


AFFLERBACK. LINDA 
ARCIA, LAURA 
BOE. VALERIE 
CASEBOLT. ZELDA 
CHEA. MONTHA 
DYE, CINDY 
FOLKINS. GAIL 


HENDERSON, GRETCHEN 
LAMB. MAVIS 
LARSON. JULIE 
LEMOINE. KAREN 
LOMBARDO. JILLIAN 
LUND. JENNIFER 
MAY. SOO 


NAGEL. TRACI 
NAW. MICHELLE 
NELSON. LAURA 
NIKULA, LYNDA 
POWELL, ANDREA 
RIVERS. LISA 
SETTERBERG. DIANA 
SLATER, LA NAE 


TAYLOR. JUDY 
TIBERIO, LAURA 
VANBRUWAENE. KAREN 
WEIL. SHANNON 
WELCH. MARCIA 
WERENKO, TINA 
WORBOYS. TERRI 
ZOELLICK, JEANNETTE 



Streit 


ADAMS, TODD 
ARTHUR. GREGORY 
CAMPBELL. DARIN 
DAHL. DANIEL 
HENESY. CHRIS 
HIGSON. SCOTT 



428 Living Groups /1984 



























































STREiT 



NAITO, GREG 
PATTERSON, DERALD 
STANFORD, KENNETH 
SYLVESTER. SCOTT 
WHITEHURST. C.S. 
YOUNG, EDWARD 
ZOLLARS, MICHAEL 


WaI'Ier 



COLLINS. ROBERT 
DARK, JAY 
FOX, TIMOTHY 
FRANTZ, MARTIN 
FUNK. DAVID 
HOBSON. JOEL 


HOSLER. TROY 
JOHNSON. DAVID 
KINNEY. LARRY 
MACQUARRIE. KEVIN 
MERCER, JOHN 
MULLINS. GREGORY 


OCALLAGHAN. JOHN 
O’DRISCOLL. TOD 
RUCKER, BRIAN 
RUUD. ERIK 
SHARP. GEORGE 
SKIDMORE. RICHARD 
WARREN. GLENN 


WiImer 



HAUGEN, GAYLA 
HENSON, KARIN 
MACKENZIE. LORI 
MATHIESON. CHRISTY 
MENGERT, THERESA 
MITCHELL. CHRISTA 
NICHOLSON. CAROL 


O'CONNOR, KATHY 
RICHARDSON. TINA 
SHERWOOD, TERESA 
THIEL. CHERYL 
WALKER. TINA 
WEBSTER. TERI 
WOLFF. JUANITA 


1984 / Living Groups 429 





























































ClniEl J os e d]h VilUqi 






ARNETT. DOUGLAS 
BROWN. SUZANNE 
COXEY. JEFF 
CUNNINGHAM. HOLLY 
DAMIANO. DAVID 
DIGRE. KAREN 





MARRON. RONALD 
MEEDS. MICHAEL 
NELSON. BRIAN 
OHNEMUS. SUE 
RICE. DOUGLAS 
SCHAUB, DANIEL 
SCHMEECKLE. ERICA 
SCOTT. ALAN 


DUGAW. SCOTT 
HOSTETTER. CONNIE 
JOHNSON. PETER 
KRAFT. KYLE 
LELAND, STACY 
LINDE. KARMA 
LYNN. KATHLEEN 



SCOVILLE. TINA 
SCOVILLE. TRICIA 
SHEA, MATHEW 
SHERMAN. MARILYN 
SHOEMAKER. CHRISTINA 
SIFFERMAN. GREGORY 
SWANSTROM. STEVEN 



■ 

■ 






ClniNook 


ARENAS. CARLENE 
BECVAR. JACQUELYN 
BELLACK. DANIEL 
BENEDICT, KAY 
BILDERBACK. JO 
CARPENTER. KEVIN 
CHVATAL. EDWARD 
COOPER. CARRI 


CUSHING, ROBERT 
DOEOERLEIN. CRAIG 
EGAWA. KENNETH 
ETHERIDGE. LISA 
FISHER. MARVIN 
FLYNN. JOHN 
FORNEY. CELIA 
FUGERE. JOSEPH 


GAULL. ROBERT 
GROVER. DANA 
HAFEZ. NICHOLAS 
HIGGS, DALE 
HILL. TRACY 
HOON. RICHARD 
HUGHES. JOHN 
HUMPHRIES, GENE 


HUNTER. ROSEMARIE 
JOENS. ANITA 
JUE. LAURINE 
KARLSON, VINCENT 
KELLEY. DAVID 
KUBLER. MARY 
LAMB. KARY 
LANTZY. PATRICIA 



430 Living Groups /1984 
































































Co[umBi'a 


MERSEREAU, KENNETH 
MONARCH. DAN 
MONTOYA. JUANITA 
MUTTER. TERRY 
NEWCOMB. CRAIG 
OAKLEY. LOREN 
OCONNEL. DANIEL 


PREEDY. DAVID 
ROOD. JOANNA 
REEVES. RAMONA 
ROE. MICHAEL 
ROGERS. LINDA 
ROMBEEK. CYNTHIA 
SCHULTZ. SUSAN 


SCHULTZ. TERESA 
SEABERG. JOHN 
SEVEDGE. JEANETTE 
SHENEMAN. DAWN 
SIMMONS. BELINDA 
SKRINDE. KAREN 
URASHIMA. BRUCE 


WARD, SCOTT 
WERNER. SALLY 
WOODHOUSE, JUSTIN 
WRIGHT. JAMES 
YOUNG. DAVID 
YOUNG. LYNNE 
ZAMZOW, KELLY 



BACKUS. LINDA 
BLEM. KATHLEEN 
BOYDSTUN. LAUNA 
CASS. CALECE 
CASS. ELIZABETH 
DUTT, JILL 
ELLIS. ANNE 


FAUNCE. JEFFERY 
FRY, ROSE 
HAMILTON. MARK 
HILL. THOMAS 
HINCHEN. CATHY 
MANSFIELD. CHRIS 
MOTHERAL. JUOITH 


NOVOTNEY. THOMAS 
OBORN, SCOTT 
PATEL. NAVIN 
PEARSON. TIM 
RIBAUDO, LYDIA 
THOMPSON. GREGORY 
WARFEL. ERNEST 






BOOTH. DAVID & CHERYL 
CREM. KIMBERLEY, AMBER & TEDDY 
DOOLITTLE. MICHAEL 
HARTWELL. ORLANDO 
LILLIE. THOMAS & CINDY 
NIEHOFF, BARB 


1984 / Living Groups 431 





























































Nez _ Per c e _ Vjl [aq e 


BOVAIRD, KATHLEEN 
BURT, DEBORAH 
CARRITHERS. R08ERT 
CHANDLER. KELLY 
CLARK. DEREK 
EAGAN. TERESA 
ENSOR. SHERRI 



HERZOG, SHELLY 
JACKETT. SALLY 
JOHNSON. JILL 
JOHNSON. MARIA 
KITTELSON. KONNIE 
MAH I, KALANI 
MASTERTON, ROGER 
MCBRIDE. ANDREW 


MEROD, MICHAEL 
O'BRIEN. ROBERT 
PAYNE. PAMELA 
PRICE. MIKE 
RAGHOTHAMA. K G. 
SCHAEFER. KAREN 
SHORT, BRENDA 
SIMEK. JOSEPH 



SMUTNY. KENT 
TURNEY. JAMES 
VEA. DANETTE 
WELTON. LEAH 
WERNER. AL 
WILKERSON, WESLEY 
ZYPH, DENNIS 




ObsERVATORy 


ADAM1. BRIAN 
ANDERSON, CYNTHIA 
ANDERSON. PAUL 
ASHITEI, OLLENNU 
AXELSON, DEBRA 
BREITENBACH, CATHERINE 
DALING. WENDY 
DODOO, FRANCIS 


DUTT. GARY 
FLETCHER. KAREN 
GOODWIN. REBECCA 
GROTTE. AMY 
GRUBB. KEVIN 
HARVILL. GREGORY 
HILL. ANGELA 
HURLBUT, MARGARET 



432 Living Groups /1984 




































































0bsERVATORy_ 



JACOBS. LAURA 
JOHNSON. TAGUE 
KINDER. DENNIS 
LEWIS. CELESTE 
MAZIE, LORITA 
MCNABB. GIL 


MCPHEE. SCOTT 
NEHRHOOD. DIRK 
OSTERBACK. JANET 
QUAMME. KURT 
RICHARDS. DAVE 
ROACH. ARTHUR 



StERTOE. .VillAQE 



GREISCHE. BARBARA 
HONEYCUTT. ELIZABETH 
JESKE. DOUG & KAREN 
KUNZ-JOHNSON. MARY 
RHODES. WILLIAM 


SCHULTE. ANDREAS 
THORDARSON, BRENT 
TREMBLEY. JAMES & MARCIA 
WOJTANOWICZ. AMY 
WRIGHT. MARK. JULIE & JASON 


Terrace 


FOWE. KELLY 
GEORGE. AMBROSE 
HEINZ. KIRK & TARA 
MILLER. EDWARD 
PHAN. POROS & VIVIAN 
THOMPSON. NEAL & BARBARA 



1984 / Living Groups 433 























































434 Living Groups /1984 


AMMERMAN. TAMARA 
AMUNDSON. RENE 
ANDERSON, ERIC R. 
ANDERSON. JUDI 
ANDERSON. KENNETH 
ANDREWS. CHRISTOPHER 
ARIWOOLA. ADEMOLA 


Qf.LCAMP.ys 


ARNOLD. DALE 
ASPEN. TED 
ASPITARTE,CYNTHIA 
ATHUKORALA. PRASANNA 
ATKINSON, TERESA 
AUSTIN, NATAHSA 
BACHMAN. ROGER 
BAERVELD. REBECCA 


ABBE. CORINNE 
ADLAM. KAYE 
ADDERLEY. VIVIAN 
AHMANN. MARGARET 
AHMED. EL-SAYED 
AL-ROBAlSHY. KHALID 


BAIRD. MARLENE 
BARNES. NOEL 
BAUGHMAN. DAVID 
BAUMANN. ERIC 
BAUMGARTNER. TRACY 
BAUR.KATHLEEN 
BEARDSLEY. DEE ANN 
BEDELL. WINSTON 


BENCE. MICHELLE 
BERGERON. JEFF 
BERNARD. MICHAEL 
BETZ. TERl 
BIRK. KAREN 
BITTNER. AMBROSE 
BITTNER. BUD & LISA CRAIN 
BLAIR. TERRI 


BLANKENBEKER, DEAN 
BLEECKER. JIM 
BOCK. GARY 
BODINE. GREGORY 
BOHLKE. LAURA 
BOLDT. KEVIN 
BOMMERSBACH. ANDREW 
BORSELLI, MARK 


BOTTEMILLER. MARK 
BOWER. GREGORY 
BOZICK. STEPHEN 
BRADY. MICHAEL 
BRIX. AMY 
BROHAN. LYNN & AMBER 
BROWN. FRANCES 
BROWN. RAYMOND 


BUCKLIN, DAVE 
BULL. NATHALIE 
BULL. TRACY & 
CHRIS BAUMGARTNER 
BULL. TROY & MARY 
BUNGCAYAO. DOMINIC 
BURKE. JOHN 
BUTLER. AMY 


BROWNLOW. JOHN 
BRUNDAGE. NEIL 
BRYANT. LINDA 
BUCHANAN. PAULA & REBEKAH 
BUCHER. DARSI 
BUCKHOLZ, KIMBERLY 
BUCKLEY. JODY 























































BYRD. DAVID 
CALKINS. BRIAN 
CALLAHAN. DONNA 

Callahan, scott 
CALLEN. CHARLES & 
TRACY WILLIAMS 
CAMPBELL. KIM 
CANNON. DIANE 
CARDER. JAMES 


CARLOS. DAVID 
CARLSON. SUSAN 
CAROLUS. CHARLA 
CAROTHERS. JAN & BECKY 
CARR. DEBRA 
CARR. MARK 
CEARLOCK. JODY 
CHAMBERLAIN. ROGER & 
AMY. JENNENE 


CHANDLER. DEBORAH 
CHENG. ALLEN 
CHEONG. KWOK 
CHOKSHI. ANIL 
CLAUS. ATHLETIC 
MASCOT SIGMA CHI 
CLINE. LLOYD 
CLINE TROY 
COBLE. LISA 


COELHO. JEAN 
COGAN. MIKE 
COLE. BRYNN 
COLGREN. ANDREA 
COMBS. JOHN 
CONDOTTA. ROBERT 
CONKLIN, LEWIS 
CONSALUS, CARL & 
SUSAN 


COOK. PAULA 
COOK. RANDAL 
COOLEY. JAMES 
COONEY. CAROLINE 
COWAN. JILL 
CRANDALL. DEBORA 
CRISIFULLI. SARA 
CROOK. COLLEEN 


CROWLEY, ROD 
CULLER. PAUL 
CURRY. DON 
DAGGETT, DIANE 
DAHMEN. DAVID 
DANIELS. PATRICK 
DAVENPORT. DENISE 
DAVIDSON. CHRISTOPHER 


DAVIS. JENNIFER 
DAVIS. LARRY 
DAVIS. LINDA 

DAVISSON, PAUL & JANICE 
DEERING. JEFFREY 
DELACRUZ. ROEM 
DELANEY. LEEROY 
DELANEY. NORMAN 8 SOMKUL 


PENNEHY, SHAUN 
DENNISON. ANGELA 
DEPINNA. GERMAINE 
DEVITT. JIM 
DEWITT, TIMOTHY 
DIEFENBACH. JASON 
DIMAH. AGBER 
DOAN. JOHN 


DONHAM, MARK 
DONNELY, K.C. 
DORMAN, PATRICIA 
DOOR, DAVID 
DORGAN, ANDREA 
DOTSON. RETHAKAY 
DUITSMAN. DEAN 
DUNN, MONTE 


EACHUS. LONNY 
ECKEL. ROBERTA 
EGAAS, DAVID 
EGELHOFER. CHRISTINE 
ELLINGSEN. SUSAN 
ELDER. KIA 
ELLIOTT. ANTHONY 
ELLIS. SUSAN 


1984 / Living Groups 435 

















































ELSE. STEPHEN 
EMSKY. PETER & JERRY 
ENDERLtN. CARL 
ENGELS. SYDNEY 
ENGLUND. ANTHONY 
ESCHBACH. PETER 
ESTES. JUDY 
ETMEKTZOGLOU. A. 


FENDEL. PETRA 
FERGUSON, DOUGLAS 
FIEDLER. LESLIE 
FISHER, DAVID 
FLODIN, ROBIN 
FOCHT. KELLY 
FORDYCE. LORI 
FOSSUM. MARK 


FOSSUM. RANDY 
FOWLER. CYNDIE 
FOWLER. JENNIFER 
FOWLER. RICK 
FRANK. DANIELLE 
FREDERICKS. SARA 
FRICKE. STUART 
FRY. MICHAEL 


FUCHINO. VALERIE 
GABRIEL. PHILIP 
GAJJAR. MAHESH 
GALBRATH. CATHY 
GALLIHER. DAVID 
GAMBRIELL. MICHELINE 
GARDNER. DEANNA 
GAUT. STACEY 


GERBER. DOUGLAS 
GETCHELL. KAROLYN 
GFELLER, ANNE 
GIBBONS. SUZETTE 
GIAMBALVO, CHERYL 
GLEASON. MARC 
GLEIN. SUSAN 
GLIDDEN. JEFF 


GOCHNAUER. MELODY 
GOETZ. CHRISTOPHER 
GONZALES IRENE 
GONZLEZ. JESCE 
GONZALEZ. DAVID & 
THERESA. CHRISSY 
GONZALEZ. GENOVEVA 
GOODMAN. ANN 
GOODWIN. JOSEPH 


GORDON. GREGG 
GRANSTROM. JEFFREY 
GRANT. DENNIS 
GRATTAN. GREGORY 
GRAVES. TAMMY 
GREEN. CRAIG 
GREENFIELD. CINDY 
GREENLEAF. MITCHEL 


GRESSET. KEN 
GRIMES, CHARLENA 
GUTSCHMIDT. CATHY 
GUSTAVSON. RONALD 
HADE. JANICE 
HAMILTON. PAMELA 
HANAFIE. JAHJA 
HANCOCK. KEN 


HANER. JILL 
HANSEN. KANDIS 
HAQUE. HEIDI 
HARDER. PATRICK 
HARDING. SHERIDAN 
HARRISON. ROGER 
HASTINGS, NICHOLAS 
HATHAWAY. TAMMY 


HATTRUP. MARK 
HAUSER. TAMARA 
HAYNES. DEBBIE 
HEDEEN. ERIC 
HEDRICK. JOHN 
HEHNER. MARTHA 
HEIN. JOHN 
HEITMAN. ROCHELLE 



436 Living Groups /1984 















































■ 


I 

( 



HELM, BOBBI 
HERMAN. PHILIP & ANN 
HERRON. KIM 
HILLMAN. MICHELE 
HIMMER. KARIN 
HINZIE. DOUGLAS 
HODGE. CRYSTAL 
HOFFMAN. JOE 


HOHMAN, LORI 
HOLBROOK. ANN 
HOLCOMB. TODD 
HONEYCUTT. TIM. LIZ & GREG 
HOPKINS. STEPHEN 
HORTON. BROOKS 
HOUGAN. MICHAEL 
HOWE. MICHAEL 


HUBER. CRAIG 
HUNSAKER. JAMES 
HURLBURT. KRISTAN 
HUSTON. RONALD 

ISRAEL. SCOTT 
ISAACSON. ERIC 
ISAAK. ELIZABETH 
IRWIN. LISA 


JACKSON. JOHN 
JACOBS. PETER 
JAINGA. JOHN 
JANUCHOWSKI. JED 
JASPER. DANIEL 
JELMBERG. GEORGE 
JELSING. LORI 
JENKINS. ALEXANDER 


JENKINS. TERESA 
JETT. TERRY 
JOHNSON. A J 
JOHNSON. JANNA 
JOHNSON. JEFF 
JOHNSON. JEFF & TAMMY 
JOHNSON. PATTY 
JOHNSON. STANLY 


JOHNSON. TAMERA 
JOHNSON. TANYA 
JOHNSON. WESLEY 
JONES. BRYCE 
JONES. DAVID 
JONES. DAVID 
JONES. JULIE 
JORGENSON. JOHN 


KAMIYA, NAOKI 
KAMPUIS. JULIE 
KAPPENMAN. KREGG 
KASSEL. DANA 
KATSARSKY. KRYSTLA 
KATZINSKI. JAMES 
KATZINSKI. TIMOTHY 
KEE, THOMAS 


KEGEL, AMY 
KELLEY. SHANLYNE 
KELLY. SHEILA 
KEMBEL. CREGG 
KENNEALLY. PATRICIA 
KHANNA. VARUN & BINDU 
KING. CHERI 
KING. JOHN 


KIMMER, MELINDA 
KIRSCH. CHRISTINA 
KISER. LAURA 
KLARICH, MARY & JAMES 
KNOX. GREG & JARA 
KONG. KIMBERLY 
KOSMATA. MATT 
KROGH. ALVIN & LAURA 


KRONAGEL. KIMBERLY 
KUHN. TOM 
KURFURST. DEBORA 
LADDERUD. JOHN 
LADDERUD. KEITH 
LALOR. RICHARD 
LANDONI, PETER 
LARSON CRAIG 


1984 / Living Groups 437 





























































LARSON. TODD 
LAVINDER. NANCY 
LAZELLE. LISA 
LEE. LAWRENCE 
LEE. ROGER 
LEGAN. DOUGLAS 
LENHARD 
LENNING. DIANA 


LEUNG. SEI-FAI & 
LIN-HEUNG SIU 
LINDSEY, BRUCE 
LO. CAROL 
LOOMIS. GREG 
LOVEJOY. DALE 
LOWRY. BRETT 
LUH. TONY 
LUFINACCI. TERESA 


LYLE. JANET 
MACMILLAN. RANDALL 
MAGNUSON. LESLIE 
MAHMOODI. AMIR 
MALLOY. STEVE 
MALSCH. DAVID & DOUGLAS 
MANDULA. ANTHONY 
MANGOLD. GLEN 


MARICLE. ROBERT 
MARTIN. ELEANOR 
MARTIN. TIMOTHY 
MARSH. TIM & CELIA 
MARSHALL. GARY 
MARSHALL. MARJA 
MATZ. RYAN 
MAYER. LORI 


MCCADAM. GERALD 
MCCAMMANT. KEVIN 
MCCLEES. BECKY 
MCDONALD. EUGENE 
MCDONALD. TERRI 
MCFADDEN, LEON 
MCFAIRLAND. KATHY 
MCGINNIS. TAMARA 


MCGREEVY ELIZABETH 
MClLRAITH, DOUGLAS 
MCLAUGHLIN. WILLIAM 
MCPHADEN. DANIEL 
MEIERS. RICHARD 
MEKDHANASARN.ATCHAREE 
•MEKKI. MAHMOUD 
MENGERT. MATTHEW 


MENKE. CARRIE 
MEYERS. GINA 
MICHAEL. ROBIN 
MIKKELESON. SHERRI 
MIKKELSEN. STEVEN 
MILDEN. DIANA 
MILLER. JOHN 
MILLER. KRISTY 


MILLER. STEVEN 
MINORS, RANDALL 
MISCHKE. ERIC 
MISCOURIDES. D.N 
MITCHELL. BARBARA 
MITCHELL. CHRIS 
MITCHELL. DEREK 
MITTAL, MANMOHAN & 
SHASHIRI, VIVEK. VIBHAV 


MOLONEY. SHAWN 
MONTOYA. LORI 
MORGAN. THOMAS 
MORRELL. COLIN 
MORRISON. JOHN 
MORSE. SHERRY 
MULZAC, VICTORY 
MORFORD, -MELANIE 


MURPHY. THERESA 
MYERS, GORDON 
NAKATA. STEPHEN 
NEAL. DEBORAH 
NELSON. CURTIS 
NICHOLSON. JAMES 
NICHOLSON. TERRI 
NiEMELA, Glenn 



438 Living Groups /1984 



































NUGENT. SAMUEL & 
ELBA, JACOB 
NUXOLL. SHARON 
NUZUM, ANNE 
O BROCHTA. STUART 
O'KEEFE. KATHLEEN 
OJA, TAMMY 
OLIVER. BRENT 
OLIVER. TAMMIE 


OLSON. CHRISTA 
OORD. JOHN 
ORLANDO. JOHN 
OSCARSON. ED 
OWEN. JOHN 
OWENS. TERESA 
OYER. GORDON 
OYER. LEROY 


PACK. BRADLEY 
PAHRE. STEVEN 
PALMER. NANCY 
PARKER. SYLVIA 
PARSONS. GALAN 
PAUL. MICHAEL 
PAYLEE. CHUA 
PEARSON. DENNIS 


PEMBERTON. PAUL 
PENNING. DONALD 
PETERSON. STUART & 
CARMEN. SCOTT 
PETERSON. ANGELA 
PETERSON. LISA 
PFEIFLE, ROD 
PHILLIPS. WILLIAM 
PIERCE. PAMELA 


PLAMONDON, THOMAS 
POLLARD. DEANA 
POLLOCK. MONICA 
POOLE, ALAN 
POTHS, STEWART 
POTTENGER. DAN 
PRATT. TONY& GINA HILD 
PROCTOR. ROSS 


PROTHERO. STANLEY 
PURKETT. JOHN & ELIZABETH 
PURKETT. PAUL 
RAGAN. JOANNE 
RAGAN. KAMMY 
RASMUSSEN. LISA 
RAYMOND, JAMES 
REDINGER. COLLEEN 


REES. BLAINE 
REGAN. JOHN 
REPANICH. LORI 
REYNOLDS. JOLYN 
RHINEHART. STACEY 
RICE. GREGORY 
RICHARDS. CHRISTMAS 
RILEY, JEAN 


RINGEL. RICHARD 
ROBERTO. PETER 
ROBERTS. MARY 
ROBERTS. VIC 
ROBERTSON. RANDALL 
ROBESON. CHARLES 
ROBINSON. KRISTI 
ROBINSON. MAGGIE 


ROGERS. BILL 
ROMANO. BRENDA 
ROMFO. ANGELA 
ROPER. DOUGLAS 
ROPER. JOHN 
ROSS. AUDREY 
ROSSO. RONALD 
RUDD. ERIC 


SADLER. NORMAN 
SAMMONS. WILLIAM 
SAMUELSEN. THERESA 
SANGL. CANDACE 
SANTOS. JULIE 
SARETSKE. LORAN 
SCANLAN. SERA 
SCATTERGOOD. WENDY 


1984 / Living Groups 439 























































SCHAFER. BROOKE 
SCHIMKE. MELANA 
SCHLITTLER. BRUCE 
SCHMIDT. ANN 
SCHMUNK. TERI 
SCHONBERG. BONNIE 
SCHULTHEIS. GLENN 
SCHWINN SUF 


SCHWISOW. SCOT 
SCOTT. MICHAEL 
SEEKINS. LYNETTE 
SHAFFER. DAVID 
SHANT. MARYLYN 
SHAUGHNESSY. PAT 
SHAW. RONALD 
SHELDON. DEBORA 


SHELDON. KAY 
SHELDON. THOMAS 
SHEPHERD DAVID 
SHEPHERD.STEVEN 
SHERROD. STEVEN 
SHIELDS. HEIDI 
SHIMOGAWA. KATHY 
SHINN. JENNIFER 


SHULER. ROBERT 
SIDI. ANIS 
SIEGLEY. JANA 
SILVERNALE. MARY 
SKILLMAN. JENNIFER 
SKOK. STEPHEN 
SLATER. CHARLES 
SLOVENKO. GLENN 


SMITH. BRIAN 
SMITH. DEBBIE 
SMITH. RAYMOND 
SMITH. REYNOLDS & USA 
SNIDER. KATHY 
SNYDER. RHONDA 
SOBO THOMAS 
SPARKS. ANNE 


SPARLING. THOMAS 
SPERLICH. LIANE 
SPORCIC. MICHAEL 
STARK. LESLIE 
STALLCOP.WYNN 
STEELE. JENNIFER 
STELZER. CHERYL 
STEPHENSON. SUSAN 


STEWARD. KARA 
STEWART. MARYANN 
ST GEORGE. RON 
STIVERS. LISA 
STOHR. JEFFREY 
STOLZ MARTIN 
STOTELMEYER. RONSON 
STRACHAN. GLENN 


STRAWN. SANDRA 
STUBBS. LESLIE 
STUHLMILLER, DAVID 
SULLIVAN. DAVE 
SULLIVAN. JEFF 
SULLIVAN. STEVEN 
TABBERT. DIANE 
TAGGART. ROBERT 


TAGGART, JAMES 
TALLEY, ROBIN 
TAN. CHEK 

TANDBERG. ERIC & DONALD TILTEN 
TANNER, SCOTT 
TATE. BRENDA 
TAYLOR, ANITA 
TAYLOR. ROBERT 


TAYLOR, TIMOTHY 
THORIN. ANITA 
TUERINA. LUIS 
TILTON. DONALD 
TIPTON. WENDELL 
TORGERSON.CAROL 
TRABUN. MICHAEL 
TRAN. BACH-TUYET 



440 Living Groups /1984 































H 



UFFORD. MICHAEL 
UPTON. BERNICE 
UWADIALE. GRACE 
VANDIVER. JEFFERY 
VANLEUVEN. LEAH 
VANVLEET. DWIGHT 




WILLIAMS. CHERYL 
WILLIAMS. KENNETH 
WILLIAMSEN. SUSAN 
WILLIS. R.D 
WILSON. STUART 
WILSON. TODD 
WILTSE. SHERRI 
WINKLEMAN. RICK 


WURM. MICHAEL & SHARON 
YARBERRY, ROBERT 
YATES. TRENTON 
YEE. FOOK 
YEE. NATE & VALL 
YONG, YEE 


YORK. EDWARD 
YOUNG. HILARY 
YOUNG. JEFFREY 
YOUNG. KEVIN 
YOUNG. SCOTT 


TRAVIS. LISA 
TRENT. STEPHEN 
TUNIS. KARLA 
UCHYTIL. ARTHUR 
UDAETA. marisol 


WALTON. TY 
WARNER. DOUGLAS 
WATKINS, BRIAN 
WATKINS. TERRY 
WATSON, JAN 
WATSON. SHARON 
WEBER, DONNA 
WEED. JOHN 


WELCH. WILLIAM 
WELLS. JENNIFER 
WELLS-HENDERSON, ANNE 
WENKE, CURTIS 
WENTWORTH. DANIEL 
WENTZKE, RONALD 
WERNER. RICHARD 
WERTZ. MOLLY 


vert 


WEST. ROSS 
WHALEN. BARBARA 
WHITE. CHRIS 
WHITE. DANIEL 
WICKMAN. SUSAN 
WILCOMB, MARK 
WILKE, STACEY 
WILLARD. CHRIS 


WINSLOW. BETH & BUDDY 
WINSTON. BEDELI 
WIRTH. CAROL 
WOO. CATHY 
WOOD-GAINES. KIRK 
WOODLING. JIM 
WORLEY CARL 
WULFF, ROBIN 


VAUGHN. LILA 
VEDDER. CYNTHIA 
VOLIVA. DEBRA 
VOLLMER. DAVID 
VONG, DACH 
VOYLES. CHARLES 
WALSER. JILL 






1984 / Living Groups 441 














































































































































♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦J 


Little Sisters 


King and Queens 


Little Sister Dedications...445 

You’ve Got A Friend.446 

Acacia Little Sisters.448 

Alpha Gamma Rho Little Sisters.449 

Alpha Kappa Lambda Little Sisters.450 

Alpha Tau Omega Little Sisters...451 

Beta Theta Pi Little Sisters.452 

Delta Tau Delta Little Sisters.453 

Delta Sigma Phi Little Sisters.454 

Delta Upsilon Little Sisters.455 

Farmhouse Little Sisters.456 

Kappa Sigma Litde Sisters.457 

Lambda Chi Alpha Little Sisters.458 

Phi Delta Theta Little Sisters.459 

Phi Kappa Sigma Little Sisters.460 

Phi Kappa Tau Little Sisters.461 

Phi Sigma Kappa Little Sisters.462 

Pi Kappa Alpha Little Sisters.463 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon Little Sisters.464 

Sigma Chi Little Sisters.465 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Little Sisters.466 

Tau Kappa Epsilon Little Sisters.467 

Theta Chi Little Sisters.468 

Alpha Delta Pi Big Brothers.469 


Congratulations!!!. 

Acacia Greek Goddess. 

Alpha Gamma Rho Goddess of Demeter 

Delta Gamma Mr. Anchorsplash .. 

Della Tau Delta Sally Sunshine. 

Delta Upsilon Diamond Girl. 

Farmhouse Farmer’s Daughter. 

Intercollegiate Knights Duchess. 

Kappa Sigma Starlet. 

Lambda Chi Alpha Crescent Girl. 

Phi Kappa Tau Pledge Princess. 

Pi Kappa Alpha Dream Girl. 

Sigma Chi Sweetheart. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Queen of Hearts. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon Waterfollies Queen.. 

Waller Hall's Duchess of Windsor. 

Royalty Dedications. 

Photos by Elliott Ahola 




: 


47 

472 

473 

474 

475 
,476 
,477 
,478 
,4791 
,480| 
,481 
,482 
,483 
484 


.485 


4861 

,487 



♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ 


444 Little Sisters /1984 


























































It's All In The Family 



Being a little sister at Phi Sig’s has been 
great. The people are so fun. Besides 
becoming close to your little brother, 
you meet a lot of other neat guys. We 
are included in all the dances and acti¬ 
vities. It’s fun getting crazy with 
everyone. 

— Julie Kgmphuis 
Phi Sigma Kappa 

I like being a little sister at Phi Delt’s 
because you get to meet a lot of people, 
both guys and girls. You get the chance to 


develop a “good” friendship with your 
little brother in the house. There are activi¬ 
ties once a month that are really fun. 1 
recommend to any girl that they be a liP sis 
- you meet a lot of neat people. 

— Connie Holt 

Phi Delta Theta 

Being a little sister at Kappa Sig’s has been 
fun because of all the neat guys. Every¬ 
one’s friendly and they all love having a 
great time. Being a little sis has given me a 
chance to meet lots of new people, espe¬ 


cially my lil’ brother and it’s also let me 
see what the Greeks are like too. 

— Jennifer Swenson 
Kappa Sigma 

Being a little sister at Acacia has been fun. 
I’ve met a Jot of nice guys. They’re all 
friendly and fun to be with. The dances and 
the liP sis get-togethers are a fun way to get 
to meet people. Thanks guys for a fun first 
year at WSU. 

— Jodi Schad 
Acacia 


1984/Little Sisters 445 

















FouVe Got A Friend 


k k^Xk yk k 


The multi-colored sign-up sheets 
appear everywhere in early autumn, 
boasting strong programs and prom¬ 
ises of numerous activities. The 
fraternities encourage young women 
to participate in Little Sister Rush. Lit¬ 
tle sister rush is held by most of the 
fraternities every fall. It is indeed very 
similar to the rush for fraternities and 
sororities, for as many as 200 girls 
turn out for the average 20 spots avail¬ 
able. 

There are approximately three to 
four rush functions, ranging from 
semi-formal introductory meetings, 
to theme parties, to initiation. As rush 
progresses, the functions become less 
crowded and more comfortable. The 
members of each house, sponsoring 
the rush, begin choosing who they 
would like as a close friend, and at the 
end of the last function, their top 
selections are finalized. 

Within a few days, the selected 
women are invited back for a celebra¬ 
tion as a new little sister. This provides 
an opportunity for all the little sisters 
and the fraternity members to be¬ 
come better acquainted. Each person 
then preferences their choices for a 
big sister or a little brother. 

The house members who are 
paired with a sister are generally 
freshman or sophomore pledges, or 
associate members, as the case may be. 
Most of the houses require that the 
girls be of sophomore standing or 
higher, hence the term big sister. 
Even though the girls are big sisters to 
individual members, they are little sis¬ 
ters to the entire house. 


The sisters, and usually a male rep¬ 
resentative of the fraternity, have 
meetings every two to three weeks to 
discuss up-coming activities. The girls 
buy T-shirts boasting the name of the 
fraternity, and often receive house 
pins for being little sisters. There are 
special activities, dinners, and parties 
held for the little bro’s and big sis’ 
throughout the year. The program 
serves as a social outlet for the guys 


and girls to become good friends. It is 
a traditional system from which many 
strong and lasting friendships have 
been made. 

The little sisters are a significant 
part of the greek system, and often 
become important and special friends 
to their brothers. All in all, being a 
little sister can provide interesting, if 
not meaningful, experiences for any 
college girl. 


Krista Haverly and Greg Ahmann set aside a special time just for each other. 


446 Little Sisters /1984 














Top Left: Looking for my best friend- Tom Springer attempts to untangle his foot, 
while Mike Ryan (in background) tries to work his way through the yam maze to 
find his big sis. Top Right: Looks like we made it. Julie Kamphuis and Mike Ryan 
finally meet after struggling through yards of yarn. Left: Finder’s keepers.. Julie 
and Mike hug each other in surprise, as they begin their big sis-lif bro relationship. 




1984 /Little Sisters 447 



















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1984 /Little Sisters 449 





















450 Little Sisters / 1984 


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1984 / Little Sisters 451 
























452 Little Sisters /1984 


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454 Little Sisters / 1984 





























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CONGRATULATIONS! 



470 Queens /1984 




















♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



1984/Queens 471 


































Acacia Greek Goddess 



Karen Thomson 


472 Queens/1984 


























Alpha Gamma Rho 
Goddess of Demeter 


Karen Beinner 


1984/Queens 473 


























Delta Gamma Mr. Anchorsplash 


Judson Preece 

474 Queens /1984 

















Delta Tau Delta Sally Sunshine 



Eden Sinclair 


1984/Queens 475 







Delta Upsilon Diamond Girl 


Denise Erickson 


476 Queens/1984 



















Farmhouse Farmer’s Daughter 



Janey Jenson 


1984/Queens 477 













Intercollegiate Knights Duchess 



Petrea Knudsen 


478 Queens /1984 














Kappa Sigma Starlet 



Jill Boon 


1984/Queens 479 











Lambda Chi Alpha Crescent Girl 



Maureen Dolan 


480 Queens /1984 








Phi Kappa Tau Pledge Princess 



Susy Babcock 


1984 / Queens 481 







Pi Kappa Alpha Dream Girl 



Teri West 


482 Queens /1984 


























1984/Queens 483 


Sigma Chi Sweetheart 


Karen Smith 





















Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Queen of Hearts 



Trina Rank 


484 Queens /1984 














Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Waterfollies Queen 



1984 / Queens 485 














Kristi Carter 


486 Queens/1984 


Waller HalVs Duchess of Windsor 




4 ^. 













Royalty Dedications 



Thanks for a great Spring. I’m 
looking forward to an even better Fall 
getting to be friends with every one of 
you. Being a part of Acacia really 
means a lot to me and always will, and 
I hope the friends I’m making will last 
a lifetime — it’ll take me that long to 
learn all your names! Thanks so much 
for the honor of being your Greek 
Goddess. 

Love, 

Your Goddess, 

Karen 

P.S. Upper 3-man; Brady Bunch 
would never be the same without you! 


To the Fellas of Delta Upsilon, 
Thank you for all the great times 
this last spring. You guys are the 
greatest and I Love You All! 

I’m looking forward to a fun and 
exciting year with “the Fellas’’, full of 
many happy memories — ones I’m 
sure I’ll never forget. 

Thanks for being so special to me! 
Love your Diamond Girl, 

Denise 


Denise Erickson 

Delta Upsilon Diamond Girl 


To the Men of Pi Kappa Alpha, 

I would like to thank you for the 
opportunity of getting to know each 
and every one of you. What a special 
group of friends!!! 

I’m looking forward to a great year, 
and many fun times ahead. 

Love Always, 

Teri 


Teri West 

Pi Kappa Alpha Dream Girl 


Karen Thomson 
Acacia Greek Goddess 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


1984 / Queens 487 









Royalty... 



To the Men of Phi Kappa Iau: 
Thank you for... 

Giving me lunches without making 
me pay a house bill. 

Taking me pJaces — even when I 
invited myself ! 

Putting my name on your In-Out 
Board. 

Making me feel at home from the 
start. 

Being the best Frat at YVSU and the 
best friends I could find! 

I love you all! 

Sue-Z-Q 

Susy Babcock 

Phi Kappa Tau Pledge Princess 


To the Windsors of Waller Hall: 

It is my sincere pleasure to tell you 
that I feel very lucky to have had the 
opportunity to represent you as your 
duchess. You men have a quality of 
togetherness, community service, and 
fun which remains uncomparable. 

Congratulations on Homecoming, 
IM football champs, Beta 500, Pho- 
nathon, The Hunger Walk, The 
Riverfront Project, and all your many 
other endeavors. Thank you for let¬ 
ting me be a part of your year because 
it was a great part of my year, l ake 
care and God bless you all. 

All my love, 

Kristi 


Kristi Carter 

Waller Hall Duchess of Windsor 



488 Queens/1984 









♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


Six months ago J never would have 
imagined broadening my f amily to fif¬ 
ty new brothers! It has brought many 
new. exciting experiences, and a lot of 
fun times!!! Thanks for all the sup¬ 
port and friendship you have given 
me! There's a special place in my 
heart for each and every one of you! 
Friendships last a life time!!! 

Love, 

Your Sweetheart 


Karen Smith 
Sigma Chi Sweetheart 


To my brothers at Farmhouse, 
Thank you so much for the great 
year and the fond memories. Getting 
to know each and everyone of you is 
what has made it so special for me. 
Although 1 know that my time being 
Farmer’s Daughter must come to an 
end, Tm certain that the new 
f riendships we’ve made will continue 
to grow. 

Love, 

Janey 


Janey Jenson 

Farmhouse Farmer’s Daughter 


To the Men of Sigma Phi Epsilon, 

Good times always seem to pass so 
quickly and often I don’t get the 
chance to say thank you or how much 
new f riends and brothers mean to me. 

I just want to thank you for spend¬ 
ing these days and memories with me. 
It is a great honor and pleasure to be 
representing Sigma Phi Epsilon, as 
your Queen of Hearts. 


It is such an honor for me to have 
been chosen the Delta fan Delta "Sal¬ 
ly Sunshine” representative (for 1984- 
85). I can’t say enough about the men 
who make up the Delt house. From 
the beginning,each of‘them made me 
fed comfortable and sincerely wel¬ 
come. I have made a lot ol special 
friends at Dells that I will treasure 
forever. I would like to thank each of 
the men (at Delta Tau Delta) for pro¬ 
viding me this opportunity, and am 
very excited for all of the fun limes 
ahead. 


Eden Sinclair 

Delta Tau Delta Sally Sunshine 


To the Women of Delta Gamma. 

1 am very proud and honored to be 
representing you as Mr. Anchors- 
plash for 1984-85. The upcoming 
months promise to be ones filled with 
excitement, great times and lasting 
friendships. I can’t express in words 
on how I am looking f orw ard to them. 
Meeting all of you w ill be a pleasure- 
able and unforgettable experience. 
Again, 1 say thank you. 


Jud Preece 

Delta Gamma Mr. Anchorsplash 


I’m both honored and excited to be 
your Starlet. I’m looking forward to 
an awesome year w ith you guys - filled 
with lots of cookies, hugs, and chats. 

P.S. I’m especially excited looking 
forward to the Ski Trip! Look out 
Bogus Basin — Here we come!! 


Being TKE’s Waterfollies Queen 
was a lot of fun. It w as great getting to 
know the guys and making some good 
friends too. TKE’s area bunch of real- 
Iv cool guvs and I’m gonna miss them 
a lot next year since I’m transferring 
schools. I wish the best for all of them. 
Thanks Again! 

Love, 

Lisa 


Lisa Boyer 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Waterfollies Queen 


What Lambda Chi Alpha means to 
me: 

My best buddies 

A w hole house of overproteettve big 
brothers 

Fun study buddies 

A place to escape f rom the zoo 

But most important a house full of 
priceless memories and very special 
friends! 

Love, 

Mo 


Maureen (Mo) Dolan 

Lambda Chi Alpha Crescent Girl 


Trina Rank JB1 Boon 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Queen of Hearts Kappa Sigma Starlet 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



1984 / Queens 


489 









































































1 

Seniors 


Agricultural Education. 

.505 

Foreign Language. 

.516 

Agricultural Engineering. 

.496 

Forestry. 

.496 

Agriculture Economics. 

.494 

General Agriculture. 

.493 

Agriculture Mechanics. 

.493 

General Education. 

.506 

Agronomy. 

.493 

General Studies. 

.525 

A New Image. 

.497 

Geological Engineering. 

.510 

Animal Science. 

.494 

Geology. 

.522 

Anthropology. 

.516 

Gone But Not Forgotten. 

.520 

Architecture. 

.510 

Graduate School. 

.526 

Bacteriology. 

.523 

Health Education. 

.505 1 

Biological Chemistry. 

.523 

History. 

.517 

Biology. 

.522 

Horticulture. 

.496 

Business Administration. 

.498 

Hotel Administration. 

.503 

Chemical Engineering. 

.509 

Human Nutrition and Foods. 

.495 

Chemistry. 

.522 

Industrial Education. 

.504 

Child and Family Studies. 

.493 

Integrated Pest Management. 

.495 

Civil Engineering. 

.511 

Interior Design. 

.496 

Clothing and Textiles. 

.495 

It All Counts. 

.512 

College of Agriculture . 

.493 

Landscape Architecture. 

.496 

College of Business and Economics . 

.498 

Material Engineering. 

.510 

College of Education. 

.504 

Math. 

.524 

College of Engineering. 

.507 

Mechanical Engineering. 

.507 

College of Nursing. 

.514 

Music. 

.516 

College of Pharmacy . 

.514 

Philosophy. 

.518 

College of Sciences and Arts . 

.516 

Physical Education. 

.505 

College of Veterinary Medicine . 

.525 

Physics. 

.523 

Comfortable and Content. 

.515 

Political Science. 

.519 

Computer Science. 

.524 

Pre-Engineering. 

.510 

Construction Management. 

.511 

Range Management. 

.495 

Criminal Justice. 

.518 

Recreation and Leisure Studies. 

.504 

Economics. 

.502 

Social Studies. 

.517 

Electrical Engineering. 

.508 

Social Work. 

.518 

English. 

.517 

Sociology. 

.517 

Entomology. 

.495 

Speech. 

.516 

Environmental Science. 

.522 

The Beginning. 

.528 

Fine Arts. 

.519 

Wildlife Biology. 

.522 

Food Science. 

.495 

Zoology. 

.523 


492 Seniors /1984 






























































































College of Agriculture 
and Home Economics 



General Agriculture 



APPEL. MICHAEL — Colfax 

CHVATAL. EDWARD - Lowden 

GEORGE. AMBROSE — Jamaica. West Indies 


Agriculture Mechanics 


HOFFMAN. JOE — Kettle Falls 
KILIAN, JOHN — Sumyside 
PRIMMER, RANDY — Rockford 
WARREN, GLENN — Dayton 



BINDER. MICHAEL — Lowden 
BROWN. RAYMOND — Farmington 
DILLING. HAROLD — Moses Lake 
GONZALES. ABRAHAM — Ml Vernon 
JANUCHOWSKI. JED — Medical Lake 


Agronomy 






KING, JOHN — Stanwood 
LANGE. MARC — Garfield 
OLSON, KERMIT — Pullman 
SCHWINT. TERRY — Quincy 
SHULER. ROBERT — Pullman 
STAFFORD. ROBERT — Pullman 


BENAVIDES. MARIA — Dayton 
CLARK. CONNIE — Boise ID 
GARCIA, MARIE — Algona 
HERZOG. SHELLEY — Snohomish 
KELLER. JANEE — Wenatchee 
KNUZ-JOHNSON, MARY — Pullman 


Child & 
Family 
Studies 



LAHGENT, ELIZABETH - Colfax 
ORR. JANET - Bothell 
PROZINSKI. KARA - Los Altos Hills. CA 
SHAY. LORI — Olympia 
TAYLOR. ANITA — Pullman 
TUNISON. PATRICIA — Spokane 
WOOLWINE. JILL - Pullman 


1984 / Seniors 493 








































Animal Science 


CORIGLIANO. BRUCE — Greenacres 
COULTER, ANN — Anacortes 
CUDE, SANDRA — Enumclaw 
DAUBER, NANCY — Pullman 
DUNCAN. ROBERT — Augusta. Ml 
ENGSTROM. SHARON — Mt. Vernon 
FERGUSON. DOUGLAS — Woodland 


BAYHA. KERRY — Freeland 
BUR WASH. MARY — Eatonville 
CAMERON. BRENT — Centerville 
CHAMPION. EUGENE — Omak 
CHANDLER. DEBORAH — Toppemsh 






GAUVIN. JANET — While Salmon 
GOBLE. JODERY — Randle 
GODDARD. SANDRA — Sumner 
HELLIE. DEAN — Manslield 
JACKSON. DAVID — Pasco 
JAQUEZ. JOEL — Tacoma 
JUDD. JANICE — Duvall 



KNOWLTON. YOK1KO — Pullman 
KOLLER. MONTY — Pomeroy 
MOLSBERRY. MICHAEL — Henderson NV 
MUECKE. ALISON — Bellevue 
MUNDSCHENK, PETER — Rainier 
NEUBAUER. ANDREW — Spokane 
OSBORN. LINDA — Everetl 



PURRINGTON. EVERETT — Pullman 
RRHEA. TERESA — Yakima 
SIMPSON. KRISTIE — Pullman 
VAN BATAVIA. DOUGLAS — Mt Vernon 
VAN BEEK. STEVEN — Enumclaw 
VILANDER. LAURA — Battleground 



WELLS. CARLENE — Colville 
WHITING, ROBERT — Seattle 



Agriculture Economics 


BARTH. OTDD — Mattawa 
CHRISTENSEN. CRAIG - Dryden 
CRIDER. CRAIG — St. John 
FORNEY. CELIA — Oroville 



GILLILAND. CRAIG — Bellevue 
HARRIS. JOE — Naches 
HIMMEL8ERGER. DON — Dayton 
HUGHES. JOHN — Almira 
IREFIN. DAVID — Maduguri. Nigeria 





JESKE. JULIANA - Warden 
JONES. JULIE — Mt. Vernon 
KANZLER. LISA — Ritzville 
MARLOW. BRADLEY — Auburn 
MIELKE. ROBERT — Davenport 
MOORE. DANIEL — LaCrosse 


OCHNER. KRIS — Buckley 
PALMER. RALPH — Bellevue 
R08ERTS. MIKE — Coltax 
RODGERS. CHARLIE — Pullman 
SUMMERS. ALICE — Mt. Vernon 
UFKES, MARK — Richland 



494 


Seniors /1984 

















































Food Science 


FROSETH, BARRIE — Pullman 
GOSSER, BELINDA — Snohomish 
JOHNSON. TED — Bellingham 
PAULINI, INGE — West Germany 
PETERSON. MICHAEL — Waitsburg 


ADAMSON. KAREN — Novato 
BOCHER, SHARI — Seattle 
CARPENTER. ELAINE — Selah 
CLEVELAND. LINDA — Olympia 
DESHAW, LYNETTE — Seattle 


Clothing 
and Textiles 




DETTRICH. KERI — Everett 
DORMAN. BARBARA — Mesa 
FOWLER. JENNIFER — Seattle 
FRANCISCO. SHANNON — Bellingham 
FRINK, CHRIS — Vancouver 
FRY, PENNY — Olympia 
GRAVES. TAMMY — Grg Harbor 


HEIN, HELEN — Pullman 

HEWITT, LAURA — Bremerton 

KARST, KATHLEEN — Moxee 

KRONNAGEL, KIM — Poulsbo 

ROGERS, BELINDA — British Columbia. Canada 

SCHUMACHER. LESLIE - Shelton 



SERESUN. KELLY — Seattle 
THOMAS. JANE — Bothell 
UNDERWOOD, LINDA — Yakima 
WILLIAMSEN. SUSAN - Davenport 



Human Nutrition 


BOLLINGER. LISA — Wenatchee 
COOK. TAMMY — Port Ludlow 
FISCHER. KAREN — Spokane 
HANSSON, MARIE — Seattle 
KLAUS, DEBRA — Woodland 


& Foods 


KOLB. DIANE — Edmonds 
MENGERT. THERESA — Spokane 
NIXON. BETH — Lynnwood 
RANDALL. CARLA — Kirkland 
SANTAROSA, TRACEY — Spokane 


Range Management 



Integrated Pest Management 



MWAKIMA. FRANCIS — Pullman 


Entomology 


1984 / Seniors 495 


































Agriculture 

Engineering 


BASTYS, MIKE — Marysville 
BEDELL. WINSTON — Lynnwood 
BLANC. BRYAN — Pasco 
CHINANZVAVANA, STEVE — Zimbabwe 


LARSON. GLEN — Mt. Vernon 
LOCK. FRED — Pullman 
MCNABB. GIL — Issaquah 
RYAN. MICHAEL — Si. Manes. ID 
YOUNCE. FRANK — Granite Falls 


Interior Design 


ARMBRUSTER. GAIL — Bellevue 
CHRISTIE. JANET — Wenatchee 
FEDJE, SCOTT — Eugene, OR 
KIGHT, JULIE — Wenatchee 


NAITO. GREG — Canada 
PUTNAM. ERIN — Edmonds 
RICKEL. CINDY — Waitsburg 
SANGL, CANDACE — Seattle 
WELLS, JENNIFER — Bellevue 


Horticulture 


Landscape 

Architecture 


ROBAISHY, KHALIDA — Saudi Arabia 
APPEL. BARBARA — Endicott 
BASIL, MICHAEL — Tacoma 
GEYER. PETER - Seattle 
JOHNSON. JEFFREY — Brush Prairie 
KAHLER. DAVID — Pullman 


MARTINSON. KIRSTIN — Pullman 
NEWBY. JANET — Marblemounl 
POLCUCH. RENE — Edmonds 
RETTER. MICHAEL — Hartline 
STARK. LESA — Kent 
SUHADOLNIK. MATTHEW — Pasco 


Forestry 



BERNARD. MICHAEL — Pullman 
CARMEAN. MARI — Yakima 
CHAN. CHRIS — Green Bank 
KRAJEWSKI. STANLEY — Seattle 


LEFFEL. CHRIS - Vancouver 
MAUDER. WAYNE — Pullman 
METTLER. KURT — Vancouver 
PFEIFLE. ROD — Renton 


496 Seniors /1984 







































Oborn 



A 

New 

Image 

their education as individuals by hav¬ 
ing them apply classroom material to 
everyday life. 

The popularity of Bryan Mohler’s 
Marketing 360 class is partly attri¬ 
buted to his use of humor; he feels it is 
a good way to ease people into the 
material and break the monotony. As 
a teacher, his age and attitude seem to 
have a strong impact on his 
student/teacher relations. He feels his 
class is popular because students learn 
something. “It’s practical, not theore¬ 
tical. It’s not easier, but it’s popular 
because it deals with everyday situa¬ 
tions.” 

Despite a “reputation” of giving dif¬ 
ficult exams, Mohler still is able to 
attract a large number of students. “In 
my tests, I ask people to be original in 
thought. I’m asking students to be 
creative and apply material to an ev¬ 
eryday situation. Students aren’t lazy 
they suffer anxiety and a fear of 
grades. They need to study and have 
fun. It bothers me to see students 
frustrated with my tests.” 

Mohler doesn’t plan on teaching 
forever, but for now he enjoys it. 
“Teaching is a lot more work than I 
ever thought it would be, but I like it. 
Why give up something that’s reward¬ 
ing. My long-term plan is a question 
unanswered.” 

Besides teaching Marketing 360, 
Mohler teaches Marketing 491, 
advises the Marketing club, is the 
chapter advisor for Lambda Chi 
Alpha, and an academic adviser for 
the University. 

by Cindy Reynolds 


and 1980 he worked in Richland for 
Battelle, a contract research firm. 
Then in 1980, he returned to WSU to 
seek a masters degree. During his 
graduate study, Mohler taught Eco¬ 
nomics 102 and 203, and ran the eco¬ 
nomics Modules. In 1983, he began 
teaching Marketing 360 and was em¬ 
ployed by the University as a halftime 
faculty member. He received his 
MBA in the spring of 1983. 

Presently, Mohler is employed by 
the University full time, but is doing 
some work as a research consultant 
with WSU Professor Don Stem. They 
are working in the Spokane Area for 
Pepsi Co. and some area lawyers. 

As far as Pullman is concerned, 
Mohler is best known for his unique 
approach to teaching Marketing 360. 
His goal is to get students involved in 


When one envisions a college pro¬ 
fessor, a man of 50 wearing a dark 
tailored suit, equipped with Barlett’s 
Book of Quotations might come to 
mind. This may have been the case at 
some earlier point in time, but not 
today. 

Bryan Mohler, age 27 and dressed 
comfortably in his Levi’s, comes to 
class equipped with Vol. I of Truly 
Tasteless Jokes to entertain his 
Marketing 360 class. In his first year 
as a full time faculty member, his 
popularity has grown immensely with 
students and other faculty as a friend, 
instructor, and colleague. He was 
awarded Marketing Faculty Member 
of the Year for 1984. 

Mohler entered WSU in 1975 and 
graduated in 1979 with a degree in 
Transportation Economics. In 1979 


1984 / Seniors 497 








College of Business 
and Economics 


Business Administration 



ANDERSON. CHRIS — Wenatchee 
ANDERSON. PAUL — Wenatchee 
ANTUSH. STEPHEN — Redmond 
AQUINO. LINDA — Seattle 
ARAKAKI. GARY — Honolulu. HI 
ARIWOOLA, ADEMOLA - Nigeria 
BABICH. PATRICIA — Yakima 


BALAGAT. GRACE — Blihue. HI 
BARNES. NOEL — Pullman 
BARRENTINE. CYNTHIA — Tukwilla 
BAUER. BRIAN — Bothel 
BEIMBORN, STACY — Tacoma 
BELMONDO. BRAD — Seattle 
BERG, BRYCE — Spokane 


BERNARD. MICHAEL — Pullman 
BERNARD. THOMAS — Bellevue 
BINKHUYSEN. COR — Kennewick 
BLOOM. MICHELLE — Richland 
BLUMENSCHEIN. MICHAEL - St. John 
BORSELLI. MARK - Redmond 
BOWIE. PATRICIA — Federal Way 



BOZICH. STEPHEN - Port Orchard 
BREITENSTEIN. BRYCE — Richland 
BRISLAWN, VIRGINIA — Mercer Island 
BROWN. ALAN — Bellevue 
BUCK, KATHLEEN — Moses Lake 
BUNGCAYAO. DOMINIC — Lihue. HI 
BUTAUD, CHRIS — Bellevue 


CAMPBELL. KEVIN — Pullman 
CARBAUGH, JOAN — Spokane 
CARE FOOT. BRENT — Pullman 
CARTER. SUZAN — Pullman 
CAVANAGH. ROBERT — Spokane 
CHAN. MONG — Malaysia 
CHESS. JAMES — Chehalis 


CHOI. IN — Lacey 
CHRISTOPH. CALVIN — Graham 
CHURCH. GREGORY — Vancouver 
ClCHOCKl. SONIA — Richland 
CLANVILLE. ROGER — Spokane 
CLAWSON. RANDY — PaSCO 
CONFORTI. STEPHEN — Tacoma 


CONLEY, SCOTT — Spokane 
COOPER, CARRI — Poulsbo 
CROSS. LEANNA — Edmonds 
CUMMINS. GREG — Yakima 
CURRAN. KATHY — Richland 
DANNERT. DEBRA — Wayzata, MN 
DARSOW. CYNTHIA — Kennewick 


DART, DENISE — Moses Lake 
DAVENPORT. DENISE - Wenatchee 
DAVIDSON. JAMES — Woodinville 
DAVIS, PAULA — Spokane 
DEAN. MARK — Bellevue 
DEHAAN, NANCY — Tacoma 
DELANEY. NORMAN — Spokane 



498 Seniors/1984 
















































































DENNEHY, SHAUN — Spokane 
DESHON. JOHN — Spokane 
DONNELLY. MICHAELA — Renton 
DONOHOE, ROBERT — Tacoma 
DOUGAN. BARRY — Bellevue 
DOUMIT, MARK — Cathlamet 
DREYER. JOHN — Pullman 


DUTT. JILL — Federal Way 
EICHELBERGER. BECKY - Gilletle. WY 
ENGLUND. ANTHONY — Camas 
ENGLUND. ERIC ~ Spokane 
ENRIGHT. MICHAEL — Kent 
ENSLIN. KIRK — Woodinville 
ENSOR, SHERRI — Davenport 


ETHERINGTON. MURRAY — Bellevue 
EVANS. BRIAN — Mt. Vernon 
EVANS. KAREN — Portland. OR 
FENDER. TERRESA — Wenatchee 
FENICH. GREGORY — Moses Lake 
FERGUSON. STEVE — Tacoma 
FLODIN. ROBIN — Sunnyside 


FLOYD. TOOD — Belfair 
FORSHAG. GEOFFREY — Spokane 
FOSTER. LYNN — Marysville 
FOTHERGILL. GREGORY — Vancouver 
FRITH. JEFF - Vancouver 
FUHR. JOAN — Seattle 
FULTON. BRUCE — Selah 


GALLAGHER. CATHERINE — Puyallup 
GAMMON. LEE ANN — Tacoma 
GARCIA. JONE — Algona 
GOFF. ELIZABETH — Tacoma 
GOODMAN. CYNTHIA — Kent 
GRIESBAUM. RICHARD — Bellevue 
GRIM. JAMES — Redmond 


GRISIFULLI. SARA — Ridgefield 
GROVER. DANA — Kennewick 
GRYTNESS. PETTER — Tacoma 
HAASE. ARLEEN — Mt Vernon 
HABERBUSH. CATHY — Seattle 
HACKETT, LISA - Kent 
HADER. WADE — Vancouver 


HALVORSON. KAREN — Toppemsh 
HAMILTON. MYLES — Canada 
HANSON, TENA — Kirkland 
HARDER. HANS — Kahlotus 
HARN, SUZANNE — Wenatchee 
HEESEN. ROBERT — Edmonds 
HEILMANN. LINDA — Tacoma 


HEKEL. MARK — Olympia 
HENDRICKS, MELINDA — Bellevue 
HENSELMAN. HOLLY — Pullman 
HERRON. KIM — Connell 
HILL. LORI — Pullman 
HOLMAN. ROBERT — Spokane 
HOOPER. KERRY - Spokane 


HORNER. GREGORY — Vancouver 
HOWARD. DANIEL — Federal Way 
HOWELL. RICHARD — Kelso 
HUNT, REED — Port Townsend 
HUNTER, JOAN — Renton 
IKEDA. RANDALL — Hilo. HI 
INGRAM. DOUGLAS — Bellevue 


ISOM. RICHARD - Yakima 
JOHNSON, JOAN — Aberdeen 
JOHNSON, MARK — Yakima 
JOHNSON. VANESSA — Seattle 
JONES. BRYCE — Bremerton 
KAKU. CLINTON — Seattle 
KASER, LAURA — Kennewick 


1984 / Seniors 499 

































































KATZINSKI. JAMES — Seattle 
KERWIN. PAUI — Renton 
KIEFFER, KRISTINE — Spokane 
KILBER, TAMARA — Puyallup 
KING. CHERYL — Kent 
KLEIN. RICHARD — Puyallup 
KLOBUCHER. MARCELLA — Spokane 


KNOPP, MARCIA — Coulee City 
KONISHL KEVIN — Seattle 
KRIEG. KERRY — Richland 
KROUGH. ALVIN — Spokane 
KU. PETER — Okinawa, Japan 
LACASSE. MARK — Bellingham 
LAM. MEI-HO — Hong Kong 


LARSE. JANET — Kirkland 
LARSEN. JOHN — Gig Harbor 
LARSON. KAREN - Bothell 
LA VALUE, JOSEPH — Yakima 
LEE. JOSEPH — Clarkston 
LEFLER, LONNA — Veradale 
LESTER, JEFFREY - Pullman 


LIM. LAURA — Singapore 
LOMBARDO, ANTHONY — Seattle 
LOOFBURROW. DAVID — Yakima 
LORAN. LISA — Tacoma 
LOUCKS. MELVIN — Puyallup 
MALONEY. DENNIS — Pullman 
MANFRE. MIKE — Seattle 


MANFRED. PATRICIA — Spokane 
MANNING, SUZANNE — Tacoma 
MANSER. KAREN — Spokane 
MARSH. TIMOTHY — Tacoma 
MARSHALL. MARJA — Bellevue 
MARTIN, RODNEY - Walla Walla 
MATSCH, WAYNE — Spokane 


MAYEDA. STEVEN — Olympia 
MCCANN. PATRICK — Seattle 
MCKINLAY. ANDREW — Oak Harbor 
MCPHERSON. STEVEN — Enumclaw 
VEKDHANASARN. ATCHAREE — Thailand 
MELLON. CHRISTINE — Seattle 
MICHELSONS. INGRID — Seattle 


MILLER. EDWARD — PuyaHup 
MITCHELL. SANDRA — Redmond 
MONTAGUE. MICHIYO — Tacoma 
MONTOYA. JUANITA — Mt Vernon 
MOOD. STEPHEN — Ketchikan. AK 
MOORE. DAVID ~ Royal City 
MOOTHART. DEAN — Vancouver 


MORASCH. KELLY — Endicott 
MORFORD, DALE — Kent 
MORFORD. MELANIE — Spokane 
MORGAN. JULIE — Poulsbo 
MORRIS. TANELL — Snohomish 
MUNSON. TODD — Seiah 
MURPHY. EDWARD — Seattle 


MURRAY, PAUL — Pullman 
MUTTER. TERRI — Federal Way 
NEESE. JEFFREY — Evanslen. IL 
NELSON, ROBERT — Bellevue 
NEUMILLER. ROBERT — Sumner 
NEVAN, CHRISTOPHER — Federal Way 
NEWBERRY. KIM — Wenatchee 


NUGENT. SAMUEL - Pullman 
NZIRAMASANGA. CHENAI — Pullman 
OAKLEY, BARBARA — Richland 
OHLUND. DIANA — Graham 
OKADA. LAURIE — Bellevue 
OLIVER. TRACY — Pullman 
OLMSTEAD. MIKE — Federal Way 



500 Seniors /1984 






























































OLSEN. PETER — Othello 
OLSON. KATHERINE — Edmonds 
OVELAND, CHARLENE — Saratoga. CA 
OVERSTREET. LORI — Spokane 
PENROD. KARYN — Colfax 
PEPPEL. DUANE — Spokane 
PETERSON. ANGELA — Tacoma 


PETERSON. ROBERT — Tacoma 
PICKENS. MARLA — Burlington 
PITTMAN, CRAIG — Tacoma 
PITZEL. KAREN — Auburn 
POAGE. JANECE — Spokane 
POE. RENE — Kennewick 
POLLARD. TERESA — Mercer Island 


QUAIDOO, IMMACULATA — Ghana 
OUAM. LISA — Kent 
RAINEY. ANDREA — Bellevue 
RANCICH. NANCY — Seattle 
RANGER. CHRISTIN — Yakima 
RAYMOND. JON — Pullman 
REISER. KATHERINE — Tacoma 


REPANICH. LORI — Port Orchard 
ROACH. JAMISON — Tacoma 
ROBERTS. RHONA — Clayton 
ROBINSON. ZOE — Spokane 
ROSSO. RONALD — Seattle 
SAGERSER. JEANNIE — Olympia 
SAMPSON, FRANK — Vancouver 


SCHMITZ, MICHELE — Spokane 
SCHROEDER. SCOTT — Wenatchee 
SCHULZ. THERESA — Sumner 
SCHWINN, SUE — Pullman 
SEALS. KANA — Seattle 
SHARP. KEITH — Clarkston 
SHELDON. BRIAN — Gig Harbor 


SHE NEMAN. DAWN — Vancouver 
SHOEMAKER. JOHN — Port Angeles 
SHUCK, PAUNIECE — Tacoma 
SIMMS. JEFFREY — Bothell 
SMITH. MARK — Spokane 
SMITH. MICHAEL — Federal Way 
SNIDER, JOHN — Spokane 


SPARKS. WADE — Pullman 
STARR, WADE — Longview 
STEVENSON. MICHELLE — Seattle 
STEWART. LEO — Pullman 
STINSON. SCOTT — Bellevue 
TADLOCK. ALAN — Pullman 
TALLENT. JAMES — Vancouver 


TANNER. SCOTT — Olympia 
TELSTAD. DAVID — Seattle 
THOMPSON. MAY — Spokane 
TIJERINA, LUIS — Pullman 
UFFORD, MICHAEL — Pullman 
UPTON. BERNICE — Pullman 
UWADIALE. GRACE — Tacoma 


VANDENDYSSEL, JAMES - Seattle 
VANDER VELDEN. ERIC - Seattle 
VANDOREN. JULIE — Wenatchee 
VANVLEET, DWIGHT — Tacoma 
VEA. DANETTE — Kebaha, HI 
VERSTELLE. JOYCE — Spokane 
VIXIE, VICTORIA — Prescott 


VOLLMER. DAVID — Endicott 
WACHTER. TIMOTHY — Pullman 
WALKNER, ANITA — Pasco 
WALLACE. TRACY — Kent 
WALTARI. KEVIN — Redmond 
WARREN. MARY — Spokane 
WHITE. VAN — Federal Way 


1984 /Seniors 501 























































Economics 


WICKLINE. MELODY — Seattle 
WILLCUTS. LARENDA — Seattle 
WILLIAMS. JEFFREY — Pullman 
WILLIAMS. LAURA — Kent 
WILLIAMS. LORRAINE — Olympia 
WILLIAMS. MATTHEW — Spokane 


WILSON. NICHOLAS — Edmonds 
WILSON. PETER — Edmonds 
WINDER. GAIL — Seattle 
WONG. YUKWAN — Pullman 
WRIGHT. DAVID — Elmer Crty 
YANDLE. COLLEEN — Seattle 


YEE, FOOK — Singapore 
YORK. JACI — Sultan 
YOUNG. LYNNE — Honolulu. HA 
ZDILAR, JAMES — Longview 
ZEHNER. CHRISTOPHER — Seattle 
ZUROSKE. LESLIE — Pullman 




<4 






BAGGEN. ELISE — Ellensburg 
BEAL. JACKIE — Spokane 
BOYNE. BRYAN — Richland 
BREARO. DAVID — Kennewick 
CHOKSHI. ANIL — Pullman 



COWAN. STEPHEN — Leavenworth 
DOWDEN, HELEN — Kirland 
DUNCAN. BRENT — Mercer Island 
EVANS. KYLE — Redmond 
FRICKE. STUART — Grandview 


GOEHRY. CLINTON — Chelan 
GREENWOOD. KELLY - Spokane 
HOLLINGSWORTH. DALE — Federal Way 
KENNA. BRIAN — Spokane 
MARSHALL. JOHN — Richland 


MCCHESNEY. TERRY — Vancouver 
NEWCOMB. CRAIG — Ravansdale 
NOORT. SANDRA — Spokane 
NORMAN. KENNETH — Bellevue 
O'BRIEN. MICHAEL — Mercer Island 


OLOFIELD. MARTIN — Seattle 
PEMBERTON. DEREK — Selah 
ROE. SARAH — Spokane 
ROVETTO. MARK — Yakima 
SCHEELE. SANDRA — Fairfield 



SOUTH, STEVEN — Pullman 
SPLANE. WILLIAM — Tacoma 
VANGELDER. SANDRA — Seattle 
VINING, STEVEN — Colville 
WEYMOUTH. CHRISTOPHER — Redmond 
WYSONG. JEFFREY — Auburn 




h 



502 


Seniors /1984 
























BOHLKE, LAURA — Yakima 
BROCADO. CLAUDIO - Mexico 
BYRD. DAVID — Ellensburg 
CHOW. RITA — Bellevue 
CLARK. CLIFTON — Bickleton 


DOUGLAS. SUSAN — Seattle 
ESTEP. WILSON — Pullman 
FILION. HOLLY — Mercer Island 
FORK. ERIC — Zillah 
FRASER. ROBERT — Olympia 


FUGERE. JOSEPH — Seattle 
GIBBONS. PAMELA — Seattle 
GLEESON. MICHAEL — Longview 
GLEIN. SUSAN — Marysville 
GROWE. LOR IE — Farmington 


Hotel 

Administration 



GUSTAFSON. DANIEL — Pullman 
HANSEN. JAMES — Chelan 
HATCH. SEAN — Bellevue 
JENSEN. KRISTINA — Bothell 
JOHNSON. KENT — Wenatchee 
JURGENSEN. ERIC — Mercer Island 



KIMBLE. STEVE — Longview 
KJOSE. TERESA — Spokane 
LAWS. DONALD — Olympia 
LINDGREN. JOHN — Seattle 
LIPINSKI. DIANE — Anchorage, AK 
MANNING. PETER — Spokane 


MACGOWAN. DOUGLASS — Vancouver 
MITCHELL. GREGORY — Spokane 
PORTER, JEFFREY — Tacoma 
ROBESON. CHARLES — Cathlamet 
SANTOS, JULIET — Spanaway 
SCHAMBRON. PAMELA — White Salmon 


SIDEL. ARTHUR — Bellevue 
SLUSSER. LINDA — Pullman 
SPIEGELBERG, WILLIAM — Pullman 
STILL. CRAIG — Wenatchee 
STOCKDALE, LINDA — Clarkston 
STRICKLAND, BARBARA — Kanaeohe. HI 



TALLENT. STEVEN — Vancouver 
TONNEMAKER. KURT — Seattle 
UDDENBERG, KENNETH — Gig Hartjor 
WANGSMO. DOUGLASS — Tacoma 
WHITE. AILEEN — Walla Walla 


1984 / Seniors 


503 














































College of Education 


Recreation and Leisure Studies 


BENSON. SARITA — Kelso 
BINDER. LYNN — Bellevue 
BRADEN. THERESE — Pullman 
BRATVOLD. ELLEN — Pullman 


BROCKMEYER. JAMES — Kent 
BROWN, MARTIN — Yakima 
CAMP. MELISSA — LaCrosse 
CLEIN. LAURA — Colfax 
CLINGAN. CAROL — Seattle 



DAVIS. LARRY — Richland 
DAVIS. WILLIAM — Wenatchee 
DIGLERIA. LISA — Vashon 
DORBOLO. MARY — Everett 
GRAEF. MARCUS A. — Seattle 
GRIEB. ROGER — Goldendale 


HANLIN. PATRICIA — Seattle 
HAWKINS. HEIDI — Kirkland 
HILL. JEANNA — Seattle 
JOHNSON. STANLEY — Richland 
KING. BRUCE — Bellevue 
LUSTED. JOHN — Canada 


MARKIN. KATHY — Calgary. Alberta. Canada 
MILLER. KATHI — Olympia 
MOSER. CAROLYN - Bellevue 
NELSON. BLAKE — Wenatchee 
NNELSON, PATRICIA — Bothell 
NICKELS. DEBRA — Langley 


TTHERRIAULT. KATHY — Wenatchee 
TOBIN. DANA — Bellevue 
VARNES. SUSAN — Spokane 
VOORDEPOORTE. ARDELL — Bow 
WARREN. MICHAEL — Lynnwood 
YATES, KIM 




Industrial Education 


BROOKE. TOM — Springdale 
COCKBURN. STEVEN — Seattle 
DIERKS. BRIAN — Richland 
DONHAM. MARK — Bellevue 


MCLAUGHLIN. PAUL — Seattle 
MUELLER. JOHN — Seattle 
SNYDER. GREGG — Longview 
STEVENS. KEITH — Spokane 



504 Seniors /1984 






















































CARLSON. CHRIS — Chattaroy 


Agricultural Education 




Health Education 


AMMERMAN. TAMARA — Gig Harbor 
BACHMAN. ROGER — Yelm 
CAMPBELL. MARGARET — Seattle 
DAVIS. LORI — Colville 
DEVLIN. DENNIS - Canada 


EMMIL. KEN - Lake Stevens 
GAMBRIEL. JANETTE — Soap Lake 
GORMAN, DOROTHY — Bellevue 
GREENFIELD. CINDY — Chinook 
HARRISON. MARK — Nooksack. AK 
HAUGHEN. GAYLA — Clarkston 


HOPKINS. TRACY — Edmonds 

HOUE. MICHAEL — Tacoma 

JAMES. LAURA — Pullman 

JANSEN. MARY — Everson 

MCGRATH, JOAN — British Columbia. Canada 

MILLER. SUZANNE — Issaquah 


Physical 

Education 



MOORE. KAREN — Lynnwood 
MORGAN. STACY - Rogue River. OR 
MURPHY. BRENDA — Tacoma 
ROBINSON. STEVEN — Mercer Island 
SHOEMAKE. TERESA — Edmonds 
SIEGWARTH. ROBERT — Oak Harbor 




BALLBACH. CRYSTAL — Newport 
BREITENBACH, CATHERINE - Seattle 
GOCHNAUER. MELODY — Davenport 
GRANT. TANYA — Seattle 
KURANKO. REBECCA — Pullman 


LEIGHTY. JANIS — Spokane 
NEIERTZ. BONNIE — Olympia 
SANDERS. JAMA — Pullman 
SCHAEFER. KAREN — Edmonds 
ZIMMER. JULIE — LaCrosse 


1984 / Seniors 


505 





















General Education 


ARNOLD. JULIE — Olympia 
BABBITT. TERESA — Ritzville 
CARR. CAROLYN — Edmonds 
COLE. ANGELA — Pullman 
CRAPSER. SANDRA — Bothell 



CREIGHTON. KRISTIE — Tacoma 
DENNIE. LINDA — Seattle 
EASTON. MARY — Prosser 
ERAK. TRACEY — Aberdeen 
FEWKES. TARA — Pullman 
FICKE. LYNETTE — Wenalchee 


F1KSDAL. SHERRY — Spokane 
GEER. TERRI — McCleary 
GETZ. ROBIN — Lynnwood 
HABERMAN. TAMARA — Pullman 
HANSEN. KAREN — Puyallup 
HAYES. JILL — Tacoma 




HICKERSON. SALLY — Ashford 
HODGES. LORI — Pullman 
HONNER. RONALD — Spokane 
JAMES. LINDA — Kennewick 
JENKINS. TERESA — Spokane 
JONES. LISA — Richland 
KELLEY. COLLEEN — Clarkston 


KtLLEY. DAVID — Tonasket 
LAMB. BARBARA — Snoqualmie 
LAVINDER. NANCY — Puyallup 
LEE. SOO MAY — Richland 
LEISHMAN. MATT — Bellevue 
LEONARD. KELLY — Olympia 
LLOYO. ANDREW — Bellevue 





LOUIE. JIM — Spokane 
MANNIX. LYNNE — Tacoma 
MAYFIELD. SHAWN — Tacoma 
MCCLEES, BECKY — Pullman 
MCGEE-FURRER. JENNY — Shellon 
MESKE, ELAINE — Colbert 
MITCHELL. DEBRA — Seattle 



MOSER. JOAN — Colton 
MURRAY. MICHELLE — Sumner 
PAGE. CINDY — Richland 
PATTERSON. BECKY — Ml. Vernon 
PAYNE. PAMELA — Sumner 
PETERSON, KATRINA — Spangle 
PRUETT. JULIE — Aberdeen 


PUBOLS. MARTHA — Pullman 
RENDLE, SANDRA — Spokane 
RIDENHOUR. LISA — Everson 
RILEY. JEAN — Touchet 
SCHULTZ. SUSAN - Education 
SHEPARD. CATHERINE — Spokane 
SHROPSHIRE. MARY — Tacoma 


SNOW. THERESA — Renton 
STEVENSON. SHERRIE — Tacoma 
SULLIVAN. PEGGY — Pullman 
SZABIYA. KRISTINE — Pullman 
TAMURA. FLORENCE — Tacoma 
WILCOX. KRISTY — Harrington 
ZIMMERMAN. MARY JO — Warden 



506 Seniors /1984 
































College of Engineering 




ADKINSON. DAVID — Kennewick 
ADKISSON, ROBERT — Yakima 


Mechanical Engineering 


ATTRI. BINDU — Renton 
BARBO. BRAD — Aberdeen 



BESEL. ALAN — Waterville 
BORK. STEVEN — Port Angeles 
BROWN. DANIEL — Walla Walla 
CHAMBERLAN. ROGER — Pullman 
CLOS. WILLIAM — Seattle 



CHOW. DAO — Pullman 
DAVISSON. PAUL — Pullman 
DONLIN, TERRY — Seattle 
EGAAS, DAVID — Bainbridge Island 
FAUNCE, JEFFERY — Tekoa 
FINKEL. MICHAEL — Spokane 



FRi.CH. ERIC — Snohomish 
GIANOULAKIS. STEVE — Olympia 
GRANT. THOMAS — Kent 
GRIESS. KENNETH — Tacoma 
HAHN. THAD — Richland 
HARGIN. WILLIAM — Vancouver 
HOAG. MICHAEL — Everett 


HOLCOMB. TODD — Bothell 
HONEYCUTT. TIMOTHY — Pullman 
HOO, KEE - Omak 
JENSEN. CATHERINE — Richland 
JESKE. DANA — Warden 
JONES. KELLY — Longview 
KHORRAM. HOSSEIN — Bellevue 


KIMBALL. JEFFERY — Federal Way 
KUBINSKI, KENNETH — Richland 
LAMBERT. MARK — Kennewick 
LANE. CHRISTOPHER — Richland 
MANO, RICHARD — Seattle 
MCALPINE, DUNCAN — Tacoma 
MOHORIC. DAVID — Chehalis 


MOSER. BRAD — Colton 
MUELLER GREGORY — Spokane 
NAKAHARA, LORI — Seattle 
NALLEY, CHARLES — Tieton 
NORBY, ERIC — Enumclaw 
NORVELL. MAX — Juneau. AK 
OROWAY, JANINE — Pullman 


PARKER. PAUL — Gig Harbor 
PATTERSON. DERALD — Inglewood 
PECCATIELLO, LAWRENCE — Sultan 
PECKHAM. DAVID - Clarkston 
PHILLIPS. JON — Scott, IL 
QUINN, THOMAS - Eugene. OR 
ROSENFELT. TODD - Walla Walla 


SADLER. NORMAN — Pullman 
SCHUSTER. ROBERT — Zillah 
SENN. STEVEN — Edmonds 
SICKLES. MARC — Renton 
SPROUSE. RONALD — Richland 
SQUIRES, KYLE — Pasco 
STARR. MARILYN — Issquah 


1984 /Seniors 507 



























































































Electrical 

Engineering 


THORDARSON. BRENT — Spokane 
TOPP. DOUGLAS — Bellevue 
TRAN, BACH-TUYET — Seattle 
VEILLARD, SCOTT — Pullman 


VINCENTI. JOE — Bellevue 
WARNER. KEITH —Lacey 
WENTZKE, RONALD — Kent 
WOO. BARBARA — Pullman 


AHOLA. ELLIOTT — Brush Prairie 
BARNHART, JAMES — Puyallup 
BENSON. RUSSELL — Sumner 
BIGELIS. WILLIAM — Rohnert Park. CA 
BITTNER. AMBROSE — Pullman 




CLARK. DEREK — Wahiawa, HI 
COLE. JAMES — Vancouver 
COWAN. KENNETH - Kirkland 
DAMIANO. DAVID — Mead 
DIDOMENICO. STEVE — Federal Way 
BOGARD. BRUCE — Auburn 



ECKARD. CHARLES — Bellevue 
EIDE. CHRISTOPHER — Hoquium 
FAGAN. C. — Auburn 
FLYNN. JOHN — Monroe 
GOLLNICK. RUSSELL — Pullman 
GOSNELL, GLENN — Tacoma 


HAMILTON. MARK — Nine Mile Falls 
JACKSON. PAUL — Richland 
JOHNSON. JEFF — Bothell 
JOHNSON. TAMMY — Bothell 
JONES. TIMOTHY - Seattle 
JOPLIN. MARK — Elma 



KAM1YA. NAOKI — Moses Lake 
KLEMOLA, ROBERT — Centralia 
KOEHLER. DEBORAH — Kirkland 
KOSMATA. MATT — Richland 
LANE. ANNETTEE — Seattle 
LAWRENCE. MICHAEL — Tacoma 
LOPEZ. THOMAS — Tacoma 




508 Seniors /1984 













































ROUSEFF. DANIEL — Pullman 
SHAW. EUGENE — Davenport 
SIMONS. DEBORAH — Puyallup 
SKOK. STEPHEN — Valley 



SLEE. ROBERT — Tacoma 
TINNEY. EOWARD — Pullman 
WERNER. RICHARD — Beverly 
WILEY. SCOTT — Spokane 
YOUNG. ERIC — Richland 





BERNDT, MITCHELL — Olympia 
DAGLE. LAURA — Richland 
DAHL, DAVID — Mountlake Terrace 
DAY. CHRISTINE — Spokane 


Chemical Engineering 



DIETRICH. STEVE — Ellensburg 
FERY. MARK — Spokane 
GOODWIN. PHILIPPA — Camus 
JOHNSON. JACK — Lacey 
LACOUNT. WALTER — Tacoma 


LOSS. KRIS — Richland 
MADLE. DAVID — Kent 
MARICLE. ROBERT - Bellingham 
NOBLE. LORI — Newport 
PEARSON. RANDALL — Tacoma 



PETERS. BRIAN — Othello 
ROPER. JOHN — Sequim 
SMITH. EDWARD — Richland 
SONNICHSEN. CHRISTIAN — Auburn 
WALTON. DON — Quincy 
WAN. IDA — PuNman 


1984 /Seniors 509 
























Geological Engineering 


Pre Engineering 


Material Science 



Architecture 



KOPPA, SCOTT — Spokane 
MALEKPOUR. SHAHRAM — Redmond 
MILLER. TOM — Seattle 
ROOKEY. GRANT — Spokane 


ANDRINGA. BRIAN — Morton 
BACKUS. LINDA — Kent 
COBLE. LISE — Olympia 
COOK. RANDAL — Pullman 
DAVIES. DEAN — Lake Stevens 




DELTIER. TRACY — Bellevue 
DESWANTI, DJOANDA — Aiea. HI 
ERICKSON. STEVE — Sequim 
GLEASON. MARC — Clinton 
HEIDENREICH. MICHAEL — Pullman 
JOHNSON. JULIE — Pullman 


KORTRIGHT. IRMA — Medical Lake 
KWAN. HENRY — Seattle 
LEE. LAWRENCE — Clarkston 
LEWIS. CELESTE — Spokane 
LETT. CHERYL — Bellevue 
LYON. JACK — Pullman 



MAHMOODI. AMIR — Pullman 
MCDONALD. JOHN — Pasco 
MCGREEVY, ELIZABETH — Pullman 
MCLAREN. KENT — Puyallup 
MITCHELL. DOUGLAS — Kennewick 
NAZZAL. MAZEN — San Diego, CA 



OPFER. ALLEN — Yakima 
SCOTT. SHELLY — Stockton, CA 
SHELDON. THOMAS — Pullman 
SIMPSON. STACY — Tacoma 
SMUTNY. KENT — ML Vemon 
THOMPSON. GREGORY — Vancouver 
WONG. TZZY — Pullman 







510 Seniors/1984 
















































Construction Management 



BERNERT, DAVID — Seattle 
BRUSER, GLEN — Bremerton 
DAVIS. GARY — Pullman 


DOWDELL. WILLIAM — Tacoma 
DUNN. MONTE — Richland 
HAYDEN. CHARLES — Pullman 
HOWELL. MARK — Shelton 





LEGGETT. CARY — Tonaskel 
MCCAUSLAND. MICHAEL - Sultan 
MCFARLAND, MICHAEL — Toppemsh 
MCLAIN. WARD — Tacoma 



MENDEZ. DAVID — Kelso 
OSBORN. TIMOTHY — Seattle 
POE. CHARLES — Auburn 
PRICE. MICHAEL — Renton 


REBER. SCOTT — Kent 
ROWE. ERIC — Olympia 
SCALZO. DAVID — Mercer Island 
STEINBACH. MIKE — Chewelah 
TIPTON. WENDELL — Anchorage, 
WRIGHT. MARK — Pullman 



ANDERSON. JILL — Sunnyside 
BAUMGARTEN. DAVID — Bellevue 
BOUCHER. MARK — Kennewick 
COZZETTO, STEVEN — Spokane 


AK 


Civil Engineering 



GALBRAITH. RON — Yakima 
GHOSH. ASHOK — West Bengal. India 
HINKLEY. KEVIN — Yakima 
HUMMEL, JAY — Vancouver 
JENSEN. KRIS — Wenatchee 
KIMBALL. KARL — Pullman 



KINDER. RICHARD — Yakima 
LAUBACH. EVAN — Shelton 
MANSFIELD, CHRIS — Spokane 
MCCRARY. RAYMOND — Bremerton 
MELCHER. SARAH — Spokane 
MILLER. STEVEN — Pullman 
MORROW. MICHAEL — Veradale 


MUNROE. JOHN — Selah 
MYRON. KURT — Spokane 
NELSON. BRIAN — Issaquah 
OYAWAYE. OLUKITIBI — Pullman 
OYAWAYE. SIYANADE — Pullman 
PARSONS. BRIAN — Bridgeport 
ROWELL. TODD — Portland. OR 


1984 /Seniors 511 





































It All Counts 







‘‘History covers everything but the 
future. To study history, one must 
look at everything...it all counts.” Dr. 
LeRoy Ashby projects this belief in 
the history courses he teaches here. 
‘‘History provides a way of looking at 
things.” Students attending his classes 
do not just look at cold facts and dates, 
these are left to individual research. 
Students are exposed to all facets of a 
historical period through animated 
lectures, assorted audio-visual aids 
and a wide scope of literature. 

Ashby uses examples of music, car¬ 
toons, art and prevalent attitudes be¬ 
cause they are all part of the human 
experience that people need to 
understand. “If you want to under¬ 
stand a period, try to understand its 
cartoons. Jokes change.” He gave ex¬ 
amples of the dumb blonde, woman 
driver and I Love Lucy. 

Ashby likes his students to get in¬ 
volved in their studies, to think imagi¬ 
natively. “It’s not just a matter of 


assembling information, it's what you 
do with it, and how you reflect on it.” 
During his classes, Ashby tries to pro¬ 
vide enough information so that stu¬ 
dents may recognize the claim our 
past has on us. He tries to provide an 
assemblage of the American past. 

When comparing college students 
of today to those of the late 60’s-early 
70’s, Ashby pointed out a distinct dif¬ 
ference in student concern and in¬ 
volvement. In the late 60’s, students 
were more politically involved, think¬ 
ing about their position as students, as 
well as their rights. Today students 
are more concerned with job security. 
In the 60’s, students formed a sort of 
counter-culture, kids vs parents. 
There was a major conflict in values; 
students and parents had no committ¬ 
ment to each other. Today values be¬ 
tween the two are much more similar. 

Ashby has been teaching history 
here since 1972. Previously, he taught 
six years at the University of Bridge¬ 


Bull 

port, Connecticut and two years at Illi¬ 
nois State University. Besides 
teaching, he has authored a number 
of books, including his latest called 
Saving the Waifs , which came out in 
April, 1984. This book is about refor¬ 
mers and dependent children from 
1890 to 1917 and how reformers tried 
to help orphans. He is now working 
on a biography of William Jennings 
Bryan which he hopes to complete by 
January 1986. 

Ashby plans to keep teaching. He 
feels his classes get better and better as 
he tries new ideas. He also hopes to 
write a book on the History of the 
Child in the Pacific Northwest , about 
juvenile delinquency, orphans, etc. 
Sometime in the future, he would like 
to write a suspense novel. 

In his spare time, Ashby enjoys 
reading many types of novels, seeing 
movies, and spending time outdoors. 

by Cindy Reynolds 


512 Seniors/1984 

































College of Nursing 


BUSCH, SANDY — Kirkland 
CURTIS. CAROL — Spokane 
HAHNER, ANN — Spokane 
HARRIS, NANETTE — Issaquah 
LINDAUER. MARIE — Oroville 


MCMANIGAL. JULIE — Yakima 
NAKAMURA. HEIDI — Renton 
OSTER, BARBARA — Richland 
RYCHLIK. SUE — Kirkland 
THOENNES. MARY — Federal Way 



College of Pharmacy 


BAUMGARTEL. SUSAN — Grandview 
BELLACK, DANIEL — Tacoma 
BRITO. KENNETH — Pullman 
BURCHAM, DONDI — Medina 
CHAPMAN, KIMBERLEY — College Place 



DEEN, JANICE — Colfax 
DOUGHTERY. CAROLE — Pullman 
EDGREN. KAY — Colfax 
EDWARD. CARMEN - Medical Lake 
EVANS. CHRIS - Clarkslon 
FONG, JOE — Spokane 


GOODMANSON. CRAIG — Kirkland 
HANFORD. ALISON — Pullman 
HENRIKSEN. KAREN — Wenatchee 
HILLEY. DONALD — Chehalis 
HOOD. GREG — Prosser 
KALEJAIYE, AYOOLA — Pullman 


MCCLEES. DAVID — Centralia 
MCGINNIS, JENENE — Spokane 
NETTEY. SAMUEL — Pullman 
RIDDLE. STEVE — Yakima 
RONNGREN. JEFFREY — Enumclaw 
SCHULTZ. CHRISTINE — Pullman 



SHANG. MARILYN — Yaqunde. Cameroon 
SPIEGELBERG. LISA — Bellevue 
STOCKER. KRISTIN — Spokane 
TOBIN. NANCY — Richland 
WANG. IRENE — Seattle 
WEYER. MIKE — Maple Valley 
WILLARD. CHRIS — Lewiston 



514 


Seniors /1984 
























Comfortable and Content 


Looking around professor Crane’s 
office, you get a sense of the man him¬ 
self. A paper Chinese fish kite dangles 
from a shelf, the walls are bare, save a 
calender and a student’s sketch of 
different fish species, and on his desk, 
a leftover Christmas ornament, an 
angel with a fishing pole, lies forlorn¬ 
ly. The shelves are filled with books 
and journals, arranged haphazardly 
yet somehow orderly, or should I say 
comfortable. Yes, comfortable is the 
best description of this 
biology/zoology professor. He has an 
aura of contentment, of self- 
satisfaction, like the cat who has eaten 
the gold-fish. 

He was born in Dayton, Ohio, the 
son of a prominant Air Force Colonel 
Carl J. Crane. Crane is proud of his 
family, boasting of two brothers and 
two sisters, “all successful” he adds 
with a smile. His father is his main 


source of pride though. Col. Crane is 
known as the “father of blind flight,” 
and collaborated on the first book 
written on instrument Hying. Crane 
also mentions that the flight center at 
Randolph field in San Antonio, Texas 
was recently named after his father. 
Being an Air Force family, the Cranes 
traveled around a lot before settling 
down in Sacramento, Calif. There, at 
California State University at Sac¬ 
ramento, Crane attained both his 
undergraduate degree and his mas¬ 
ter’s degree. He worked on his mas¬ 
ter’s while teaching at primary and 
secondary schools. After receiving his 
master’s, he transferred to the Uni¬ 
versity of California at Davis to get his 
Ph.D. 

In September of 1970, he came to 
WSU , and has been here ever since. 
He says that one of the reasons he 
made the move was because of his 


great love for the outdoors. He enjoys 
hunting, backpacking, hiking, and 
fishing, and the Northwest affords 
plenty of these activities. When asked 
what other special interests he has, he 
expressed his greatest pleasures as 
teaching and his students. He ex¬ 
presses a belief in the benefits of his 
GUR course, Biological Science. He 
feels that the over 20,000 students he 
has taught have, for the most part, 
enjoyed the course. He hopes that his 
course “shows them the relevancy of 
the biological sciences in their lives.” 

Asked what his future plans are, he 
responded, “I don’t know what I want 
to be when I grow up.” He wants to 
continue learning and stay involved in 
the academic environment. He just 
wants to be content and active — and 
he’s doing a pretty good job. 

by Debbie Moore 


1984 /Seniors 515 













College of 
Sciences and Arts 


Anthropology 


ADAMS. PATRICK — Bellevue 
BARTA, ELIZABETH — Clarkslon 
DONAHUE. MICHELLE — Pullman 



Music 


DOWLING. KAREN — Rancho Palos Verdes. CA 
MEKKI. MAHMOUD — Khartoum. Sudan 
MULZAC. VICTOR — Brooklyn. NY 
ROOSE. CARRIE — Bellevue 


BOULTON. KEN — Arlington 

HIVELY. CONSTANCE — Longview 

HOAG. ERIN — Lake Stevens 

HOWARD. ALISON — British Columbia. Canada 


& 

A 

it 

It 

p 

in 

L 


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I 


Speech 


MACOUARRIE. SCOTT — Oakesdale 
MCCARTNEY. KAROLYN — Spokane 
MCCONNELL. LAURIE — Pullman 
MCCORMACK. MARY — Farmington 
TUELL. TERRY — Lapwai 



ANNIS. JANE — Spokane 
BROSSARD. JOHN — Bellevue 
GRAZIANO, SUSAN — Bremerton 
HOLMSTROM. SONJA — Ellensburg 
HORTON. MACK — Farmington. NM 
KAFER. JOAN — Everefl 



LAWTON. CYNTHIA — Issaquah 
MCKEIRNAN, LOIS — Pullman 
ROBINSON. KRISTI — Edmonds 
SHUTE, BRIAN — Pullman 
SPENCER. GWEN — Pullman 
STOWE, ANNA — Newport Beach. CA 





Foreign 

Languages 


AWA. JACOUELINE — Apo, NY 
BURNS. KRISTINE — Pullman 
COONEY. CAROLINE — Bellevue 
DELONG. KIM — Greenacres 
HAJRSTONE. MICHAELA - Pullman 
HANSON. TENA — Kirkland 


LORD, JULIE — Seattle 
MCKENNA, MARGARET — Pullman 
MOGENSEN ANNETTE — Everett 
MOORE. KIRSTEN — Montesano 
OUIST DE OLIVERES. DEBBIE — Pullman 
RASMUSSSEN. CATHY — Issaquah 
RIBAUDO. LYDIA — Seattle 



SIUEG. DEBORAH — Seattle 
THISTED, ELLEN — Spokane 
UFFORD. MICHAEL — Pullman 
VOGEL. ANNE — Spokane 
WEST. WAYNE — Ferndale 
WINSLOW. ROBERT — Spokane 
WRIGHT. JAMES - Spokane 




516 Seniors/1984 


























4 




KAPPENMAN. KREGG - Pullman 
OLSON, MARC — Richland 


Social Studies 


43 





Sociology 


BLACKEN8EKER, DENISE — Colton 
BRUNTON. REBECCA — Walla Walla 
COX. AUDREY — Tacoma 
DEMBROKE, MARY — Bellevue 
FRANKLIN. KYMBERLEE — Youngstown, OH 
HANNUS, TODD — Sumner 


English 


SHIELDS. CORNELIA - Dayton 
SKRINDE. KAREN — Bothell 
TEACHMAN, MICHAEL — Seattle 
THOMAS, DONALD — Pullman 
WAIGHT. BRENDA — Seattle 
WELTY, CRISTA — West Linn. OR 
WENT, ERIC — Pullman 


BENSON. JENNIFER - Everett 
BULL. NATHALIE — Pullman 
CRABB, DIANE — Tacoma 
CREFELD. LISA - Tacoma 


BRADFORD. KIMBERLEY - Olympia 
FORSTER. DAVID — Edmonds 
LAWVER, DENISE — Pullman 
MILLER. KIRBY — Bellevue 
MORRISON. JOHN — Seattle 
PLAYFAIR. DEBORAH — Chewelah 


History 


RAGAN. KAMMY — Pullman 
RAMSEY. SCOTT — Vancouver 
SCHLENZ. JEFFREY — Pullman 
TADLOCK. NANCY — Pullman 
VANWELL. LISA - Wenatchee 
ZIMMERMAN. MARK — Centralia 


HEDBERG. KRIS — Tacoma 
HEDRICK. JOHN — Pullman 
KAUFFMAN. LESTER - Spokane 
MILLER, GERALD — Pomeroy 
NUXOLL, SANDY — Clarkston 
ROGERS. LINDA — Warden, Denmark 
SHELTON. LEE — Pullman 


GUNKEL. STEVEN — Tacoma 
KRUMWIEDE. KATHRYN — Bellevue 
MATOBO. THOPE — Meseru. Lesotho 
SPENCER. TAMI — Bellevue 
TABBERT. DIANE — Olympia 


1984/Seniors 517 













































Social Work 


Criminal Justice 



HILL LESLIE — Seattle 
HOWARD. CAROLYN — Bremerton 
MCMAHON. SHAWN — Pullman 
NOLTE. MARY — Wenatchee 




< 



DELAY, CYNTHIA — Newport 
DOYLE. JOHN — Tacoma 
GAMBLIN. MARCIA — Pullman 
GEIER, CHRISTOPHER — Collax 



HEFNER, JANE — Pullman 
HILL, JOHN — Pullman 
HOLT. STEVEN — Renton 
HOYLE. DEBRA — Pullman 
HUSTON. RONALD - Bellevue 



KUZNETZ. ROBIN — Seattle 
MILLER. VICKY — Pullman 
NOLAN. MICHAEL — Bellevue 
RINTA. GREGG — Woodinville 
RUTT. TED — Olympia 
SHOEMAKER. JOHN — Port Angeles 


SITES. SHEILA — Richland 
STRAUS. JONATHAN — Seattle 
STUBBEN. DAVIO — Palos Verdes. CA 
SUNDSTROM. CHRISTOPHER — Maple Valley 
SZAMBELAN, DAVID — Olympia 
THOMAS. GREG — Port Angeles 



Philosophy 



518 Seniors/1984 


























ANDERSON. DIANA — Kent 
BEYL. CHARLES — Tacoma 
BURTON. BRIAN — Seattle 
COULTER. SUSAN — Canada 












CRISLER. SHAWNETTE — Pullman 
FUJII. BONNIE — Bellevue 
NIEVES. ROBERT — Redmond 
SAELENS. ROXANNE — Seattle 
SHAFFER. DAVID — Pullman 



ALLEN. ALEXA — Seattle 
BROWN. PAUL — Olympia 
BROWN, SHARON — Pullman 
BROWN. THOMAS — Pullman 
CHALICH. MICHAEL — Spokane 


COLE. KEVIN — Pullman 
EDMISTON. STEVEN — Sealtlle 
FENZ. NICOLE — Kennewick 
GETCHELL. SCOTTY — Pasco 
GRIFFIN. MICHAEL — Yakima 



Fine Arts 


SUMAN. KHISTY — Pullman 
TREDWAY. GREGORY — Redmond 
VEDDER. CYNTHIA — Kent 
WAGNER. KELLEY — Prosser 
WATT, RICHARD — Pullman 
WEST. ERIC — Wenatchee 
WOOD. JULIE — Kennewick 


Political Science 


HARNS. DONALD — Henderson. Nv 
HEATON, KELLIE — Tekoa 
HONEKAMP. JULIE — Richland 
JACKSON, JOHN — Pasco 
JAMES. DAVID — Pullman 
JOHN. SAMUEL — Pullman 


KISTER. KARI — Othello 
LEE. DAVID — Castro Valley. CA 
LINDOR. KRIS — Pullman 
LUCAS, MARGARET — Vancouver 
LYNN. KATHLEEN — Tacoma 
MALES. MELANIE — Pullman 
MCVITTIE, JAMES — Puyallup 


MEADOWS, JAMES — Spokane 
MORIYASU. SUE — Sumner 
MORTIMER. EMILY — Bellevue 
MULHOLLAND, DAVID — Tacoma 
NELSON, BRIAN — Seattle 
OBRASTOFF. MIKE — Seattle 
O'CONNELL, DANIEL — Pullman 


POPRAVAK. TERRENCE — Vancouver 
RAZ. DONALD — Ridgefield 
SHANNON, MARC — Richland 
ST. GEORGE. RON — Richland 
STEVENS. MICHAEL — Seattle 
STRAIGHT, LAUREE — Pullman 
TAKACS, ANTHONY — Tacoma 


1984 /Seniors 519 


















































































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Chemistry 


HUNT. PHYLLIS — Pullman 


Wildlife Biology 


CLINE. TROY — Bremerton 
GLADISH. JENNIFER — Snohomish 



Environmental Science 


LEE. JERRY — Pullman 
MILLER. DWIGHT — Walla Walla 
SIMONDS. DERRICK — Wheaton. IL 


Geology 


Biology 


522 Seniors /1984 


CADDEY. ERIC — Tacoma 
DOAN. JOHN — Sedro Wolley 
JONES. BRENT — Redmond 
KOVACICH. BRIAN — Spokane 


MOWLDS. RICHARD — Lacey 
PUGH. MARK — Midland. Ml 
ROSS. DOUG — Port Angeles 
SWYNENBURG. JACK — Cannon Beach. OR 
WALKER. LESLIE — Grandview 


ACEY. OENNIS - Clarkston 
BOCZIEWICZ, CATHY — Seattle 
BOZO. CINDY — Thousand Oakes. CA 
COHN. LISA — Kennewick 


CRANDALL. DAROLYN — Pullman 
DURKETT. PAUL — Pullman 
OYKE. ELLEN - Walla Walla 
ELLINGSEN. MARY — Moses Lake 


FANNING. MIKKI — Spokane 
FOLEEN. COLLEEN - Pullman 
HINTON. STEVE — Everett 
HYATT. DAVIO — Bow 
MORRIS. KEVIN — Snohomish 


PUTNAM. MICHAEL — Edmonds 
ROTH. GRETCHEN — Moses Lake 
SAMMETH. COROIA — Port Orchard 
STEARNS. STEVEN — Seattle 


t'lZ 

























Physics 



GROEING. MURRAY — Yakima 



JAMES. BRYAN — Pullman 
LESTER. ALLEN — Pullman 


Biological Chemistry 



DAUGHTRY, LAURA - Richland 
DUFFY. MARGARET — Everett 
DURETTO. MICHAEL — Wenatchee 
EAGAN. TERESA — Pullman 





EATON. DENISE — Sultan 
EVANS. KAREN — Tacoma 
HAMES. MARY — Kennewick 
KOBZA, MARY — Airway Heights 



MAGLEBY. ANNE — Pullman 
ONEAL. DONNA — Renton 
PAULSEN. CHARLES - Seattle 
PEDERSON. JANICE - Lynden 
PETERSON. BRAD — Spokane 



PITTMAN. DAVE - Tacoma 
SMITH. JOE - Colville 
TAKATA. VALDA — Ml. View. HI 
TANNER. SHELLEY — Richland 
YEE. NATHAN — Pullman 


AHMED. EL-SAYED — Pullman 
CONDER. MICHELLE — Walla Walla 
DICKERSON. BENDETTA — Seattle 
ELLINGSEN. DAVID — Spokane 
HARPER. KAREN — West Linn. OR 




MCKEE. KARIN — Snohomish 
SCHIREMAN. MICHELLE - Everett 
SCHUEMAN. KENNETH Ridgelield 
SMITH. JANE — Tacoma 



SMITH. SANDRA — Forks 
WOMACK, ED — Wenatchee 
YAMAKAWA. KEITH — Hilo, HI 
ZOGRAFOS. STEPHEN — Spokane 


Bacteriology 


Zoology 


1984 / Seniors 


523 








































Math 


CLARKE. ELLEN — Bellevue 
COOLEY. TED — Harrington 


Computer Science 


DOBLER. KRISTIN — Everett 
GOMULKIEWICZ, RICHARD — Wenatchee 
KHAMNEIAN. BAHMAN — Pullman 


LEACH. JULIANNE — Richland 
LEE, MAPLE — Pasco 
RUSSELL. KEITH - Pullman 
THORNTON. SHANNON — Wenatchee 


THOROUGHMAN. JEFFEREY — 
WENKE. CURTIS — Spokane 
WYRlCK, JOSEPH — Bellevue 
YATES. KEMBLE — Portland, OR 
YENNE. WAYNE — Moses Lake 




BAKKEN. DAVID — Snohomish 
CUMMINS. ERIN — Kent 
DALE. DIANA — Auburn 



DAWSON. DALE — Prosser 
FLEMING. CHARLES — Kirkland 
FLINT. SCOTT — Blaine 
FREDERICKS. JANA — Renton 


HART. EDWARD — Seattle 
HILL. THOMAS — Tacoma 
HUFFMAN. DALE — Spokane 
HU1SINGH, LARRY — Richland 
KOPLITZ. KEITH — Olympia 


LANTZY, PATRICIA — Seattle 
LOUDON. ABIGAIL — Anchorage. AK 
LYON. CATHLEEN — Spokane 
PATTEN. RICHARD — Spokane 
TONKIN. JANICE — Spokane 




TRABUN. STEVEN — Spokane 
TURNER. CHARLENE — Sultan 
UCHIDA, TED — Wapato 
VAN LOO. BRIAN — Kennewick 
KHANNA, VARUN — Renton 
WALLIN. MICHAEL — Spokane 



524 


Seniors /1984 






























BOLSON. SARA — Bellevue 
BOYDSTUN, LAUNA — Vancouver 
CHEESMAN. MONTY — Tacoma 



OEMOSS. MITZI — Walla Wall 
DUONG. MY NGOETHI — Richland 
GRIMES. CHARLENA — Pullman 
GROSS. ROONEY — Bremerton 


HOFFMAN. GEOFF — Snohomish 
HOLBROOK, ANN — Yakima 
JELLISON. CHRIS — Puyallup 
MCCAUL. VICKI — Morion 


MERLINO. MARK — Federal Way 
NICHOLS, MARY — Wenatchee 
OAKLEY. LOREN — Pasco 
OBRYAN, TARA — Richland 


OLSON. ROBYN - Tacoma 
OLSON. BRETT — Vancouver 
PAULSON. BRYAN - Kent 
RIKALO. JODY — Aberdeen 
RYAN. MICHAEL — Vancouver 


SCHUBACH. LEAH — Spokane 
SEIFERT. ROBERT — Cle Elem 
STEIGER. SCOTT — Seattle 
SWOFFORD. JOHN - Sunnyside 
WILSON. DEBBIE — Garland. TX 




General Studies 


College of Veterinary 
Medicine 




DEMARIS. PAUL — Seattle 
SMITH. DOUGLAS — Seattle 


1984 /Seniors 525 

























Graduate School 


AGBADI. ISA — Kaduna. Nigeria 
AIKENS, ANTHONY — Spokane 
AKHTAR. MOHAMMAD — Bangladesh 



AKOH. CASIMAR — Port Harcourt, Nigera 
ALLEN. DAVID — Seattle 
ANDJARWATI. SADIK — Pandang. Indonesia 


ANDO. MASAOKI — Pullman 
AVDIN, ALI — Turkey 
CALL. MELANIE — Aptos. CA 
CASTLE. MICHAEL — North Bend 






CHAUOHRY, ASIF — Pakistan 
CHEUNG. CHUNG — Pullman 
CORMIIER, DONNA — Shelton 
CRAIG. VICKIE — Pullman 


CROSBY. BRUCE — Pullman 
DASILVA. LIONEL — Newport Beach, CA 
DAVIS. BRIAN — Spokane 
DEME, IBRAHIMA — Senegal. West Africa 


DERI. BANDONA — Indonesia 
DIMAH. AGBER — Pullman 
DODOO. FRANCIS — Pullman 
ENGLISH, JOANE — Fair Oaks. CA 
ETMEKTZOGLOU. A. — Athens. Greece 




GAMON, MEG — Ellensburg 
GR1ESCHE. BARBRA — Berlin. West Germany 
HERSHFIELD. JOSHUA — Alberta. Canada 
HIGLEY. LARRY — Vashon 
HILLE. LISA — Ritzville 


HILLEGASS. GINA — Pullman 
HO. CHUNG WA — Hong Kong 
HOST. LAWRENCE — Pullman 
JENKINS, DEBORA — Bellevue 
JOHNSON. CAROL — Spanaway 
KASHYAP. POORNA — Bangalore 


KELLER. ROBERT — Curtis 
KOYORO. HENRIETTE — Pullman 
LAM. YIU HUNG — Pullman 
LEE. LYNETTE — Pullman 
LEUNG, SEI FAI — Hong Kong 
LILLIE. CINDY — Pullman 







526 Seniors/1984 

















LILLIE. THOMAS — Pullman 
LIM, JOSE — San Francisco. CA 
LITTLE. SANDRA — Pullman 




LIU. TOMMY — San Francisco. CA 
MAGANA, JOSEPH — Salaam 
MALSCH, DAVID — Wenatchee 


MCNALLY. BRIAN - Lawrence 
MITTAL. MANMOHAN — Pullman 
MORIYASU. SHARON — Sumner 



MURPHY. PATRICK — Pullman 
NAMANE, TROWER — Pullman 
OBORN, SCOTT — Seattle 
OHHARA, YOSHIYUKI — Tokyo. Japan 


OLIVARES CORTES. JUAN — Pullman 
OLSEN. PER — Denmark 
OLUOCH, ELIZABETH — Pullman 
OSBORNE, RODNEY — Seattle 




PAYNE. DAVID — Burlington. NC 
PHAM. BERNARD — Pullman 
PRASAD. VENKATESH — Nez Perce 
RAFI. MOHAMMAD — Canrt Quetta. Pakistan 



RAGHOTHAMA, K.G. — Pullman 
RAHI. MOHAMMAD — Pullman 
RAVICHANDRAN, RAMARATH — India 
REISSIG, MARK — Seattle 
ROMAS. GEORGE — Montreal, Canada 


RUDIN. RUSSELL — Tumwater 

SAHIDE. AMALIUS — Ujung Pandang. Indonesia 

SATTERLEE. PERRY — Tacoma 

SCHULTZ. TIMOTHY — Pullman 

SCUKA, ADRIANA — Canada 



SELINTUNG. MARY — Sutsei 
SEMRAU. MARK — Mt. Vernon 
SWAN. MELISSA — San Antonio. TX 
SY. LING — Pullman 
TOURIGNY. CAROL — Leaminster, MA 
ULLAH, HABIB — Pullman 


VANHALM, THOMAS — Bellingham 
VEDAGIRI, VELPARI — Quadi Tamelnadu 
WATSON. SHARON — Richland 
WEI. JYH-JUIN — Pullman 
WERNER. STEFAN — West Germany 
WILLIAMS. KAREN — Tonasket 


1984 /Seniors 527 







































Beginning 




528 Seniors /1984 






























































































Clubs 
Fun Clubs 
Honoraries 


Ad Staff.581 

Ad Staff Secretaries.581 

Ag Econ Club.556 

Ag Ed Club.564 

Ag Mech Club.564 

Agronomy and Soils Club.579 

Air Force ROTC.571 

Alpha Epsilon Rho.594 

Alpha Zeta Ag Honorary. 598 

American Advertising Federation.536 

American Home Economics 

Association.541 

American Society of Ag Engineers.536 

American Society of Chemical 

Engineers.541 

American Society of Civil Engineers.542 

Army ROTC.574 

Arnold Air Society.593 

Asian American Women s 

Association.567 

AS1D/IBD.535 

Associated Students of Construction 

Management.557 

Associated Women Students.565 

Basketball Sports Crew.561 

Block and Bridle.542 

Cable 8 News.553 

Chinese Students Association.558 

Chinook Yacht Club.583 

Clothing and Textiles Club.534 

College of Engineering Coordinating 


Council.558 

Concert Choir.560 

Crimson Company.577 

CUDS.559 

Dad’s Weekend Committee.543 

Dairy Club.559 

Daily Evergreen Fall Staff.580 

Daily Evergreen Spring Staff.580 

Fifth Year Architecture.570 

Finance Club.543 

Fish Fans.544 

Food Science Club.563 

Forestry Club.544 

Friday Afternoon Seminar Club.585 

Future Chemists of America.586 

Grass Roots Journal.561 

Greek Week Committee.560 

High Tide Clamdiggers and Lutefisk 

Lovers.584 

Honors Students Advisory Council.545 

Horticulture Club.546 

Hui Hauoii O I lawaii.538 

Initial Club.582 

Interfraternity Council.537 

International Relations Committee.547 

1 & Ys.584 

Japanese Exchange Students.535 

KUGR FM.540 

KWSU TV - Radio.539 

Lambda Alpha Epsilon.545 

Lambda Kappa Sigma.556 







j 


532 Clubs/1984 




































































Marketing Club.554 

Moms' Weekend Committee.568 

Mortar Board.594 

Mujeres Unidas.568 

Muley Malt Brewery - Night Shift.586 

Native American Women’s 

Association.567 

Navy ROTC.578 

Newman Association.552 

Nigerian Students’ Association.562 

Omicron Nu.595 

Orchesis Dance Honorary.595 

Organization of Future Vets.549 

Panhellenic Executive Council.562 

Party Animals.590 

Permias.552 

Phi Beta Kappa.596 

Phi Kappa Phi.597 

Pokey’s Kidnappers.587 

PRSSA.563 

Pullman Boys’ Club.590 

Pub Board.592 

Rec Club.553 

Recipe Club. 588 

Residence I iall Association.555 

Rho Nu Nursing.549 

Rho Chi.593 

Risky Businessmen.582 

Sexuality Information and Referral 

Center.569 

Sigma lota.577 

Society of Women Engineers.598 


SPURS.591 

Student Alumni Connection.538 

Student American Pharmaceutical 

Association.550 

Student Dietetic Association.569 

Superbad He-Men.587 

Twelfth East Little Brothers.589 

WAMI.550 

WAZZU Whiriers.551 

white Swan Club.589 

Women’s Center.566 

YMCA. 551 

YWCA.565 

ASWSU.599 

Asian Pacific American Students.604 

Assembly.601 

Black Awareness.604 

Consumer Protection.605 

Dance Committee.607 

Environmental Task Force.605 

Films.602 

Homecoming.608 

Ku-Au-Mah.608 

KZUU.609 

Lecture Artists.609 

Mayfest.607 

MEChA.606 

Political Union.606 

Rec. Advisors.603 

Secretaries.600 

Special Events.602 




1984/Clubs 533 


























































































kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk ASID/IBD 


ASID/IBD-Ztow One: Darlene Gleason, Karen 
Hutchins, Lisa Tonge, Michele Hillman. Row Two: 
Lisa Miller, Greg Naito, Erin Putnam (IBD Secret¬ 
ary), Diane Hoiland. Row Three: Kelli Smith, Terri 


Iverson, Gail Armbruster (ASID Secretary). Row 
Four: Jim Ritter (IBD Vice President), Andrea 
Cleveland, Cindy Rickel (ASID Vice President), 
Carmen Henke (ASID President), Scott Fedje (IBD 


President), Kathy Grady, Lisa Marquez, Kay Be¬ 
nedict (ASID Treasurer), Tim Davison (IBD 
Treasurer). 



k k k k k k k Japanese Exchange Students 


JAPANESE EXCHANGE STUDENTS: Row One: Two: Yoshiya Miwa, Naoko Yamashita, Koshi Nakamura. 

Yuki Fukuzumi, Junko Hosoi, Yuko Azuma. Row 


1984 /Clubs 535 












American Advertising Federation LkLkk, 



AAF -Row One: Holly Cunningham, Sandra Patzer, 
Kristine Hassa. Row Two: Juli Brudvik (Vice Presi¬ 
dent), Stella Okigbo (Program Director), Polly L. 


Kibbe, James W. Purviance. flow Three: Thomas C. 
Puth. Craig M. Doederlein, Mike S. Rengstorff, 
Nancy Gunter. Ed Wurz (President), Kelly Marie 


Chandler, Karen R. Phillips, James C. Parrish, Nan¬ 
cy Palmer (Treasurer). 


American Society of Agricultural Engineers 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURE 
ENGINEERS/tow One: Rob Ritchie. Doug Schus¬ 
ter, Mark Schmidtgall. Row Two: Glen E. Larson, 
Andy Reaves, Fred Duke, Frank Younce, Alan 


Mace. Dan Hamilton. Row Three: Matt Ewers, Todd 
Macomber, Tim Gunderson, Terry Force, Randy 
Carstens, Tony Carlson, Ken Hodges, Mike Ryan, 


B.J. Phelps. Row Four: Dr. James, Ken Bergstrom, 
Damon Smith, Doug McComas, Dave Lohman, Tim 
Wright, Ole Grevstad. 


536 Clubs /1984 






















Student Alumni Connection k k k k k k k 


HUIHAUOLI ’O HAWAII-/?o\v One: Jackie Awa, 
Pattie Hamasu, Wayne Nishioka, Steve Jandoc, De¬ 
borah Pajardo, Val Takata. Row Two: Leah Ramos, 
Arlene Cabalce, Janet Solanzo, Velma Palma, Karin 
Pfaeltzer, Danette Vea, Jolene Yano, Lynelle Lee. 


538 Clubs/1984 


Row Three: Keith Yamakawa, Joseph Cacatian, 
Joyce Torigoe, Tommy Ho, Ginger Fernandez, Nata¬ 
lie Chin, Lance Kaneshiro. Row Four: Nathan Yee, 
Jill Tamane, Reid Imai, Glenn Ester, Darren Abcl- 
lera, Grace Balagat, Ken Tokita. Not Pictured: Steve 


Sumida, Gail Nomura, Dominic Bungcayao, Arlene 
Arabia, Edric Daida, Grace Galam, Lori Hata, Wes¬ 
ley Hirano, Kimberly Kong, Paula Manalo, Michelle 
Nishijo, Sera Scanlan, Deborah Takehiro, Mark 
Tom, Daryn Yamada, Kathy Hara, Jon Sonoda. 


STUDENT ALUMNI CONNECTION -Row One: 
Steve Wall, Rick Mercado, Jessica Smith, Becky 
Tate. Row Two: Mark Chance, Nina Lippert, Kathy 
Krumweide, Tammy Kilber, Teresa Coss, Grelchen 
Gohlert, Julie Raftis, Darcy Steiner, Kris Dunn, Kar- 


lyn Gehring, Susie English. Row Three: Lisa Digler- 
ia. Bill Plummer, Katy Olson, Darin Chestnut, , 
Joleen Olson, Laurie Clein, Christal Boyd, Marja 
Marshall, Erin Sulliavn, Terry Lee. Row Four: Kent 
John, Jud Preece, Paul Meany, Craig Messenger, 


Mike Monroe, Steve Schroeder, Mike Chalich, Jim 
Van Den Dyssel, Matt Coe. Row Five: Drene Jensen, 
Bill Tucker, Jeff Porter, Cort Johnson, Dave Palmer. 
Luke Delen, Tim Melton, Dan Wick. 


k 


Hui Hauoli O’Hawaii kkkkkkkkkkk 














1984 /Clubs 539 
























KUGR Board of Directors k.k.Kkk.KKk.k. 

[HQ 


KUGR BOARD OF DIRECTORS-/?^ One: Jeff 
Wagner (Sales Director), Bill McCann (Traffic 
Director), Ginny Matson (Promotions Director), 


Tom Kee (Music Director), Brian Smith (Music 
Director), Belinda Simmons (Program Director), 
Jami Roach (General Manager). Row Two: David 


Booth (Production Director), Donalee Yeagus (News 
Director), Dan Bryant (Roadshow Director). 


KUGR Air Staff 


540 Clubs /1984 


Booth, Greg Huson, Belinda Simmons. Row Three: 
Roland Brown, Leif Sandaas, Ray Brown, Ron 
Mackovich, Shawn Rakes, Dave Nelson, Clay 
Schueman, Brian Smith, Steve Joffe. Row Four: Joel 


Arensberg, Bryan Cummings, Dan McPhaden, Jim 
Hatcher, Jeff Klinger, Steve Small, Bill Brendgard, 
Cheryl McKay. 


KUGR-/tow One: Tom Kee, Stevyn Anthony, Dave 
Norman, Bill McCann, Bryan Phillips. Row Two: 
Kari Montgomery, Bryan Johnston, Jami Roach, 
John Wilkerson, Stu Smith, Nick Tuttle, David 











k k American Home Economics Association 



STUDENT CHAPTER OF HOME ECONO- Deborah Appel, Susan Stanford. Row Two: Sharie Breitenbach, Julie Zimmer. 

MICS ASSOCIATION -flow One: Sue Schoedel, Carter, Pamela Nelson, Mary Andrews, Cathy 

k American Institute of Chemical Engineers 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL EN- 
GINEERS-/tow One: Ida Wan, Greg Whyatt, Rob 
Maricle, John Cochran, Dr. Bemie VanWie, Rod 
Osborne, Mike Moore. Row Two: Tom Pfeifer, 


Andrew Larson, Janice Gwin, Carie Henderson, Bev 
Boss, Philippa Goodwin, James Straka, Dave Madle. 
Row Three: Brian Meiners, William E. Burke, Joe 


Weinand, Chris Sonnichsen, Mark Fery, Edward 
Smith, Don Walton, Mitchell Jay Bemat, Steve Diet- 
rich. 


1984 / Clubs 541 





























STUDENT CHAPTER OF AMERICAN SOCIE¬ 
TY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS-fow One: Clint W. 
Smith, Scott D. Wenger, Kent G. Merrick, Mark W. 
Fromong, Brad M. Mickelsen, Keith J. Stocker, Jay 
F. Hummel, James K. Carder. Row Two: Ken Gres- 


set, Ronald R. Welch, Raymond T. Steiger, Charles 
H. Ferguson, Kevin B. Hall, John D. Munroe, Sherie 
M. Nichols, Critch C. Kinder, Brad T. Flom, Dann, 
Jill Anderson. Row Three: Karl R. Kimball (Presi¬ 
dent), Richard D. Hendrickson, Walter C. Mih 


(Faulty Advisor), ToddT. Rowell, Jay C. Eaton, Dee 
Dee Rouse, Diana J. Leonard, Kris R. Jensen, Kath¬ 
leen M. Olsen. Row Four: Ron L. Galbraith, Brad L. 
Halverson. 


Block and Bridle kkkkkkkkkkkkk 


BLOCK AND BRIDLE tfon One: Holly L 
Schmidt (Treasurer). Bob W. Duncan (President). 
Janet M. Gavin (Secretary). Cheryl L. Williams 
(Vice President). Kathy A. Hillman. Row Two: 
Tanya Paul (Assistant Treasurer). Terry Walters. 
Chris M. Mitchell. Barb J. Jensen. Doug L. Jensen. 
Dale E. Lovejoy. Rob D. Pohndorf. Row Three: 


542 Clubs /1984 


Craig D. Coonrad. Jerry D. Asmussen. Dean D. 
Hellie, Carl G. Franz. Carol L. Lorenzen. Teresa K. 
Johnson. Linda A. Dorrance. Joel E. Huesby. Tony 
R. Zempel. Row Four: Sylvia Larson. Bruce B. 
Carigliano. Ann M Lust. Carol R. Jessup. Richard J. 
Mann, Karen L. Riba. Dale Scott Baldwin. Mike 
Howell. Bill Shanks. Row Five: Laurie Kelly, “ Bon¬ 


nie.” Everett Purrington. Scott G. Bennett. Gail R. 
Eggenberger. Jim Hirst. Clara L. Owen. Newgene 
W. Leadbetter. Row Six: Julia L. Besola. Amelia M. 
Besola. Julie M. Bayha. Todd F. Harris. Wayne D. 
Blair. Ann C. Colgren. Lisa K. Roth. Vanessa A. 
Crockford, Renee E. Hauber, John C. Courtright. 


American Society of Civil Engineers k k k k 

















k.k.k.k.k.k.k.kDad’s Weekend Committee 




DAD’S WEEKEND COMMITTEE -Row One: 
Karen DeVleming, Susan Wylie, Julie Roberts, Rob 
Cavanagh (Co-chairperson), W. Barry Speigelberg. 
Row Two: Craig Hooper, Jack Johnson, Tyler Gibb, 


Matt Henrie, Gary Steele, Donald Kalkofen, Joan 
Menzies (Advisor), Jane Thomas. Row Three: Lori 
Thibodeaux, Erin Kilpatrick, Brad Belmondo, Tom 


Bernard, Curt Rider, Damon Skyta, Wade Hader, 
Scott VanWormer, Tena Hanson, Nancy Arnold. Not 
Pictured: Gail Gibb (Co-chairperson). 


WSU Finance Club 


FINANCE CLUB -Row One: Erin C. Belgard, Ei¬ 
leen V. O’Keeffe, KeithT. Sharp, Robert E. Nelson, 
Rob F. Flodin (President), Joan M. Fuhr(Vice Presi¬ 


dent), Stephen L. Mood (Secretary), Kris L. Kieffer, 
Scott A. Bolles (Treasurer). Row Two: J. Hams, 
Kelli Shannon, Tom Bernard. Michael Accomero, 


Tim Marsh, Ted Hart, Geoff Forshag, Mark E. 
Smith, Jon Garcia, Mike Manfre. 


1984 /Clubs 543 












WSU Forestry Club LkLkLLWkkkk, 



FORESTRY CLOB-/?otv One: Ken McNamee 
(President), Mary Porubek, Dennis Roberts, Lea 
Allison, Kim Smolt, Bill “Head” Dunnell, Chris 
Leffel (Vice President). Row Two: Scott “Turkey 
Lips” Long (Vice President), Jeff “The Flame” 
Boyce, Don Miller, Andy “The Hode”, Lise 


“Duck” Duckworth, Tim “Moped” Vorpahl. Row 
Three: Gordy Glockner, John “No-Leggs” Keller 
(Information Officer), Jane “Yaptran” Cottrell, 
Mari Carmean, Mark Schermerhom, Mark Gabert. 
Row Four: Kurt Mettler, Gale Mayer, Bob Johnson, 
Ken Johannes, Duane Brinson, Stan Haralson, Kirk 


Tesdahl, Wayne West, Jackie Becvar. Row Five 
Lome Blackman, Ed Moe, Stan Krajewski, Waym 
Moulder, Bob Winslow, Jerry Heinrich, Steve “Ba^ 
Boy” Turner, Tim “Wip Wap” Walker, Rober 
McKellar. 


Fish Fans kkkkkLkkkkkLLkkk 



FISH FANS-/tow One: Kirsten J. Isaksen. Gerri K. 
Martin (Show Chairman), Dorothy J. Pietras, Dixie 
K. Vinson (Publicity Manager), Helen I. Oster, Di¬ 
ane K. Thayer. Row Two: Debbie E. Bangerter, 
Wendy K. Daling, Teresa Anne Teitzel, C. Lynell 


Vance, Diane D. Ahrendt. Peggy A. Schmitz, Sher¬ 
idan E. Harding. Row Three: Jenny L. Flechsig (Vice 
President), Dianne E. Christianson, Donna R. 
Mooney, Kirsten D. Moore (Social Chairman), 


Sheila A.M. Rogers (President), Debbie J. Pederson, 
Janet A. Newby, Abby J. Cross, Jennifer L. Swen¬ 
son, Rosemarie Ellis, N. Jo Gillam. Not Pictured: 
Kathy Jones. 


544 Clubs /1984 



























k k. k Honors Student Advisory Committee 



HONOR STUDENT ADVISORS-/?™ One: David 
Little, Leslie Werttemberger, Timothy Wachter, Pat¬ 
rick Lamb. Row Two: Doug Loeffler, Christine 


Schultz, Heather Crook, Heather Patrick, Khursheed 
Mama, William (Tommy) Thomas. Row Three: Jane 


Ann Smith, Jeffrey R. Franks, Dorinda Bartleson, 
Cheryl Wetterhus, Kellie Heaton. 


kkkkk.k.k.k.k.k. Lambda Alpha Epsilon 



LAMBDA ALPHA EPSILON CRIMINAL JUS- 
TICE CLUB-/?™ One: Kevin M. Kelley, Sheila L. 
Sites (President), Laurie L DiDomenico (Vice Presi¬ 


dent). Row Two: Dawn M. Christiansen (Treasurer), 
Kristi A. Johnson, Mike J. Canaan, Linda M. Rosar¬ 


io, Beckie M. Carter. Not Pictured: Rhonda 
Buckley. 


1984 /Clubs 545 














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546 Clubs/1984 







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1984/Clubs 547 


International Relations Committee 





































kkLk. Organization of Future Veternarians 



ORGANIZATION OF FUTURE VETERINA¬ 
RIANS-/?^ One: Zoltan Tusnadi (Co-Vice Presi¬ 
dent), Ann Colgren, Shaela Leaver, Khursheed 
Mama, Laura and Migil Lewis (Treasurer), Rhonda 
S. Snyder, JohnLadderud, Elizabeth Morgan, Rocky 


(Dog), Jeff Dahl (Sports Representative). Row Two: 
Nancy B. Dauber (Co-Vice President), Tracy J. 
Hobbs (Secretary), Amelelia M. Besola, Chris E. 
Cane, Mary Lour Maddux, Nikki Richards, Cathy 
Trawatha, Bossy Cow, Carlene L. Wells (President). 


Row Three: Wendy Rockhill, Christine M. Mitchell, 
Shelly M. Gunderson, Lucy J. Painter, Charlotte E. 
Mitchell, Lisa K. Roth, Karen B. Wichert, Dr. Tho¬ 
mas Besser (Advisor). 


Rho Nu Nursing 



RHO NU NURSING HONORARY -Row One: No- 
reen Karen Olson, Jo Anne Bilderback, Jeanne 
Chavey, Lisa Absalonson, Lynn Downing, Ann 
Marie Waller, Kathleen Hehnen, Maria Henriksen. 


Row Two: LaVonne Berentson (Advisor). Suzanne 
M. Halvorson, Kathryn Sue Henley, Susan Leon, 
Natalie Lum, Tami VonDracek. Chenelle Howard, 
Mary J. Cooper, Jenny Freese, Stacey Youmans, 


Gail Harvester. Row Three: Lisa Boyer, Sally Har¬ 
bour, Claudia Dunscomb, Laurel Smith, Lynn K. 
Scott, Linda Hanson, Leslie Stubbs, Amy Lightfoot, 
Melinda Chaffee, Jolene Phillips. 


1984 /Clubs 549 


















Student American Pharmaceutical Assoc, k. 


STUDENT AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL 
ASSOCIATION-/?oh> One: Gary D. Baker, Dondi 
Burcham, Karen L. Henricksen (Vice President), 
Donna Dacar (President), Josephine G. Lou, Dave 
Oeser. Row Two: Alison M. Hanford, Janice M. 
Deen, Landa L. Wambeke, Kay Lynn Edgren, 


Christine S. Schultz, Kim A. Hinthome. Row Three: 
Chris Evans, Kyle Shaner, Donna Meigs, Valerie 
Silva, Tom Sutherland, Elizabeth Dibbem, Scott 
Sprenger (Treasurer). Row Four: Doug Dahmen, 
Brian Williams, Robert Lee, John Thompson, Patri¬ 


cia Roberts, Bruce Carleton, Lisa Spiegelberg, 
Kevin Cook, Jon McArthur, Sharron Bengert. Row 
Five: Larry M. Simonsmeier, Dave B. Schmick, 
Evan O. Mayo, Kathy A. Renouard Paul E. Senuty, 
Brian M. Auer. 


WAMI LkLkkLkkkkLkLkLkk 



WAMI -Row One: Bill Solan, Alexandra Hope, Jean 
Gruver, Teresa Mclnnes, Leslie Steed. Row Two: 
Scott Elrod, Mike Sailer, Tom Schneider, Mike 


Eickerman, John Everett. Row Three: John Kelley, 
Mack Orsbom, Ted Koutlas, Alex Burt, Cal Gey- 


man, Russ VanderWilde, Jim Fallavollita, Diane 
Danly. Not Pictured: Russ Marelli, Melissa Smith. 


550 Clubs /1984 




























Wazzu Whirlers 



WAZZU WHIRLERS-/tow One: Holly McMur- 
rary, Denise Michelle Eaton, Laura J. Dagle. Row 
Two: Sondra Morrow (Advisor), Terri Braden, Nina 


A. Hagy, Beth Booth, DeeDee Rouse. Row Three: 
Larry Morrow (Advisor), Gary Baker, Kevin M. 


Ketchie, Glenn Berry, Scon Foster, Greg Silva, Ed 
White, Paul J. Gonseth. 


kkkWkkkkkkkWkkkkL YMCA 



YMCA-/tow One: Sharon Brown, Ellen Bratvold, 
T.J. Rutt, Judy Metheral, Kelly Boyle, Cally Cass, 
David McCue. Row Two: J.T. Barrows, Joe 


Kooyers, Tague Johnson, Jody Ragan, Prasanna 
Athukorala, Erik Rozario, Ed Murphy. Row Three: 


Jeff Nelson, Erik Geras, Marty Hausten, Dave 
Olson. 


1984 /Clubs 551 





























Permias k,k,k.k,k.k,k,tk.k,k,k.k,k,k.k. 



PERMIAS (INDONESIAN STUDENT ASSO¬ 
CIATION)-/?^ One: Claudio M. Selintung, 
Michael Selintung, Gladys T. Selintung. Row Two: 


Judya M. Wospakrik, Mary I. Selintung, Deri Bang- 
kona, Anjarwati Sadik, Jeanette R.P. Katuuk, Moira 
M.M. Jahja. Row Three: Masman Andara, Amalius 


Sahide, Masril Bustami, Mohammad Arifin Amril, 
Moha Kolopita, Frans A. Wospakrik, James Selin¬ 
tung, Jahja Hanafie, Amin Ishak. 


Newman Association 



NEWMAN ASSOCIATION-/?™ One: Peter 
Roberto, Raymond G. Ishii, Bonnie R. Neiertz, 
David M. Brumbach, Cathy A. Floyd, Mathew 
Horstman, Lan L. Nguyen, Mira Yoon. Row Two: 
Lisa A. Berger, Tom J. Watkins, Ray S. Osbum, 
Roger A. Lemire, Sharon H. Uhlrich, Mary L. Pec- 
chia, Kristina E. Sharp, Tom M. Sullivan, Timothy 
L. Paul. Row Three: Steven Konetchy, Judy Spado- 
ni, Patrick Dooris. Amy Newmeyer, Ruth Arabas, 
Mark Suryan, Stan Krajewski, Chuck Markarian, 


Mary Jo Langenhorst. Row Four: Mark L. Doumit, 
Maggie G. Martin, Reby A. Mayor, Donna M. 
Horstman, Tami M. Danielson, Teresa L. Rosakony, 
Michael J. Patrick, Leon H. McFadden, James E. 
Wright, Douglas N. Jeske, Dave Peckham. Laura L. 
Haines. Row Five: Ted A. Gooley, David L. Zwas- 
chka, Mark A. Castaldi, Beverly D. McDonough, 
Rachel D. Pate, Mike J. Crisostomo, Donna J. 
Oneal, Mike A. Reed, Donna L. Bredahl, Judith A. 


Anderson, Karen A. Jeske, K. Scott Sampson, 
Danette P. Victorine, Leslie A. Stewart, Marty 
Omalley. Row Six: Ruhard Beggs, David Jones, 
Sharon Lee, Marie Wallace, John R. Farnsworth, 
Norman Schille, Joseph A. Goodwin, Kendall A. 
Williams, Shannon L. Weil, Russell D. Pearson, 
James D. Hunsaker, Julie E. Rollinger, Anne M. 
Gfeller, Pamela M. Weber, Jim Oshie, Dan Rollin¬ 
ger, Julie Kamphuis. 


552 Clubs/1984 





k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.kk.k.k. Cable 8 News 



CABLE EIGHT NEWS-tow One: Darci Childers, 
Susan Joseph, Rebbie Goodwin, Shirley Skidmore, 
Sara Coddington, Linda Torrey. Row Two: Denny L. 
Hostetter, Eric J. Johnson, Caroline R. Wilson, 


Donalee A. Yagues, Gayle B. Home, Curtiss D. 
Carver. Row Three: Robert Lowery (T.A.), Rodney 
L. Smith (T.A.), Glenn A. Johnson, Darin G. Wat¬ 
kins, Greg K. MacGowan, Robert J. Bristow, Randy 


Querin. Not Pictured: Lori Andemson, David Booth, 
Paule Buntrock, Clete Casper, Tracy Dronen, Andy 
Lockett, Steve McDonagh, Stacy Sorge, Ginny Wil¬ 
liams, Mike Young. 


WSU Recreation Club 



RECREATION CLUB-/?™ One: Susan Vames, 
Marcus Graef (Public Relations), Nancy Arnold 
(Vice President), Mary McKinney (President), Diane 


Lamb, Dana Dykes. Row Two: Richard Berans 
(Advisor), Kathi Miller, Dana Gottfried, John 
Lusted, Marty Brown. Row Three: Stan Johnson, 


Debbie Mergens, Ellen Bratvold (Treasurer), Chris 
Frey, Neal Ohata (Secretary). 


1984 /Clubs 553 
























J 


554 Clubs /1984 



















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1984 / Clubs 555 













Lambda Kappa Sigma kkkkkkkkl k 



LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA -Row One: Kay Lynn 
Edgren, Kathy Hara, Christine Schultz, Kim Wolfe, 
Nancy Newson, Betsy Dibbem, Josephine Lou. Row 


Two: Kim Salzwedel, Lisa Spiegelberg, Amy Gal- 
ben, Karen Zimmermann, Kathy Renouard, Kim 
Hinthome. Row Three: Janice Deen, Alison Han¬ 


ford, Michelle Koch, Karen R. Fletcher. Row Four: 
VTS, Lisa Roth, Fatty Roberts, Lorrain Thompson, 
Denise Husarik, Frances Olson, Shelley Sunich. 


Ag. Econ. Club kkkkkkkkkkkkk 



AG ECON CLUB-/?ok> One: Tony Hansen (Secret¬ 
ary-Treasurer), Holly Hansen, Mary Pedro 
(A.H.E.S. Representative), Nate Asplund (Vice 
President), Teri Becker, Alice Summers Robert 


Mielke (President). Row Two: Val Rowell, Kelly 
Thomsen, Kris Ochner, Holly McMunay, Cindy 
Kaseberg, Lori J. Gillihan, Randy L. Primmer. Row 


Three: Daniel C. Druffel, Kevin M. White, Douglas 
L. Roper, Lance Dever, Dale Goodwater, Richard T. 
O’Connor, Leroy Rogers. 


556 Clubs /1984 



















Lkk Association for Computing Machinery 



ASSOCIATION FOR COMPUTING MACHIN¬ 
ERY-/?^' One: Craig Thomas, Annette Morasch. 
Row Two: Jim Wood, Brian VanLoo, Larry Huisin 
gh, Jeff Schmaltz, Abbie Loudon, Dave Bakken, 


Alan Meyer. Row Three: Allen Hall, Charlene Tur¬ 
ner, Lynn Irsfeld, Ann Thyme, Eric Schneider, Patty 
Lantzy, Jan Tonkin. Row Four: Chuck Fleming, Joe 


Hug, Bryan Bredberg, Dan Campau. Chuck Berrie, 
Vicki Vanderburg, Mary Winters, Kathy Snider, Sid 
Watson, Rick Ringel, Stephen Roller. 


kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkA.S.C.M. 



ASCM-flcw One: Chuck Haydn, Gary Davis, Lionel 
R. daSilva, Mark R. Bottemiller. Row Two: Mike 
McFarland, Dave Scalzo, Jeff Metke, Mike Price, 
Ted Jacobsen, Mike Steinbach, Mike Peterson, Mike 
Sweet, Dan Lovejoy, David Bemert, Kevin John¬ 
stone, Mark Howell, Bill Dowdell, Ray Woolf. Row 
Three: Betsy H. Sandidge, Linda M. Shoemaker, 
Kathy M. Jones, Kelly L. McCarty, Mark H. Sidell, 
William J. Hart, Celeste D. Badgett, Navin D. Patel, 
Mike S. Swarthout, Dan M. Pence, Will A. Daniels, 


Mike Mills, Hans A. Breivik, Francis D. Santelli, 
Mark A. Wright, Scott A. Reber. Row Four: Robert 
R. Able, Todd S. Larson, James W. Ross, David W. 
Mendez, Steve L. Potter, Tim J. Osborn, John 
Nowoj, Greg A. Selstead, Luke F. Delen, Craig W. 
Messenger, E. Robert Bonnett, Richard S. Lewis, 
Doug E. Misley, Bill M. Robinson, Robert J. Bar¬ 
nard, Paul F. Galeno, Larry G. Fisher. Row Five: 
Eric Hau, Tim Taruscio, Jerry Stubbs, David Quel- 


lette, Peter Emisky, Kevin Monsey, Dale Dove, 
Dwane Carver, Michael Muller, Monte Dunn, Tony 
Wood, Ron Nelson, Rob Rice, Marvin T. Fisher, 
Anthony R. Brodd, Ray C. Harrison. Row Six: Keith 
W. Roberts, Mark F. Triesch, Jeffrey R. Waiblinger, 
Rick Solis, Peter G. Vierthaler, Glen X. Bruser, Ron 
S. Green, Dan R. Krantz, Todd F. Rehm, Dave G. 
Denney, Paul R. Engert, Chris H. Davies, Brian C. 
Smith, Ken W. Mersereau, Mike S. Fiebelkom. 


1984/Clubs 557 






















Chinese Students Association k. k. k. k k Ik 



CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION-/?^ Lai P. Yong, Leung-Heung Jaycee Ho. Row Two: Ho, Yiu Wing Wong, Yiu Hung Lam. 

One: Paylee Chua, Rita E. Chow, Sei Fai Leung, Yee Chia Choon William Lim, Lai Man Luk, Chung Wa 

College of Engineering Coordinating Council 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING COORDINA¬ 
TION COUNCIL-/?0>v One: Dell Deierling, Brent 
Thordarson, Dave Egaas, Mark Howell, Ronald 


Welch, Eric Norby. Row Two: Tim Taylor, Marilyn 
Starr, David Lohman, Rob Adkisson, Ken Gresset, 


Andreas Schulte, Joe Weinamd, Bev Boss, Stever 
Skok, Richard Werner, Laurie Capriola. 


558 Clubs/1984 

























k.k.k.kk.k.k.kk.k.tk.k.k.k.k.k.tk. CUDS 



CUDS-Row One: Ferris Forar (Advisor), Kim 
“441” Kaut, Ron “240” Muzzall, Monica 
“335” Verme, Dave “Cool” Jones, Shame 


“271” Schols, Troy “487” Smith. Jim “417” 
Engle, Steve “181” Van Beck, Rick “480” 


Dowrey, Joe Hillers (Advisor), Ann “193” Coul¬ 
ter, Robin “CO 13-Robin” Dowrey. 


Dairy Club 



DAIRY CLUB-fonv One: Scott Wallace, Cindy 
Eggenberger, Marie Wallace, Greg McKay, Robin 
Dowrey. Row Two: Kim Kaut, Kristie Simpson, 
Sharrie Schols, Julie Jones, Dave Jones, Brian 


Elwanger, Gretchen Dykers, Rick Guttierez, Peter 
Munschenk, Scott Horner. Row Three: Tony Hansen 
Rick Dowrey, Steve Van Beek, Scott Youngren, Ron 


Kincaid. Row Four: Troy Smith, Jim Engle, Ron 
Muzzall, Bill Evans, Joe Hillers. 


1984/Clubs 559 











WSU Concert Choir k.k.kk.k.fck.k.k.k.k.k. 



CONCERT CHOIR-/?mv One: Jeanine M. Rouzee, 
Susan L. Shirley, Cindy M. Annoncn, Kerri L. 
Nichols, Lisa A. McElroy, Julie A. Pruett, Ann E. 
Holbrook, Heather L. Schweppe, Barbara L. Bunce, 


Myrna J. Ross, Dr. Francis Green (Conductor), 
Anthony Aikens (Piano). Row Two: Sue A. 
Moriyasu, Patricia L. Dorman, Joseph M. Janus, 
Wesley J. Clare, Barbara J. Gish, Paul G. Thomas- 


son, Scott M. Bruce, Kara L. Wilsey, Jennifer L. 
Wildung. Row Three : Douglas J. Legan, Jon J. Jenk¬ 
ins, Michelle D. Koch, Mary K. Lambert, Allan S. 
Townsend, Russel H. Gollnick, Corinne L. Abbe, 
David G. Mock, David H. Moore. 


Greek Week Committee k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k 



GREEK WEEK COMMITTEE -Row One: Bany 
Dougan, Kevin L. Morris, Monty C. Cheesman, Ken 
B. Uddenberg, Damon R. Skyta, Tom C. Bernard, 
Gary A. Marshall, Scott F. Smith. Row Two: Cindy 
Tyler, Julie VanDoren, Janet Montecucco, Sheila 


O’Neill, Andrea Jonas, Terri Klett, Sue Schink, 
Alice Summers, Julie Eckard. Row Three: Ed Mur¬ 
phy, Laurie Smith, John Hunt, Kacie J. Greenwood, 
Marie E. Harris, Eric Molver, Ken Brewer, Yvonne 
Ingalls, Deanna York. Row Four: Rick Roberts, 


Mike Connell, Ray McCrary, Gail Winder, Mary 
Brouillard, Melani Hiles, Wes Loomis. Row Five: 
Reed O. Hunt, Virginia M. Brislawn. 


560 Clubs /1984 
















Grass Roots Journal 



GRASS ROOTS JOURNAL-/?™ One: Jody R 
Buckley, Kathy M. Rogers, Shirley A. Skidmore, 
Sara C. Coddington, Susan Peters, Donalee R. 
Yagues. Row Two: Sunny M. Burgio, Dean E. Kors- 
mo, Nellie M. Paulsen, Barbara Dickinson, Kathleen 


T. Gilligan, Steven S. Sauffer, Kari Montgomery, 
Stacy L. Sorge, Robert Lowery. Row Three: Tom 
Van Bronkhort, Kerry L. Bustetter, Judy E. Elrod, 
Galen T. Culver, JeffS. Winteroth. Row Four: Brian 
M. Murray, Tim Brown, Tom Puth, Tim Church, 


Darin Watkins, Andy Berhow, Joel Berhow, Della 
Franklin. Row Five: Christopher J. Sayre, Greg 
Huson, Willie McGrady, Glenn Johnson, Nick De- 
Vogel, Don Rees, R.D. Willis, Brad Pack. 


Basketball Sports Crew 



BASKETBALL SPORTS CREW-/?™ One: Greg¬ 
ory D. Huson, Danial A. Bryant, Dean E. Korsmo, 
Nellie M. Paulsen, Shirley A. Skidmore, Steven S. 
Stauffer, Judy E. Elrod, Christopher J. Sayer. Row 


Two: Pat E. Dooris, Rodney L. Smith, Darin G. 
Watkins, Rickey M. Ricardo, Joel E. Berhow, 
Andrew H. Berhow. Row Three: Tom Van Bronk- 
horst, Robert Lowery, Kerry Bustetter, Willie 


McGrady, Nick C. DeVogel, R. D. Willis, Steve 
McKean, Jeff Winterroth. 


1984/Clubs 561 





















PANHELLEN1C EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE- Crider. Row Two: Char Oveland, Susan Schink, lawn, Jennifer Hall. 

Row One: Melani Hiles, Karyn Andriesen, Anna Margaret Lucas, Carolyn Bakamis, Virginia Bris- 

562 Clubs /1984 


Panhellenic Executive Council kkkkkk 


NIGERIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION/tovv One : Fortune Sorgwe, Ademola Ariwoola, Edwin Ozoma, Agber Dimah. Row Two : David Irefin 

Chinyere Egbe, Isa Agbadi. 


Nigerian Students Association k. k. k. k k k k 






Public Relations Student Society of America 



PRSSA-fiow One: Teri L. Forsland, Michelle G. 
Webber, Mary F. Ainslie. Row Two: Thea J. Gorma- 


nos, Robin J. Adair, Linda K. Wren, Adrienne E. 
Pape, Jennifer M. Stiles, Georgianna Mullan. Row 


Three: William Rozier, Jennifer L. Jansen, Margaret 
A. Roberts, Sheila R. Johnson, Kevin A. Bay, Jeff 
Butler. 


kLkkLWWkk. WSU Food Science Club 



FOOD SCIENCE CLUB flow Own: Karen A 
Fletcher, Gary O. Caviness, Lisa E. Rasmussen, 
Bonnie J. Sendzicki, Henry K. Leung, Marc P. 


Bates. RowTwo: BarrieR. Froseth, Shelly G. Crites, 
Teresa D. Wilson, Kevin L. Mackey, William E. 
Artz, Losso J. Nzuzi, Lloyd O. Luedecke. Row 


Three: Jennifer L. Kahl, Becky A. Schroeder, Eli¬ 
zabeth A. McCann, Henriette Koyoro, Gordon H. 
Fong, Tom M. Rouleau. 


1984 /Clubs 563 















Agriculture Education Club kkkkkkkk 


AGRICULTURE EDUCATION CLUB-/W One: 
Mark Heitstuman, Mike Patrick, Cliff Nichols, Shar¬ 
on Colfelt, Anna Funk, Kremiere Jackson, Chris 
Carlson, Dr. Lee Holmes (Advisor). Row Two: Brad 


Watkins, Kim VanNausdle, Mike Hougan, Kathy 
Johnson, Jodi Nelson (Secretary), Richard Mitchell, 
Jim Clifton, George Sharp. Row Three: Chuck 
Neubauer. Bill Evans, Dan White. Rick Weber. Jeff 


Alden. Lonnie Dixon, Shame Schols (Treasurer), 
Rod Crowley (President), Anne Miller (Reporter), 
Curt Nelson. John Page. Not Pictured: Brad Gering, 
Lyle Stark, Marie Wallace, Tim Nichols. 


564 Clubs/1984 


Agriculture Mechanization Club k k k k k k 


AGRICULTURE MECHANICS CLUB -Row 
One: Dave Kennedy (Vice President), Ellen Moore 


(Secretary/Treasurer), Randy Primmer (President), 
Scott Spanier. RowTwo: Glenn Warren, Mark Charl¬ 


ton, Joel Herman. Row Three: Jerry Gwin, Joe Hoff¬ 
man, Dr. A.E. Powell. 

















k k k k k k Association of Women Students 


ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN STUDENTS-/?ow dent), Eric Lee Parker, AmyKay Trueblood, Christ- ary). Row Two: Arlene Lynn Cabalce, Karol J. Chin, 

One: Laura L. Twining (Treasurer), Beth E. Lynch ine D. Obert, Chris Gerdes, Deena L. Ihry (Secret- Kari A. Kisler. 

(President), Darolyn M. Crandall (First Vice Presi- 

k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k. k. k, k k YWCA 



YWCA -Row One: Gail M. Ryder, Kimberly Coni- Council), Vera R. Storman, Sheila Wolf (Residence Council), 
gan (Recruitment), Rhonda Borchard (Residence 


1984/Clubs 565 




Women’s Center LLLkkLkkkkLkk 



WOMEN’S CENTER ST AFF-Marlene A. Howell, Michele Stelovich, Tarri Rude, Lyndia Vasquez. Not pictured: Leslie Hill, Sheila Batry, Donna Hondle, 

Taryn Linhorst, Mary Kolm, Dee-Dee Gartrell. 



Women’s Transit System 


WOMENS TRANSIT-/? One: Laurie A. 
Ehlhardt, Glenn L. Austin. Katie A. Kinzel, Debbie 
M. Burt. Row Two: John S. Vetrano, David L. Hirs- 
chberg, Paula Manalo, Kathy A. Lynn, Paul A. 
Senuty. Row Three: Teresa Welton, Linda L. Neill, 


Karen S. Fickenwirth, Jacuqeline L. Balzer, Kelli S. 
Campbell, Donna M. Bamer, Elizabeth J. Haynes. 
Row Four: Brynn E. Cole, Lynn P. Brohan, Bruce T. 
Unger, Taryn P. Lindhorst, Brian P. O’Reilly, Bill J. 
Holzberger, Gale Mayer. Row Five: Deborah L. 


West, Marlene A. Howell, BenDetta L. Dickerson, 
Eileen V. O’Keefe, Mark Murphy. Row Six: Julie M. 
Lonergan, Sharon R. Sterling, Teri J. Betz, Matt C. 
Miller, Sarah L. Kellegrew. 


566 Clubs /1984 





















k k k Native American Women’s Association 



NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN’S ASSOCIA- kim, Denise A. Lawver, Lara L. Reyes. Alberta A. Arviso. 

TION-Jftw One: Jim S. Yvette, Annette Squetim- 

kk Asian American Women’s Association 



ASIAN/PACIFIC AMERICAN WOMEN-fiotv Marlene B. Anderson, Gail Nomura (Advisor). Row Hamasu. 
One: Arlene Lynn Cabalce (Treasurer). Row Two: Three: Cathy Song, Karol Chin (Chairman), Patti T. 


1984/Clubs 567 







Mujeres Unidas 



MUJERES UNIDAS-/?™> One: Irene Gonzales, 
Connie Hostetter, Melva Garcia, Olga Stockle. 


Mom’s Weekend Committee k.k.k.k.k.kk.k 



MOM’S WEEKEND COMMITTEE-flow One: 
Lisa A. Ridenhour, Diane Sikora, Susan G. Lindahl, 
Laura L. Twining, Mary G. Helsper, Jodi K. Crick, 


Christina R. Gerdes, Chuck S. Hilliard. Row Two: 
Christine D. Obert, Dave A. Mitzel, Joan M. Curtis, 
Jennifer L. Jansen, Brenda K. Heinck, Wendy D. 


McMonigle, Diane E. Lasch, Vincent B. Karlson 


568 Clubs/1984 












k Sexuality Information and Referral Center 



SIRC-tfowO/te. Scott Reed, Eileen Kelion, Louis F. Kristin K. Schutte, Laura L. Nash (Social Director), Kelly Marie Chandler (Treasurer), Sara Bolson, 

Damis, Marie R. Garcia, Lora L. Shoop. Row Two: Tammy A. Rappuhn. Row Three: Mike Bame, Heidi Grant Goodwin, Wayne Welde, Jackie Nichols, Joan 

Kim I. Heggemess, Terrie B. Skavlem (Publicity), Hill. Mikki Fanning, Jenny Freese, Julie Hildebrand Boyd. 

(Assistant Director). Kim Hardy (Student Director), 


kkkkkkkk Student Dietetic Association 



STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIATION-Bridget Mengert, Deb Klaus, Lisa Boucher, Carla Randall, Hansson, Diane Kolb, Vickie Warren, Karren Man- 

Klinkenberg, Karen Scarlet, Kaye Funk, Carole Courtney Schweppe, Sue McGarraugh, Linda ring, Linda Harder, Melody Coonc, Rebecca Cruick- 

Carpenter, Corinda Graf, Tammy Cook, Marie Tatarek, Lori Mayer. shank, Judy Anderson, Kyomi Satoh, Theresa 


1984/Clubs 569 


























American Institute of Architecture k k k k k 


570 Clubs /1984 


5th 


FIFTH YEAR ARCHITECTURE-/?™ One: John 
Whitlow, Rustin Hall, Mike Heidenrich, Brett Wig¬ 
gins, Dean Davies, Tzzy Wong, Steve Erickson, Jeff 
Hummel, Marc Gleason. Row Two: Lloyd Melone, 


Nancy Lim, Desi Djoanda, Irma Kortright, Cheryl 
Lett, Julie Johnson, Tracy Peltier, Ann Warrington, 
Maz Nazzal. Row Three: Jack Lyon, Dave Peterson, 
Larry Lee, Brian Andringa, A1 Opfer, Greg Thomp¬ 


son, Beth McGreevy, Mike Lafond, Henry Kwan, 
Rick Cotton. Row Four: John MacDonald, Doug 
Mitchel, Sid Scarboro, Paul Engert, Bob Barnard, 
Lisa Coble, Tom Sheldon, Shelly Scott, Mark New¬ 
ton, Jeff Hecker. 


AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
ARCHITECTURE-/?™ One: Ann Meadows, Dave 
Nagahiro, John J. Marwel, Beth McGreevy, Kent 
“Humpty” McLaren, Mike “Dumpty” Bauer, Bet¬ 


sy Sandidge, Cheryl Lett, Mazen P. Nazzal, David 
Burger. Row Two: Douglas A. Livingston, Darryl 
Hall, Lance Jacky, Rutia Arabas, Jeffrey J. Hummel, 
Lisa Coble, Shelly K. Scott, Irma T. Kotright, Tracy 


Peltier, Howard T. Roarke, Sid Scarbord. Row 
Three: Matthew J. Mengert, Rodney H. Hill, Jeffrey 
J. Ryan, Bret R. Wiggins, Kendall “Butch” Wil¬ 
liams, Pamela M. Wieber, Steve A. Erickson, Mark 
A. Peterson. Not Pictured: Dave McVey. 


Year Architecture 


kkkkkk 


kkkk 


















kkkkkkkkk Air Force ROTC Faculty 



AIR FORCE ROTC FACULTY-/?™ One: Major 
Robert M. Barrett Jr., Colonel Bob Koehne, Major 


Stephen O. Davis. Row Two: Sargeant Victor I. 
Cruise, Technical Sergeant Stephen E. Wagner, Cap¬ 


tain Douglas R. Thorsvik, Captain Sandra J. Ballen, 
Secretary Mindy S. Sheley. 


kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk Seniors 



AIR FORCE ROTC SENIORS-/?™ One: Christ 
opher J. Quinn, Robert L. Horton, Scott D. Thacher, 
James E. Wright Jr., Randall G. Laythrop. RowTwo: 


Martin W. Devorss, Steve G. DiDomenico, Kevin L. 
Mattoch, Ted Uchida, Paul G. Murray Jr., John T. 
Hill, Chris M. Jellison, Rocky L. Calkins. Row 


Three: Todd A. Boyd, Wayne G. Yenne, Michael R. 
Blumenschein, Timothy M. Honeycutt, Scott A. 
Smith, Kevin J. Cole, Paul G. Poppe Neil B. Esten- 
son. Perry J. Adams, Ken F. Jackson. 


1984 / Clubs 571 











AIR FORCE ROTC (DCR)-/?ow One: Wesley J. 
Clare, Randal G. Lathrop, Scott J. Amsden, Christ¬ 
opher P. Nathe, Jack N. Schneider, Kevin K. Grubb. 
Row Two: Willie H. Richardson, Stephen P. Bricker, 
Blain A. Barton, Michael J. Poole, John A. Wood, 


Eric D. Hedeen, Michael A. Zollars, Phillip L. 
Hayden. Row Three: Kenneth F. Jackson, Kevin L. 
Mattoch, Chris L. Aldrich, Stanley W. Augusty- 
niewicz, Robert K. Broce, George W. Stone, Greg 
D. Brink, Robert S. Scholtz, Randolph J. Stauden- 


raus, Todd A. Boyd. Row Four: James E. Wright Jr., 
Christina M. Rose, Joseph B. Natterer, Winifred L. 
Weatherly, Jon D. Januchowski, Scott A. Johnson, 
Joseph R. Marsh, Mohammad R. Mostafavinassab. 


DCS kkkkkkkkkLkkkkkkkk 



AIR FORCE ROTC (DCS )-Row One: William A. 
Morrison, Jerri L. Waddington, Ann M. Giffin, 
Mark Murphy, Larry W. Bittner, Lisa R. Loney, J. 
Doug Harris, ErikS. Price. Row Two: Janet R. Lyle, 


Ernst H. Schubert, Michael H. Pawlowski, David R. 
Delo, Sherri L. Mikkelsen, Karin E. Sims, Colleen 
G. Carlsen, Dennis K. Pearson. Row Three: Chris M. 
Jellison, John T. Hill, David W. Hilton, Shannon 


Herron, Michael R. Blumenschein, Nigel L. Hennis, 
Scott M. Bruce, Peter R. Johnson, Steven W. Axel- 
son, William J. Holzberger, Kevin Cole, Ted T. 
Uchida. 


572 Clubs /1984 





tk.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.kk. DCO 



AIR FORCE ROTC (DCO)-/?ow One: Mark J. 
Tharp, Michele M. Burris, David J. Uselman, 
Christopher C. Moran, Jeff T. Dark, Paul G. Poppe, 
Gregory T. Brown, Ronad L. Skaggs, Dori Ann 


Bunn. Row Two: Mark H. Virtue, John Welch, Rick 
E. Standaert, Christopher J. Quinn, Mark C. Burks, 
Carleton H. Hirschel, Glenn L. Gagnon, Dean 
Blankenbeker, John F. Levi, Suzanne L. Smith. Row 


Three: Neil B. Estenson, Clayton M. Barnard, John 
R. San Fellipo Jr., Andrew C. Hachman, Steve M. 
Govemale, Don P. Hoback, Fred B. Christ, Tim S. 
Murray, Christopher J. Bence, Jeffrey A. Cox, Scott 
A. Smith, Timothy P. Haynie. 





IMEMlE 

A great way of life. 


HIGH FLIGHT 

Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth 

And danced the skies on laughter-silvered 
wings; 

Sunward I’ve climbed, and joined the 
tumbling mirth 

Of sun-split clouds . . . and done a 
hundred things 

You have not dreamed of . . . wheeled and 
soared and swung 

High in the sunlit silence. Hov’ring there. 

I’ve chased the shouting wind along, and 
flung 

My eager craft through footless halls of 
air. 

Up, up the long, delirious, bluring blue 

I’ve tipped the windswept heights with easy 
grace 

Where never lark, nor even eagle flew. 

And, while with silent, lifting mind I’ve 
trod 

The high untrespassed sanctity of space. 

Put out my hand, and touched the face of 
God. 

— James Gillespie Magee, Jr. 




J 


1984 /Clubs 573 




















MS III Class k.k.k.k.k.k.kk.k.k.k.k.kk.k. 



MS III CLASS-/tow One: Chris S. Whitehurst. Be¬ 
verly D. McDonough. Yokiko Y. Herrick, Mike J. 
Caples, Jesse T. Cruz, Robert P. Chelonc, Shawn P. 
Mahana, Kelly R. Walters, Captain David Saffold 


(Instructor). Row Two: Carlson, M. Roach, Michael 
A. DcVon, Michael S. Barrett, Robert P. Longncck- 
er, Arthur J. Roach. Kevin W. Weir, Peter D. Ansell, 
Kim M. Robinson, Matt McKinney. Zachary S. 


Smalls. Row Three: Durr, Yates, Underwood,Wall¬ 
ing, Thompson, David H. Redemann Jr., David 
C.Sexton. David O. Porter Kenneth J. Primus, Rick 
L. Wolfe, Rick W. Lally. 


SR. Class 



SR. CLASS-/?0w One: Debra Hoyle, Michiyo Mon¬ 
tague, Margret Ervin. Raynard Grant. Michael M. 
Butler, Karen Larson. Bryce Breitenstein, Donald 
Kunkle (Major). Row Two: Russell Anderson, Joel 


FACULTY-/?mv One: Ginny Boyle, Paul Yacoritch 
(Major). Rodney Henely (Major), Norma Hatley. 
Row Two: Les Vance (Sgm). Rick Swisher (CPT). 


Delbert Houser (SSG), William Mcloughlin (CPT), 
Don Kunkle (MAJ), Ronald Kluenper (MSG), Dave 
Saffold (CPT). 


574 Clubs/1984 































































1984 / Clubs 


575 












Army ROTC Color Guard kkkLkkkkk 



COLOR GUARD-/tow One: Guy (Dubious Duck) Anne K. Hesse, Walter LaCount. Row Three: David nough, Sgt D. Houger. Not Pictured: Craig Callies, 

Zero. Row Two: Debra A. Hoyle, Carra L. Bush, C. Sexton, Joel D. Loiacono, Beverly D. McDo- Eric Jurgensen. 


Cougar Rangers k.k.LLkkkkkkkLk.L 




ROTC RANGERS-/tow One: Cptn. Richard E. 
Swisher, C. David Sexton, Zachary S. Smalls, 
Michael P. Brown, Camilo B. deGuzman, Jeffrey R. 
Hugdahl, Carra L. Bush, Thomas Emsley, Joe A. 
Roach, MSG Ronald J. Kluemper. Row Two: Todd 


L. Wacker, Mitchell J. Roach. Michael A. Fleet- 
wood, Jeffrey M. Schlenz, Frederick B.A. Squic- 
ciarini, Scott M. Geiger, Shawn P. Mahana, Loren 
C. Yates, Yokiko K. Herrick. Row Three: Sean P. 
Myatt, John E. Armour, Guy M. Rosser, Robert E. 


Lee, Tim E. Griffith, Dean M. Forgard, Michael A. 
DeVon, Fred C. Rody, Guy M. Zero. Row Four: 
Alex J. Hobbs, Christopher R. Sandstrom, D. Joel 
Loiacono. 


576 Clubs /1984 





























































Crimson Company 



CRIMSON COMPANY-/?^ 1: Robert Hughes, 
David Simpson, Mark Stutterheim, Michael Willing. 
Row 2: Laura Brady, Ann Vanderlinden, Patty Wel¬ 


ter. Row 3: Cindy Schomo, Gayla Devries, (Direc¬ 
tor) Lori Rossman, Karen Skrinde, Sara Frey. Row4: 
Christopher Nevan, Randy Stubbs, Douglas Brandt, 


Eric Larsen, Casey Allen, Craig Guisinger. Row 5: 
Jeanette Puhich. Not pictured: Laura Garretson, 
Kevin Hanson, Doug Rice, Melinda Whitacre. 


kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk Sigma Iota 



SIGMA IOTA-fiow One: Cheryl Christensen, 
Angelina C. Neo, Lily Jee, Mee Mee Kiong, Peter 
J.N. Manning, Roy A. Weil, Mary Jo Jones, Kurt E. 
Tonneitiaker, B.J. Duft. Row Two: Sally L. Beddor, 
Jill E. Stair, Ruth L. Trail, Patricia A. Dahlin, David 
H. Olson, Dan P. Engell, Shauna D. McGregor, 
Claire M. Meany, Teresa L. Kjose, Susie E. Glein, 
Pamela L. Gibbons, Carolyn M. Johnson, Rick D. 
LaBlond, Jeff B. Harris, Jeff S. Struble, Barbara J. 
Strickland, Janice L. Ludtka, Alan R. Poole, Dan 


“Gus” Gustafson. Row Three: Tracy Tomlinson, 
Todd W. Washkoska, Douglas P. Wangsmo, Lisa A. 
Ludwig, Jodi L. Carlson, Brian D. Cheek, David W. 
Peters, Linda A. Rasmusson, Brian L. Klein, Morris 
B. Pettit, Arthur L. Sidel, Matt B. Berge, Ray C. 
Leisy, C. Mathew Shea, Erik T. Rudd, Kevin M. 
Atteberry, Dana H. Casey, Karen A. Corbett, Colin 
J. Mackenzie, Christopher H. Swanson, Melissa A. 
Hitt, Lilinda M. Marks. Row Four: Chia Choon Lim, 
Paul S. Dorai Raj, See-Chek Tan, Debbie Pederson, 


Deslie C. Coppinger, Brian S. Johnson, David W. 
Byrd, Robin Wulff, Susie L. Douglas, Joe J. Fugere, 
Peter J. Kost, Mike R. Shapley, Jane M. May, Karen 
A. Caviezel, Dorothy P. Tan, Peggy L. Herman, 
Gregory A. Mitchell, Richard E. Vollmer, Kathi 
Hagemayer, Michael D. Scott, Kim E. Mossman, 
John A. Leslie, Chai-Peng Wong, Matt J. Coe, Dave 
R. Dreher, Julie G. Raftis, Kris D. Dunn, Linda M. 
Slusser, Brian A. Hartley. Not Pictured: James P. 
Hansen, Diane Lipinski. 


1984 / Clubs 577 














NAVY ROTC Staff k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k. 



NAVY ROTC STAFF -Row One: Patricia Dyer, liam Sawyers. Row Two: James Raymond, Douglas 

Benjamin S. Meeker, Kirby D. Miller, Captain Wil- Mcllraith, Michael Trabun, Chris Deerkop. 

Navy ROTC 



NAVY ROTC-/tow One: Paul Thomasson, Douglas 
Ross, Benjamin Meeker, Kirby Miller, Ronald Nel¬ 
son, Michael Tabun, Chris Deerkop, Douglas Mcll¬ 
raith. Row Two : Harvy Beigert, Patricia Dyer, Eric 


Krejci, Richard Casali, Robert Funk, James 
Raymond, Steven Stougard, Eric Patten, Janies Fox, 
Fred Davis. Row Three: William Milligan, Timothy 
Smith, Machelle Burpee, Keith Jensen, Steven Bay, 


Scott Guinn, Douglas Krebs, Robert Eckroth, Jerry 
Cochran, K.C. Puaa. 


578 Clubs /1984 


















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1984 / Clubs 579 












Daily Evergreen Fall Staff 


DAILY EVERGREEN FALL STAFF -Row One: 
J.T. Cooley, Robert Ward Taylor, Dale Mar. Row 
Two: Nate Bull, Deborah Turcotte, Todd Lewis, Jeff 
Cox, Troy Bull, David Carlos, Allen Cheng, James 


Lucien Goins, Steve Nakata, A1 Werner. RowThree: 
Robert Hessen, Gretchen Hanna, Bob Donohoe, 
Richard G. Harris Jr., Laura Anderson, Gail Folkins, 


Lynn Standerfer, Tracy Jo Honsinger. Row Four: 
Michael Wickline, BobCondotta, A. Kipp Kennedy, 
Bill Dickerson, Lori Hehr. 


Daily Evergreen Spring Staff kkLLkkkk 



DAILY EVERGREEN/tow One: Troy Bull, Brian 
Rust, Michael Wickline, BobDonahoe, BobCondot¬ 
ta. Row Two : Patti Nilan, Lisa Young, Peter Schup- 
penhaur, Tracy Honsinger (Editor), Arthur Kipp 


Kennedy. Row Three: Lori Hehr, Scott Griffin. 
David Carlos, Mark Mansfield, Tracy Bull. Row 
Four: Dale Mar, Terry MeuJJef, Stephanie Anacker, 
Gail Folkins, Gordon Beeman, Jim Goins, Gretchen 


Hanna, Dawn Dibble. Row Five: Bill Dickerson, 
Gina Jausoro. 


580 Clubs/1984 












k. k k k Ik Daily Evergreen Advertising Staff 



EVERGREEN ADVERTISING STAFF-/? cnv 

One: Dudley Moore. Row Two: Leslie “The Wert” 
Werttemberger, Polly “The Cube” Kibbe, Anne 
“Where’s the Beef?” Hall, Bob Lama (Our Hero). 


Row Three: Kody “Drive it Home” Hayes. Robin 
“Al“ Adair, Dave “Matt Houston” Coury, Steve 
“Hang Down” Bozick, James “Purvy” Purviance. 
Row Four: Mike “Goon II” Rengstorff, Brian 


“Wert’s Cuz” Jolley. Row Five: Dan “Recede” 
Martin, Lisa “No Excuse” Sizelove. Not Pictured: 
Stephen Sparkman, Susan Sigmar, Steve Malloch, 
Mary Murphy, Gary Cecil. 


Out to Lunch Bunch 



OUT TO LUNCH BUNCH-/?dtv One: Karene McDonald, Margaret Reinbold, Donna Blacker, Sue Neese. 


1984 /Clubs 581 










initial Club ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



INITIAL CLUB-foiv One: K.L., T.O. Row Two: 
R.H. (D.I.). K.W.. E.A. 


Risky Business Men ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



THE RISKY BUSINESSMEN-tfmv One : Paul F. 
Ojoc, Jack B. Mitchell, Mike S. Hamden. 


582 Clubs /1984 
















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1984/Clubs 583 







High Tide Clamdiggers & Lutefisk Lovers ♦ 



HIGH TIDE CLAM DIGGERS-flow One: Kevin 
Ryan. Row Two: Jim Rammerman, Laura Hewitt, 
Brent Anderson, Paul Fisher, Kim Mossman, Alan 
Mace, Carie Eliason, Brad Pugh, Dave Whitely, 


Robert Lee. Row Three: Shelly Nielsen, Gary Foster, 
Mike Monell, Ed Clarke, Eric Andersen, Tom Hack- 
ett, Duane Drummond, Ramona Reeves. Row Four: 


Jeff Huggart, Kirk Adams, Matt Thomas, Mike Arm¬ 
strong, Pat Fuhrer, Todd Jarvi, Dave Bucklin, Kelly 
Waterman. 


i & Y’S ♦ ♦ ♦ 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



THE I Sc Y'S-Row One: Jennifer Y. Kennedy, 
Suzanne Y. Brown, Diane Y. Daggett, Pho I. 
Nguyen, Kerri Y. Helms, Ed I. Amato. Row Two: 


Vicki Y. McCaul, Mary Y. Hames, Denise Y. Eaton, 
Karen Y. Malthie, Hanh Y. Nguyen, Lisa A. Saxe, 


Ron I. Trussel, Jeff I. Marks, Mark I. Hallgrimson, 
Kurt I. Langston, Ray I. Corwin, Gerhard I. Mueller. 


584 Clubs /1984 









♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Friday Afternoon Seminar Club 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON SEMINAR CLUB-/tow 
One: Michael Moore, Kris Loss, Jack L. Johnson, 


Chris J. Sonnichsen, Darin Butler, Pat D. Haywood, 
Don T. Walton, Rob P. Maricle. Not Pictured: Tom 


and Vickie Pfeifer (Charter Member), Julie Lord 
(Honorary Member). 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ LBA 




LBA-Row One: Stefani Peters (Social Chair), President), Deeann Zurkammer (Secretary- Schilb, Charlotte Copin, Debbie Patrick, Mary 

Linda Wren (President), Kay Debroeck (Co-Vice Treasurer). Row Two: Shelley Yenney, Cindy Moore. 


1984 /Clubs 585 





Muley Malt Brewery - Night Shift ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 


This historic photograph is dedi¬ 
cated in memory of Ernest T. Muley, 
founder of the Muley Malt Brewery. 
His ideals and guidance have revolu¬ 
tionized the brewing industry. Going 
back to the basics has made Muley 
Malt, Washington’s most asked for 
beer. These individuals devoted to the 
brewing of the enigmatic ale will carry 
these mystic secrets forever. If you’re 
lucky enough to spot one of these 
select few in your travels, don’t let the 
chance slip through your fingers. Ask 
them for a kick of the Muley. 





MULEY MALT BREWERY -Row One: Dale 
“Whitey” Hockenson. Row Two: Carol “Ernie’s 


Babe” Wirth, Ed “Otter” Lane, Chris “Mr. Fun” 
Lane, Ernie “Am I In A Rut Or What?” Muley, 


Marie “Fun No. 1” Reim, Julie “Fun No. 2” Kir- 
chner, Glenn “Brewmeister Photon” Thornton. 



Future Chemists of America ♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


FUTURE CHEMISTS OF AMERICA-Row One: Karl Pool, Phyllis Hunt, Paul Sprengeler, Michael Wallin, Kris Sharp, Dave Wren. 


586 Clubs/ 1984 





♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ Super Bad He-Men 



The Super Bad He Men sprang 
from the loins of the Palose and in a 
matter of weeks were recognized as an 
international power. Mothers locked 
up their daughters and bartenders 
cringed with fear as the superbads cut 
a path of destruction which made the 
Roman Army look like Spandau Bal¬ 
let. They soon became so popular that 
bodyguards and unlisted phone num¬ 
bers became necessary to protect 
them from huge hordes of coeds. For 
those wishing to enjoy the Super Bad 
experience, the Corner Club is a fre¬ 
quent habitat of theirs. If you are 
lucky enough to see a Super Bad in 
person it will be an event you will be 
proud to tell your grandchildren; for 
the SUPER BAD HE MEN are truly 
legends in their time. 


THE SUPER-BAD HE-MEN-/?ow One: Dan “Iron 
Bladder” Sharp, Mike “Thermal Destructions” 


Connors, Eric “Grampa” Ott, Brian “Cocky Man” 
Balustein. Row Two: Chuck “Huff & Buff” Ram¬ 


say, Nate “The Snake” Asplund. Regan “Reggie” 
Leon. 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ Pokey’s Kidnappers 



POKEY’S KIDNAPPERS: Kari “Perpetrator” Montgomery, Darin “The Mastermind” Watkins, Dan “The Voice” Kirchmeier. 


1984 / Clubs 587 






















Recipe Club ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



RECIPE CLUB-/?™ One: V Dub, The Swam 
(Secretary of Defense), Otis (Treasurer), Deanus 
(Quality Control), Mick Mick (President), Snort’n 
(Vice President), R.J. (Secretary of Transportation), 
Steve. Row Two: Tommy, Lk’ Shit, Slowe, Scottie, 
Ray Ray, Dwarf, Brett. Row Three: Hans, Wengle, 
Ebin Ubin, Purple, Pee-Wee. Row Four: Kennae, 
Beer Man. 


The Recipe dub meets at every home 
football game to promote school spirit 
and...other activities! All members 
must: 1) love Cougar football, 2) 
attend every Coug game, 3) be willing 
to fight for 50 yard line seats and 4) 
fullfill all financial obligations. Motto: 
A member not standing is a member 
in good standing! 



choster dosiy»'» 


588 Clubs /1984 



















































♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦ 412th East Little Brothers 



STEPHENSON EAST’S LITTLE BROTHERS 
“THE DIRTY DOZEN”-/?ow One: Stacia Sayan, 
Ron Gallucci, Krista Haverly. Row Two: Tracey 
Ellis, Bob Graham, Scott Spaulding, Jeff McDonald, 
Eric Lauer, Rick D’Alessandro, Greg Knutson, Tim 


Camp, Bruce Verburg, Tracy Sexton. Row Three: 
Tracy West, Jill Knobel, Carmen Stark, Polly De- 
twilier, Nancy Wasley, Karin Pfaeltzer. Row Four: 
Karen Betz, Shari Edgren, Kristi Kosmata, Greg 
Lee, Lisa Knoepfel, Jeff Schlect, Kathy Crews, 


Loren VanLoo, Kristen Aspaas, Wayne Winsor, Juli 
Cartozian, Mike Hovenkotter, Elliott Walker. Not 
Pictured: Barry Brown, Dwain Oster. 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ White Swan Club 



WHITE SWAN CLUB-Rcnv One: David Funk, Joe Nissen. Row Two: Rob Ritchie, Diana E. Ferguson, Kate A. Braden, Shane Daniels. 

Lauinger, Allan McDowell, Devin Dekker, Peter E. Jeanne K. Filer, Kremiere H. Jackson, Anna Funk, 


1984 / Clubs 589 












Party Animals ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



PARTY ANIMALS-Row One: Kari Kisler (Beer it when you call me names”). Row Two: Andy kom (Space It!), David McBride (Devo). Not Pic - 

Slinger), Tommy Thomas (QuandoGet a Job), Dawn McKinlay (Linguine Tongue), Christopher Anderson tured: Kristin Thompson (It Just Doesn’t Matter), 

Sheneman (Lightweight Crew), Lisa Loran (‘‘Hove (Who said accountants were boring?), Mike Fieble- Dave Vollmer (TV Head), Sonja Holmstrom 

Pullman Boys Club ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



PULLMAN BOYS CLUB-/tow One: Don Laws, Santini, The Senator, Arthur Side!. Row Two: Willy Daniels, Mike Madden, Greg Lattin, Jeff Meadows, 

Dan Gustafson. Row Three: Alan Poole, Pat Daniels. 


590 Clubs /1984 











































Rho Chi 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY RHO CHI SOCIE- Carole Dougherty. Sondra Sather, Tracy Morton, Stroyan, Dave Oeser. Scott Sprenger. Bryan Tan. 

TY -Row One: Kay Lynn Edgren, Christine Schultz, Sheni Hodgdon. Row Two: Jon Maesner. Jeff Van- Not pictured: Alison Hanford. Brent Finley. 

derweide, Lisa Spiegelberg. Brian Auer, Dave 


Arnold Air Society 





ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY-tfdu One : John P 
Adams, Rich Poston, Jeff Cox, Robert Horton. 
Andrew C. Machman. Terry Popravak, Dave Dietel. 
Greg Brown, John Wood, Tim Iszley. Row Two: 
David Wren, Jon Januchowski, Clayton Barnard, 
Suzanne Smith, Robert Jeffrey. Sheni Mikkelsen, 
Colleen Carlsen, Doriann Bunn. Christina Rose, 


James Wright. Winnifred Weatherly, Lisa Loney, 
Anne Giffin, Joseph Marsh, Erik Price. Row Three: 
Janet Lyle, Nigel Hennis. Richard Robertson, 
Richard Standaert, Steve Haninson, Shawn Nelson, 
Robert Scholtz, Jeff Dark, Rick Grove, Carolynn 
Barber, Scott Bruce, Blaine Barton, Y. Bruce, Todd 


Barber, John Welch, Randolph Staudenraus, Wil¬ 
liam Holzberger. Michael Poole, Richard Arestad. 
Don Hoback, Mark Virtue. Row Four: Steve Gov- 
ernale. Dean Blankenbecker. Mark Murphy. Jack 
Schneider, Dave Delo. 


1984 / Clubs 593 










Alpha Epsilon Rho 



ALPHA EPSILON RHO -Row One: Gayle B 
Home (Vice President), Rodney L. Smith (Special 
Envoy), Robert Lowery (President), Shirley Skid- 
more (Secretary), Donalee Yagues (Treasurer). Row 


Two: Patrick E. Dooris, Belinda L. Simmons, Reb- 
bie Goodwin, Darci Childers, Susan Joseph, Eric 
Johnson, Sara C. Coddington, Bryan R. Johnston. 


Row Three: Bill R. Tackett, Brian M. Beach, Galen 
T. Culver, Denny L. Hostetter, Don N. Rees, Greg 
D. Huson, Bob J. Brustow, Jim Vander Dyssel. 


Mortar Board 



MORTAR BOARD-/?ow One: Stephanie Witt 
(President), Froseth Barrie (Historian), Robert 
Mielke, Nancy Lavinder. Row Two: Linda M. Estep- 
Wilson (Treasurer), Dinae Lipinski, Maggie J. Lucas 


(Elections Chairman), Jenny L. Hal, Kris L. Stocker, 
Zoe L. Robinson, Terri L. McDonald. Row Three: 
Sue C. Hinz (Adivsor), Deanna J. York, Gayle B. 


Home, Gini M. Brislawn (Programs), Marie E. Har¬ 
ris (Secretary), Laura K. Bussey, Kathryn A. Schof- 
stoll, Gail L. Gibb. 


594 Clubs /1984 












Omicron Nu 



OMICRON NU-/? 0 h> One: Bedra L. Klaus, Ellen E. 
Belcher, Lori J. Shay, Tanya A. Grant, Victoria A. 
Warren, Carole E. Carpenter. Row Two: Sherri 1 


Richarz, Kathryn A. Soldat, Mary A. Andrews, 
Gladys E. Jennings, Pamela R. Nelson, Catherine A. 


Breitenbach, Cathy Rice, Kathryn A. Schofstall, 
Rochelle A. Beley-Scott. 


Orchesis Dance Honorary 



ORCHESIS DANCE HONORARY -Row One: 
Patricia “Bob” Tiberio, Delona “Bob” Lang. Row 
Two: Vincas “Bob” Greene, Lori “Bob” Way. Row 


Three: Tami “Bob” Bratner, Bonnie “Bob” Schon- 
berg, Shannon “Bob” Robbins, Chelan “Bob” 
Robbins, Karen “Bob” Le Moine, Dana “Bob” 


Wells, Kristi “Bob” Kosmata, Tracy “Bob” Kelly, 
Maura “Bob” Flynn, Junko “Bob” Hosoi. 


1984 / Clubs 595 




























Phi Beta Kappa 



Phi Beta Kappa has been part of our nation’s intellec¬ 
tual life since 1776. New members are selected from 
the senior class on the basis of broad cultural interests 
and scholarly achievements. In exceptional circumst¬ 
ances candidates for the Ph.D. are elected to mem¬ 
bership. The local chapter brings distinguished scho¬ 
lars to campus for public lectures and visits with 
undergraduate classes. During the last fourteen years 
the W.S.U. Chapter has awarded over $38,000 in scho¬ 
larships for undergraduates. 


STUDENTS ELECTED TO 
MEMBERSHIP, 
SPRING, 1984 


Mary J. Afsharirad 
Tanya M. Alexander 
Aliza C. Allen 
Ed F. Amato 
Cindy L. Bentley 
Karen R. Birk 
Ken O. Boulton 
Sharon L. Brown 
Laura K. Bussey 
Catherine J. Carbone 
Gregory S. Cowell 
Audrey E. Cox 
Katie M. Crittenden 
Matthew G. Dalton 
Marie L. Davis 
Teresa A. Eagan 
Steven W. Edmiston 
David G. Forster 
Gail L. Gibb 
Jennifer A. Gladish 
Theresa A. Goetz 
Richard Gomulkiewicz 
Ted A. Gooley 
Debra E. Greagor 
Barbara K. Green 
Steven E. Gunkel 
Robin C. Hardiman 
Helen K. Hawn 
Kellie A. Heaton 
Daniel E. Herron 
Thomas G. Hill 
Tena K. Hoke 
Alan J. Hunt 
Phyllis J. Hunt 
Bryan D. James 
David A. James 


Sandra L. Johnston 
Tom K. Kerppola 
Kari A. Kisler 
James H. Klarich 
Debbie L. Kringen 
David A. Lester 
Scott D. MacQuarrie 
Lisa M. Maki 
Melanie K. Males 
Mark C. Mansperger 
Derek A. Matthews 
Lisa K. Mills 
Mikael C. Monson 
Heidi K. Nakamura 
Lewis L. Nick 
David M. Obenland 
Richard L. Patten 
James G. Patterson 
Donald J. Raz 
Jeff C. Reynolds 
Mark A. Rogers 
Sally J. Sebring 
Shirley A. Skidmore 
Jane A. Smith 
Gary L. Steele 
Christopher R. Sundstrom 
Jeffrey M. Thierry 
Mark K. Thoennes 
Nancy D. Thomas 
Paul J. Triesch 
Jill M. Tuttle 
Anne M. Vogel 
Catherine A. Wescott 
Anita R. West 
Wayne G. Yenne 


Scholarship Awards for 1983-84 


Charles E. Blackburn Scholar 
Dorothy Alice Jahnke Ohlson Scholar 
Gamma Chapter Scholar 
Gamma Chaper Scholar 


Douglas A. Loeffler 
Melanie K. Males 
Scott D. MacQuarrie 
Tanya M. Alexander 


596 Clubs/1984 






























Phi Kappa Phi 


New Members Initiated in 1984 


The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was founded in 
1897 and became a national organization through ihe 
efforts of'the presidents of three state universities. Its 
primary objective from the first has been the recogni¬ 
tion and encouragement of superior scholarship in all 
fields of study. 



I Idle Aaes-Jorgensen 
Drishnan Aghonumirthy 
Steven (I. Allcr 
Timothy A. Anderson 
Iwiuri Maniac Aimonen 
Douglas B. Amen 
Harry R. Bader 
Rebecca |. Baervcldl 
G. Margaret Baker 
Michael Lee Bamc 
James 1-ouis Barnhart 
Daniel II. Barsher 
Rol)en M. Bartlett 
Rochelle Beley-Scon 
John T. Beneski. Jr. 

Mitchell |av Berndt 
Daren R. Bil k 
Tim K. Bhiiner 
Sandra L. Book 
Kate Anne Braden 
Virginia M. Brislawn 
Gregory G. Brown 
Jell R. Brown 
Ronald*1). Bull 
Craig Glen Byquist 
Diane Marie Carlson 
Jel l rev L. Carlson 
John Jav Carroll 
Matthew James (a>e 
Randy Colbert 
Katherine M. Crittenden 
Collette Dahlstrom 
Matthew G. Dalton 
l^slie C. Davenport 
Lynn F.. DcBroeck 
Somkiil A. Delaney 
Kristin D. Dobler 
Mark ). Dominquez 
Ilellen Kay Dowdcn 
Mary Kathleen Dunn 
Cassandra Earl 
Steven VV. Ediniston 
Melinda Babick F.lledgc 
Ron F.llingsen 
Susan B. Ellis 
MikkiJ. Fanning 
Marya Ruth Farr 
Teresa Sue Faulk 
Christopher A. Feryn 
Jeffrey G. Feuerstein 
Terese M. Flynn 
Donald A. Fortner 
Jeffrey R. Franks 
i)ougias William Freeman 
Barrie R. Froseth 
Amy Jo Galpin 
Gynthia Christine Goodman 
Theodore Alan Gooley 
Theodore J. Gormanos 


Judith A. Graham 

Patricia Mansfield Green 

Dana E. Grover 

Steven F.. Gunkel 

Rustin Lee Hall 

Susan D. Hall 

James P. Hansen 

Mark G. Hansen 

Robert O. Hanson 

Heidi 1. Harder 

Anne L. Harkonen 

Melissa Harp 

Ameer llassan 

Douglas G. 1 lavcman 

I lelen Kimiko I lawn 

Brenda lleinck 

Daniel Edward Herron 

Elizabeth Ann Honeycutt 

Tracy Jo Honsinger 

loamiis N. 1 loupis 

|oau K. 11uc 

Alan J. Hunt 

Phvllis Jean Hunt 

Rosemarie J. Hunter 

David A. James 

l)cna N. Johnson 

Jeffrey Scott Johnson 

Marilyn Frances Johnson 

Lisa Ann Jones 

Cindy J unger 

Cynthia Marie Kascbcrg 

M l.arcw Kennedy 

Raili Emilia Kerppola 

Tom Klaus Williamm Kcrp|x>la 

Erin Kilpatrick 

Shelly L. Kitne 

Dennis Rat Kinder 

John George King 

Kari Anne Kislcr 

Debra L. Klaus 

Kurt Rlingman 

Elia/heth Anne Largcni 

Nancy J. I-avimlcr 

Pamela Awana Lee 

Lisa Feme LcIT 

Margaret Mary Levcrnier 

Sarah A. Levden 

David A. Loolburrow 

Margaret Joan Lucas 

Janet R. Lyle 

Timothy Owen Lynch 

Mark G. Manspcrger 

Kathryn J. Markin 

Susan Anne Martinis 

Susan A. Mathis 

Stephen J. McConnel 

Kent L. McLaren 

Theresa Mengeri 


Karen I. Meyer 
Kathryn E. Meyer 
Susan K. Michelsen 
Robert Edward Mielke 
Karen Louise Mills 
Juanita Leal Murray 
Pamela R Nelson 
Jerry Nick • 

Anne M. Nuzum 
Lisa Amanda Nystrom 
Carol Ann Oas 
John C. Palmer 
Richard Leslie Patten 
Brian Burdette Peters 
Susan Marlene Pheasant 
[on Rown Phillips 
Todd A. Pierce 
Maria Lee Quann 
Joanne Ragan 
Donald J. Raz 
Tammy Reid 
I«ori Repanich 
Peggy Jo Roberts 
Scott Elliot Robins 
Julia J. Robinson 
Sarah Anne Roe 
Kathv Suzanne Rosston 
Brian J. Rust 
Robert Laverne Schilling 
Rebecca A. Schroedcr 
Scott A. Schrocder 
Susan L. Schultz 
Scott Alan Schwisow 
Kvle T. Shener 
Brien Robert Short 
David Alan Shuel 
Susan C. Smawley 
Benjamin S. Smith 
Jane Ann Smith 
Michele K. Stueckle 
Sarah Jane Suhadolnik 
Steven T. Swansttrom 
Ann Thyme 
William Brian 'fiiff 
James Van Den Dvssel 
Dim Allen Van Nausdle 
Anne Michelle Vogel 
Timothy J. Wachter 
Sandra Diane Warren 
Mark Timothy Wasson 
Anita Rae West 
Susan Anne Whitman 
Scott M. Wierenga 
Melody Winkle 
Kevin Shane Woods 
Kenneth Steven Wriggle 
Keith K. Yamakawa 
Wayne G. Yenne 


Phi Kappa Phi Officers 

President, Robert Jonas 
Vice President, Laura Dagle 
President Elect, Muriel Oaks 
Treasurer, Sue Durrant 
Secretary, Robert Doomink 
Public Relations, Sherrill Carlson 


1984/Clubs 


597 









SOCIETY OF WOMEN ENGINEERS-/?^ One: 
Debbie Simons, Lisa Arkli Arkills, Flo Hausler, 
Annette Lane. Row Two: Beverly Ash. Becky Mih, 


Kirsten Dunatov, Bev Boss, Wendy Darnell, Heather 
Patrick. Row Three: Barbara Cole. Marilyn Starr, 
Dianne Coddington, Yvonne Meyer, Jill Anderson. 


Jennifer Jacobs, Julie Ablertson. Row Four: Ed Tin- 
ney. Bill Baker, Steve Reebs, David Biegel. 


Alpha Zeta Agricultural Honorary 


ALPHA ZETA-/?pw One: Holly I. McMurray 
(Scribe), Kirstin L. Martinson, Mike J. Roberts, 
David W. Door (Chancellor), Collette Dahlstrom, 


598 Clubs/1984 


Kim Kaut, Everett Purrington, Sandra Goddard. Row 
Two: Jimmy C. Schultheis, Chris M. Mitchell, Malt 
P. Ewers, Randy L. Primmer, Greg L. Johnson, 


Todd C. Cameron, Robert E. Mielke, Curtis E. Nel¬ 
son, Jeff D. Langer, Scott E. Schwisow, Julie L. 
Kirchner, Kristie L. Simpson. 


Society of Women Engineers 





















ASWSU 



The purpose of government of the 
Associated Students of Washington 
State University is twofold; to repre¬ 
sent the students of Washington State 
University and to provide services and 
activities for Washington State Uni¬ 
versity. Our goal this year was to do 
our best to accomplish these pur¬ 
poses. Additionally, along the way, we 
corrected, re-structured, and im¬ 
proved our organization whenever 
possible so as to better meet its pur¬ 
poses. 

The president and his staff were pri¬ 
marily responsible for communicat¬ 
ing the needs and concerns of WSU 
undergraduates to external organiza¬ 
tions, such as the university adminis¬ 
tration, the local community, and the 
state government. This was accom¬ 
plished via a variety of activities rang¬ 
ing from the simple filling of all com¬ 
mittee vacancies and presidential 
appointments to the joining of the 
Associated Students with the Pullman 
City Council to active lobbying on be¬ 


half of student concerns in Olympia. 
Responsible for overseeing the ser¬ 
vices and activities for the students of 
WSU, the Vice-President and her 
staff dealt with the internal structure 
and operations of ASWSU. This was 
accomplished not only by chairing the 
ASWSU Assembly but also by increas¬ 
ing communication within the various 
ASWSU committees and organiza¬ 
tions. Newly created monthly meet¬ 
ings between the Vice-President and 
committee chairpersons as well as the 
establishment of five new ASWSU 
committees (Mini-Concert, Entertain¬ 
ment, Symposium, Voter Action, and 
Dance) resulted from these efforts. 
Student government always appears 
to be in a state of flux, a period of 
transition. Its leaders must be aggres¬ 
sive enough to effectively promote 
student interests while being flexible 
enough to react correctly and quickly 
to a variety of often conflicting ideas, 
issues and problems. About the time 
this highly diverse, complex, and 


wonderful organization known as 
ASWSU is sorted out enough so as to 
be considered a body politic that is 
governable, the brief term of office 
granted its leaders is over. Because it 
is so important for student govern¬ 
ment to have continuity in order to 
achieve effectiveness, it has been a 
goal of this administration to work to¬ 
wards the long term stability of 
ASWSU. Ensuring student repre¬ 
sentation on the committee studying 
the potential Eastern Washington and 
Washington State University merger, 
continued support of the Washington 
State Lobby, and instigating plans for 
an annual ASWSU week promoting 
the various activities and organiza¬ 
tions provided by WSU student gov¬ 
ernment are just a few of the ways this 
administration has attempted to en¬ 
hance the effectiveness of the Associ¬ 
ated Students. 

Although challenging and often hec¬ 
tic, this year has been a successful one 
for ASWSU government. 


1984 /Clubs 599 












Staff 



ASWSU STAFF-flmr One: Mickey Schmitz, Sarah Roe. Kirk Wood-Gaines. Susan Meyer, Cindy Aspi- tarte. Row Two: Ken Crowley. Dan O’Connell. 

Anne Marie Martinis. 


Secretaries 



ASWSU SECRETARIES-Ztovc One: Sandy Turner. 
Cathy Thraillcill. 


600 Clubs/1984 









































Assembly 



ASWSU ASSEMBLY-Row One: Bruce E. Haw¬ 
kins, Angie L. Dennison, Alice C. Summers, Geoff 
Forshag, Theresa M. Schulz (Chair of Programming 


Committee), Cathy A. Keogh, Lynn M. Woolslayer, 
Charles G. Little. Row Two: Robert D. Cushing, 
John C. Palmer, Colleen M. Cook (Chair Pro Tern), 


Robert M. Bartlett (Chair of Finance Committee), 
Frank G. Stone, Brian L. Burnett, Dr. Terrie B. 
Skavlem, Randy J. Rosman. 



The Assembly is the legislative body 
of ASWSU and is currently composed 
of 18 members elected by various liv¬ 
ing groups around campus. 

The Assembly is charged with repre¬ 
senting student views and overseeing 
the activities of the Association. 
Among the accomplishments by the 
Assembly this past year are the estab¬ 
lishment of four new activity commit¬ 
tees (Dance, Mini-Entertainment, 
Symposium and Voter Action); revi¬ 
sion of the constitution, by-laws and 
organizational manual; vastly increas¬ 
ing funding for the ASWSU sports 
clubs and committees. The Assembly 
also stated its views to the state legisla¬ 
ture on various issues, including a 
proposal to put a student on the 
Board of Regents. 


1984/Clubs 601 
















Films Committee k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k.k. 


Special Events Committee kkkkWkkWi 


The Films Committee provides a 
full range of films geared to satisfy the 
wide spectrum of students’ tastes. 
Activities include selection, booking, 
programming and operations of the 
entire films program. 


FILMS COMMITTEE-Zton' One: Jeff Ball, Barb Robbins. Nikki Richards, Denver Burtenshaw. Row Two: Mike Policy, Janel Walzer. Cindy Bohan, Ed 

Casper. Row Three: Sheila Kelly, Mazla Marlin. 


SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE Row One. 
Bill Drummey, Debbie Anastasi, Jean Lemcke, 
Melinda Byrne, Romona Felton, Joan Menziers, 


Kelly Seresun, Robin Browder, Row Two: James, P. 
May, Bryan J. Kennedy, Jeff J. Eller, Mark C. Han¬ 
sen, Danny R. Monarch, Bill C. Dowdell, Suzanne 


M. Kaufmann. Row Three: KevinT., Fiore, Brian S. 
Leibsohn, Mike J. Morrow, David L. Dunn, Brian E. 
Parsons, Pete G. Vierthaler, Jim Morrow, Ronnie 
(Roland) E. Davis. 


602 Clubs/1984 


Special Events provides large-scale 
entertainment functions such as Casi¬ 
no Royale or Christmas at the CUB 
for the university community. They 
also create new and innovative prog¬ 
ramming as members desire. 
















1984 / Clubs 


603 


Recreation Advisers 

















Asian Pacific American Students k k k k k 


Asian Pacific American Students 
develop and sponsor a wide range of 
programming which explores the 
heritage, experience and culture of 
Asian Pacific American students. Its 
purposes are to promote awareness 
and to serve as a focus for participa¬ 
tion by Asian Pacific American stu¬ 
dents. 



ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN STUDENTS- 

Row One: Steve Sumida (Advisor), Karol J. Chin, 
Gail M. Nomura (Advisor). Row Two: Cole E. 


Tsujikawa, Patti T. Hamasu, Arlene L. Cabalce 
(Treasurer). Row Three: Marlene B. Anderson, 
Toshio Isogai (Consul General, Japan). Row 


Four: John J. Steere, Gregory A. Ota, Susumu 
Kawakita (Consul, Japan), Cathy Song (Visiting 
Poet). 


Black-A wareness Committee k k k k k k k 


Black-Awareness serves as a focus 
for political and social unity for the 
black community. It strives to fulfill 
the cultural, social and academic 
needs of the students. 



• inb 

|Yl i - 

V -A/ 

a 

Ifs J 

9 m 

.iaVS® 


BLACK AWARENESS COMMITTEE-/?^ One: Woods, Johnna Lehr. Row Two: L.C. Mincey, Alex- 

Raymond L. Moffatte Jr., Inez B. Lindsey, Leaza ander Jenkins, Calvin Harris, John J. Williams. 


604 Clubs/1984 




















Consumer Protection and Legal Services 



CONSUMER PROTECTION AND LEGAL 
SERVICES-/tow One: Raymond T. Steiger, Todd 
S. Woodard, Ron St. George, Tom C. Brown, Kris 
R. Jensen. Row Two: Patty L. Jones, Kimberlee A. 


Franklin (Legal Director), Kari A. Kisler (Consumer 
Director) Linda L. Kingen, Denise F. Holiman, Emi¬ 
ly P. Mortimer, Mary J. Warren (Finance Director), 


Consumer Protection/Legal Ser¬ 
vices provides consumer protection 
services to the student and to Pullman 
residents through the investigation of 
consumer complaints and the provi¬ 
sion of information and educational 
programs to increase the awareness of 
rights and responsibilities of the mar¬ 
ketplace. It also provides legal services 
such as advice and representation for 
full fee-paying WSU students. 


Cindy E. Swears. Not Pictured: Dave Zwashka, Patti 
Bailie, Reid Imai, Sheryl Matoi, David Johnson, 
Naide Lavery, Luz Young-Rodrigues, Attorney. 


k.k.L.k.k.k.k.k. Environmental Task Force 



Environmental Task Force works to 
promote environmental awareness 
through sponsorship of films, speak¬ 
ers and educational programs as well 
a having responsibility for campus re¬ 
cycling. 


ENVIRONMENTAL TASK FORCE -Row One: 
H.R. Bader, John Palmer, D.R. Diefenbach, Curt 
Westberg, Jerry Lee (Co-Chairman), Susan Wilkin¬ 


son (Dorm Representative-Regents), Keith Ebersole 
(Dorm Representative-Orton), Jay Dark (Dorm Rep¬ 
resentative-Waller), Jeff Lafer, Dean White (Activi¬ 


ties Coordinator). Row Two: Linda Osborn (Co- 
Chairman), Beth Ebersole (Dorm Coordinator). Not 
Pictured: Bev Meadows, Liz Morgan. 


1984 / Clubs 605 











Political Union 

The Political Union is responsible 
for presenting political issues in a vari¬ 
ety of forums and for providing voter 
information on state, regional and 
local issues. This group also sponsors 
the candidate’s debate each spring as a 
part of the ASWSU election process. 





POLITICAL UNION-Row One: Cathy Campen 
(Co-chairperson), Laurie Galbraith. Maggie Gates. 


Row Two: Tim Zenk, Bryan Yager. Row Three: 
Randy Roseman, Dan Maher (Adviser), Steve 


Edmiston. Not Pictured: Jennifer Kreiss, Jeanette 
Sevedge, Marlene Anderson. Greg Brink, Loren 
Oakley. 


M.E.Ch.A. 



M.E.Ch.A., the Chicano awareness 
committee, programs toward stu¬ 
dents interested in Hispanic culture 
with emphasis on allowing the Chica¬ 
no student to explore his or her own 
identity with respect to the entire stu¬ 
dent population. 


MECHA/tow One: Abraham Gonzalez Jr. (Vice 
President), Francisca Garrison Garza (Treasurer), 
Genoveva Gonzalez (Secretary), Joe Guerra (Presi¬ 


dent), Karen Brito. Row Two: Ben Bazaldua, Melva 
Y. Garcia. Lourdes Rodriguez, Marie E. Petersen, 
Jesus M. Chanlatte, Norma D. Duran. Row Three: 


Tom M. Lopez, Mario R. Cordova, Mark Costa, 
Maria O. Ramirez, Connie L. Hostetter, Rick M. 
Mercado. 


606 Clubs/1984 










LLkkLkkkLkkLLkLkk Mayfest 



Mayfest is a week-long celebration 
involving as many departments and 
groups that care to participate. This 
committee coordinates and promotes 
the entire week. The week-long event 
winds up with an outdoor dance. 


MAYFEST-/?™ One: Dan Maher, Steve ki- Row Two: Christopher D. Engle. a.J. Site, Aaron Johnson. 

Detrich, Kim Hasko, Joyce A. Szymans- Cathy Jentges, Ken L. Anderson, Perry 


kkkkkkkkkkkk Dance Committee 



Dance provides students with the 
opportunity for informal and inex¬ 
pensive interaction. The design, plan¬ 
ning, theme and programming are 
undertaken by the members. 


DANCE COMMITTEE-/?™ One: Bob Ellis, Di¬ 
ane Newgard, Rhonda Geek, Kellyann Robinson, 
Aaron Johnson. Row Two: Cynthia L. Higgins, Kris¬ 


tin M. Hatch, Shannon C. Gish, Jane A. Jenson, 
Debbie J. Anastasi, Beth J. Kerst, Beverly A. James, 
Mike V. Obrastoff. Not Pictured: Fabi Gonzalez, 


Cindy Reynolds, Renee Williamson. 


1984 /Clubs 607 
















Ku-Au-Mahk LLkkLLkkkkkkkkk 


Ku-Au-Mah deals with the con¬ 
cerns of the native American student. 
Its programs range from talks on the 
native American student in today’s 
educational system to social events 
such as the turkey shoot'and the 
annual spring pow-wow. 


KU AU MMi-RowOne: Loretta A. Tuell, “Felix,” 
Randolph L. Griffith, Marvin Chee, Jeff L. San- 


608 Clubs /1984 


daine. Row Two: Donna Mae Hondle, Denise Ann 
Lawver, Patricia Mae Tuell, ‘Vette Sue Jim. Row 
Three: Dave Bonga, Arthur Tulee, Mike “Wucka” 


Parker, Arthur Taylor, Ken Egawa, Darryl Dau, 
Richard Watt, Wendell Jim. 


Homecoming Committee 


The Homecoming Committee is 
primarily involved with the student 
side of homecoming activities: the 
dance, the homecoming games, the 
yard displays and other spirit-raising 
events. All events are coordinated 
with athletics and the Alumni Associa¬ 
tion. 


HOMECOMING COMMITTEE-Row One: Dan 
Maher, “Vic.” Row Two: Patrick Dempsey, 
Jonathan “Worm” Little, Bobby Peterson (Chair¬ 
man), Mark P. “M.J.” Johnson (Dance Chairman), 


Ronnie Davis, Paul Carlson, Greg “Swami” Sel- 
sted. Row Three: Dave Loofburrow, Nancy E. Terry, 
Kris L. Stocker (Games Chairman), Shauna D. 
Stocker, “L.A. Woman” M. Anderson (Social 


Chairman), Diane S. Engel, Debbie K. Weaver, Joan 
L. Johnson (Games Chairman), Cindy C. Goodman 
(Co-chairman), BillC. Dowdell (BannerChairman). 






k.Lk.k.kk.k.k.k.k.k.k.kkk. KZUU Radio 



KZUU Radio is a student-owned 
and operated station set up to provide 
an alternative to Top 40’s listening. A 
variety of programming can be heard 
from jazz to new wave to folk, news 
and other special programming. The 
station provides an excellent hands- 
on learning experience for anyone in¬ 
terested in broadcasting or station 
management. 


KZUU-/tow One: Sheila Kelly, Janet Walzer. Row 
Two: Heidi Froseth, Leah VanLeuven, Paco. Row 
Three: “Joker Joe” Ford, Barbara Robbins, Eric the 


Armadillo, Julie Brudvick, David Hills, Kevin 
Leaky. Row Four: Brian Ruse, Jeff Ball, Kristin 
Gifford, Lisa Schamhorst, Tom Kuhn, Brad Carl- 


berg, Tracey Leaky. Row Five: Brad Nelson, 
Michele Bloom, Wes Smith, Beth Roberts, John 
Anderson, Darryl Engel. 


Lecture Artists Committee 



ASWSU L ECTUR E ARTISTS OOMMITTEEr Allan H. Kachelmeier, Jess Gobel, Lori Claudon, 
Row COMMTTTEE-Clockwise Around the Table: Heidi Winters, Scott Schroeder (Chairman), Janice 


Lecture Artists sponsors cultural 
and educational speakers. This in¬ 
cludes a weekly Spring Lecture Series. 
The committee draws on local to 
national speakers of a non-political 
nature. 


E. Mano, Bob Ellis, Jon Bolinger. 


1984 / Clubs 609 




















ASWSU Election 1984 












Who Won? 


The teams stood ready for the start 
of another race. There were the usual 
pre-race favorites and the long shots. 
All were prepared for the long dash to 
the victory circle. Some stood confi¬ 
dent while others seemed disorga¬ 
nized. The rhetoric was the usual for 
this type of race. There were strategy 
meetings and some maneuvering. 
There were charges and counter¬ 
charges. Some complained of rule 
violations while others planned to out- 
master the other competitors. It was 
turning out to be quite a contest. 

In the end, it would be one of the 
most unforgettable races in the his¬ 
tory of the university. Seven teams 
would start the longjourney. It would 
be pared down to three and finally a 
winner would stand alone. Problems 
with violations, however, called for 
another race. A second preliminary 
saw the same victor and only two 
teams to choose from. After more 
than a month of fighting, a long shot 
took the title as the new student body 
officers. 

The election of Mike Coan and Jim 
Van Den Dyssel, two seniors in busi¬ 
ness, as the ASWSU President and 
Vice President was one of the most 
unusual in recent times. The team 
didn’t even run in the first election 
and were outdistanced in the second 
primary by 550 votes by the orginal 
winners. The final tally, however, saw 
the team take a 400 vote victory into 
the third floor niche. 

Twenty years from now someone is 
going to look back at student govern¬ 
ment here and get confused about 
who won and why they lost. 

It all started late. The orgininal 
election was to take place in the mid¬ 
dle of March. It was delayed until ear¬ 
ly and finally late April, because of 
procedural matters. 

Seven teams filed for the posts for 
the first election. They included the 
current young leaders in the Student 
Assembly, a few long shots and repre¬ 
sentatives from Olympia. 


The first primary eliminated four 
of the teams and saw a leader in Ken 
Crowley, a student representative in 
Olympia, and Cameron Dime, a 
Cougar mikeman. Crowley and Dime 
were followed closely by the first elec¬ 
tion winners Neil Thomas and Heidi 
Froseth, a long shot team, and the 
team of Brian Burnett and Carol 
King, from the Assembly. 

Political maneuvers began to sur¬ 
face, however, as a number of people 
began to questions promises made by 
some of the young leaders. The team 
of Thomas and Froseth promised stu¬ 
dent programs and looked to take 
control of a surplus in the parking 
division here. The team drew fire 
from several administrators and stu¬ 
dent politicians for proposing a prog¬ 
ram that was beyond the reach of stu¬ 
dent government. 

Thomas, however, said student 
government could have an impact 
and said it was wrong not to try to get 
the surplus in parking. 

In a final debate before the general 
election, Thomas and Froseth attack¬ 
ed the problem of sexual assault on 
campus and promised to make this 
university a model university. Crow¬ 
ley and Dime ran on being outsiders 
of the current leaders and promoted 
their experience in Olympia while 
Burnett and King spoke of their 
accomplishments on the Student 
Assembly. 

The race was close. Thomas and 
Froseth won by just 71 votes over the 
team of Crowley and Dime while Bur¬ 
nett and King were a distant third. 

After the final tally, however, prob¬ 
lems began to surface for Thomas and 
Froseth. The team was cited 64 times 
for seven different campaign viola¬ 
tions. They were found guilty of put¬ 
ting signs in academic buildings, in 
non-living group areas, writing on 
chalkboards, having too many signs 
on a single kiosk, posting an outdoor 
sign, taking down an opponent’s sign, 
campaigning near a polling place on 


the day of the election and posting 
signs within sight of a polling place. 

Crowley and Dime were cited for 
four different violations. They were 
found guilty of posting an outdoor 
sign and taking down another candi- I 
date’s sign. Buurnett and King were 
not found in violation of any cam- I 
paign rules. 

In its ruling the Judicial Board said, I 
“The respondents (Thomas and 
Froseth) personally committed sever¬ 
al violations, all done willfully and i 
with prior knowledge of the rules. 
This demonstrates blatant disregard 
for the regulations, which they had 
agreed to abide by, and also disregard 
for the other candidates by creating 
unfair competition. The sheer i 
volume of illegal signs posted could 
well have influenced the results of an 
election as close as this one was.” 

The Board continued, “Even allow¬ 
ing for ignorance early on in the cam¬ 
paign, there still can be no excuse for 
infractions occuring on the very day 
of the general election, of which the 
respondents Thomas and Froseth 
had numerous instances.” 

“Four of those violations are not 
valid,” Thomas said. The outdoor 
signs was defined as a wooden sign 
supported by stakes or braces, he said. 
Electioneering was done more than 
100 feet from a polling place, which is 
within the rules. 

He said a number of the violations 
could not be considered signficant 
enough to have changed voter deci- ' 
sions. Having material in academic 
buildings was done by more than the 
executive ticket and the signs over the 
limit on the kiosk were only up for a 
few minutes, he said. 

In a heated special meeting late 
Sunday, May 6, the Student Assem¬ 
bly, under the recommendation by 
the Judicial Board, invalidated the re¬ 
sults of the election of Thomas and 
Froseth, because of the number and 
seriousness of the campaign viola¬ 
tions. 


610 Clubs/1984 







Mike Coan 

“Rules have to be followed/’ said 
Shawn Ryan, chiefjustice for the Judi¬ 
cial Board. “There are more viola¬ 
tions this year than last.” 

With the election invalidated, the 
entire process of selecting the top stu¬ 
dent leaders had to be started again. A 
special election was set by the Assem- 


Jim Van Den Dyssel 

bly during its next meeting and filing 
began the following Monday. 

Dan O’Connell, the current student 
body president, however, had a prob¬ 
lem with the date of the special elec¬ 
tion, because it was so close to finals. 
O’Connell debated if he should sign 
the bill or veto it and effectively put 


the election off until the following 
year. He proposed to elect a tempor¬ 
ary president until the new officers 
were elected and took office. 

His act, however, drew sharp critic¬ 
ism from administrators and stu¬ 
dents. After almost a week of waiting, 
O’Connell signed the bill and the elec¬ 
tion was set for the end of May during 
Closed Week. 

Five teams filed for the top execu¬ 
tive offices. Thomas and Froseth and 
the team of Crowley and Dime were 
the only tickets in the race from the 
previous election. Coan and Van Den 
Dyssel and the team of Erick Larson 
and Leah VanLeuuven were to battle 
the other teams. A fifth team with¬ 
drew for personal reasons before the 
primary. 

In the primary election, Thomas 
and Froseth received the most votes. 
The team got more than 550 votes 
more than second place Coan and 
Van Den Dyssel. Crowley and Dime 
were third while Larson and Van- 
Leuven were eliminated from the 
race. 

After the primary, however, Crow¬ 
ley and Dime withdrew from the race 
and gave their support to Coan and 
Van Den Dyssel. 

With the two team race, the political 
maneuvers began to heat up as Coan 
and Van Den Dyssel campaigned 
hard on Greek Row. The team prom¬ 
oted their experience in state politics. 
“What the (other) candidates have 
been talking about in this campaign, 
we have discussed for a year (in the 
Council for Postsecondary Education 
meetings),” Coan said. Coan was 
appointed to the Council by Gov. 
Spellman to represent all students in 
the state. 

In the one day special election, 
Coan and Van Den Dyssel outdis¬ 
tanced Thomas and Froseth by more 
than 400 votes. The election was vali¬ 
dated the next week and the team 
took office a week later after gradua¬ 
tion. 

The race was concluded after more 
than a month of battles before, during 
and after the elections. The election 
of the student body top officers in 
1984 can be called many things. One 
thing is for certain, however, it made 
history. 

— by Troy D. Bull 




1984 /Clubs 611 



















INDEX 

Aa 



Aaron, Virginia L.453, 306 

Aasland, Mark A.272 

Abbe, Corinne L.560, 434 

Abbott, Daniel L.425 

Abbott. David K.319 

Abbott. Martha T.426 

Abdelrahman. Olfat 1.547 

Abellera, Darren J.271, 538 

Abendroth, John D.321 

Abicht, David M.331 

Abraham, Anil Z.337 

Absalonson, Joe.268, 424 

Absalonson, Lisa L.338, 549 

Accornero. Michael D.543, 405, 498 

Acey, Dennis E.413, 522 

Ackerman, Lisa M.465, 264 

Ackermann, Marcy L.262 

Acufl, Jackie D.363 

Adair, Nancy L.260 

Adair, Robin J.302. 308, 580, 563 

Adami, Brian M.432 

Adami. Heidi M.304, 309 

Adams. Elizabeth A.345 

Adams. Jeffrey J.341,405 

Adams, Julie A.290 

Adams, Kirk L.584, 377 

Adams. Michael F.385 

Adams. Patrick H.336, 516 

Adams. Perry J.538 

Adams, Shawn M.288 

Adams, Steven E.428, 555 

Adams, Todd F.428 

Adams, Todd R.331 

Adams. Trudi J.343 

Adamson, Donald K.301 

Adamson, Karen M.347, 495 

Adderley, Vivian T.434 

Addleman, Cheryl D.363 

Adkins. Cindy F.452 

Adkinson, David.507 

Adkisson, Robert W.507 

Adlam, Kaye M.430 

Adler, Steven B.337 

Adsitt, Richard A.297 

Aeschliman, Marla J.258 

Afflerbach, Linda C.312, 428 

Aflatooni, Tooraj.284 

Agbadi, Isa.526, 562 

Agerup, Dan W....383 

Agnew, John J.322 

Aguilar, Nina S.304 

Aguirre, Lisa M.304, 467 

Ahern, Mary L.294 

Ahlf, Pamela J.349, 518 

Ahlquist. Anita L.343 

Ahmann, Gregory M.405. 446 

Ah man n, Jeffrey M.405 

Ahmann, Margaret J.434 

Ahmed, El-Sayed A.434, 523 

Ahola. Elliott L.508, 583, 636, 

638-639, 634-635 

Ahrendt. Diane D.544 

Ahrens. Tena M.291, 456 

Aiken, Anita L.498, 554 

Aikens, Anthony C.526, 560 

Aikins, Jim N.319, 324 

Ainslie, Mary F.332. 563 

Aistrope, Diane C.277 

Aitcheson. Carol.259 

Aker son, Allen W.297 

Akhtar, Mohammad N.526 

Akmal, Tariq T.274 

Akoh, Casimir C.526 

Akridge. Jeff J.297 

Al-Robaishy, Khalid A.434, 548 

Albergetti, Anna M.334 

Albert, Barbie E.332 

Albertson, Julie A.598 

Albro, Bradley A.268 

Alcorn, David R.268 

Alcorn, Michael H.274 

Alden Jeffrey D.428, 564 

Alder, Monty B.272 

Aldrichr Christian L.391, 571 

Aldrich, Craig W.297 

Aldridge, Jeff J.389 

Alexander, Brady M.271 

Alexander, Cindy G.260 

Alexander. Larry G.299, 427 

Alfano, Mark S.419, 504 


Alfano, Michael P.,...419. 504 

Alferd, Laura M.286, 425. 555 

Alfonso, Jeffrey L. 297 

Alford. Elizabeth A.465 

Allen. Candy L.301, 327 

Allen, Casey C.577 

Allen, Cheryl K.498 

Allen. Christina M.468 

Allen, Cynthia M.365 

Allen. David M.526 

Allen, Deborah C.347, 465 

Allen, Douglas W.385 

Allen, Greg.432 

Allen. Jeffrey S.298 

Allen, Kevin W.323, 324, 325 

Allen, Stephanie A.317 

Allen. Stephanie J.315. 318 

Alley. Bruce L.275, 328 

Allison, Lea E.544 

Alonzo. Rod D.411 

Alpaugh, John R.393 

Al-Robaishy, Khalida.496 

Alsbury, Robert L.286 

Altman, Pamela A.357 

Alvernaz, Paul M.498 

Amato, Ed F.584 

Amble, John H.403 

Amdal, Jon M.329 

Amery, Cindy A.464 

Ames. Todd W.419 

Ammerman, Tamara K.434, 505 

Amos, Kirk L.424 

Amril, Mohammad A.552 

Amsbaugh, Beth M.353, 459, 520 

Amsden, Lori D.345 

Amsden. Scott J.275, 279, 328, 571 

Amsel, James G.515 

Amundsen, John E.427 

Amundson, Rene L.434 

Anand. Mandeep S.266 

Anastasi, Deborah J.463, 602, 607 

Andaleon, Amelia D.555 

Andara, Masman.552 

Andersen. William N.274, 309 

Anderson, Amy B.359 

Anderson, Brent M.584 

Anderson, Brian M.411 

Anderson. Brian R.275, 279 

Anderson, Cara L.334 

Anderson, Christopher.432, 498, 590 

Anderson, Colleen L.361 

Anderson. Cynthia G.432 

Anderson, Denise M.313 

Anderson, Dtana L.519 

Anderson. Donald J.268 

Anderson, Eric A.272 

Anderson. Eric R.434, 584, 636 

Anderson, Gregg T.411 

Anderson, Jill T.511, 542, 598 

Anderson, John A.385 

Anderson, Judi L.434, 462 

Anderson, Judith A..262, 263, 552, 570 

Anderson. Karri F.J.320 

Anderson, Ken L.199, 405, 607 

Anderson, kenneth J.434 

Anderson, Kristin A.307, 458 

Anderson. Laura M.520 

Anderson, Laura S.276 

Anderson, Lynn D.277 

Anderson, Lynn M.345 

Anderson, Mark G.515 

Anderson, Marlene B.333, 567, 

604, 606 

Anderson, Michael D.266, 424 

Anderson, Michael J.297 

Anderson, Michele M.199, 316 

Anderson, Paul B.432, 498 

Anderson, Rebecca L.365 

Anderson, Rhonda K.293 

Anderson, Ron S.284 

Anderson, Scott W.405 

Anderson. Susan J.448 

Anderson, Susan K.334 

Anderson, Todd K.379 

Anderson, Veronica O.520 

Ando, Masaoki.526 

Andrews. Christopher S.271, 434 

Andrews. David L.194, 397 

Andrews, Deborah K.353 

Andrews, John M.321 


Andrews, Mary A.541, 595 

Andriesen, Karyn T.355, 562 

Andriesen. Thomas A.377 

Andringa. Brian J.510, 570 

Andrus, Cameron W.199 

Angel, Kim.357, 468 

Anhorn, Gerald J.300 

Annis, Jane E.516 

Annonen, Cindy M.560 

Anspach, Don S, Jr.272, 424 

Antal. David F.301 

Anthony, Stevyn L.520, 540 

Antion, Jennifer L.305 

Anttila, George E.403 

Antush. Stephen A.389, 498 

Apostol, Gus J.300 

Appel. Barbara J.496, 548 

Appel. Deborah A.432. 541 

Appel. Michael P.493 

Applemeyer. Bea L.292 

Aquino, Linda D.498 

Arabas, Ruth L.316, 552, 570 

Arafat. Ziad A.329 

Arakaki, Gary M.432, 498 

Arbanas, Carl F.417 

Area, Stephanie L..451 

Archer, Janet S.338, 461 

Arcia, Laura J.314, 428 

Arenas. Carlene K.430, 520 

Arend, Jack W.399 

Arensberg. Joel H.268. 424, 540 

Arestad. Rick N.299, 593 

Arington. Roy E.275 

Ariwoola, Ademola A.434, 498, 562 

Arkills. Lisa M.598 

Armbruster, Becky L.453 

Armbruster. Gail M.343. 496, 535 

Armour. John E.379 

Armstrong, David D..381 

Armstrong, Michael J.299, 427 

Armstrong, Mike C.584 

Armstrong. Yvette M.280 

Arndt, Tod W.330 

Arnett. Douglas B.430 

Arnett, Thomas H.321 

Arney, Carrie M.520 

Arnold, Dale A.377, 434 

Arnold, Julie A.506 

Arnold. Nancy L.345, 543, 553 

Arnold, Robert K.257 

Arnold. Thomas W.407 

Arnold. Todd P.286 

Arrendale, Jon L.267 

Arsenault. Amy J..293, 426 

Arthur, Gregory D.330, 428 

Artz, William E.563 

Arviso, Alberta A.567 

Asawakul, Kanitha.284 

Ash. Beverly A.349, 458, 598 

Ash, Dean R.274, 279 

Ashburn, Gary.403 

Ashby, Jean E.554 

Ashitei, Ollenny.432 

Ashley, Dayle L..349, 466 

Asmussen, Jeny D.542 

Aspaas, Dena A.307, 589 

Aapaas, Kristen L.307, 589 

Aspen. Ted.434 

Aspitarte, Cindy J.293, 434, 459. 600 

Asplund, Nathan M.. 299, 309, 556, 591 

Atherton, Angela M.303 

Atherton, Theresa J.302 

Athukorala, Nuvan P.434, 547, 551 

Atkins, Don.319 

Atkins. Mary M.353 

Atkinson, Teresa L.434 

Atteberry, Kevin M.403. 577 

Attri, Bindu K.507 

Auckland, Tamra J.338. 343 

Auer. Brian M.550, 593 

Auer, Jonathan M.413 

Augustyniewicz, Stanle.323, 571 

Aukland, Tami.460 

Aune. Jeff E.377 

Austin, Glenn L.566 

Austin, Merilee S.262, 263 

Austin. Natasha R.434, 554 

Austin, Steven F.395 

Autrey, Tony D.299 

Auvil, Grady T.397 


Auvil. Theresa A.262 

Avery, Dwight S.405 

Avey, Arthur F.319 

Avila, Miguel J.331 

Awa, Jacqueline M.516, 538 

Axelson, Debra S.432 

Ax els on, John C.379 

Axelson, Steven W.540 

Axtman, Mary E.259, 423 


Bb 

Babbitt, Danielle J. 

.260. 465 

Babbitt, Teresa L. 

.363, 506 

Babcock. Christopher A.. 

.328 

Babcock, Susan E. 

.363, 449 

Babich, John P. Jr. 

.287 

Babich, Patricia E. 

..293, 448. 498 

Bach, Carl M. 

.274 

Bachman, Roger H. 

.434, 505 

Backstrom, Thomas J. 

.297 

Backus, Linda A. 

.431, 510 

Bacon, Heidi M. 

.265, 450 

Bacon. John M. 

.271 

Badger. Leslie L. 

.263, 452 

Baerveldt, Rebecca J. 

.335, 434 

Baeta Liz A . 

333 

Baffico, Gina A. 

.333 

Baggen. Elise M. 

.285, 502 

Bahrenburg, Kimberly J.. 

.591 

Bailey, Brad L. 

.381 

Bailey, Kelly J. 

.334 

Bailey, Rebecca A. 

.291 

Baillie, Mary A. 

.287 

Baird, Marlene E. 

.434 

Baird, Shelley C. 

.306, 458 

Baird, Tami L. 

.287 

Bakamis, Carolyn P. 

.562 

Baker. Brad S. 

.395 

Baker. Christopher H. 

.385 

Baker, Gary D. 

..301, 550, 551 

Baker, Johathan P. 

.272 

Baker, Kristine E. 

.332 

Baker, Matthew S. 

.331 

Baker, William 1. 

.598 

Bakken. David E. 

.524, 557 

Bakker, Wayne E. 

.300 

Balagat. Grace M. 

.398. 538 

Balch, Beverly D. 

.461 

Baldwin, Dale S. 

.542 

Baldwin, William. II. 

.421 

Bales, Robin G. 

.296 

Ball, Laura A. 

.306 

Ballard, Diane L. 

..343, 467, 520 

Ballata, Paul R. 

.289 

Ballbach, Crystal J. 

.505 

Ballou. James E. 1. 

.329 

Balmelli, Michael B. 

.397 

Balmer, Robert O. 

.298 

Balsiger, David P. 

.300 

Balzer, Jacqueline L. 

..307, 308, 566 

Bambrick, Bruce W. 

.274 

Bambrick, Doug. 

.200 

Bame, Michael L. 

.569 

Banaji, Nilufer. 

.326, 327 

Bangerter, Debbie E. 

.544 

Bangkona, Deri. 

.552 

Banister, Brent A. 

.337 

Banks, Rhonda L. 

.458 

Bannon, Pamela A. 

.264 

Barber, Carolyn Y.. 

.593 

Barber, J. Kevin. 

.336 

Barbieri, Daniel J. 

.266 

Barbo, Brad E. 

.417 

Bardo, Brad. 

.507 

Bardwell, Timothy A. 

.299 

Barela, Timothy A. 

.271 

Barker, Jeffrey S. 

.381, 520 

Barker, Jennifer J. 

.259 

Barker. Jeri A. 

.326 


Barlow. Arnold F. 

.266 

Barlow, Julie A. 

.302, 356 

Barnard, Clayton M. 

.540. 596 

Barnard. Robert J. 

.57C 

Barnecut, George D, III... 

.386 

Barner, Donna M. 

.566 

Barnes, Noel W. 

.434. 496 

Barnhart. James L. 

.506 

Barnhart, Jeffrey D. 

.266 

Barr. Betsy A. 

.347 

Barratt, James F. 

.4 OS 

Barraugh, William M. 

.271 

Barrentine, Cynthia A. 

.496 

Barrett. Brenda J. 

.280. 281 

Barrett, Christopher J. 

.321 

Barrett, Jeffrey S. 

.287. 290. 424 

Barrett. Jon S. 

.336 

Barrett. Judy R. 

.287 

Barrett. Heidi. 


Barrett, Mark L. 

.4ll 

Barrett, Michael S. 

.297 

Barron, Pamela F. 

.30S 

Barrows, Johnathan T. 

.551 

Barry, Michael E. 

.324 

Barstow. Scott A. 

.392 

Barta, Elizabeth A. 

.51 e 

Barth, Todd R. 

.377, 494 

Bartholf, David W. 

.29? 

Bartko, James A, 1. 

.381 

Bartko, Kimberly A. 

.365 

Bartleson, Dorinda L. 

.315, 318, 545 

Bartlett, Debora E. 

.31G£ 

Bartlett, Robert M. 

.26$ 

Barton, Blain A. 

.272, 571, 592 

Barton, Jill. 

.357 

Barton, Kathleen M. 

.359 

Baryshnikou, Mikhail. 

.33$ 

Baschen, Robert J. 

.297? 

Baserman, Garrett . 

.401 

Basil, Michael J. 

.395. 496 

Basore, Terri L. 

.457 

Bastron, Michael K. 

.263* 

Bastys. Mike E. 

.496 

Bates. Holly A. 

.334, 426. 

Bates, Laura A. 

.313, 318. 

Bates, Marc P. 

.563 

Bates, Robert B. 

.299 

Batte, Cherie E. 

.291i 

Batterberry, Thomas J. 

.407, 

Batterton, Debbie L. 

.365, 451 f 

Batterton, Laurie A. 

.365 

Batterton, Tracy A. 

.413 

Baffin, Apryl M. 

.347 

Batty, Cheryl C. 

.199 

Bauer, Antoinette M. 

.303 

Bauer, Brian H. 

.490 

Bauer, Gretchen Y. 

.367 

Bauer. Michael C. 

.5701 

Bauer, Steven B. 

.319 

Baugh. Patricia A. 

.361, 451. 591 

Baugh. Thomas W. 


Bauman. David R. 


Baumann, Eric J. 


Baumgardner, Anna Belle 

!.465 

Baumgartel. Susan L. 

.349, 515 

Baumgarten, David A. 

.511 

Baumgartner, Chris D. 

.293, 434, 


634,635 

Baumgartner, Tracy S. 

.434 

Baur, Kathleen J. 

.317, 434, 463 

Bawden, Pete G. 

.407 

Bay, Kevin A. 

.563 

Bay, Steven E. 

.268, 578 

Bayha, Julie M. 

.542 

Bayne. Margaret E. 

.546 

Bazaldua, Ben. 

.606 

Beach,Brian M. 

.413, 594 

Beach, Lee A . 

.277, 278 

Beacock, Gayle M. 

.347 

Beacock Russell K. 

.389 

Beal, Jackie L.502. 534, 554, 583 

Beal. Thomas T. 

.419 

Beall, Amanda J. 

.305; 

Bear, Max P. 

.292 

Bear Richie O. 

.258 

Beardemphl, Michelle A.. 

.333 

Beardsley, Deeann D. 

. 291, 367. 434 

Beardsley, Linda A. 

.326’ 

Beck, Andrea L. 

.313 

Beck. Christopher G. 

.432 




612 Index/1984 





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































eck, Robert M. 

.399 

ecker. Christine L. 

.293, 462 

ecker, Julie N. 

.306, 466 


.395 

ecker, Rita M. 

.458 

ecker, Robert C. 

.267 

•ecker, Teri L. 

.556 

ecktold. Kimberly J. 

.277 

•ecvar, Jacquelyn L. 

.430, 544 

-eddor, Sally L. 

.577 

Jedegi, Laszlo. 

.297, 427 


.441, 496 

fedrossian, Mary E. 

.309 

teebe, Daniel A. 

.399 

ieggs, Richard E. 

.323. 552 


.286 



tehler, Steven C. 

.284 

Jehm, Kenneth R, Jr. 

.288 

Jehrmann. Frederick P... 

.487 

tehymer. Bryan R. 

.300, 427 

Jeigerl, Harvey. 

.391,578 

Beimborn, Stacy A. 

.498 

teinner, Karen L. 

.365 


.537 

3ekey, Michael E. 

.336 

Belcher, Ellen E. 

.595 

Belgard, Erin C. 

.543 

Bell, Randall W. 

.301 

Sell, Robert 1. 

.395 

Sell, Shannon M. 

.309 

Bell. Tim C. 

.389 

Sellack, Daniel R. 

.430, 515 

3ellero, Susan R. 

.289, 466 


.336 

Bellinger. Sandra A. 

.286 

Belmondo. Brad J. 

...419, 498, 543 

Beman, Janell R. 

.333 

Benavides, Maria A. 

.493 

Bence, Christopher J. 

...288, 290, 572 

Bence. Michelle A. 

.434 

Bender. Charles R. 

.407 

Bender. Kathleen M. 

.357 

Bender, Robin M. 

...302. 309, 463 

Bender William H. 

.268 

Benedict. Kay A. 

.430, 535 

Bengelsdorf, John D. 

.331 

Bengert, Sharron J. 

.550 

Benjamin, Gary G. 

.286 

Bennett, Cathenne M. 

.293 

Bennett, David A. 

.395 

Bennett, Dawn M. 

.359, 590 

Bennett, Karen L. 

.264, 265 

Bennett, Laurel L. 

.312 

Bennett, Scott G. 

.542 

Bennett, September R... 

.305 

Bennett. Steven T. 

.275 

Bennett. Whitney A. 

.197,365 

Benoit, Michael G. 

.407 

Benoit, Rodney E. 

.284 

Benson, Carrie. 

.369 

Benson. Gerald H. 

.284, 425 

Benson, Jennifer L. 

.517 

Benson. Martin D. 

.515 

Benson, Paul P. 

.407 

Benson, Russell A. 

.379, 508 

Benson, Sarita M. 

.504 

Benson, Timothy A. 

.267 

Benton, Susan E. 

.357 

Berard, Jeffrey D. 

.266 

Berg, Bryce E. 

.417, 498 

Berg Gayfinn M. 

.317 

Berg Herbert M, Jr. 

.385 

Berg. Jodi 1. 

...277, 279, 450 

Berg Marie. 

.520 

Berg, Tandy C. 

.286 

Berge. Matt B. 

.399, 533 

Berger, Lisa A. 

.552 

Bergeron, Jeffrey M. 

.434 

Bergerson Jeff . 

.434 

Berget, Michelle A. 

.359 

Bergh, Jeanne M. 

.317 

Berghout Christopher.... 

.375 

Berghout. John L. 

.375 

Berghout, Paul A. 

.375 

Bergstresser, Evelyn L.. 

.264 

Bergstrom, Julie A. 

.305, 309 

Bergstrom, Kenneth J.... 

.536 

Berhow, Andrew H. 

.389, 561 

Berhow, Joel E. 

.561 

Bernard. Michael G. 

...434, 496, 498 

Bernard. Thomas C. 

..419, 498, 543, 


560 

Berndt, Mitchell J. 

.509 

Bernert. David C. 

.511, 515 

Berrie, Charles D. 

.557 

Berry, Debra K. 

.452 

Berry, Glenn D.. 

.274, 551 

Berry Laurie G. 

.367, 459 

Bertus, Holly A. 

.152 

Besel, Alan D. 

.391,507 

Besola, Amelia M.259, 423, 542, 549 

Besola, Julia L. 

....334, 426, 542 

Bethel, Elizabeth A. 

.365, 451 

Bethune, Bradley N. 

.381 

Bettger, Stephanie L. 

.333 

Bettinger, John G. 

.487 

Betz, Karen A. 

....307, 308, 589 

Betz, Teri J. 

.434, 566 

Bevier. Terence C. 

.321 

Beyl, Charles E. 

.519 


Bialek, Dawn M. 

.312, 359 

Bickford. Pauline D. 

.313 

Biegel, David R. 

.598 

Biegert, Kelly C. 

.334 

Bierlein, Sharon E. 

.315 

Biever. Christine M. 

.306 

Bigelis, William C. 

.508 

Biggs William D 

.383 

Bigham, Charles W. 

.320 

Bigler, Derek L. 

.385 

Bigler Peter C. 

.268. 424 

Bigler, Robert E, Jr. 

.268 

Biladeau, Dawn M. 

.518 

Bilderback, Jo Anne. 

.430, 549 

Binder, Lynn M. 

.359, 455 

Binder, Michael T. 

.493. 504 

Binkhuysen, Cor L. 

.498 

Birdsell. Alan C. 

.287 

Birk, Karen R. 

.434 

Bishop. Lori L. 

.307 

Bishop, Mark S. 

.266, 269 

Bissel, Bradley K. 

.413 

Bissell, Peter S. 

.274 

Bittner, Ambrose. 

.434, 508 

Bittner, Bud L. 

.434, 469 

Bittner, Lawrence W. 

.540 

Bjoostrup. Brian. 

.200 

Black, Jeffrey L. 

.205 

Black, Mary Jo E. 

.287 

Blackard, John K. 

.320 

Blakcman, Lome D. 

.544 

Blackstone, Donald W. 

.288 

Bladek, John D. 

.270 

Blair, Karen A. 

.333 

Blair, Pamela J. 

.332 

Blair, Terri S. 

.264. 265, 434 

Blair, Wayne D. 

.542 

Blake. Judy A. 

.369 

Blakesley, Linda J. 

.203, 288 

Blanc Bryan J. 

.496 

Blanc, Timothy J. 

.393 

Blankenbeker, Dean R.... 

.434, 572. 593 

Bfankenfeld, Kristi S. 

.291, 463 

Blase. Dan J. 

.391 

Blaser. Oscar M. 

.336 

Blaske, Scott E. 

.287 

Blatter, Erwin W. 

.419 

Blattner. Joseph D. 

.381 

Blaustein, Brian E. 

.587 

Blayden, Bruce W. 

.301 

Blazina, Shannon E. 

.293, 461 

Blechman. Lisa R. 

.454 

Bleecker, Jim L. 

.434 

Blehm, Hollie L. 

.313 

Blem, Kathleen A. 

.431 

Bliesner. Steven R. 

.379 

Block, David R. 

.336 

Blocker. Dewey H. Jr. 

.330 

Blomquist, Melanie R. 

.361, 458, 591 

Blomquist, Susan E. 

.365 

Bloom, Marc S. 

.409 

Bloom, Michelle L. 

.498 

Bloomster, Timothy C. 

.268, 424 

Blume, Jennifer L. 

.317 

Blumenschein. Michael.... 

.405, 498, 


538,540 

Blunck, Debra A. 

.312, 318 

Boatman, Alan R. 

.331 

Boccia, Kelly S. 

.347, 465 

Bocek, Molly S. 

.361 

Bocher, Shari. 

.495 

Bock, Gary L. 

.434 

Boczkiewicz, Cathy A. 

.522 

Bodenhamer, Brett A. 

.287 

Bodenman, Brad D. 

.554 

Bodine, Gregory L. 

.434 

Boe, Stephen E. 

.195, 419 

Boe Valerie D. 

.312. 428 

Boersma, Mark S. 

.319 

Boettcher, Leann M. 

.289 

Boeve, Mike R. 

.270 

Bogard, Bruce W. 

.201, 508 

Bogen, William A. 

.337 

Boggess, Elaine M. 

.264 

Boggs, Jeffrey W. 

..417 

Boggs, Kellie A. 

.326 

Boggs, Tammy K. 

.203 

Bohlke. Laura J. 

.'134, 503 

Bohlke, Stacey J. 

.302 

Boice, Craig D. 

.331 

Boje, Kim. 

.285 

Bolang, Lisa H. 

.359, 457 

Boldt Kevin A. 

.434 

Boles, Susan E. 

.258 

Bolinger, Jon P. 

.413 

Bolles, Scott A. 

.407. 543 

Bollinger. Lisa A. 

.361. 495 

Bollinger, Renee W. 

.262, 263 

Bolson, Sara R. 

.203, 525, 569 

Bolt. Gary A. 

.329 

Bomben. Craig R. 

.379 

Bombino, Paul A. 

.272 

Bomkamp, Valerie J. 

.291 

Bommersbach, Andrew P 

.434 

Bond, Matthew M. 

.268, 269 

Bondy. Christopher E. 

.270 

Bone Kenneth E. 

.395 

Bonham. Bret A. 

.409 

Boocher’ Shari L. 

.461 

Book, Sandra L. 

.361 


Boon, Jill M.365 

Booth. Brenda J. 264, 265 

Booth, David C.431, 520, 540 

Booth, Elizabeth A.551 

Borchard, Rhonda C.351, 565 

Borchert, R. Paul.417 

Borders. David W.298 

Borgford, Theresa L.343, 457 

Bork, Steven C.285, 507 

Bornstein, Heidi A.199. 345 

Borozan, Karen E.333 

Borozan, Lisa K.355 

Borselli, Gregg A.328 

Borselli, Mark J.428. 434, 498 

Borst. Lisa A.286, 425 

Boss, Beverly D.541, 598 

Boswell. Alin R.268 

Both. Bradley W.270, 273 

Bottemiller, Mark R.434 

Boucher, Lisa D.570 

Boucher. Mark E.274, 279, 511 

Boucher. Shari L.534 

Bouck, Daniel S.320 

Boudwin, Lawrence N.583 

Boulanger, Stephen L.199 

Boulton, Ken O.516 

Bourgette, Bradley M.290 

Bourn, Joy M.449 

Boutillier, James M.389 

Bovaird, Kathleen A.432 

Bowen. Cynthia L.261 

Bower, Gregory J.434 

Bowers. Jane D.338 

Bowie, Patricia E.498 

Boyce, Jeffrey A.544 

Boyce, Mark D.389 

Boyce. Richard D.393 

Boyd. Christal D.538 

Boyd. Diana L.369 

Boyd, Joan M.338, 429, 468 

Boyd, Joan.569 

Boyd. Todd A.205. 538, 571 

Boyden, Paula S.293 

Boydston, Anthony P.393 

Boydstun, Launa J.431 

Boyer. Elizabeth A.549 

Boyle, Kelly.551 

Boyles, Karen A.312, 318 

Boyne, Bryan K.502 

Bozanic. Cathy L.315. 460 

Bozick, Stephen G.434, 498, 580 

Bozo. Cynthia.279, 522 

Braas, Nancy A.554 

Brackett. Greg C.393 

Bradbury. Amy L.292. 465 

Braddock, Catherine M.304 

Braden, Kate A.292, 456, 589 

Braden, Therese A.504, 551 

Bradford, Kimberly R.517 

Bradham. Barbara C.201, 260 

Bradley, Charles T.336 

Bradley, John W.413 

Bradley, Mary-Jo.316 

Bradley. Steven M.427 

Bradshaw, Myong-Hui.326 

Brady, Donald L.297 

Brady, Laura M.577 

Brady, Michael D.434 

Brand, Jeffrey S.272 

Brandes. Diane N.287, 347 

Brandt, Darcy J.338 

Brandt, Douglas E.577 

Brandt, Jack E.319 

Brandt, Leonard A.296 

Brandvold, Teresa L.347 

Bratcher, Kevin S.298 

Bratvold, Ellen B.452. 504, 551. 553 

Brauer, Robert M.487 

Braun, Lisa A.332 

Braun. Timothy E.515 

Braunstein. Ken C.330 

Brauti, David F.393 

Bray, Daniel J.421 

Brazier, Thomas R..196, 399 

Breaker, Stephanie M.314 

Breard, David B.502 

Breard, Lynne M.347 

Breaux, Brenda J.520, 636 

Bredahl, Donna L.520, 552 

Bredberg, Bryan R.557 

Brehm, Molly M.287, 425 

Breitenbach, Catherine.432, 505, 595 

Breitenbach, Janet L.260, 261, 456. 

541, 546, 591 

Breitenstein, Bryce D.401, 498 

Breivik, Hans A.403 

Brems, Lisa-Marie.276, 461 

Brendgard, William R.427, 540 

Brennan, Mark W.336 

Brenner, Kristen E.326, 327, 546 

Brentin, Patrick.375 

Brewer, Earl E. 194 

Brewer, Kenneth M.385, 560 

Brewer, Robert A..299 

Brewster, Denise A.315, 460 

Bricker, Stephen P.331, 571 

Bridges. David K.331 

Briggs, Jane M.264 

Bright, Julie E.265 

Bright, Tony C.297, 427, 469 


Brincken, Susan L.258, 423, 467 

Brink. Gregory D.272, 571. 606 

Brinson. Dan W.267 

Brinson. Duane A.544 

Brtslawn, Virginia M.343. 463. 498. 

560, 591, 594 
Bristow, Robert J.520, 553, 594 


Brito, Kenneth L. 

.’.515 

Brix, Amy E. 

.338, 434 

Brocado, Claudia G. 

.503 

Brocard, Nancy L. 

.288 

Brole, Robert K. 

.571 

Brocket!, Mitch D. 

.401 

Brockmeyer, James M .. 

.504 

Brockway. Michael A.... 

.331 

Brodeck, Ken R. 

.385 

Brodhun, Karie R. 

.345 

Brodvik, Julie A. 

.199 

Broeckel, Janet A. 

.334, 426, 450 

Brohan. Lynn P. 

.434. 566 

Bromley, John P. 

.267 

Bronsch, Broderick A.... 

.329 

Bronson, Charles G. 

.316 

Brooke, William T. 

.504 

Brookie, Kimberly R. 

.363 

Brooking, Arthur W. 

.300 

Brooks, Charlotte L. 

.363, 465 

Brooks. Kelly M. 

.303 

Brooks, Mairi M. 

.262 

Brossard, John M. 

.516 

Brothers, Michael J. 

.288 

Brougher, Craig W. 

.330 

Brouillard. Mary M. 

.369, 456, 560 

Browder. Robin R ....455, 534, 591, 602 

Browitt, James E. 

.399 

Brown, Aaron F. 

.286 

Brown, Alan R. 

.498 

Brown, Allen J. 

.520 

Brown, Barry S. 

.320, 589 

Brown, Daniel M. 

.507 

Brown, Dianne M. 

.300 

Brown, Donald C. 

.320 

Brown, Eline M. 

.260. 261 

Brown, Frances A. 

.434 

Brown, Gregory G. 

.399 

Brown, Gregory T. 

.572, 593 

Brown, James P. 

.300 

Brown, Jeffrey W. 

.267, 424 

Brown, Keith D. 

.322 

Brown, Kevin S. 

.379 

Brown. Mark A. 

.300 

Brown. Mark R. 

.275 

Brown. Martin R. 

.452, 553 

Brown, Michael P. 

.504 

Brown, Milton W. 

.270 

Brown, Nance J. 

.313 

Brown, Nancy L. 

.294 

Brown, Paul A. 

.519 

Brown, Peggy L. 

.261 

Brown, Raymond E. 

.391 

Brown, Raymond M. 

.434, 493 

Brown, Richard C. 

.199 

Brown, Roland C. 

.379, 540 

Brown, Ryan K. 

.299 

Brown, Sharon L. 

.519. 551 

Brown, Shelly R. 

.546 

Brown, Steven C. 

.407 

Brown, Steven P. 

.266 

Brown, Susan E. 

.343, 461 

Brown, Suzanne M. 

.430. 584 

Brown, Thomas C. 

.405. 519 

Brown, Thomas J. 

.329 

Brown, Tim D. 

.379, 561 

Brown, Todd D. 

.379 

Brown, Todd F. 

.274 

Brownlee, Douglas G.... 

.341 

Brownlow, John. 

.434 

Bruce. Grant H. 

.555 

Bruce, Robert K. 

.272 

Bruce. Scott M.288. 540, 560. 593 

Brudvik Juli A. 

.520, 536 

Brumbach, David M. 

.552 

Brumblay, Jennifer. 

.365 

Brundage, Neil P. 

.434 

Brunner, Jackie D. 

.361 

Bruno, Michelle E. 

.314,318 

Brunton. Rebecca A. 

.517 

Bruser, Glen. 

.511 

Bruya, Richard M. 

.271 

Bryan Todd J. 

.268. 424 

Bryant Danial A. 

.541. 561 

Bryant, Linda D. 

.434 

Bryant Lisa M. 

.264 

Bryce, Beth A. 

.338 

Buchanan. Patricia R... 

.365 

Buchanan, Paula D. 

.434 

Buchanan, Scot J. 

.266 

Buchea, Bruce M. 

.411 

Buchea. Collette J. 

.363 

Bucher, Darsi D. 

.434 

Richer Scott K. 

.299 

Buchmore, Brian. 

.330 

Buck Kathleen L. 

.498 

Buckholz, Kimber L. 

.434 

Buckingham, Steve A.. 

.417 

Bucklen, Dave J. 

.379 

Buckley. Jody R. 

.434, 557 

Bucklin, Dave S. 

.434. 520 

Buckmiller, Joe J. 

.515 


Buel. Richard D.299 

Buhler. Kathleen M.313 

Bujacich, Charlene M.334, 426 

Bulat. Laurie L.259 

Buldhaupt, Elizabeth 1.306, 309 

Bull. Nathalie L.434. 517, 592. 634, 

635, 636, 640 

Bull, Tracy A.434 

Bull. Troy D.434 

Bullock. Renee D.304. 309. 457 

Bunce, Barbara L.369 

Bunch, Beverly J.560 

Bungcayao. Dominic A.434, 498 

Bunker, Patricia K.332 

Bunn, Doriann.572, 593 

Bunn. Jerry T.515 

Bunnell. Thomas A.417 

Buratto, Ann E.365 

Burch, Andrew P.331 

Burcham, Dondi A.515, 550 

Burchett Stephen D.275 

Burdick. Jill C.343 

Burdick. Katherine N.333, 363 

Burger. David M.570 

Burgess, James M.321 

Burgess, Kristi J.302, 458 

Burgio, Sunny M.520, 561 

Burk, Mikelanne.333 

Burke, James W.413 

Burke, John L.434, 634, 635, 636 

Burke, William E.541 

Burks, Andrea L.333 

Burks, Bruce J.385 

Burks. Julie M.304 

Burks. Lisa R.304 

Burks, Mark C.409, 572 

Burlingame, Sheri L.343 

Burma, Karin J.365 

Burmester, Robert J.515 

Burn, Linda S.317 

Burnett, James A.330 

Burns. Barrett B.337 

Burns, Brad J.385 

Burns, Brian C.274, 279 

Burns, Cheryl L.293, 462 

Burns, Christine M.307 

Burns, Dawn M.465 

Burns, Kimberly A.458 

Burns, Kristine M.516 

Burns, Laura E..357 

Burns, Marc P.299, 555 

Burpee. Machelle M.316, 578 

Burris, Eben M.403 

Burris, Michele M.572 

Burrows. Kevin R.515 

Burrows. Michael D.331 

Burt, Alex R.550 

Burt. Deborah M.432, 566 

Burton. Brian D.519 

Burton. Shelitha M.326 

Burwash, Mary E.494 

Busch, Barbara D.291 

Busch, Kimberly A.353 

Busch, Robert T.330 

Busch, Sandra J. 514 

Bush, Carra L.576 

Bushnell, David D.427 

Busse, Jennifer S.345 

Bussey. Laura K.361, 520, 594 

Bustami, Masril.552 

Bustetter. Kerry L.561 

Butaud, Chris G.393, 498 

Butaud, Gary V.393 

Butaud, Sheri C.306 

Butcher. Susan R.338, 339. 429, 591 

Butler, Amy M.435 

Butler, Darin R.585 

Butler, Jeff M.520, 563 

Butler, Joyce R.292 

Butler, Lori K.280. 456 

Buur, Kimberly A.259 

Buxton. Cheryl A.363, 454 

Byers. Merry L.259 

Byington, Barry M.329 

Byquist, Tod A.298 

Byrd. David W.435. 503. 577 

Byrd. James A.266 

Byrd, Leisa M.309 

Byrd, Ray E.289 

Byrne. Enn A.349. 591 

Byrne, Melinda T.602 


Cc 


Cabalce. Arlene.538, 565, 567, 604 

Cabanilla, Cherry L.312 

Cacatian, Joseph A.267, 424, 538 

Cachero, Paul Q.301 

Cadd, Susan C.365 

Caddey, Eric L.522 

Cahoon, Teresa L.365, 465 

Cain, Anthony G.275 

Cain, Rob C.271 


1984/Index 613 
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Caine, Carmen M.264, 583 

Caldwell, Merrie C.277, 278, 279 

Caldwell, Patrick G.299 

Calhoun, Dave R.411 

Calhoun, Susan K.313 

Calkins. Autumn L.258 

Calkins. Brian M.435 

Calkins, Rocky L.538 

Call, Gregory J.383 

Call, Melaine A.526 

Callahan. Donna D.201, 435 

Callahan, Scott G.435 

Callen, Charles E.435 

Callies, Craig J.274, 279, 576 

Calmus, Kevin J.510 

Calrissian, Char.318 

Calvin, Andrea B.203, 291 

Calvin, John C.427 

Camacho, Richard J.337 

Cameron. Brent J.377, 494 

Cameron. Todd C.290, 594 

Cammack. Heidi S.367 

Camp, Melissa A.361, 504 

Camp, Timothy J.300. 589 

Campau, Daniel B.557 

Campbell, Cynthia L.276 

Campbell, Darin R.331. 428 

Campbell, Kelli S.326, 335, 566 

Campbell, Kenneth W.266, 269 

Campbell, Kevin G.498 

Campbell, Kim D.435 

Campbell. Kristin L.260, 261 

Campbell, Margaret S.505 

Campbell, Megan T.333, 335 

Campbell, Pamela J.333 

Campen, Cathy A.606 

Canaan, Michael J.545 

Cane, Chris E.259, 549 

Cannell, John J.419 

Canned. Tom R.419, 525 

Cannon. Diane M.435 

Canon, George A.424 

Canova, Josh B.397 

Cappetto, Tony M.407 

Capriola. Laurie J.365 

Carbaugh, Joan F.355, 448 

Carbon, Catherine A..361 

Carbone. Carmen J.196, 365 

Carbone, Christine J.338 

Card, Steven A.299 

Carder, James K.435, 542 

Cardon, Andrea L.292 

Carefoot, Brent F.498 

Carey, John G.272, 583 

Cariker, Dawn M.466 

Carissimo. Kama H.361 

Carissimo, Taunia M.361, 465 

Carle, Ray A.286 

Carleton, Bruce C.550 

Carlile, Michael R.301 

Carlin, John R.515 

Carlisle, Lenor J.338 

Carlos, David D.435, 520 

Carlos, Edgardo D.520 

Carlsen, Colleen G.276, 341, 540, 

593 

Carlson, Anthony K.320, 536 

Carlson, Christine M...195 

Carlson, Christopher R.399, 469, 

505, 564 

Carlson, David B.397 

Carlson, Donna L.591 

Carlson, Eric A.383 

Carlson, Jodi L.355, 467, 577 

Carson, Julie A.304 

Carlson, Karen M.359 

Carlson, Kelli A.355 

Carlson, Richard D.272 

Carlson, Scott A.325 

Carlson, Steven F.274, 375 

Carlson, Susan L.435 

Carlsson, Maria E.285 

Carlton, Kenneth D.301, 428 

Carman, Traci A.458 

Carmean, Mari J.496, 544 

Carmical, Michael H.N.270 

Carmody, Daniel J.407 

Carnell. Brenda L.351 

Cames, Gordon P.268, 424 

Carney, Benjamin L.329 

Carney, Hugh J.306 

Carney, Laura J.284 

Caro, Craig A.286 

Carolus, Charla R.435 

Carothers. Becky A.435 

Carothers, Jan T.435 

Carpenter. Carole F.338, 429, 

570, 595 

Carpenter. Edward J.336 

Carpenter, Elaine C.326, 327, 495 

Carpenter, Jennifer S.361, 455 

Carpenter, Kevin J.„,.430 

Carpenter, Nathan E.321 

Carpenter, Shiela M.260 

Carpinito, Angela M.313 

Carr, Carolyn L.506 

Carr, Christopher S.286 

Carr, Debra L.435 

Carr, Jeffrey P.329 

Carr, Jonathan P.267, 424 


Carl, Mark. 

Carr, Stephanie L. 

.435 

.287 

Chin. Natalie J. 

Chinanzvavana, Stephen 

.538 

.496 

Carrillo, Carol J. 

...312, 318, 598 

Chittick. Brian S. 

.205, 397 

Carrithers. Robert D. 

.432 

Chitty, Tamara D. 

260 261 462 

Carrothers, Kevin M. 

.199, 266 

Choate David L 

395 469 

Carstens, Randy J. 

.536 

Choi In S 

498 

Carstensen, Kristi A. 

.332 

Chokshi Anil K 

284 435 502 

Carter, Andre D.. 

.297 

Chourre Ceci S. 

199 289 

Carter. Dana D. 

.305, 308 

Chow, Dao M. 

.’ 507 

Carter, Kirsten L. 

.357 

Chow, Rita. 

.503, 558 

Carter. Rebecca M. 

.464, 545 

Chrisman. Jessica A. 

.359 

Carter, Sharie L. 

.541 

Christ Alfred R 

487 57? 

Carter, Suzan S. 

..498 

Christensen Cheryl L 

577 

Cartier. Curt J. 

.297 

Christensen, Craig R. 

.409, 994 

Cartozian, Julianne M . .. 

.307, 589 

Christensen, Jill C. 

.302 

Carver, Curtiss D. 

.553 

Christensen John 1 

288 

Carver, Dwane A. 

.385 

Christensen, Kimberly.. 

.317 

Casali, Dick R. 

.578 

Christensen Kirk N 

202 

Cascio, Dana M. 

.363 

Christenson, Jeff P. 

.381 

Case, Jennifer L. 

.303, 308 

Christenson, Roxanne G 

.353 

Case, Kerryn L. 

.361, 463 

Christiansen, Dawn M. 

.280, 545 

Casebier, David S. 

.319, 325 

Christiansen Jennifer 

304 453 

Casebier, Joel K. 

.375 

Christiansen, Susie. 

.353] 463 

Casebolt, Zelda D. 

.314, 428 

Christianson, Dessiree. 

.341 

Casey. Dana H. 

.314, 577 

Christianson, Dianne E.... 

.338, 452, 544 

Casey, Shannon L. 

.270 

Christie Janet M 

496 

Casey, William S. 

.298 

Christman Sophia 1 

?87 

Casper, Edward T . 

.329 

Christoph, Calvin J. 

.498 

Casperson. Cristi L. 

.334, 465 

Chrush, Tracy J. 

. 203 305 

Cass, Calece D. 

...201, 431. 551 

Chua. Paylee. 

.558 

Cass, David S. 

.287 

Church, Gregory M. 

. 498 

Cass, Elizabeth A. 

.431 

Church, Timothy J. 

561 

Casserd, Robert A. 

.520 

Chvatal, Edward F. 

.430, 493 

Castaldi. Mark A. 

.552 

Cichocki, Sonia S . .. . 

496 

Casteel, Shelly K. 

.313 

Clagg, Diana L. 

.264. 265 

Castleberry, Joseph J.... 

.270 

Clancy, Colleen A. 

.353, 463 

Castleberry, Kelli J. 

.367, 452 

Clare, Wesley J.275, 328, 560, 571 

Castrey, Tara J. 

.276 

Clark. Ca/I W. 

.288 

Castrey, Tilly M. 

.292, 952 

Clark, Clifton L. 

.375, 503 

Castrilli, Laura C. 

.334 

Clark, Connie L . 

493 

Catey, Thomas J. 

.271 

Clark, Derek P.. 

.432, 508 

Catey, William P. 

.518 

Clark, Holly A. 

.264 

Catlin, Krista J. 

.259 

Clark Jill M 

357 

Caton, Nancy A. 

.363 

Clark, Jody M. 

.304 

Catt, Kerry D. 

.298 

Clark, Michael J . 

417 

Caudill, David S. 

.304 

Clark, Stephen H. 

.409 

Cavaletto. Allan D. 

.411 

Clarke, Andrew 

284 

Cavanagh, Robert E. 

...409, 498, 543 

Clarke, David J. 

.381 

Cavanagh, Susan M. 

.292 

Clarke, Edward J. 

.271, 584 

Cave, James A. 

.275 

Clarke, Ellen M. 

.361, 524 

Caviezel. Karen A. 

...332, 359, 577 

Clarke, Jeff G. 

.425 

Caviness. Gary O. 

.563 

Claudon, Lori E. 

.349 

Cawley, Brent E. 

.385 

Clausen Scott D. 

419 

Cearlock. Jody R. 

.435 

Clawson, Edward C. 

.322 

Cecil, Gary D. 

.580 

Clawson, Randy E. 

.498 

Cedergren, Brian C. 

.379 

Clayton Bradley D 

285 

Cederholm. John F. 

.284 

Clein, Laura J. 

.347, 504, 538 

Cerjan, David M. 

.331 

Clemen, Annemarie T. 

.307 

Cerqui, Michele L. 

.363 

Clement Albert J 

403 

Cervarich, Caroline A.... 

.290 

Clement, Cindy L. 

.277 

Cervarich, John, III. 

.419 

Cleveland, Andrea R. 

.338, 340, 

Chaffee, Melinda S. 

.280, 549 


460, 535 

Chalich, Michael J....393, 469, 519, 538 

Cleveland, Linda G. 

.361, 495, 534 

Chamberlain, Roger J ... 

.435, 507 

Clifton, James L. 

.564 

Chambers, Kevin. 

.274 

Clifton, Neil A. 

.385 

Chambers, Peter J. 

.399 

Cline, Lloyd E. 

435 

Chambers. Susan M. 

.426 

Cline, Troy A. 

.435. 487, 522 

Chambers, Thomas C... 

.319 

Clingan, Carol A. 

. 504 

Chan, Christopher E. 

.496 

Clogston David A .. 

385 

Chan. Mong T. 

.498 

Clos, William R. 

.507 

Chance, Mark J. 

.389, 538 

Coats. Kevin P. 

.375 

Chandler, Cindy L. 

.290 

Cobain, Scott A. 

.290 

Chandler, Deborah J. 

.435, 494, 

Cobb, Melaine A. 

.365 

634-636. 638-639 

Cobb, Teresa A. 

.316 

Chandler, Kelly M .... 432. 520, 536, 569 

Coble, Lisa A. 

.435. 510, 570 

Chanlatte, Jesus M. 

.606 

Cochran, Jerry L. 

.298, 578 

Channing, Susan M. 

.280 

Cochran, John H. 

.541 

Chapel, Lee W. 

.323, 325 

Cockhurn Steven R 

403 504 

Chaplin, Joel S. 

.407 

Cockill, Jeff A. 

..297 

Chapman, Brett. 

.401 

Coddington, Dianne M. 

.289, 425, 598 

Chapman, Kimberley C. 

.515 

Coddington, Sara C. 

369, 520, 553, 

Chapo, Corinna L. 

.293 


561,594 

Chappell, Janine L. 

.338 

Coriiga Craig P 

298 

Chaput, Robert B. 

.323, 325 

Coe, E)i§a R. 

.361 

Chara, Steve. 

.413 

Coe Matthew J 

413 533 538 

Charles, Toby. 

.267 

Coe Stanley R 

403 634-635 

Charlton, Glen M. 

.288 


’ 638-639 

Charlton, Josephine A... 

.450 

Coelho, Jean M. 

435 

Charlton, Mark A. 

.564 

Coffelt Silvie A L 

332 

Chavey, Jeanne M. 

.549 

Cogan, Mike P. 

.435 

Chea, Montha. 

.314, 428 

Cohn Lisa G 

522 

Cheah, Kuan Y. 

.266 

Cok, Sandra L . .. 

.. 334 

Cheek, Brian D. 

.577 

Colby, Scott A. 

.321 

Cheek, Craig R. 

.389 

Cole, Angela M. 

.506 

Cheesman, Mary A. 

.369, 456 

Cole, Barbara L. 

.326. 598 

Cheesman, Monty C. 

.419, 525, 

Cole, Brynn E. 

.435, 566 


537, 560 

Cole, Daniel A. 

.267 

Chen, Eddy. 

.231 

Cole, James R. 

.508 

Cheney, Katherine A. 

.292 

Cole. Kevin J.301, 519, 538, 540 

Cheney, Ronald G. 

.272 

Cole, Stacy Y. 

.280 

Cheng, Allen T. 

.435 

Colfelt, Sharon E... 

.291 564 

Cheong, Kwok M. 

.323, 435 

Colgren Andrea L 

435 542 549 

Cherberg, Teri. 

.357 

Collier, Samuel S. 

..’..329 

Cherian, Jacob T. 

.284 

Collingham, Mark E. 

.200, 385 

Chess, James A. 

.403, 498 

Collins Deana M 

365 

Chestnut, Darin J. 

.419, 538 

Collins, Julie L. 

.306, 309, 459 

Chiarovano. Toni M .. 

.. 353 

Collins Richard R 

381 

Childers, Darci L.341, 520, 553, 594 

Collins, Robert R. 

.337, 429 

Chilton, Mary A. 

.306 

Collins, Robin A. 

.510 

Chin, Karol J. 

...565, 567, 604 

Collins, Stephen S. 

.268 


Collins. Wendi A. 

.467 

Collman. James W. 

.379 

Colton, Stacey R. 

.367, 468 

Colville, Susan C. 

.458 

Colvin, Gregory A. 

.267, 424 

Colwell, Kristi L. 

.367 

Combes, Brian A. 

.407 

Combs, John W, Jr. 

.435 

Commodore, M.J. 

.323 

Conde, Kris A. 

.334, 335, 554 

Conder, Michelle A. 

.523 

Condotta, Robert J. 

.435 

Cone. Ronald E. 

.403 

Conforti. Stephen M. 

.409. 498 

Conger. James M. 

.331 

Conger, Julia L. 

.290 

Conklin, Lewis A. 

.266, 435 

Conley. Scott K. 

.381, 498, 554 

Conley, Tonya A. 

.334, 426 

Connell, Michael C. 

.381, 560 

Connelly, Eric D. 

.323 

Connelly, Michael J. 

.383 

Connor, Brett M. 

.383 

Connor, Jean M. 

.332 

Connors, Mike. 

.587 

Consalus, Carl G. Jr. 

.435, 515 

Consalus, Susan L. 

.435 

Conway. Daniel T. 

.268 

Conway, Stephen J. 

.407 

Cook, Brian M. 

.320 

Cook. Carol E. 

.369 

Cook, Colleen M. 

.289 

Cook, Julie A. 

.314, 453 

Cook. Kevin D. 

.550 

Cook, Martha A. 

.369, 456 

Cook. Paula M. 

.430 

Cook Randal J 

435 510 

Cook, Sigmund K. 

.267! 330 

Cook, Tammy J. 

.495, 570 

Cook, William S. 

.515 

Cooke, James T. 

.397 

Cooke, Warren A. 

.299 

Cooke, William L.. 

.397 

Cooker. Alison N. 

.363 

Cookman, Thomas P... 

.322 

Cooksey, Susan J. 

.280 

Cool, Kim J. 

.306, 463 

Cooley. Craig P. 

.267 

Cooley, James T. 

.435 

Cooley. Mark E. 

.407 

Cooley. Ted. 

.524 

Coonc. Melody M. 

.570 

Cooney, Caroline. 

.435, 516 

Coonrad, Craig D. 

.542 

Cooper, Carri K. 

.430, 498 

Cooper, Derick E. 

.270 

Cooper, Mary J. 

.336, 549 

Cooper, Perry R. 

.300 

Cope, Todd E.. 

.272 

Copenhagen, Carla J... 

.196, 367 

Copin. Charlotte M. 

.334, 585 

Coppinger, Deslie C. 

.307, 448, 577 

Coppock, Catherine A. 

.262 

Corbett, Jeffrey L. 

.395, 413 

Corbett, Karen A. 

..338, 577 

Cordt, Christopher... 


Corey, Russell P. 

.487. 494 

Corigliano, Bruce B-.. 

.542 

Corliss, Bryan C. 

.266 

Corliss, Kevin A. 

.300 

Coronado. Anselmo C. 

.331 

Corrigan, Kimberly E ... 

.280, 281, 565 

Corwin. Kevin A. 

.413, 469 

Corwin, Raymond O.... 

.201, 584 

Cosacchi. Sheila A. 

.292, 465 

Coss, Teresa L. 

.345, 520, 538 

Cossano, Jennifer L. 

.203, 338 

Cossano. Peggy A. 

.260, 261 

Cossett, Jeffery N. 

.329 

Costa, Donn C. 

.379 

Costello, Mark F. 

.413 

Cotton. Richard D. 

.570 

Cottrell. Jane L. 

.544 

Coughlan, Susan K. 

.307, 309 

Coughlin, Christopher.. 

.337 

Coulter, Ann M. 

.559 

Coulter, Rose M. 

.359,-457 

Coulter. Susan E. 

.519 

Coupe. Lyn M. 

.294 

Coursey, Dru A. 

.305, 308 

Courtright. Edward B... 

.377 

Courtright, John C. 

.542 

Coury, David M. 

.413. 580 

Covert. Steven S. 

.274, 279 

Covington, Jennifer L... 

.355, 451 

Cowan, Jill M. 

.277, 435 

Cowan, Kenneth F. 

.508 

Cowan, Richard M. 

.310 

Cowan, Robert J. 

.405 

Cowan, Stephen T. 

.502 

Coward, Jennifer A. 

.307, 347 

Cox, Audrey E. 

.517 

Cox, Carl D. 

.337 

Cox, Christel R. 

.309 

Cox, Diane D. 

.463 

Cox, Dianne M. 

.304 

Cox, Jeffrey A. 

.270, 572, 593 

Cox, Kristi M. 

.313 

Cox, Randy B. 

.389. 520 

Coxey, Greg B. 

.397 


Coxey, Jeff B. 

Cozzetto, Steven B. 

Crabb, Diane J. 

Crader, William D.. 

Craig, Connie M. 

Craig, Debra J. 

Craig, Laura A. 

Crain, Kristin A. 

Crain, Tracy M. 

Cramer, Cristi D. 

Crandall, Darolyn M. 

Crandall, Debora A. 

Crandell. Debbie L. 

Crane, Margaret R. 

Crane. Melissa J. 

Cranefield. Lisa A. 

Cranfill, Carolyn L. 

Crapser, Sandra L. 

Crawford, Andrew C. 

Crawford. Kevin J. 

Crawford, Rhonda D. 

Crawford, Roger H. 

Creagan, Jon P. 

Creager. Dave L. 

Creasia, Tom M. 

Creelman, Suzanne M.... 

Crefeld, Lisa R... 

Creighton, Carolyn S. 

Creighton. Kristie A. 

Crem, Kimberly. 

Cresap, Tanya K. 

Crews, Katherine H. 

Crick, Jodi K. 

Crider, Anna S. 

Crider, Craig W. 

Crimps, Elizabeth A. 

Cripe. James A. 

Crisifulli, Sara L. 

Crisler, Shawnette L. 

Crisostomo. Michael J.... 

Crist, Kimberley K. 

Critchlow, Mark G. 

Crites, Michelle R. 

Crites, Shelly G. 

Crockett, Anita K. 

Crockford, Vanessa A. 

Croll, Thomas J. 

Crollard, Dennis M. 

Cromer, Lynnette M. 

Crook, Douglas R. 

Crook, Harold D. 

Crook, Heather J. 

Crook, M. Colleen. 

Cross, Abby J. 

Cross, Kerby A. 

Cross, Kimberly J. 

Cross, Leanna F. 

Crossen, Michael S. 

Crotty, Colleen T. 

Crow, Dana L. 

Crow, Gene F. 

Crow, Marlin E. 

Crowder. Leslie E. 

Crowe, Dick R. 

Crowed, Kristine L. 

Crowley, Kenneth C. 

Crowley, Rod S. 

Crudge, Natalie A. 

Cruickshank, Rebecca A 

Crush, Tracy. 

Cruz, Jesse T. 

Cruz. Roxana L. 

Cude, Sandra L. 

Culanag, Anthony M. 

Culleeny, Patricia M. 

Culler, Paul B. 

Culver, Galen T. 

Cummings, Bryan E. 

Cummings, Gregory S.... 

Cummins, Erin G. 

Cummins, Heather J. 

Cunningham, Diane S.... 

Cunningham, Holly J. 

Curran, David R. 

Curran, Kathy A. 

Curry, Donald L. 

Cuny, Shannon B. 

Curtis, Carol L. 

Curtis, Joan M. 

Curtis, Michael G. 

Cushing, Robert D. 

Cushing, Scott L. 

Cushman, Steven R. 

Custer, Richard W. 

Cusworth, James E. 

Cutler, Jace C. 

Cutler. Kindra E. 



.4358 

.519E 

.552v 

.338, 555 

.515 

.196, 365, 455 

.563 

.306, 309 

.314, 542 

.300V 

.286 

.294 

.274 

.274 

.284, 545 

.435 

.544 

.409 

.332 

.369, 498 

.. 284 

.264 

.343 

.267 

.319 

.462 

.407 

.260 

.600 

.435. 564 

.276, 279 

.570 

.460 

.329 

.333 

.494 

.. 300 

.305 

.435 

.561, 594 

.300, 389, 540 

.498 

.. 524 

.204, 426 

.265 

.430, 520, 536 

.202 

.498 

.435 

.272 

.514 

.369, 449, 568 

.399 

.. 430 

.417 

.266 

.337 

.322 

.403 

.302 


Dd 


Dabakis, Krista J...326 

Dabrock, Daniel W.297 

Dacar, Donna A.550 

Dacosta, Noelle C.259 

Daggett, Diane G.435, 584 


614 


Index /1984 



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Daggett. Kevin S.341. 405 

Dagle, Laura J.351, 509, 551 

Gagnon. Laurie M.357 

pahl, Daniel W.428 

Dahl. David P.J.196. 419 

pahl, David R.509 

Dahl, EricT.323 

Dahl. Jeff D.549 

Dahl, Kevin R.375, 407 

Dahl. Laura L.317, 353, 463 

Dahlin, Patricia A.263, 361, 577 

Dahlke, Paul E.300 

Dahlquist, Jeff G.389 

Dahlquist, Lori A.292, 295 

Dahlstrom. Collette.594 

Dahmen. David F.435 

Dahmen, Douglas P.550 

Daida, Edric R.271, 424 

Dale, Diana L.•..524 

Dalessandro, Richard J.268, 589 

Dating, Wendy K.432, 544 

Dalke, Tammy L.306, 456 

Dally, Kurt P.299 

Dalton, Matthew G.301, 428 

Dalton, Richard K.300 

Daly, Brian A.331 

Damiano, David M.430, 508 

Damis, Louis F.569 

Danaher, Patricia L.285 

Dang, Long P.272 

Daniel, Phillip 1.268 

Daniels, Patrick M.435, 590 

Daniels, Shane D.589 

Daniels, William A. 590 

Danielson, Brian W.194 

Danielson, Erik D.296, 427 

Danielson, Gary K.337 

Danielson, Kathleen E.268, 359, 468 

Danielson, Tamara M.294, 426, 552 

Danlstrom, Collette.546 

Danly, Diane L.550 

Dannert, Debra S.363, 465, 498, 799 

Daquila, Mark N.300 

Darbous. James P.534 

Darcy, Paul K.336 

Dark, Jay A.429 

Dark, Jeffrey T.275, 572, 593 

Darling, Tom A.330 

Darlington, Doug R.405 

Darnell, Wendy S.598 

Darsow, Cynthia A.347, 498 

Dart, Denise C.498 

Dasinger, Grace D.317 

Daub, Denise L.277 

Dauber, Nancy B.494, 549 

Daubersmith, James R.270 

Daughtry, Laura E.523 

Davenport. Denise L.498 

Davenport, Glen D.583 

Davenport, Kellie S.262, 263 

David, Kevin L.300 

Davidson, Christopher.435 

Davidson, James A.498 

Davidson, Teana M.355 

Davies, Dean B.511, 570 

Davies, Donald W.271 

Davies, John M.403 

Davies, Kimberly A.343 

Davis, Bob E.331 

Davis, Bradford L.298 

Davis. Carmen R.333 

Davis, Darrell H.267 

Davis, Denise L.280 

Davis, Elizabeth A. .. 338, 339, 340, 429 

Davis, Ellen K.363 

Davis, Erin D.361 

Davis, Frederick T.287, 578 

Davis, Gary R.511 

Davis, Jan E.199, 293 

Davis. Jennifer E.435 

Davis, Jeri V.317 

Davis. Karen J ...... 546 

Davis, Kelly A.277 

Davis, Larry D.407, 435 

Davis. Linda J.435 

Davis, Lisa K.293, 426, 504 

Davis, Lori A...505 

Davis. Mary L.347 

Davis, Pamela V.294 

Davis, Paula R.367, 498 

Davis, Roland E.381,602 

Davis, Roxie A.333 

Davis, Troy E.546 

Davis, Vincent M.272 

Davis, Wendy M.347, 455 

Davis, William E.337, 504 

Davison, Timothy R.535 

Davisson. Paul D.435, 507 

Davisson, Janice.435 

Dawg, Phil S.;.199 

Day, Christine J.509 

Day, Christopher M.419 

Day, Gregory R.285 

Day, Kenneth G.266 

Day, Rochelle A.357 

Day, Steven L. 275 

Day, Terry L.328 

Dean, Brett W.405 

Dean, Christopher W.275, 279, 328 

Dean, Mark W.389, 498 


Debroeck, Katherine S.334, 585 

Debroeck, Lynn E.520 

Debruyne. Lori M.291,367 

Dechenne, Cynthia L.363 

Dechenne, Sue E.262 

Decker, Leslie R.343, 455 

Decohar, Sushil.279 

Dederick, Cindy E.305, 309 

Dederick, Mindy J.305, 308, 309 

Deen, Janice M.515, 550, 556 

Deering, Jeffrey R.300, 435 

Deerkop, John C.578 

Deford, Nancy L.264, 265 

Defrees, Mark C . 399 

Degel, Dave A.330 

Degman, Karen L.359 

Deg man, Kathy A.359 

Dehaan, Nancy E.363, 454, 498 

Dehaven, Jeff S.267 

Dehning, Brent R.407 

Dehning, Gwendolyn M.302, 355 

Dehorn, David H.413 

Deierling, Dell A.510 

Dejka, Tracy L.312 

Dejong, Eric A.413 

Dekker, Devin J.297, 589 

Delacruz, Roem E.435 

Delaney, Heidi A.259, 423 

Delaney, Leeroy L.435 

Delaney, Norman E.435, 498 

Delaney, Somkul A.435 

Delaurenti, Michael P.286 

Delay, Cynthia A.351, 518 

Delen, Lukas F.389, 538 

Dalla, David A.375, 469 

Delo, David R.,.54, 593 

Delong, Kim M.369, 516 

Deltier, Tracy.510 

Delvo, Julianne R.293 

Delzer, Donald J.322 

Demaris, Paul R.525 

Dembroke, Mary.520 

Demond, Linda R.361, 464 

Demoss, Mitzi E.302, 304, 525 

Dempewolf, Todd G.288 

Dempsey, Patrick M.407 

Denaxas, John E.271 

Denby, Beverly M.276 

Dengel, Denise L.292 

Denmark, Clarissa L.314 

Dennehy, Brian K.409 

Dennehy, Shaun M.435, 499 

Dennie, Linda A.506 

Dennis, Julie A.451, 591 

Dennison, Angela L.435 

Denny, Todd O.297 

Dent, Cory R.326, 591 

Deodhar, Sushil.275 

Depaul, Jeanne M.520 

Dephelps, Michael J.401 

Depinna, Germaine M.204, 292, 435 

Derosier, Cynthia Y.264 

Deruwe, Robin R.357 

Deshaw, Lynnette A.495 

Deshon, Janet L.280, 281, 555 

Deshon, John D.499 

Desmarais, Damon M.425 

Desordi, Steven P.290 

Deswanti, Djoanda.510 

Detering, Michael D.287, 424, 546 

Detrich, Steve.199, 607 

Dettrich, Keri J.495, 534 

Detwiler, Doug A.407 

Detwiler, Polly A.307, 589 

Dever, Lance L.556 

Devin, Jenny F.293, 295 

Devish, A Jacqueline.314 

Devitt, James L.435 

Devleming, Karen D.361, 543 

Devleming, Steven P.413 

Devlin, Daniel L.505 

Devogel. Nicolaas C.520, 561 

Devorss, Martin W.538 

Devries, Gayla C.577 

Dewitt, Timothy R.435 

Dezellem, Todd S.289 

Dibbern, Elizabeth A.338, 550, 556 

Dick, Darrel R.299 

Dickerson, Anthony G.407 

Dickerson, Bendetta L.523, 566 

Dickerson, Kimberly K.361 

Dickerson, Lisa M.367 

Dickman, Paul S .377 

Dickson, Bonnie F.334 

Didomenico, Lorna L.203, 545 

Didomenico, Steve G.300, 427, 

508, 538 

Didzun, Melissa M.454 

Dieffenbach, Jason W.435 

Dierken, Stephan M.297 

Dierks, Brian M.504 

Dietel, Dave C.266, 593 

Dietrich, Steve E.509, 541 

Dietsch, Gregory N.407 

Diggs, Helen E.367 

Digleria, Lisa A.345, 504, 538 

Digre, Karen M.430 

Dijulio, Lori. 309 

Dijulio, Matthew M.413 

Dillard. Judith M.302, 308 


Dilling, Harald M.493 

Dillon, Carey L.315 

Dillon, Kelly.200 

Dillsi, TarikT.425 

Diloreto, Stephen P.320 

Dimah, Agber A.435, 562 

Dime, Cameron J.383, 520 

Dimmitt, Patricia A.332 

Dingman, Douglas J.270, 413 

Dinkins, Steven J.417 

Dinning, Michael E.319 

Dire, Paul A.196 

Dirks, Randall J.377 

Ditommaso, Marc V.324, 325 

Ditier, Mike F.395 

Ditzler, John C.385 

Dixon, Clarence D.321 

Dixon, Crystal G.293 

Dixon, Heather M.333 

Dixon, Kathy J.333 

Dixon, Lonnie D.564 

Djoanda. Desiwanti.570 

Doan, Deborah A.314 

Doan, John T.435, 522 

Doane, Colleen C.347 

Doane, David J.413 

Doane, James J.403 

Dobbs. Dana R.201. 259, 423 

Dobias, Thomas J.274, 555 

Dobish, Gary W.336, 389 

Dobler, Ann D.291, 295 

Dobler, Kristin D.524 

Dobson, Steven L.385 

Docherty, Tracey L.203, 293 

Dodd. John J.299 

Dodd, Karlin M.300 

Dodds, Priscilla L.280 

Dodge, Pamela R.259 

Dodgson, Caroline R.291, 466 

Dodoo, Francis K.N.432 

Doederlein, Craig M.430, 520, 536 

Doke. Brian G.409 

Dolan, Maureen A.349 

Dolan, Sheila R.258 

Dolinar, Michael E.271 

Doman, Gina M.359 

Donahou, Joseph P.399 

Donahue. Michelle K.516 

Doneen, Octavia A.359 

Donham, Mark A.435, 504 

Donlin, Terry L.285, 425, 507 

Donnelly. Kathleen C.435 

Donnelly. Michaela M.355, 499 

Donohoe, Robert L.499 

Donohue, Michael J.301 

Dooley. Mike A.298 

Dooley, Sharon A.315 

Doolittle, Michael W.432 

Door, David W.435, 594 

Dooris, Patrick E.552, 561, 594 

Dorai Raj. Sharad P.337 


Doran, Shane D.515 

Dorbolo. Mary J.258, 301, 504 

Dorgan, Andrea J.369, 435 

Doric, Michael W.421 

Dorman, Barbara L.534 

Dorman, Patricia L.435, 495, 560 

Dorn, Jeff S.300 

Dorrance, Linda A.367, 542 

Dossa, Kareem N.323, 407 

Dost, Patricia M.291 

Dotson, Kenneth L.297 

Dotson, Michael J.381 

Dotson, Rethakay M.435 

Dougan, Barry.393, 499, 560 

Dougherty, Carole A.515, 593 

Dougherty. Linda M.334 

Douglas, E. Brad.419 

Douglas, Keith C.425 

Douglas, Susan L.363, 503, 533 

Doumit, Mark L.391, 499, 552 

Doumit, Matthew E.391 

Doumitt, Rhett P.285 

Douwes, Frank P.271 

Dover, Aileen L.292 

Dow, Alison.332 

Dowdell. William C.511, 602 

Dowden, Helen K.285, 502 

Dowden, Kevin C.270 

Dowers, Debbie.335 

Dowie, Kimberly P.357 

Dowling, Karen L.516 

Downing, Jana M.280 

Downing. Kathleen J.302, 309 

Downing, Lynn M.327, 549 

Dowrey, Glen R.559 

Dowrey. Robin B.469, 559 

Dowty, Janey L.314 

Doyle, John L.518 

Drane, Aaron R.469 

Dreher. David R.533 

Dreher, Douglas W.323, 325 

Dressel, Margaret E.305 

Drever, Andrea D.262 

Dreyer, John R.499 

Drier, Lezlie F.264, 355 

Drill, Lisa M.332 

Dronen, Tracy L.357, 520 

Droubay, Peter W.300 

Druffel, Daniel C.195, 556 

Drummey, Terence P.487 

Drummey, William J. 602 

Drummond, Duane E.427, 584 

Drummond, Heidi S.347, 520 

Drummond, Jay T.487 

Dubois, James D.403 

Duckworth, Jama J.326 

Duckworth, Lise Y.544 

Duckworth. Randy A.286, 290, 425 

Duffy, Jill K.263, 463 

Duffy, Margaret A.523 

Duffy, Regina A.468 


Duffy, Thomas M.331 

Duff. William J.393, 469, 577 

Dugas, Monica J.334 

Dugaw, Scott J.430 

Duitsman, Dean R.305, 435 

Duke, Fred J.379, 536 

Dull. Allan G.321 

Dumo. Carlita C.302. 308 

Dunatov, Kirsten H.598 

Duncan, Brent C.402 

Duncan, Kit A.301 

Duncan, Robert W.499, 542 

Dunlap, Steven K.268 

Dunn, Brian C.405 

Dunn, David L.375, 602 

Dunn, Ian C.275 

Dunn, John J.393 

Dunn, John W.583 

Dunn, Kristine D.343, 538, 577 

Dunn, Monte C.435, 511 

Dunn, Patrick F.286 

Dunn, Steven J.299, 427 

Dunnell, William R.544 

Dunscomb, Claudia J.549 

Dunsmoor. Shawn E.399 

Dunsmore. Kenneth S.375 

Dunton, Rich.200 

Duong, My-Ngoc T.525 

Dupree, Dale J.383 

Dupuis, Doreen R.357 

Durado, Tony K.377 

Duram, Jacqualynn D.326 

Duran, Norma D.606 

Durand, Dana L.299 

Duretto, Michael J.397, 523 

Durkett, Paul.522 

Durr, Brenda L.265, 314 

Durr. Kris 0.267 

Durrant, Curtis B.285 

Duskin, Todd E.375 

Dutt, Gary S.432 

Dutt, Jill S.431, 499 

Duton, Kimberly J.353 

Duzan, Jonathan T.268 

Dye, Cynthia R.317, 428, 463 

Dye, Jeffrey E.271 

Dyer, Deborah E.326, 327 

Dyer, Patricia.578 

Dyke. Ellen M.285, 522 

Dykers, Gretchen A.559 

Dykes, Dana A.452 


Ee 


Eachus, Lonny A.322, 435 

Eades, Eric G...336 

Eagan, Teresa A.432, 523 



1984/Index 615 




















































































































































































































































































































































































































Eager, Kevin M.331 

Eakin, Julie A.365 

Ealy, Anta M.303, 308 

Earl, Cassandra.361 

Early, Steven K.377 

Easter, Douglas E.381 

Easter. Jane E.345, 314 

Easterday, Jody D.591 

Easterday. Kimberly K.332 

Easterwood, Mark W.310 

Eastman, Merton J.337 

Eastman, Susaan R.326, 327 

Easton, Mary J.355, 506 

Eaton, Denise M.303, 308, 523, 551 

Eaton, Jay C.542 

Eaton, Mike G.319 

Ebersole, Gordon K.289, 290, 425 

Eckard, Charles J.508 

Eckard, Christopher G.319 

Eckard, Julie M.560 

Eckel, Roberta J.435 

Eckroth, Robert J.274, 279, 578 

Edgren, Jana L.306, 309 

Edgren, Kay L.515, 550, 556, 593 

Edgren, Shah J.307, 309, 467, 589 

Edmiston, Steven W.519, 606 

Edwards, Carmen J.515 

Edwards, Claire A.355 

Edwards, Colleen S.357, 451, 458 

Edwards, Gwendolyn B.304 

Edwards, Matthew K.407 

Edwards, Rondilyn C.292, 361 

Eerkes, Lynn E.341, 405 

Eerkes, Sarah A.291 

Egaas, David R.435, 507 

Egan, Jana M.260, 261 

Egan, Nancy W.304, 309 

Egawa, Kenneth L.430 

Egbe, Chinyere E.562 

Egelhofer, Christine E.435 

Egerton, Marc M.323 

Egerton, Timothy P.267 

Egge, Christine C.326 

Eggenberger,Cindy K.559 

Eggenberger, Gail R.542 

Eggert, G. Eric.267, 389 

Egilla, Jonathan N.A.284, 425 

Ehlhardt. Laurie A.566 

Ehringer, Wendy A.355, 634-635 

Eichelberger, Becky S.262, 263, 499 

Eickerman, Michael S.550 

Eide, Christopher C.508 

Eihl, Heather A.353, 455 

Einan, David R.275 

Ekman, Scott B.275 

El-Khouryhanna,Tanios.285 

Elder, Kia M.435 

Eldredge, Mark J.322 

Eley, Kerri C.347 

Eliason, Brett A.298 

Eller, Jett J.602 

Elligsen, Mary L.355, 522 

Ellingsen, David C.381, 523 

Ellingsen, Jett I.270 

Ellingsen, Ronald H.381 

Ellingsen, Susan E.435, 520 

Ellingson, Eric S.268, 424 

Elliott, Anthony C.435 

Elliott, Frederick W.270 

Elliott, John R.274 

Elliott, Mary T.365 

Ellis, Anne Grace.264, 431 

Ellis. Ardeana Q.303 

Ellis, Colleen L.303 

Ellis, Jeffrey R.403 

Ellis, John S.270 

Ellis, Laura A...316 

Ellis. Mark A.336 

Ellis, Robert L.607 

Ellis, Rosemarie.288, 544 

Ellis, Saralyn.264 

Ellis, Stephen W.377 

Ellis, Susan R.436 

Ellis, Tracey L.307, 589 

Ellis, Wendell D.329, 335 

Ellison, James E.411 

Ellwood, Daniel M.421, 505 

Elrod. Judy E...264, 561 

Elrod, Scott E.550 

Else, Stephen A.438 

Elsensohn, Julie A.349 

Elsensohn. Shari L.349 

Elstrott, Eric F.274 

Elwanger. Bryan W.559 

Elwell, Carl A.296 

Ely, Scott D.268 

Emerick, Gary S.199 

Emerson, Bobby G.331 

Emerson, Melissa A.292, 365, 457 

Emerson, Rita M.343 

Emmil, Ken A.205, 413, 505 

Emrick, Celia A.277 

Emsky, Peter A.436 

Emtman, Debra K.338, 429 

Emtman, Linda C.292, 426 

Emtman. Randall S.377 

Enderlin, Carl W.436 

Endsley, Pollyanna L.264, 265, 463 

Engel, Barbara J.259 

Engel, Diane S.347 


Engel, Douglas L.329 

Engell, Daniel P.271. 273, 424, 577 

Engels, Sydney A.436 

Engert, Paul R.570 

Engle. Christopher D.199, 405, 607 

Engle, James F.559 

Engle, Kimberly A.306 

English, Dave L.297 

English, Leslie E.351, 520 

English, Susan D.336, 343, 457, 538 

Englund, Anthony S.435. 499 

Englund, Eric C.499 

Engstrom, Sharon J.494 

Ennis, Jennifer A.316 

Enright, John R.385 

Enright, Michael J.385, 499 

Enslin, Kirk E.499, 554 

Ensor, Sherri R.432, 499 

Enyeart, Karen R.291, 367 

Erak, Tracey L.506 

Erdly, Margaret R.326 

Erickson, Densie L.307, 365 

Erickson, Joyce.309 

Erickson, Karen A.518 

Erickson, Keith G.289 

Erickson, Kelly P.286 

Erickson, Michael E.515 

Erickson, Richard T.322 

Erickson, Steve A.510, 570 

Eriksen, Jo S.301 

Ernsdorff, Gary M.405 

Errett, Brenda M.583 

Erskine, Margaret M.307 

Ertel, Rebecca A.261 

Ertman, Kerry L.520 

Esber, Glenn P.272 

Eschbach, Peter A.436 

Estabrook, Patricia L.548 

Estefan, Jeffrey A.325 

Estenson, Neil B.538, 572 

Estep-Wilson, Linda M.503, 594 

Estep, Peter 1.399 

Estes, Judy L.436 

Estes, Robert A.325, 428 

Estirity, Al.583 

Etheridge, Lisa A.430 

Etheridge, Roy L.289 

Etheridge, Ted.299 

Etherington, Murray D.499 

Etmektzoglou, Athanasi.436 

Evans, Brian K.499 

Evans, Chris D.515, 550 

Evans, Darcie A.326, 327 

Evans, James S.413 

Evans. Jennifer A.357 

Evans, Karen.499, 523 

Evans, Kyle R.502 

Evans, Monty C.298 

Evans, Scott E.280, 389 

Evans, Shauna L.303 

Evans, William R.559, 564 

Everett, John P.550 

Everson, Marc A.275, 279 

Everton, Julie K.276 

Ewers, Matthew P.536, 594 

Ewing, Grant R.487 

Ewnetu, Zeleke A.270, 425 


Ff 


Fadler. Richard E.325 

Fagan, C.L.508 

Fagan. Rory J.383 

Fagg, Kip J.411 

Fagg, Kyle R.417 

Fahselt, Jeff C.290 

Falcon, William A.393 

Faletti, David W.274 

Falk, Kristin L.351 

Fallavollita, James A.550 

Fangen, Richard L.411 

Fanning, Kathleen M.361 

Fanning. Mikki J.367, 458, 522, 569 

Farmer. Bradley F.266 

Farmer. Richard A.319 

Farnbarstur.273 

Farnsworth, John R.271, 552 

Farr, Linda L.338, 460 

Farrell, Deanna C.345 

Fasone, Donald Jr.487 

Fasulo, Jim A.298, 427 

Faubion, Dana F.496 

Faulstich, Julie E.363, 468 

Faunce, Jeffery W.431, 507 

Fayette, Michelle A.289, 290 

Fedje, Scott D.393, 469, 496, 535 

Feely, John C.337 

Feemster, Jeff R.285 

Fegert, Kevin L.266 

Fehlig, John F.409 

Feider,Darren A.389 

Feinstein, Jeffrey H.395 

Feiring, Wendy S.347, 520 

Felde, Steve R.288 

Feldman, Kent J. 377 


Feldman, Mark E.391 

Feldsteins, Maurice.299 

Felton, Kevin M.290, 425 

Felton, Romona K.292, 602 

Fendel, Petra.436 

Fender, Terresa R.499 

Fenich, Gregory A.499 

Fennell, Kevin D.337 

Fennimore, C. Jan.334 

Fenton, Lee R.324 

Fenz, Nicole C.519 

Ferber, Sallie A.334, 465 

Ferbrache, Kimberly A.305, 363 

Ferguson, Charles H.542 

Ferguson, Diana E.326, 449, 589 

Ferguson, Douglas R.436, 494 

Ferguson, Gregory D.389 

Ferguson, Ken D.399 

Ferguson, Steve D.499 

Ferluga, Cathryn A.347, 455 

Fernandez, Ginger S.262, 538 

Ferris, Roger G.409 

Ferson, Gary L.275 

Fery, Mark B.509, 541 

Feryn. Christopher A.267, 269 

Fewkes, Tara L.349, 506 

Ficke, Lee R.397 

Ficke, Lynette M.355, 506 

Fickenwirth, Karen S.326, 566 

Fickes, Steve D.288 

Fiebelkorn, Michael S.590 

Fieder, Todd.407 

Fiedler, Leslie A.436 

Field, Sara B.277-279 

Fields. Efrem R.331 

Fields, George B.271 

Fiksdal, Sharon M.347, 506 

Filer, Jeanne K.345, 449, 589, 591 

Filicetti, Joseph P.413, 518 

Filion, Holly L.503 

Fillis, James D.328 

Filsinger, James M.298 

Finch, Jill A.467 

Findlay, Kirk J.520 

Finholm, James A...397 

Fink, Maurene R.343 

Finkel. Michael 1.285. 425, 507 

Finkle, Craig S.363 

Finley, Brent L.593 

Finley, James B.383 

Finley. Patricia E.314 

Fiore, Kevin T.602 

Fischer, Bruce A.397 

Fischer, Karen A.495 

Fischer, Margaret C.347 

Fisher, David E.436 

Fisher, Jeffrey S.286 

Fisher, Mark R.330 

Fisher, Marvin T.438 


< 7 # 


Fisher. Paul A.584 

Fisher, Scott T.330 

Fisher, Teri R.333, 335 

Fisher, Victor J.270, 273 

Fithian, Claire L.292 

Fitzgerald, Paul R.487 

Fitzsimmons, Douglas R.266 

Fitzsimmons. Mark A.381 

Flaget, Richard N.271, 273 

Flaming, Kristi R.338 

Flechsig, Jennifer L.544 

Fleener, Glenda F.335 

Fleener, Nathan C.334 

Fleetwood, Michael A.272 

Fleisch, Kristin M.303 

Fleming, Charles R.524, 557 

Fleming, Joel W.266 

Fleming, Pamela A.276 

Fleming, Sharilyn J.334 

Fleming. Susie M.426 

Fletcher, Karen A.563 

Fletcher, Karen R.432, 556 

Fletcher, Staci A.347 

Fletcher, Todd R.377 

Flint, Kimberly S.355, 457 

Flint, Scott K.524 

Floan, Kristen C.304, 309 

Flodin, Robin F.436, 499, 543 

Flom, Bradley T.542 

Flores, Christopher R.300 

Flores, Jose Jr.320 

Flowers, William V.275 

Floyd, Catherine A.313, 318, 552 

Floyd, Todd A.395, 499 

Fluetsch, Brad J.205 

Fly, Jack L.314 

Fly, Linda J.316 

Flynn, John A.430 

Flynn, John R.508 

Flynn, Maura E.338, 595 

Flynn, Patrick J.397 

Focht, Kelly D.436 

Fode, Ronald L.413 

Foerste, Cherie L.316, 450 

Fogerty, Sam J.432 

Foleen, Colleen G.522 

Foley, Susan M.29, 426, 463 

Folkins, Gail L.428 

Folsom, Brad K.266 

Folsom, Bruce A.270, 310 

Fong, Karen.279 

Fong, Gordon H.563 

Fong, Joe N.C.425, 515 

Fong, Peter H.391 

Forbis, Michael L.270 

Force, Terry W.536 

Ford. Walter L. Jr.321 

Ford, Yung B.331 

Forde, Kirsten M.353, 466 


Fordham, Stephen D. 

.324 

Fordyce, Lori C. 


Fordyce, Susan E. 

.314 

Forgaard, Dean M. Jr.... 

.268 

Fork, Eric J. 

.503 

Forney, Celia J. 

.430, 494 

Forrester. Lawrence W.. 

.413 

Forsberg, Kenneth R. 

.425 

Forsberg, Robert M. 

.407 

Forshag, Geoffrey D. 

...419, 499, 543 

Forsland, Teri L.197, 359, 520, 563 

Forslund, Douglas A. 

.383 

Forslund. William L. 

.383 

Forster, David G. 

.517 

Fort, Allison R. 

.305, 461 

Fort, Robin J. 

.365 

Fort, Susan J. 

.294, 359 

Fortmann, Scott J. 

.407 

Foseid, Paul R. 

.397 

Fossum, Mark R. 

.436 

Fossum, Randy S. 

.436 

Foster, Colin D. 

.297 

Foster, Elizabeth A. 

.261 

Foster, Gary W. 

.584 

Foster, Loren E. 

.321 

Foster, Lynn M. 

...363, 499, 554 

Foster, Scott A. 

.551 

Foster, Tracy C. 

.333 

Fothergill, Gregory L. 

.381, 499 

Fothergill, Steve M. 

.381 

Foulon, Joel E. 

.268 

Fountain, Velma J. 

.259 

Fournier, Lisa A. 

.343 

Fowe, Kelly A. 

.433, 448 

Fowler, Cynthia A. 

.291, 436 

Fowler, Frederick T. 

.271, 436 

Fowler, Jennifer L. 

...436, 495, 534 

Fowler, Lois R. 

.351 

Fowler, Neal J. 

.301 

Fox, Donald S. 

.319 

Fox, James P. 

.300, 578 

Fox, Timothy R. 

.337, 429 

Frakes, Janet M. 

.264, 265 

Fraley, Lisa D. 

.369 

Frame, David J. 

.300 

Francis, Sharon D. 

.304, 355 

Francisco, Melinda R. 

...359, 459, 468 

Francisco, Shannon. 

.495, 534 

Francisco, Siri J. 

.291 

Frank, Danelle K 

436 453 

Frank, William C. 

.. 297 

Franklin, Della R. 

.277, 561 

Franklin, Kelly N. 

.264 

Franklin, Kymberlee A... 

...338, 339, 517 

Franks, Jeffrey R. 

.545 

Frantz, Martin B. 

.336, 429 

Franz, Cari G. 

.542 

Fraser, Robert D. 

...409, 503, 583 

Frasier, Lee M. 

.272 

Frasier, Stephen L. 

.270 

Frazee, Karen R. 

.294 

Frazier, John B. 

.411 

Frazier, Michelle R. 

.314, 461 

Freeh, Barbara J. 

.293 

Fred, Todd L. 

.320 

Fredenburg, Anne L. 

.294, 426 

Frederick, Brenda J. 

...203, 292, 426 

Frederick, Brigette J. 

.294 

Frederick, Karen C. 

.355, 464 

Fredericks, Jana L. 

.524 

Fredrickson, Carrie S. 

.463, 591 

Freeman, Anne M. 

.326 

Freeman, Mary E. 

.259 

Freeman, Roy A. 

.401 

Freemon. Pamela A. 

.305 

Freeney, Shelon D. 

.304 

Freepons, Alys M. 

.638-639 

Freese, Jennifer S. 

.549, 569 

Fremling, Mitchell A. 

.320, 324 

Freuen, Catherine A. 

.367, 464 

Freund, Jeffrey A. 

.319, 325 

Frey, Christopher K. 

.452, 553 

Frey, Constance L. 

.204 

Frey, James H. 

.271 

Frey, Sara C. 

.577 

Frick, Gregory A. 

.274 

Frick, Patricia A. 

.259 

Fricke, Stuart W. 

.436. 502 

Friend, Sharon L. 

.258 

Frink, Christine M.353. 455, 495, 534 

Frink, Daniel R. 

.411 

Frrtch, Eric T. 

.377, 507 

Frith, Brian W. 

.389, 495 

Frith, Jeff S. 

.499 

Fritz, Martin E. 

.274, 278 

Froemke, Robert M. 

.361 

Froland, Mark J. 

.330 

Frolich, Christine E. 

.316 

Fromong, Mrk W. 

.542 

Froseth, Barrie R. 

...495, 563, 594 

Frost, Arthur J. 

.274 

Fry, Michael T. 

.436, 487 

Fry, Penny M. 

.281, 495 

Fry, Rose M. 

...200, 431, 454 

Fry, Sylvia S. 

.280 

Fryett. Brad A. 

.272 

Fryzek, Dawn L. 

.369 

Fu, David C. 

.297 

Fuchs, Teresa L. 

.468 

Fudge, Cindy L. 

.276 



616 


Index/1984 


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































r udge, David M.297 

-"ugate, Donald R.301 

r ugere, Joseph J.438, 503, 577 

r uhr, Joan M.361, 499, 543 

: uhrer, Darin L.405 

-uhrer, Pat K.584 

r ujii, Bonnie J.519, 636 

r ujioka. Grace M.432 

rukuzumi, Yuki.284, 535 

Fuller, Daniel M.409 

=uller. Gretchen F.294, 465 

-uller, Micah B.331 

Fulton, A. Bruce.379, 499 

Fulton, Bradford J.411 

Funk, Anna M.345, 449, 564, 

589 591 

Funk. David D.336, 429! 580 

Funk. Robert D.578 

Furness, Ian D.377 

Furrer, Jeflrey J.266 

Furseth, Darcy A.199, 345 

Furubotten, Shari A.280, 355 



Gabert, Mark S.544 

Gabriel, Philip L.436 

Gacek, Paula J.264 

Gaddis, Kellie L.313 

Gaddis, Marcella A.280 

Gadeholt, M. Kirsten.343, 460 

Gaede, David M.321, 520 

Gaffney, Michael J.381 

Gage. John R.299 

Gagnon, Glenn L.267, 572 

Gagnon, Lori A.252 

Gaines, Harmon C.299 

Gaither, Joel D.393 

Galanti, Debbi R.316, 357 

Galban, Michelle Y.306, 556 

Galbraith. Laurie J.606 

Galbraith, Richard R.297 

Galbraith, Ron L.511, 542 

Galeno, Paul F.395 

Gallagher, Carol A.326 

Gallagher, Catherine M.499 

Gallagher, Linda J.353 

Gallagher, Susan P.287 

Gallant. Robert H.411 

Galliher. David A.436 

Gallinger, Dawn E.333 

Gallinger, Gary G.419 

Gallucci. Mark A.205, 515 

Gallucci, Ronald G.589 

Gamble. Robert A.288 

Gamblin, Marcia S.518 i 

Gambriel. Janette.505 

Gambriell. Micheline L.291, 436 

Gamon, Margaret A.526 

I Gant, Caryn L.316 

Gant, Stacey M.277 

Ganutan, Jacqueline.294 

Garcia, Jon.543 

Garcia, Jone R.499 

Garcia, Marie R.569, 993 

Garcia, Meiva.568, 606 

Gard, Daniel C.202, 322 

Gardiner, Deanna L.290, 425, 436 

Gardner, Gerald W.274 

Gardner. Keith E.267 

Gardner, Susaan M.288 

Gar lick, Todd F.329 

Garman, Bernadette.312 

Garraway, Vicki R.304 

Ganretson. Laura L.277, 365, 577 

Garrett, Alvin.270 

Garrison, Lisa A.277, 279 

Gartrell, Sharon A.303 

Garza, Cris.288 

Garza, Francisca.606 

Gates, Catherine M.429 

Gates, Margaret K.369, 467, 606 

Gator, Nancy.286 

Tim Gattenby.202 

Gaudinier, Richard.272 

Gaull, Robert E.430 

Gauntt. Wendy P.432, 456 

Gaut, Stacey L.436 

Gauvin, Janet M.494, 542 

Gaylord, R. Kevin.201 

Gaynor, Sheila M.308 

Gecas, Erik.551 

Geek, Rhonda M.349 

Geer, Terri A.506 

Geffe, Joan L. 265 

Geffe, Tamara L.343 

Gehle. Elizabeth A.309, 315, 459 

Gehle, Jon E.205 

Gehlen, Teresa L.262 

Gehring, Karlyn M.343, 538 

Gehringer, David P.329 

Geier, Christopher L.518 

Geiger, Rebecca L.291,426 

Geiger, Scott M.320 


Gellos, Christopher J. 

.347 

Gentry, Wayne T. 

.268 

George, Ambrose V. 

.438, 493 

George, Christopher J.. 

.411 

George, Kip A. 

.299 

Gepperl, Monica A. 

.260 

Gerard, Rick H. 

.336 

Gerber, Darryl C. 

.274 

Gerber, Douglas R.. 

.413, 436 

Gerbert, G. Leslie. 

.334 

Gerdes, Christina R. 

...343, 565, 568 

Ger.ety, Richard P. Jr. 

.381 

Gering, Brad G. 

.564 

Gerking, Gina M. 

...264, 265, 463 

Gessel, Troy D. 

.411 

Getchell. Karolyn M. 

.436 

Getchell, Scotty J. 

.411, 519 

Gettman, Gregg T. 

.405 

Getz, Robin J. 

.506 

Getz, Stanley D. 

.301 

Geyer, Peter A. 

.405, 496 

Geyman, James C. 

.550 

Gfeller. Anne M. 

...436, 453, 552 

Ghan, Jeffrey D. 

.399 

Ghan, Thomas D. 

.328 

Ghosh, Ashok K. 

.511 

Giambalvo, Cheryl L. 

.436 

Giangrasso, Lujeana M. 

.351 

Gianoulakis, Steven E... 

.417, 507 

Gibb, Gail L. 

.345, 594 

Gibb. Tyler D. 

.409, 543 

Gibbons. Mary M. 

.333 

Gibbons, Pamela L. 

.503, 577 

Gibbons, Suzette M. 

..436. 634, 635. 


636, 638, 639 

Gibbs, Janice C. 

.466 

Gibson, Deanna L. 

.317 

Gidlof, Daniel C. 

. 336 

Gies, Kandy K. 

.283 

Giesa, Erik J. 

.411 

Gift in Ann M 

540 593 

Gilberg, Gunter J. 

.’ 275 

Gilbert, Greg L. 

.397 

Gilbert, Jane H. 

.367, 451 

Gilbert, Kathryn A. 

.634-636 

Gilbert, Lee R. 

.405 

Gilbreath, Anthony D. 

.401,469 

Gilchrist, Shelley M. 

.451 

Gilden, Karen S. 

.294 

Gile, Barbara R. 

.343, 520 

Gilfry, Paul W. 

.407 

Gill, Heidi S. 

.353, 455 

Gill, Tamara L. 

...203, 260, 261 

Gillam, Nellie J . 

.280, 281 

Gilligan, Kathleen T. 

...264, 265. 561 

Gillihan, Lori J. 

.556 

Gilliland, Craig A. 

.375, 494 

Gilliland, Erin L. 

. 369 

Gillis, Julia M. 

.365 

Gillman, David M. 

.413 

Gitlman, Kelly R. 

.204, 334 

Gilmartin, Lisa N. 

.353 

Gilmore, Brian O. 


Gilmore, Ginger L. 

.288. 290 

Ginn, Alexander M. 

. 407 

Gish, Barbara J . 

.593 

Gish, Shannon C. 

.347 

Gjelvik, Eric C. 

.270 

Glaas, Eric H. 

.336 

Gladish, Jennifer A. 

.522 

Gladish, Leslie K. 

.313, 318 

Glase, John B. 

.397 

Glasenapp, Thomas K.... 

.336' 

Glasgow, Brenda K. 

.363 

Glasgow, Jill E. 

.277, 279 

Glaze, Elizabeth A. 

..333, 363, 466 

Gleason, Darlene. 

.326, 536 

Gleason, Helen E. 

.467 

Gleason, Marc C. 

..436, 510, 570 

Gleesing. Nancy R. 

.303 

Gleeson, Michael F. 

.503 

Glein, Susan E. 

..436, 503, 577 

Glick, Erik R. 

.401, 469 

Glidden, Jeff H. 

.436 

Glockner, Gordon E. 

.544 

Glover, Daniel S. 

.395 

Glover, Shari K. 

.289, 462 

Glover, William J. 

.395 

Glueck, Karen E. 

.304 

Goble, Jodery A. 

..301, 428, 494 i 

Goble, Melanie N. 

.432 

Gochnaer, Melody J. 

.436, 505 

Gocus. Catherine S. 

.317 

Goddard, Barbara L. 

.579 

Goddard, Marjie M. 

.258 

Goddard, Sandra A. 

.494, 594 

Godsey, Jack E. 

.287, 425 

Goedhart, Dolly L. 

.294 

Goehry, Clinton H. 

.432. 502 

Goel, Anu R. 

.323 

Goetz, Christopher W. 

.436 

Goetz, Rebecca J. 

.290 

Goetz, Theresa A. 

.520 

Goff, Clark T. 

.329 

Goff, Elizabeth S. 

.361, 499 

Goh. Wilson WK. 

.321, 325 

Gohlert, Gretchen E. 

.345, 538 

Gohm, Karri L. 

.277 

Gohrick, Laura B. 

.261 


Gohrick, Lisa A.261 

Gold, Edward K.397, 510 

Golden, William V.403 

Goldfarb. Emma S.Z.465 

Gollnick, Russell H.508, 560 

Golombek, Terry O.336 

Gomger, Kate R.326 

Gomulkiewicz, Richard.524 

Gong, Chin 0.271 

Gonseth, Paul J.551 

Gonzales, Irene.436, 462, 568 

Gonzales, Jesce.196, 436 

Gonzalez, Abraham Jr.301, 428, 

493, 579, 606 

Gonzalez, Chrissy.436 

Gonzalez, David.436 

Gonzalez, Fabiola H.347 

Gonzalez, Genoveva.436, 606 

Gonzalez, Maria R.312 

Gonzalez, Theresa.436 

Good, Stephen H. Jr.205 

Goodman. Ann L.437 

Goodman. Cynthia C.367, 499, 554 

Goodmanson, Craig M.515 

Goodwater, Dale E.321. 325, 556 

Goodwin, Grant E.405, 520, 569 

Goodwin, Joseph A.437, 552 

Goodwin, Maria E.262 

Goodwin, Philippa S...509, 541 

Goodwin, Rebecca A.432. 520, 

553, 594 


Greenleaf, Mitchel D.437 

Greenlee. Christopher.329 

Greenlund, Douglas D.323, 324, 555 

Greenwalt, Georyl L.302, 308, 309 

Greenwood, Dan R.496 

Greenwood, Kacie J.347, 455, 560 

Greenwood, Kelly G.389, 502 

Greer, Christine D.347, 466 

Greer, Susanne C.347 

Gregg, Lisa A.291 

Gregory, Robert C.413 

Greif, Michael A.301 

Greische, Barbara.433 

Greive, James J.286 

Grella, Scott A.297 

Grendahl, Cheryl L.304, 353 

Gressard, Jim M.202 

Gresset, Ken.437 

Grevstad. Olejohn K.199, 270, 536 

Gribble, Tamese G.357, 468 

Grieb, Roger R.417, 504 

Griepp, Doug E.413 

Griesbaum, Richard M.499 

Griesche, Barbara.526 

Griess, Kenneth H.381, 507 

Grieve, John W.330 

Griffin, Chris J.397 

Griffin, Michael S.519 

Griffin, Todd A.267 

Griffis, Scott H .331 

Griffith, Christine L.369, 454 


Haba, Cindy L.317 

Haberbush. Cathy..499 

Haberman, Brent M.377 

Haberman, Tamara L.506 

Hachman, Andrew C.572 

Hackett, Lisa D.499 

Hackett, Michael T.397 

Hackett, Thomas J.584 

Hackler, James W.324 

Hackney. Merry M.284, 425 

Haddock,Roberta A.309, 463 

Hade, Janice M.280, 436 

Hade, Terri J.332 

Hader, Wade E.405, 499 

Hafez, Nicholas J ...430 

Hagan, Michael K.301 

Hagemeyer, Katherine E.333, 533 

Hagen, Kary J.336 

Hagen, Mairalee D.353, 520 

Hagerth, Mike A.270 

Hagerty, Steven M.515 

Haggen, Brad.395 

Haghighi, Shahriar.393 

Hagy, Nina A.260, 261, 551 

Hahn, Thad W.507 

Hahner, Ann M.514 

Haight, Norman R.270, 271 

Haines, Laura L.313, 552 

Hairstone. Michaela D.516 

Haldeman, Ray L.274 

Hale, Christopher C.409 


Gooley, Ted A. 

.552 

Griggs, Lewis E. 

.324 

Hale, Matthew E. 

.336 

Gorder, Constance M.J. 

.293 

Griggs, Trena G. 

.338, 462 

Haley. Sandra A. 

.259 

Gordon, Bradley P. 

.417 

Grillo. Julie M. 

.345 

Hall. Alan W. 

.274, 557 

Gordon, Catherine D. 

.333 

Grim, James A. 

.397, 499 

Hall, Darryl S. 

.337, 570 

Gordon, Gary A. 

.389 

Grimes, Charlena H. 

.437, 525 

Hall, Elisabeth A. 

.367 

Gordon, Gregg R. 

.437 

Grobe, Mystique D. 

...260, 261, 345 

Hall, Elizabeth A. 

.580 

Gorham, Barbara J .... 

290 555 

Groenig, Murray B. 

. 523 

Hall, James. 

.325 

Gorman, Bronwyn K. 

.306! 308 

Groeschel. Peter. 

.381 

Hall, Jennifer L. 

367, 464. 562, 594 

Gorman, Dorothy J. 

. 448 505 

Groh. Jane M. 

...280 281,456 

Hall. Kevin B. 

.275, 328, 542 

Gorman. Jill P. 

.293 

Gronhovd, David S. 

.325 

Hall, Rustin L. 

.570 

Gorman, Larry R. 

.205 

Gropper, Mary K. 

.343 

Hall, Susan D. 

.259. 555 

Gormanos, Thea J. 

.361, 563 

Gross, Joseph B. 

.515 

Hallen, Deborah 1_ 

.305 

Gormanos, Vassie K. 

.361 

Gross, Kristie L. 

.306 

Haller, Mark E. 

.379 

Gosnell, Glen P. 

.508 

Gross, Miner P. 

.403 

Haller, Molly L. 

.353, 455 

Goss, Scott E. 

.379 

Gross, Rodney D. 

.301, 525 

Halletl, Denny M. 

.286 

Gosse. Fuoanfi L.. 

.T75 

Grosse, Timothy W. 

.296 

Hallgrimson, Mark L. 

.584 

Gosser, Belinda A.... 334, 335, 426, 495 

Grossi, Thomas W. 

.487 

Halpin, Charie M. 

.315 

Gotfredson, Cheryl M.... 

.264 

Grossman, Heidi R. 

.293, 426 

Halverson, Brad 1_ 

.542 

Gottfried, Dana M. 

.452, 553 

Grosso, Andrea K. 

.363 

Halverson. Janna D. 

.302 

Gottfried, Timothy C. 

.319 

Grotte, Amy K. 

.432 

Halvorsen. Patrice 1. 

.359 

Sottschalk, Crystal L. 

.369, 467 

Grotte, John P. 

.321 

Halvorson, Karen L.. 

.345, 499 

3oudy, Philip B. 

. 381 

Groueh, Oscar. 

.336 

Halvorson. Robert L. 

.377 469 

Bough, Eric A. 

.288 

Grove, Ricky L. 

.337, 593 

Halvorson, Suzanne M.549 

Bould, Paul F. 

.397 

Grover, Dana E. 

.430, 499 

Hamasu, Patti T. 

.538 

Sourdine, Lisa E. 

.207 

Growe, Lorie. 

.503 

Hambersain, J. 

.301 

Govemale, Stephen M.... 

.572, 593 

Grubb. Kevin K. 

.432, 571 

Hames, Mary L. 

.523. 584 

Gowans, Pam. 

.270 

Gruber, Bill H. 

.381 

Hamilton, Brook D.... 

.205, 432 

Gower, Lisa M. 

.347 

Grueter, Paul E. 

.297 

Hamilton, Daniel S... 

.268, 424, 536 

Gracio, Deborah K. 

.316. 461 

Grumme, Karin M. 

.363 

Hamilton, Dean M.... 

.300 

Gradwohl, James G. 

298 

Grunhurd, Scott L . 

286 425 

Hamilton, Mark A. 

.431. 508 

Grady, Kathleen. 

..349, 457, 536 

Gruver, Jean M. 

... 550 

Hamilton, Myles V.... 

.499 

Graef, Marcus A. 

..452, 504, 553 

Gruwell, Steven C. 

389 

Hamilton, Terry N. 

.419, 519 

Graf, Corinda M. 

.570 

Grytness, Petter L. 

.. 499 

Hamlin, Catherine J. 

.259 

Graff, Richard E. 

.375 

Gubb, Suzanne L. 

.305, 359 

Hamlin, Jeanine L. 

.355 

Graham, Barbara L. 

.333 

Guckenburg, William J... 

.299 

Hammer, William A.. 

.375 

Graham, Ondrea D. 

.363 

Gucker, Holly L. 

.334 

Hammond, Joe K. 

.201 

Graham, Robert S. 

.589 

Gudbranson, Gregory L.. 

.395 

Hamrick, Kevin S. 

.298, 310 

Grahm, Thomas C. 

.271, 424 

Guerra, Joe. 

.606 

Hamro, susan L.. 

.353, 463 

Grandey, Dana J. 

.332, 467 

Guido, Carrie A. 

. 518 

Hanafie, Jahja. 

.436. 552 

Granger, Edward L. 

. 407 

Guinn, Scott F. 

.515, 578 

Hancock, Kenneth J 

.436 

Granstrom, Jeffery D. 

.437 

Guisinger, Craig A. 

.393. 577 

Hancock, Norman M 

.272 

Grant, Bruce H. 

.274 

Guisinger, Craig A. 

.393. 577 

Haner, Jill M. 

.280, 281. 436 

Grant, Colleen K. 

.353, 467 

Guisinger, Michele A. 

..260, 261, 457 

Hanesworth, Jodie M 

.291 

Grant. Dennis C. 

.336, 437 

Gulati, Ranjay. 

.284 

Haney, Kristin E. 

.334 

Grant, Tanya A. 

.505, 595 

Gulick, Damon D. 

.337 

Hanford, Alison M.... 

515, 550, 556, 593 

Grant, Thomas R. 

.507 

Gullikson, Jeffrey L. 

.487 

Hanford, Natalie A.... 

.326 

Grashuis, Darlene A. 

.293 353 

Gullikson, Sandra L. 

.460 

Hanlord, Saralyn M... 

.351 

Grattan, Gregory S. 

437 

Gumaer, Kathleen R 

327 

Hanle, Robert N. 

.330 

Graves. David A. 

.319 

Gundersen, Shelly M. 

..259, 423, 539 

Hanlin, Monica 1. 


Graves, Donald W. 

.385 

Gunderson, Timothy M... 

.536 

Hanlin, Patricia R. 

.504 

Graves, Tammy A. 

.437, 454, 

Gunkel, Steven E. 

.517 

Hanna, Gretchen V... 

.345 


495, 534 

Gunnarsson, Elisabet M. 

..276, 278, 279 

Hanna, Joseph R. 

.205 

Gray, Garrett T. 

. 397 

Gunstone, Eric L. 

323 

Hanna, Peter D. 

.321 

Gray, Heather J. 

.361 

Gunter, Nancy. 

.520, 536 

Hanning, Robert W... 

.296 

Gray, Kristin L. 

.194 

Gusa, Lawrence L. 

.297, 427 

Hannus, Todd G. 

.285, 425, 517 

Gray, Sharon L. 

.353 

Gushman, Richard A. 

.287 

Hanrahan, John M.... 

.266 

Gray, Stephen E. 

.407 

Guske Loren M. 

. 377 

Hansen, Anthony S... 

.391. 556, 559 

Graziano Susan L. 

516 

Gustafson Daniel H .3Q5 503 577 5QO 

Hansen, Carol R. 

.365 

Greaves, Elizabeth A. 

.260 

Gustafson, Scott B. 

.. 200 

Hansen, Cleo M. 

.294 

Grebenc. Douglas M. 

. 417 

Gustavson, Ronald L. 

.436 

Hansen. Don H. 

.401 

Greek, Carol A. 

.365 

Gutierrez, Richard E. 

.559 

Hansen, Holly A. 

.456. 556 

Green, Bruce G. 

.202, 266 

Gutschmidt, Cathy L. 

.437 

Hansen, J. Kenneth.. 

.385, 520 

Green Christopher E. 

.405 

Guyer, John B. 

.413 

Hansen, James P. 

.503, 577 

Green Craig E. 

.437 

Guyer, Linda L. 

.345. 449 

Hansen, Kandis D. 

.436 

Green, David L. 

.391 

Gwin, Gerald T. 

.310. 564 

Hansen. Karen 1. 

.353, 455 


Green. Dee A.361 

Green, James A.271 

Green, James J.395 

Green, Larry P.270 

Green, Robin A.357, 458 

Green, Ronald S.403 

Green, Suzy J.305 

Greenbush, Sydney C.290 

Greene, Barbara K.363, 454 

Greene. Julie A.363 

Greene. Katherine E.292, 426 

Greene, Vincas S.271, 595 

Greenfield, Cindy L.437, 505 


Gwin, Janice L.541 

Gydesen, Kay E.347 

Gype, Richard C.515 



Ha, Ki B.329 

Haase, Arleen F.499 

Haase, Mara K.199 


Hansen, Karen J.506 

Hansen, Kindra L.363 

Hansen, Kris L.347, 448 

Hansen, Mark C.602 

Hansen, Mark E.385 

Hansen, Mary M.284 

Hanson, Kevin P.321, 325, 577 

Hanson, Linda J.303, 308, 309, 549 

Hanson, Peter J.393, 469 

Hanson, Tena L.345, 499. 

516, 543, 554 

Hanson, Todd A.202, 268 

Hansson, Marie L.495, 570 


1984 /Index 617 



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Hara, Kalhy Y.556 

Haralson. Micheal A.287 

Haralson. Stanton A.544 

Harbinson, Steven A.299 

Harbottle. Jerry L.389 

Harbotlle, Suzanne.455 

Harbour. Sally M.549 

Hardenburgh, E.583 


Hardenburgh, Lindsey M..306, 308, 583 


Harder. Conrad A. 

Harder, Hans J. 

Harder, Kurt J. 

Harder, Lisa K. 

Harder, Michael P. 

Harder, Patrick J. 

Harder. Robyn R. 

Harder. Wade. 

Harder, William G. 

Hardin, Todd L. 

Harding, John T. 

Harding, Sheridan E.. 

Hardy. Kimberly K. 

Hargin, William G. 

Harkonen, Anne L. 

Harkonen, Sara K. 

Harm. Dean R. 

Ham, Suzanne M. 

Harndern Michael S... 

Harnett, Marie H. 

Harp, Benton J. 

Harp, Melissa. 

Harper. Karen I. 

Harper, Susan T. 

Harpster. Scott R. 

Harris, David C.. 

Harris. J. Doug.. 

Harris, Jay B.. 

Harris, Jeflrey B. 

Harris, Jeffrey L.. 

Harris, Joe E. 

Harris, Joel M. 

Harris. Laura N. 

Harris, Marie E. 

Harris.Martin I. 

Harris, Paul A.. 

Harris. Richard G. Jr. 

Harris, Robert A. 

Harris, Robert B.. 

Harris, Todd E. 

Harrison, Cheri L. 

Harrison, Martha J .... 

Harrison. Roger G. 

Harro, Douglas R. 

Hart, Edward C. 

Hart, Phillip E. 

Hart, Stacy C. 

Hart, Susan A. 

Hartley, Brian A. 

Hartman. Todd J. 

Harto, Donald E. 

Hartwell, Jane R. 

Hartwell, Orlando E.. 

Harvester, Gail J. 

Harvey, Shannon D.. 

Harvill, Gregory C. 

Hasfjord. Todd C. 

Hasfurther, Daniel L.. 
Hasko, Kimberly K.... 

Hassa, Kritstine D. 

Hastings, Cheri L. 

Hastings. Nicholas J. 
Hatch. Christopher B 

Hatch. Kristin M. 

Hatch, Loryn P. 

Hatch, Ryan L. 

Hatch, Sean M. 

Hatcher. James S. 

Hatcher, Terrence L.. 

Hatfield, Tim J. 

Hathaway, Shawn C. 
Hathaway, Tammy L. 

Hattan, Karen L.. 

Hattori, Junko M. 

Hattrup, Mark P. 

Haub, Steven R. 

Hauber, Renee E. 

Hauge, Lorna A. 

Haugen, Gayla R. 

Haun, Trishaa R. 

Hausler, Florence M. 

Haven, Pamela J. 

Haverly, Krista K. 

Hawes. Terry A. 

Hawk, Terisa M. 

Hawkins, Curt. 

Hawkins, Debra M.... 

Hawkins, Heidi L. 

Hawkins. James W... 

Hawkins Janis L. 

Hawkins, Michael P.. 
Hawley. Elizabeth M. 
Hayden, Charles W.. 

Hayden, Phil L. 

Hayden, Robert E. 

Hayek, Alina O. 

Hayes, Cynthia A. 

Hayes, David M. 

Hayes, Jill S. 

Hayes, John E. 


.385 

.325, 499 

!”..ZZ... 365, 468 

.487 

.272. 436 

.457 

.543 

.319 

.266 

.298 

.259, 436, 544 

.569 

.389, 507 

.262, 263 

.326, 327 

.310 

.499 

.548, 582 

.284 

.270 

.262, 263, 555 

.523 

.315 

.393 

.405 

.-.540 

.377 

.577 

.301 

.377, 494 

.397 

.514 

.345, 454, 

520, 560, 594 

.520 

.336 

.636, 638.639 

.268 

.385, 469 

.542 

.312 

.277, 279, 458 

.436 

.299 

.524, 543 

.391 

.357 

.312 

.577 

. 296 

.284 

.288 

.431 

.316, 549 

.276 

.432 

.286 

.271, 424 

.199, 363 

.369, 460, 536 

.262 

.331, 436 

.301 

.347 

.303 

.290 

.289, 290, 503 

.419, 540 

.297 

.297 

.424 

.436 

.343. 463 

.286 

.436 

.419 

.542 

.367 

.338, 429, 505 

.357, 464 

.598 

.316, 318, 461 

307, 446, 462, 589 

.268 

.334 

.288 

.263 

.504 

.405 

.263 

.194, 393 

.288, 463 

...511 

.323, 325, 571 

.266, 424 

.264, 265. 428 

.314, 461 

.407 

.361, 506 

.301 


Hayes. John T. Jr.375 

Hayes, Kellie A.333, 367 

Hayes, Kenneth S.290, 425 

Hayes, Kody K.580 

Hayes, Mitch R.268 

Hayes. Tom V.199, 323 

Haynes, Debbie A.341, 436 

Haynes, Elizabeth J.566 

Hayme, Timothy P.572 

Hays, Michael J.409 

Haywood, Patrick D.585 

Hazard. E. Patricia.204 

Hazelquist, Heidi L.468 

Healy, Shannon M.353 

Heaps, Steven H.286 

Heath, Robert D.409 

Heathman, Suzzanne M.432 

Heaton. Kellie A.349. 519, 545 

Heberling. Sharon M.307, 308 

Hecker. Jeffrey A.393, 570 

Hecker, Michelle A.315, 353 

Hedberg, Kristin L.351, 517 

Hedding. Terry C.515 

Hedeen, Eric D.399, 436, 571 

Hedlund, David L.267, 411 

Hedrick, John B.517, 436 

Heesen, Robert W.D.499 

Heflner, Jane E.518 

Heffron. John A.405 

Heggerness, Kim 1.203, 569 

Hehnen, Kathleen E.549 

Hehner, Martha A.436 

Hehr. Lori A.345, 591 

Heida, Kelli M.289, 290. 425 

Heidenreich, Michael J.510, 570 

Heikkinen, Thomas S.403 

Heilman, Jeffrey J.274 

Heilmann. Linda A.499 

Hein, Helen H.495 

Hein, John J.436 

Heinck, Brenda K.568 

Heinemann, Lori R.277, 279, 453 

Heinen, Loran K.288 

Heinrich, Cornelia J.260 

Heintz, Jay C.381 

Heinz. Kirk F.433 

Heinz, Tara L.433 

Heitman, Rochelle R.437 

Heitstuman, Mark D.564 

Hekel. Mark K.499 

Hellie, Dean D.494, 542 

Hellyer, Martha M.264, 450 

Heims, Kerri M.584 

Helsper, Mary G.277, 568 

Hemenway. Douglas T.379 

Heminger, Crystal L.461 

Hempei, Robert A.336 

Hemrich, Jerald R.337, 544 

Hemstreet, Cynthia M.459 

Henderson. Carie A.541 

Henderson, Dale A.391 

Henderson. Gregg A.». 417 

Henderson, Gretchen J.317, 428 

Henderson, Kenneth C.417 

Henderson, Sarah A.334 

Hendrick, Michael D.320 

Hendricks, Elizabeth L.306 

Hendricks, Melinda 1.499 

Hendrickson, Jeff R.389 

Hendrickson, Melinda L.369, 520 

Hendrickson, Richard C.542 

Hendrickson, Rondald E.381 

Hendry. Anne E.263 

Hendry. Jean L.262, 263 

Henesy, Chris L.329, 428 

Henion, Gregory B.330, 335 

Henke, Camie J.277 

Henke. Carmen J.535 

Henley, Kathryn S.549 

Henn, Dave J.407 

Hennessey. Patrick J.330 

Hennig, Diane L.359 

Henning, Mark C.377 

Henning, Teresa A.287, 290 

Hennis, Nigel L.289, 425, 540, 593 

Henricksen, Christi J.369, 449 

Henrie, Matthew P.385, 469, 543 

Henriksen. Karen L.515, 550 

Henriksen, Maria L.549 

Henriksen, Mark E.321 

Henry, Sue E.292, 307, 309 

Hensel, Paul A.202 

Henselman, Holly A.499 

Hensley, Mark J.409 

Hensley, Tim E.424 

Henson, Karin L.338, 429 

Heppell, Stephen R.379 

Herb, Roger J.270 

Heredia, Laurie J.276 

Hereth, Sheila R.312 

Hergert, Jennifer K.261 

Herington. Donald D.320 

Herman, Joel E.564 

Herman, Peggy L.465, 577 

Herman. Robert M.331 

Herman, Philip W. Jr.437 

Herrera, Steven B. 272 

Herrin, John T.274 

Herrin, Sheldon H.419 

Herron, Bradley E.469 


Herron, Daniel E.. 

.301 


309, 555 

Herron. Kim J. 

.437, 499 

Hoff. Randal K. 

.320 

Herrington, Diane J. 

.264 

Hoffman, Geoff. 

.288 525 

Herron, Mona E. 

.316. 357 

Hoffman, Joe A. 

..437, 493, 564 

Herron, Shannon. 

.264, 540 

Hnflman Michael R.. 

.300 

Hershfield, Joshua P. 

.194, 526 

Hofmann, Gary W. 

.336 

Hervey, David T. 

.268 

Hogan, Eric W. 

.300 

Herzog. Shelley C. 

.432. 493 

Hogger, Marlin R. 

.381 

Hesse, Anne K. 

...326, 327, 576 

Hoglund, Kris S. 

.393 

Hester, Russell T. 

.330 

Hogund, Robert E. 

.393 

Heston, John M. 

.469, 921 

Hogue, Laurie C. 

.359 

Heston, Michael J. 

.310 

Hogue, Lynn. 

.463 

Heuston Kami K. 

.520 

Hohman Lori A 

. 437 

Heutmaker. Thomas N.. 

.397 

Holland, Diane M. 

.535 

Hewett, Dallas A. 

.270, 555 

Holand, Elizabeth A. 

. 280 281 453 

Hewitt, Ellen A. 

.312 

Holbrook, Ann E. 

..437, 525, 593 

Hewitt, Laura L. 

.495. 584 

Holcomb, Tammie M. 

.287, 425 

Heyn, Martin J. 

.407 

Holcomb, Todd A. 

.437,507 

Hickam, Tamara S. 

.312, 467 

Hollingsworth, Dale E .... 

.502 

Hickerson, Sally A. 

.506 

Hollingsworth Dave M.... 

.397 

Hickey, Peter V. 

.286 

Hollis, Mark E. 

.298 

Hickle. Patricia J. 

.291 

Holman. Robert D. 

.499 

Hicks, Allison A. 

...355, 463. 591 

Holmberg, Caroline A. 

.363 

Higby, Brian C. 

.401 

Holmes Ann E 

466 

Higginbotham, Michael.. 

.298, 555 

Holmes. Libby. 

.353 

Higgins, Jay E. 

.202. 381 

Holmes Natalie A. 

.294, 459 

Higgins, Jerry D. 

.323 

Holms, Tammy J. 

.361. 520 

Higgins, Julie F. 

.291 

Holmstrom, Jay M. 

.202 

Higginson, Kay B. 

.313 

Holmstrom, Sonja J. 

..367, 516, 590 

Higgs, Dale E. 

.430, 520 

Holt, Arne P. 

.487 

Higley, Larry A. 

.526 

Holt. Connie J. 

.459 

Higson, Scott R. 

.428 

Holt, Steven A. 

.270, 518 

Hildebrand. Julie A. 

.569 

Holten, Dan J. 

.375 

Hildebrand!, Kathy M. 

.347 

Holler, William T. 

.271 

Hiles, Melani J. 

...369, 560, 562 

Holzberger, William J. 

..540, 566, 593 

Hill, Angela J. 

.432 

Homberg, Caroline. 

.313 

Hill, Carole R. 

.199. 260 

Honan, James J. 

.395 

Hill Heidi M. 

.338, 569 

Honekamp Julie M 

519 

Hill. Jeanna L. 

...349, 448, 504 

Honeycutt, Elizabeth A... 

.433, 437 

Hill. Jeff D. 

.266 

Honeycutt. Timothy M. 

..437, 507, 538 

Hill. Jeffrey B. 

.267, 424 

Honeywell, Kimberly L.... 

.290, 425 

Hill. John T. 

...518, 538, 540 

Hong, Minja J. 

.258 

Hill, Lori R. 

.499 

Honner, Ronald W. 

.393, 506 

Hill, Mary M. 

.280, 281 

Honsinger, Tracy J. 

.592 

Hill Michael C. 

.379 

Hoo Kee K. 

.507 

Hill, Robbie A. 

.409 

Hood Denise 1. 

.326 

Hill, Rodney H. 

.299, 570 

Hood, Greg M. 

.405, 515 

Hill, Thomas G. 

.431, 524 

Hood, Jim R. 

.383 

Hill, Tracy R. 

.430 

Hooke, Jayme M. 

.359, 455 

Hille, Kirk A. 

.300 

Hooks, Maria T. 

.450 

Hille, Lisa. 

.426 

Hoon, Richard R. 

.430 

Hillegass, Gina C. 

.526 

Hooper. Craig M. 

.393, 543 

Hillestad, Jan M. 

.262, 263 

Hooper Jeffrey A 

.393 

Hilley, Donald T. 

.428, 515 

Hooper, Ken E. 

.385 

Hilliard, Charles S. 

.487, 568 

Hooper, Kerry J.. 

.359, 499 

Hillman, Kathleen A. 

.288, 542 

Hoover, Pierce M. 

.417 

Hillman, Michele E. 

.437, 535 

Hoover, Scott R. 

.389 

Hill. David S. 

.199 

Hope Alexandra M. 

.550 

Hilpert, Layne R. 

.310 

Hope. Gerald W. 

.419 

Hilton, Dave W. 

.540 

Hopf, Kristi A. 

.313 

Hiltwein. Wendi J. 

.333 

Hopkins. Clayton T. 

.289 

Himmelberger, Don H..., 

....377. 469, 494 

Hopkins, James M. 

.417 

Himmer, Karin M. 

....314, 318, 437 

Hopkins. Stephen M. 

.437, 520 

Hinchen, Catherine J. 

.431 

Hopkins, Stephen T. 

.298 

Hinck, Steve P. 

.419 

Hopkins, Tracy L. 

...353, 455, 505 

Hine, Leanne M. 

.286 

Horan, Jillana G. 

.334 

Hine, Wendy E. 

.204 

Horlander. Barbara L. 

.277, 279 

Hinkley, Kevin B. 

.511 

Horn Christopher E. 

.288 

Hinrichs, Scott B. 

.296 

Horne Andre M . 

.287 

Hinthorne, Charles R.... 

.271 

Horne, Elisa M. 

.291, 355 

Hinthorne. Kim A. 

.550, 556 

Horne, Gayle B.349, 520, 553, 594 

Hinton, Lewis G.J. 

.271 

Horne, Lawrence D. 

.297 

Hinton, Steve R. 

.. .407, 424, 522 

Horne, Scott S. 

.383 

Hinzie, Douglas R. 

.437 

Horner, Gregory L 

.395, 499 

Hirata, Lorraine A. 

.262 

Horner Michael B. 

. 395 

Hirayama, Aki. 

.260 

Horner, Scott D. 

.559 

Hirsch, Ronald S. 

.419 

Horstman, Donna M. 

.552 

Hirschberg, David L. 

.566 

Horstman Mathew. 

.552 

Hirschel, Carleton H. 

....268, 424, 572 

Horton, Brooks E. 

.437 

Hirschmann, Erica L. 

.317, 318 

Horton, Dana L. 

.307 

Hirst, James L. 

.542 

Horton, Jennifer A. 

.314 

Hisayasu. Philip T. 

.274 

Horton, Mack P. 

...341, 405, 516 

Hitt. Melissa A. 

.303, 577 

Horton. Robert L. 

...520, 538, 593 

Hively, Constance S. 

.369, 516 

Hosken, Brian D. 

.322, 325 

Hixson, Jennifer L. 

.276 

Hoskin, Scott E. 

.397 

Ho, Chung W. 

....301, 526, 558 

Hosking, Christi A. 

.259 

Ho, Leung-heung J. 

.558 

Hosier, Troy R. 

.336, 429 

Ho, Thomas J. 

.286, 538 

Hosoi, Junko. 

...425, 535, 595 

Hoag, Deborah L. 

.260 

Hoss Michelle M. 

.357 

Hoag. Erin C. 

.516 

Host, Lawrence A. 

.526 

Hoard, Daniel M. 

.417 

Hostetter, Connie L. 

...430, 568, 606 

Hoard. Phillip S. 

.337 

Hostetter. Dennis L. 

.553, 594 

Hoback, Don P. 

.572, 593 

Houby, Karen E. 

.333 

Hoback, John R. 

.275 

Hougan. John C. 

.413 

Hobbs Kristi L. 

.333 

Hougan Michael W 

. 437 564 

Hobbs, Tracy J. 

.549 

Houpis, loannis N. 

.336 

Hobson, Brandon K. 

.409 

Houston, Earl H. 

.389 

Hobson, Joel A. 

.337, 432 

Hovenkotter, Michael T.. 

.266, 589 

Hochhalter, Teresa L.... 

. 357 

Howard, Alison M. 

.516 

Hockenson, Dale R. 

.586 

Howard. Carolyn A. 

...260, 261, 518 

Hocking, Bradley D. 

.272 

Howard Chenelle R .. 

..326 327, 549 

Hoder, Andrew C. 

.544 

Howard, Corrie L. 

.259, 423 

Hodgdon, Sherri D. 

.593 

Howard, Daniel W. 

.499 

Hodge, Crystal J. 

.437 

Howard, Greg S. 

.379 

Hodges, Kari L. 

.264, 465 

Howard, Raymond S. 

.331 

Hodges, Kenneth J. 

.331, 536 

Howe, James B. IV. 

.297, 427 

Hodges, Lori L. 

.506 

Howe Michael C . 

.437 

Hodgson, Ron C. 

.268 

Howeiler, Heidi A. 

.454 

Hoeck Lora G. 

.334 

Howeiler, Jon P. 

.297 

Hoepfinger, Jill H. 

.305, 308, 

Howell, Betsy L. 

.287 


Howell. John M.395. 51' 

Howell, Michael P.379. 54. 

Howell. Richard K.49a 

Howell, Shawn J.357, 46* 

Hoyle, Debra A.518, 57* 

Hoyt, Jeanna M.284 

Hsu. Paul D.S.549 

Hubbard, Kimberly D.361, 59' 

Hubbell, Earl J.289, 29( 

Huber, Craig A.431 

Huber, Monica J.25$( 

Huber, Petra S.264, 45: 

Huber, Stephani R.292, 42f 

Hublou, Jon R.41* 

Huck, Todd D.38S 

Huddle, Lisa D.34 

Huddleston, Dave H.27- 

Hudelson, Diane M.343, 45! 

Hudon, Elizabeth M.28^ 

Hudon. Rich M.41 i 

Hudson, John.199, 27' 

Hudson. Kent C.39» 

Huesby. Joel E. 542 

Hufana, Myrlino P.33< 

Hufana, YSmael P.33 « 

Huffman, Dale 1.52« 

Huffman, Kara A.35L 

Hug. Joel D.55. 

Huggart, Jeff D.58^ 

Huggins, Pamela J.46i 

Hughes, John W.385, 430, 49* 

Hughes, Ninette H.34f 

Hughes, Pamela J.26J& 

Hughes. Robert F.57'. 

Hughes. Sharon M.314, 318, 46 

Huisingh, Greggory L.300, 42 

Huisingh, Jeffrey S.272, 42- 

Huisingh, Larry R.290. 524, 55J 

Hull. Bennett J.39S 

Hull, Bill H.39£ 

Hull. Janelle L.347 

Humes. Erika M.287, 29C 

Hummel. Christopher S.3391 

Hummel, Jay F.413, 511, 542 

Hummel. Jeffrey J.57C 

Humphries, Gene A.430 I 

Hunhoff, Joseph P.267 

Hunsaker, James D.437, 552 

Hunt, Jill E.291, 466 

Hunt. John P.389, 56C 

Hunt, Phyllis J.522, 586 

Hunt, Reed 0 . 419, 499, 537, 56q 

Hunt, Sheelagh A.307- 

Hunt. Susan J.31? 

Huntamer. Kim L.26* 

Hunter, Amilynn.276, 546 

Hunter, Gregory S.324, 325 

Hunter, Joan M.49ffi I 

Hunter, John D.32d 

Hunter, Lori A.30^ 

Hunter, Paul B.4IS* 

Hunter, Peter A.287, 42t 

Hunter, Rosemarie J.4301 

Huntington, Debra M.355 

Huntzinger, Sarah.36S? 

Hurd, Lyle D.205. 51^ 

Hurd. Roger M..391 

Hurlburt, Kristan B.437 

Hurlbut, John F.413 

Hurlbut, Margaret A.432 

Hurson, Mary K.35S 

Hurson, Maureen J.35S 

Husarik, Denise M.556 

Huse, Barry G.268 

Huson, Gregory D.540, 561, 594 

Huston. Ronald.437, 518 

Hutchins, Karen A.535 

Hutchins, Lance C.194 

Hutchinson, John K.202, 271 

Hutchinson, John L.407! 

Hutt, Taylor W.289 

Hutton, Bruce W.339 

Hutton, John D.2971 

Huynh, Dung T.301 

Hyatt. David C.52ffl 

Hyatt, James F.319 

Hyde, Tiffany W.286, 463; 

Hyde, Tracy L.343, 454 

Hylton. George L.2980 

Hynes, Jerald J.331' 


Ii 


Ide, Frank R.201 

Idler, Diane L.343, 463 

Ihrig, Mark N.267| 

Ihry, Deena L.195, 343, 565 

Ihry, Marci L.343| 

Ike, Dede.4551 

Ikeda, Randall R.202. 499 

Imai, Reid S.5381 

Imlig, Theresa M.276 

Ingalls. Jenay E.518 

Ingalls. Yvonne M.560 


618 


Index /1984 



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Ingham. Rand E. 

Ingram, Douglas R. 

Ingram. Terry. 

.320 

.401. 499 

.345 

.291 


.583 

Inouye, Jon W. 

.284 

Intermill, Tersea. 

.309 

Ippolito, Michael C. 

.411 


494 562 

Ironside, Jill M. 

.292 

Irsfeld, Karin L. 

.365 

Irsfeld, Lynn 1. 

.557 

Irvine, Linda S. 

.258 

Irvine, Mary E. 

.258 

Irving, Bradley D. 

.290, 425 

Irwin, Edward M. 

.413 

Irwin, Lisa M. 

.437 

Irwin, Michael J. 

.399 

Isaacs, Karen S. 

.361,463, 591 

Isaacson, Dennis J. 

.399, 469 

Isaacson, Eric E. 

.437 

Isaacson, Peter D. 

.397 

Isaak. Elizabeth M. 

.437 

Isaksen, Kirsten J. 

.351, 544 

Isaksen, Laurie A. 

.355, 455 

Ishak, Amin M. 

.496. 552 

Ishii, Raymond G. 

.552 

Ishimitsu, Kathy T. 

.317 

Isom. Richard L. 

.499 

Israel, Scott C. 

.437 

Iszley, Timothy B. 

.421, 593 

Ivanis, Daniel J. 

.583, 634-636 

Iverson, Laurie A. 

.306, 309 

Iverson, Terri L. 

.535 



Jackett, Sally J.432 

Jacklin, Gayle A.357, 459 

Jacklin, Glenn C.393 

Jackson, Christa M.313 

Jackson, Clifton G.335. 428 

Jackson. Cynthia E.279 

Jackson, David R.494 

Jackson, John A.437. 519 

Jackson. Keith L.413 

Jackson, Kenneth F.538, 571 

Jackson, Kremiere H.326, 449, 

564, 589, 591 

Jackson, Miles G.321, 325 

Jackson, N. Dayna.343 

Jackson, Paul M.428. 508 

Jackson, Sheryl R.197, 353 

Jackson. Vince L.299 

Jacky, Lance D.424, 570 

Jacob, Rick L.515 

Jacobs. James A.272 

Jacobs. Jennifer A. 598 

Jacobs, Laura D.433 

Jacobs, Peter D.271, 417, 437 

Jacobsen, Darryl S.321. 325 

Jacobsen, Gretchen L.359, 468 

Jacobsen, Tami V..277, 448 

Jacobson, Margaret R.520 

Jacobson, Terri M.259 

Jacobson, William B.399 

Jacques. Sarah A.292 

Jaderhoim, Julie A.426 

Jaeger, Alison J.306 

Jaeger. Glenda K.333 

Jahja, Moria M..495, 552 

Jamga, Jon T.437, 548 

Jakotich, Iva-Mane.359 

James, Beverly A.306, 453 

James. Brenda K.305 

James, Bryan D.523 

James, David ..519 

James, Jeffrey A.413 

James, Laura.505 

James, Linda L.262, 263, 506 

Jandoc. Steven M.329, 538 

Janett, Anne C.309 

Janke, Derek W.298, 427 

Jansen, Bonnie L.520 

Jansen, Dan R.268 

Jansen, Jennifer L... 195, 349. 563, 568 

Jansen, Mary S.203, 505 

Janssen, Beverly J.449 

Janssen, Elizabeth A.355, 467 

Januchowski, Jed W.493 

Januchowski, Jon D.437, 487, 

539, 593 

Janus, Joseph.560 

Jaquez, Joel K.494 

Jaquish, James M.322 

Jaquish, John D.320, 324 

Jaremko, Lisa K.367 

Jarrell, Jacueline L.303 

Jarvi, Todd.584 

Jasper, Daniel N.437 

Jausoro, Gina M.369, 467 

Jay, Paul J.548 

Jee, LilyC.V.423, 577 

Jeffrey. Robert III.375, 593 


Jeffries. Tracy A.326 

Jelic, Anthony M.270 

Jellison, Christopher.385, 525, 538, 

540 

Jelmberg, Anna C.276, 279 

Jelmberg. George V.437 

Jelsing. Lori A.437 

Jenkel, William C.546 

Jenkins, Alexander M.437 

Jenkins. Darian.337 

Jenkins. Debra L...:.526 

Jenkins, Jeffrey K.389 

Jenkins, Jon J.425, 560 

Jenkins, Ronald E.296 

Jenkins, Teresa A.437, 506 

Jennings. Kevin M.301 

Jennings, Suzanne M.355 

Jensen. Arne C.381 

Jensen. Catherine S.507 

Jensen, Douglas L.532 

Jensen. Drene L.389, 538 

Jensen, Jeffrey D.319 

Jensen, Jillann M.304 

Jensen, Julie L.259 

Jensen, Keith R.578 

Jensen. Kris R.511, 503, 542 

Jensen, Merrill B.546 

Jenson, Jane A.347 

Jentges, Cathy M.363, 607 

Jerome, Shawn M.591 

Jerue. Lynne M.349 

Jeske, Dana M.507 

Jeske, Douglas N.443, 552 

Jeske, Juliana K.494 

Jessen, John G.403 

Jessup, Carolyn R.542 

Jett, Terry A.437 

Jewett, Ronald D.381 

Jirava, Thomas R.279, 328 

Joens, Anita C.430 

Joffe, Steven M.297, 427, 540 

Johannes, Kenneth E.544 

Johannesen, Greg S.266 

John, Kenneth L.389, 538 

John, Samuel A.391. 519 

Johnson, Aaron.375, 437, 515 

Johnson, Aaron D.607 

Johnson, Bhan S.577 

Johnson, Brian W.268 

Johnson, Bruce G.296 

Johnson, Carol L. 526 

Johnson. Carolyn M.277. 577 

Johnson, Charlene M.309 

Johnson, Charles E. Jr.303, 405 

Johnson. Clark V.271 

Johnson, Cort E.389, 538 

Johnson. Craig M.299 

Johnson, David L.336, 429 

Johnson. Debbie J.347 

Johnson, Denise V.302 

Johnson, Diana L.306, 308 

Johnson, Eric C.287 

Johnson, Eric E.268, 424 

Johnson, Eric J.393, 553, 994 

Johnson, Glenna.553, 561 

Johnson, Gregory L.329, 335, 594 

Johnson. Jack L.385. 509, 543, 585 

Johnson, James P.i.... 407 

Johnson. Janie L.306 

Johnson. Janna M.293, 437 

Johnson, Jeff S.:.377, 439 

Johnson, Jeffrey D.437 

Johnson, Jeffrey G.548 

Johnson, Jeffrey H.270 

Johnson, Jeffrey T.393 

Johnson, Jill J.369. 432 

Johnson, Joan L.367. 464, 499 

Johnson. Julie A.510, 570 

Johnson, Karri A.316, 318, 555 

Johnson, Kate M.333 

Johnson. Kathleen M.333, 564 

Johnson, Kay E.361 

Johnson, Kenneth S.270 

Johnson, Kent R.503, 515 

Johnson, Kevin S.381 

Johnson, Kim A.277 

Johnson. Kristi A.280, 545 

Johnson, Kristin E.347 

Johnson, Laura L.317 

Johnson, Laura M.338 

Johnson, Lynn K.277 

Johnson, Maria S.432, 456 

Johnson, Marl* H.272 

Johnson, Mark P.375 

Johnson, Mark.499 

Johnson, Molly J.258 

Johnson, Neil A.366 

Johnson, Patricia S.307 

Johnson, Patty J. 437 

Johnson, Peter R.430, 540 

Johnson, Regina M.359 

Johnson, Robert W.544 

Johnson, Robin D.367 

Johnson, Scott A.297, 539 

Johnson, Scott D.409 

Johnson, Sheila R.520, 563 

Johnson, Stanley W.437 

Johnson, Steven D. 299 

Johnson. Susan L.!... 292 

Johnson, Suzanne M.363 


Johnson, Tague A.433. 551 

Johnson, Tamera B.437 

Johnson, Tammy L.437, 508 

Johnson. Tanya S.437 

Johnson. Tanzee C.197 

Johnson, Ted D.409, 495 

Johnson, Teresa K.542 

Johnson. Thomas H.487 

Johnson, Traci A.292 

Johnson. Tracy A.304 

Johnson, Tracy R.294, 453 

Johnson, Valerie J.355 

Johnson, Vanessa M..499 

Johnson. Wesley E.437 

Johnston. Bryan R ... 417, 520, 540, 594 

Johnston, David B.419 

Johnston. Kevin M.274 

Johnston, Larry K.320 

Johnston, Robert R.324 

Jolley. Brian L.580 

Jolly. Kim M.355, 459 

Jonas. Andrea L.359, 560 

Jonas, Scott K.401 

Jones. Bryce M.437, 499, 554 

Jones, Corey L .397 

Jones. D. Brent.403, 522 

Jones. David T.437, 552 

Jones. David W.437. 559 

Jones. Edmund J.419 

Jones, Gregory S.297 

Jones, Jennifer L.345 

Jones, Jossandra N.287. 426 

Jones. Julie A.353, 559 

Jones. Julie K.439. 458, 494 

Jones, Kathy M.259 

Jones, Kelly T.507 

Jones. Lisa A.506 

Jones, Martin B.336 

Jones. Marty A.201. 267 

Jones, Maryjo.677 

Jones, Molly A.333 

Jones, Rick E.201 

Jones, Robyn N.264, 583 

Jones. Rollen V.270 

Jones, Scott A.298 

Jones, Scott D.272, 555 

Jones, Steven R.301, 428 

Jones, Todd C.381 

Jones, Todd E.322 

Joplin, Mark A. 201. 508 

Jordan. Christopher W.288 

Jordan. Tina M.347 

Jorgensen. Mardi M.355 

Jorgenson, John K.409, 437 

Jorgenson. Randy C.515 

Jorstad. Lars B.194 

Jorve. Kathy D.367 

Jose, Phillip A.322 

Joseph, Douglas G.336 

Joseph. Susan M.343, 553 

Judd. Carol K.277 

Judd, Janice L.494 

Judson, Beth V.355, 453 

Jue, Laurine E.430 

Jue, Lissa J.462 

Jung, Mary A.314 

Junger, Cynthia A.338 

Jurgensen, Eric C.403, 503, 576 

Jurich, Suzanne M.347 

Jurries, Jodi L.359 

Justin, Jennifer A.464 

Jutila, Mark A.367 


Kk 


Kaalaas, Richard H.275, 279, 328 

Kabat. Brent L.275, 278. 328 

Kafer, Joan D.367, 516 

Kahl, Jennifer L.563 

Kahler, Dave M.496, 548 

Kahler, Greg A.297 

Kahler. Jeffrey L.320 

Kahler. Scott B.285 

Kahn, Sarah L.277 

Kaimakis, Lisa C.359 

Kaku, Clinton A.499 

Kalahar. Michael D.336 

Kalanquin. Dean A.397 

Kalasz, Stephanie K.333 

Kalata, Marian G.459 

Kalejaiye, Ayoola O.515 

Kalkofen, Donald A.409, 543 

Kamiya, Naoki.201, 437, 508 

Kammers, Todd L.298 

Kammerzell, Kristin H.467 

Kamphuis , Julie M.293. 437, 

447, 462, 552 

Kamrin, Joy L.333 

Kaneshiro. Lance M.270, 538 

Kangas, Timothy A.515 

Kanzler, Kim R.345, 449 

Kanzler, Lisa K.449, 494 

Kappenman, Kregg A.437, 517 

Kappenman. Kristeen M.303, 449 

Kappes, Michael L.407, 469 

Kappl, Todd M.286 


Karasek.Lisa M....313, 355 

Karimi, Azita L.334, 359 

Karlsen, Eric M.298 

Karlson, Kevin L.268, 548 

Karlson, Vincent B.430, 568 

Karr. Dean W.275, 279 

Karst. Kathleen E.357, 458, 495 

Karwal, Timothy M.297 

Kaseberg, Christopher.286 

Kaseberg, Cynthia M.355, 556 

Kaser, Laura.357, 499 

Kashyap, Poorna P.526 

Kassel, Dana E.437 

Katsarsky, Krystla F.437 

Katuuk. Jeanette R.P.552 

Katzinski. James G.437, 500 

Katzinski, Timothy A.437 

Kauffman. Lester L.383, 517 

Kaufman. Henry C.271 

Kaufmann, Suzanne M.602 

Kaun. Shaysann..203, 315 

Kaut, Kimberly K.260, 559. 594 

Kay. Brian D.419 

Kearney. Shawn P.419 

Keating, Mark T.419 

Keck. Cathenne J.369. 449, 520 

Keck. Josh N.296 

Kee, Thomas E.437, 540 

Keefer, Jody A.343 

Keehnel. Wendy L.288 

Keen, Susan.520 

Keeney, Laura L.345 

Kegel, Amy L.437 

Keilwitz, Kelly M.510 

Kellam. Terence S.393 

Kellegrow, Sarah L.566 

Keller, Janee M.493 

Keller. John W.200, 544 

Keller. Robert T.526 

Keller. Thaddeus J.377 

Kelleran. Lynn M.293 

Kelley. D. Colleen.343. 506 

Kelley. David L.430, 506 

Kelley, Geoffrey G.267 

Kelley. John R.550 

Kelley, Kathleen M.353, 459 

Kelley, Michael R.407 

Kelley, Shanlyne M.437 

Kelley, Steven K.267 

Kelley. Tracy A.595 

Kelliher, William F.331 

Kelly. Brett A.381 

Kelly, Chris N.405 

Kelly. Christopher J.331 

Kelly, Felecia A.369. 456 

Kelly, Kevin M.545 

Kelly, Kirk R.383 

Kelly. Laurel C.542 

Kelly. Patricia J.367 

Kelly, Renee B.303, 449 

Kelly. Sheila L.437. 554 

Kelly, Steven E.268 

Kelton, Eileen M.569 

Kembel, Cregg L.437 

Kemp, Deanne L.316 

Kemp, Kenneth R.409 

Kendall, Margaret L.454 

Kenderesi, Traci L.332 

Kenedy. Rosanne.326, 327 

Kenna, Brian J.502 

Kenneally. Patricia M.437 

Kennedy, Arthur K.417 

Kennedy. Bryan J.602 

Kennedy, Dave E.564 

Kennedy. James H.583 

Kennedy. Jennifer.584 

Kennedy, Michael J.381 

Kenney. Laura.467 

Kenney, Paige L.294, 457 

Kenney, Paul E.271, 425 

Kenoyer, Karen L.262 

Kent, Joseph L.299 

Kepner, Kathryn L.463 

Kern, Bryan C.399 

Kero, David A.395 

Kerr, Charlene R.316 

Kerrone. Kelly D.205 

Kerst. Elizabeth J.347 

Kertson, Chris T.319 

Kerwin. Paul J.500 

Ketchie. Kevin M.551 

Key, Kathryn E.291, 426 

Keyes, Kenneth C.284 

Keys, Duane E.271 

Keyser, M. Anthony.270 

Khamneian, Bahman.524 

Khanna, Varun.437, 524 

Khorram, Hossein.507 

Kibbe, Polly L.520, 536, 580 

Kidd, Doug.323 

Kidder, Dave A.411 

Kidder, Linda M.458, 357 

Kieffer, Kristine L.351, 500, 543 

Kienzle, Steve B.554 

Kight. Michael A.266, 269, 424 

Kilber, Tamara K.345, 500, 538 

Kilborn, Paige B.353, 459 

Kilborn, Suzanne L.291 

Kile, Bob E.288 

Kilgrow, J Katie.259 


Kilian. John R.493 

Killebrew, R. Kyle.287 

Killion, Carolyn E.369, 456 

Kilmer, Nancilee M.468 

Kilpatrick, Erin K.345, 543 

Kim, Sue Y.287 

Kim, Won K.266 

Kim,'Yong N.401 

Kimball. Jeffery A.274, 507 

Kimball. Karl R.383, 511, 542 

Kimball, William J.319 

Kimble. Steve S.503 

Kimborowicz, Dana D.329 

Kimbrell, Julie M.277. 279, 328 

Kimery, Sandy L.312 

Kimmel. Melinda J.437 

Kimrey, David T.320 

Kincaid. Jeffrey M.290 

Kincaid, Kathi R.305, 309 

Kinder, Dennis R.433 

Kinder, Richard C.511, 542 

King, Bruce N.419, 504 

King, Carol L.286 

King, Cheri R.355, 437 

King, Cheryl.203, 500 

King, Dale W.330 

King. Diane A.264, 456 

King, George J.579 

King. John J.437, 493 

King, Marcia L.294 

King, Roy P.377 

Kingston, Elizabeth M.293 

Kinley, Terry A.286 

Kinney, Felecia M.201 

Kinney. Larry P.337, 429 

Kinnunen, Laura J.291. 465 

Kintschi. Joseph B.319 

Kinzel, Katie A.566 

Kiong, Mee M.289, 426. 577 

Kipfer. Kimberlee M.455 

Kirchner, Julia L.586, 594 

Kirk, Gregory T.299, 427 

Kirkland. Ken G.274 

Kirkpatrick. Brian K.510 

Kirkpatrick, Carl R.298 

Kirsch, Christina.437 

Kiser. Laura C.439 

Kishline, Mike G.272. 424 

Kisler, Kari A.363, 565, 590 

Kittelson, Konme R.341, 432, 462 

Kivimaki, John R.417 

Kizer, Karen S.457 

Kjose, Teresa L.349. 503, 577 

Klabo, Anona M.450 

Klansnic, Barbara J.333 

Klapp, Kevin R.271 

Klarich. James H.437 

Klarich, Mary A.437 

Klaus, Debra L.495. 570, 595 

Klaus, Richard I.268, 424 

Klein, Brian L.399, 533 

Klein. Michael T.329 

Klein, Richard J.500 

Klem, Brian L.469 

Klemola. Robert J.508 

Klett, Steven K.419 

Klett, Teresa L.560 

Kline. Greg A.266, 424 

Kline, Scott L.289 

Klinefelter. Nancy A.262, 263 

Klinger. Jeffrey P.395, 540 

Klingman, Kent L.321, 324 

Klingman, Kurt L.321,325 

Klmkenberg, Bridget!.570 

Klinkenberg, Paul D.575 

Kliphardt. Lena R.369 

Klipperl, Kyle L.275. 278 

Klobucher. John M.515 

Klobucher. Macella M.363, 500 

Klosterhoff. Andrea R.357 

Klozar, Michael A.267 

Klundt. James M.330 

Kluth, Francine M.259 

Knapp. Gretchen A.365 

Knapp, Julie A.367 

Knapp, Kristi J.326 

Knapp. Scott R.284 

Knauf. Jeffrey G.267, 325 

Knebel. Frederick R.322, 325 

Knecth, Andrea L.316, 318, 462 

Knezvich. William J.298 

Knight, Jeff S.271, 425 

Knight. Lisa A.264 

Knight, Lori A.353, 455 

Knight, Maurice M.403 

Knight, Michael M.469 

Knight, Patrick T.331 

Knittle, Brenda L.461 

Knobel, Jill M.307, 589 

Knoepfel. Lisa S.307, 589 

Knopp, Marcia D.284, 335, 425 

Knott, Dianne C.334 

Knotts, Gilbert E.407 

Knowles, Mark W.383 

Knowles, Teresa M.294 

Knowlton, Yokiko.494 

Knox, Gregory P.437 

Knox, Tara L.437 

Knox, Tom W.515 

Knud son, Christopher L.286 


1984 / Index 


619 


























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Knudson, Ole J.301 

Knudtson. Dean M.271 

Knutson, Gregory W.266, 589 

Knutzen, Roger K.407 

Ko, Justin J.279 

Kobza. Mary A.523 

Koch, Colleen K.260 

Koch, Donna A.280, 449, 591 

Koch, Doreen A.289 

Koch, Mary A.293 

Koch. Michelle D.313, 318, 556, 560 

Koehler. Deborah H.508 

Koenig, Maria E.307, 308, 458 

Koepke. Greg A.289 

Koepke. Laura A.194, 332, 335 

Koes. Richard T.272, 425 

Koga, Steven J.200 

Koh, Hui YenC.258 

Kohler, Richard B.200 

Kohlman, Terry A.469 

Koidal, Michael W.383 

Koide, Renee C.262, 263 

Kolb, Diane L ...338, 340, 449. 495. 570 

Koller, Brent C.377 

Koller, Monty L.377, 494 

Kolopita. Moha.552 

Koloski, Laurie A.359 

Komoto, Gail A.332 

Konetchy, Dawn M.302, 450 

Konetchy, Steven J.552 

Kong, Kimberly N.437 

Konishi, Kevin T.385, 500 

Koontz, Darcy K.345 

Kooyers. Joe.547 

Kopf, Lisa M.294 

Koplitz, Keith S.524 

Kopp, Dawn M.333 

Koppa, Scott A.510 

Koppel, Nancy L.328 

Korenkiewicz, Stephen.296, 427 

Korpi. Todd M.331 

Korsmo. Dean E.325, 561 

Kortright, Irma T.510, 570 

Korthght, Sandra L...294 

Kosiancic, Terrence.397 

Kosmata, Knsti M.307, 589, 595 

Kosmata, Matt.437, 508 

Kost, Peter J.411, 577 

Kottke, Mark A.:.268, 269 

Koutlas, Theodore C.550 

Kovacich. Brian T.522 

Kovalenko. Pete G.399 

Koyoro, Henriette.526, 563 

Kraabel, Timothy R.297 

Kraft, David W.411 

Kraft. Jeffrey F.411 

Kraft, Kyle A.430 

Kragerud. Bret D.385 

Krahmer, Mike S.337 

Krajewski, Stanley E.496, 544, 552 

Krantz, Daniel R.407 

Kraupa, Diane.332 

Kraupa, Don L.403 

Kraus, Cathryn L.343, 455 

Kraus. Lavon V.286, 555 

Krause. Ann E.283 

Krause, Paul H.330 

Krause. Terry A.515 

Kreager, Don L.421 


Krebs, Douglas R.578 

Kreifels, Shawn M.331 

Krein, Brenda M.359 

Krein, Jodie R.448 

Krein. Mark.520 

Kreiss, Jennifer L.606 

Krejci, Eric J.268. 578 

'Kremer, Elizabeth A.367 

Krieg, Kerry J.500 

Kring, Warren R.322 

Kristofferson. Heidi L.277, 278 

Krofchek. Mary H.316, 318, 460 

Krogh, Alvin Z.437, 500 

Krogh, Tina M.333, 343 

Kromminga. Jon M.399 

Kromminga, Lee R.399 

Kronnagel, Kimberly J.195, 437, 495 

Kronvall, Lisa K.293 

Krouse, James J.270 

Krouse, Michael T.321, 322, 324 

Krumwiede, Kathryn L.345, 517. 538 

Kruse, Elizabeth A.365 

Kruse, Nancy J.457 

Krussel, John P.274 

Krystad, Peter D. 320 

Ku, Peter D.284, 425, 500 

Kubinski, Kenneth J.507 

Kubler, Mary E.430 

Kuffner, Robert W.330 

Kugel, Stephenia L.289, 462 

Kuhlman, Brad A.266, 424 

Kuhn, Anita L.333 

Kuhn, Thomas P.437 

Kuhnhausen. Julie M.292 

Kuhnhausen. Karl A.268 

Kuhnhenn, Jon A.329 

Kuklish, David A.487 

Kukuk, Karen D.294, 454 

Kulaas, Stacy S.353 

Kulfan. Christine R.-....452, 353 

Kumasaka. Koby J.272, 425 

Kumpula, Donald A.426 

Kunka. Timothy R.330, 428 

Kunkel, Thomas A.496, 546 

Kunz-Johnson, Mary F.433 

Kunz, Eileen M.338, 466 

Kunz, Michael L.417 

Kunzler, Marieanne.457 

Kuranko, Rebecca L.505 

Kurfurst. Deborah A.437. 583 

Kurosu, Darin M.391 

Kurtenback. Shelly L.291 

Kurtz, Elizabeth A.463 

Kutsch, Duane B.389 

Kuykendall. Brenda I.329, 332 

Kuznetz, Robin L.518 

Kwan, Henry.284, 510,570 

Kwant, Maureen C.351 

Kycek. Alan J.397 

Kyriazis, D Michelle.302, 458 


ill 


LabJond, Richard D.515, 577 

Labomme. Donald M.331 


Lacasse. Mark R. 

Lacount, Walter J. 

Ladderud. John C. 

Ladderud. Keith J. 

Lafond. Michael A. 

Lafontaine. Todd C... 

Lagasse, Jill D. 

Lagerlund, Christy A, 
Lalor, Richard D.. 

.500 

301, 428, 509, 576 

.437, 549 

.437 

.570 

.271, 425 

.347 

.367 

.437 

Lam, Mei Ho. 

.500 

Lam, Yiu Hung D. 

.526, 558 

Lamb, Barbara J. 

.506 

Lamb, Diane E. 

294, 295, 452. 553 

Lamb, Erin K. 

.353 

Lamb, Kary L. 

.430 

Lamb, Mavis J. 

.314, 459 

Lamb, Patrick R. 

.383, 545 

Lambert. Cynthia M. 

.280, 281 

Lambert. Mark W. 

.507 

Lambert. Mary K. 

355, 360, 449, 520 

Lamey, Michele L. 

.343, 463 

Lamotte, Andrea L... 

.367 

Lampa, Kristin M. 

.277 

Lamson, Jeffrey 1_ 

.331 

Landes, Roger W. 

.297 

Landoni, Peter F. 

.437 

Lane, Andrea S. 

.365, 508 

Lane Annette L. 

.259. 598 

Lane, Christopher P. 

.507, 586 

Lane, Maureen M. 

.363, 468. 591 

Lane. Patrick J. 

.419 

Lane Stacey M. 

.204 

Lanford, Janet E. 

.359 

Lang, Delona L. 

.326, 327, 595 

Langan, Mark R. 

.391 

Lange, Dave G. 

.377 

Lange, Marc B. 

.493 

Lange, Ronald J. 

.397 

Langenhorst, Mary J 

.552 

Langer, Jeff D. 

.594 

Langston, Kurt J. 

.584 

Langton, Thomas F. 

.409 

Lannuein. Christine A.294 

Lanker, Linda L. 

.259 

Lanning, James M... 

.397 

Lantzy, Patricia L. 

.430, 524, 551 

Larabee, Laura E. 

.359, 457 

Larabee, Michael L.. 

.298 

Lardizabal, Scott S... 

.401 

Large, Karen M. 

.452 

Largent, Elizabeth A 

.493 

Larimer, Douglas F.. 

.515 

Larse, Janet K. 

.500 

Larsen, Angela M. 

.280 

Larsen, Christian. 

.401 

Larsen. Eric S. 

.297, 577 

Larsen, James B. 

.336 

Larsen, John S. 

.393, 500 

Larsen. Kevin J. 

.322 

Larsen, Kim L. 

.347 

Larsen. Steven F..... 

.341, 405 

Larsen, Ward E. 

.395 

Larson, Allison J.. 

.345 

Larson, Andrew R... 

.547 

Larson, Craig W. 

.437 

Larson, Dan S. 

.397, 520 

Larson, Eric S. 

.405 

Larson, Glen E. 

.496, 536 

Larson, Jonica D. 

.426, 500 



Larson, Julie E.428 

Larson, Karen S.500 

Larson, Keith T.487 

Larson. Megan A.338, 343, 457 

Larson, Michael R.330 

Larson, Sarah J.264 

Larson, Sylvia L.542 

Larson. Todd S.438 

Lasater, Linda M.259, 423 

Lasater, David J.329 

Lasch, Diane E.338, 568 

Lascheid, Gregory W.322 

Lathim. Dale L.493 

Lathrop. Randal G.201, 279, 539 

Lattin, Gregory J.590 

Laubach. Evan D.511 

Laubach, Gary L.319, 324 

Lauer, Eric C.274, 589 

Lauersen, Sandra J.264 

Laughlin, Robin M.203, 317 

Lauinger, Joseph J.391. 589 

Lauper, Cindy T.260 

Laurent, Cecile M.315 

Laurnen. Matthew S.199 

Laursen, Britta K.291 

Lauth, Nancy E.520 

Lauvrak, Carolyn M.450 

Lavallee, Dan G.268 

Lavallie, Joseph G.379, 500 

Lavery, Brian E.383 

Lavery. Naida M.363 

Lavey, Jeffrey A.267 

Lavigne, Allison K.359 

Lavinder, Nancy J.438, 506, 594 

Law, Robin D.361 

•Law, Stanley G.331 

Lawless, Linda M.448 

Lawrence. Lyn M.333 

Lawrence, Michael R.508 

Lawrenson, Vickie L.359 

Laws, Donald R. Jr.503, 590 

Laws, Robert W.297 

Lawton, Cynthia A.347, 516 

Lawton, Elizabeth C.293 

Lawver, Denise A.517, 567 

Layman. Lori M.199, 345 

Laythrop. Randall G.538 

Layton, Dwayne A.272 

Lazear, Diane.290 

Lazelle. Lisa J.438 

Le. Phuong N.276 

Leach, Cynthia A.304 

Leach. Jennifer E.524 

Leach, Julianne M.264. 265 

Leach, Michele D.496 

Leadbetter, Newgene W.542 

Leaf. Tammy L.451 

Leahy, Linda M.280 

Leaver. Shaela M.204, 258, 549 

Leber, Darrin R.298 

Ledford, Bob S.413 

Ledford, Keith E.266 

Lee. A. Scott.319 

Lee. B.Q.298 

Lee, David A.519 

Lee, Gregory S.268, 589, 424 

Lee, Henry M.391 

Lee. James D.268, 424 

Lee. Jerry.522 

Lee. Joe V.500 

Lee. Kenneth W.321 

Lee. Kyu D.270 

Lee. Lawrence D.437, 570 

Lee, Linda L.292, 456 

Lee, Lynelle G.538 

Lee, Lynette C.526 

Lee, Maple L.292, 524 

Lee, Michael G.330 

Lee, Robert H.550 

Lee, Roger A.287. 438 

Lee. Sharon.315, 552 

Lee. Soo M.506 

Lee, Terry E.538 

Lee, Tony J.328 

Lees, Dana.286, 290 

Leffel, Chris A.399, 496. 544 

Leffler, Heidi L.359 

Lefler. Lonna L. 500 

Lefrancois, Jeannette.353 

Legan, Douglas J.438, 560 

Legg, Randy F.515 

Leggett. David D.310 

Lehan, Pam C.289, 466 

Lehman, Eric A. 399 

Lehmann. Amy S.315, 318 

Leibsohn. Brian S.602 

Leighton, Juda S.333 

Leighty, Ann L.294, 295 

Leighty. Janis L. 505 

Leija, Phillip.268 

Leirdahl, Kim A.293, 353, 458 

Leishman, Matt J.506 

Leisy, Ray C.399, 577 

Leitzinger, John D.297 

Leland, Stacy A.430 

Lemcke, Jean M.602 

Lemire, Roger A.300, 552 

Lemoine, Karen A.313, 428, 595 

Lederink, Darin C.275 

Lenhard, Joseph A.287, 437 

Lenhart, Brenda A.520 

Lenius, Eric J.275, 328 


Lenning. Diane E. 

.194, 438t 

Lenoue. Linda M. 

.288 

Lent. Mark H . 

.407 j 

Lenth, Edward J. 

.298 

Lenz, Larry J. 

.381 

Lenz. Randall G. 

.421 

Leon, Anthony F. 

.324' 

Leon, Regan F. 

.591 

Leon, Susan E. 

...276, 279, 549 

Leonard, Diana J. 

.542 

Leonard, Donald G. 

.407 

Leonard, Edith L. 

.369 

Leonard, Kelly L. 

.506 

Leonard. Paul C. 

.272 

Lepoidevin, Catherine.... 

.464 

Leskovar. Michael A. 

.274, 

Leslie, Brian W. 

.379 

Leslie, John A. 

.577, 

Lessor, Kelly S. 

.338 

Lessor, Kimberly J. 

.338 

Lester, Allen R. 

.523 

Lester, Elonna M. 

.326 

Lester, Jeffrey T. 

.500 

Letendre, Guy R. 

.393 

Lett. Cheryl A. 

.510, 570. 

Lett, James B. 

.200. 329 

Leung, Harry. 

.563 

Leung, Sei F . 

...438, 526, 558 

Levee, Jon R. 

.290 

Leverett, Herschel V. 

.419 

Levi, John F. 

.487, 572 

Levi, Mary J. 

.326 

Levine, Amy E. 

.367 

Levy. Lauren R. 

.333 

Levy. Michael A. 

.325 

Lewis, Arne K. 

.299 

Lewis, Celeste M. 

.433i 

Lewis, Karen. 

.326; 

Lewis, Laura. 

.549 

Lewis, Melissa B. 

.355, 463 

Lewis. Richard S. 

.487 

Lewis, Shelly K. 

.355, 463 

Libbey. Linda L. 

.293 

Lieberg, William S. 

.4199 

Light, Michael R. 

.299, 427 

Lighffoot, Amy J. 

.549: 

Likes, Jeffrey K. 

.407 

Likes. Jill R. 

.449 

Liles, Carla A. 

.367, 464 

Ulleness, William A. 

.385 

Lilley, Christopher J. 

.288 

Lillie. Cindy H. 

.431, 526 

Lillie, Thomas S. 

.431. 527 j 

Lim, Chia C.299, 427, 533. 558 

Lim, Jose B . 

.527 , 

Lim, Nancy L. 

.260, 570 1 

Lim, Tuang J.L. 

.500 

Lin, Nortie L. 

.254 

Lind, Terry W. 

.287 

Lindahl, Douglas F. 

.202 

Lindahl. Susan G. 

.345, 568 

Lindauer, Marie E. 

.514 

Lindauer, Melvin L. II_ 

.261 

Lindberg, Eric J. 

.409 

Lindberg, Thomas C 

.375,} 

Linde, Karma K. 

.315, 430 

Linde. Terry L. 

.421 

Undell. Kelly A. 

.286 

Lindeman, Michael W... 

.397 

Lindemeyer, Molly S. 

.304 

Linden. Gregory 1. 

.319 

Linder, Jerri L. 

....304, 309, 328 

Lindgren. David D. 

.379 > 

Lindgren, Gary J. 

.487, 503 

Lindgren. Heidi A. 

.351 

Linhorst, Taryn P. 

.566 

Lindor, Kris R. 

.519 

Lindsey. Karina A. 

.264, 453 

Lindsey, Michael B . 

.438 

Lindsey. William F . 

.407 

Lindstrand, Devin M. 

.270, 425 

Undstrand, Keri L. 

...294, 426. 462. 

583, 634-636, 638, 639 

Lingard, Carole A. 

....313, 357, 451 

Lingard, Julie D. 

.317, 465 

Link, Kelly C. 

... 304, 309, 459 

Linklater, Greg C. 

.268 

Lionetti, Donald M. 

.4171 

Upinski, Diane. 

...351, 503, 577 

Upon, John J. II. 

.274 

Lippens, Julie V. 

.353 

Upper!, Nina L. 199, 345. 455, 538 

Little. Brian R. 

..301 

Little, David W. 

.487, 545 

Little, Jonathon J. 

.407 

Little, Robert M. 

.201, 430 

Little, Robert W. 

.202 

Little, Sandra Y. 

.527' 

Liu, Alex V. 

.275 

Lie, Theresa. 

.284 

Liu, Tommy O. 

.527 

Livengood, Gregory L ... 

.424 

Livingston, Douglas A... 

.405, 570 

Lloyd, Andrew F. 

.336,506 

Lloyd, Richard M. 

.393 

Lo, Carol A. 

.438 

Lo. Thomas A. 

.301 

Lobsinger, Eric B. 

.321 

Locati, Andrew J. 

.268: 

Lochtie, E. Kirsten. 

.288 

Lock, Frederick J. 

.496 

Lockhart, Connie M. 

.338 




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































Loechelt. Hans K.337 

Loeffler. Douglas A.545 

Loggins, John R.288. 290 

Lohman, David S.. 536 

Lohuis. James D.417 

Loiacono, D. Joel.576 

Loken. Allan A.336 

Lolcama. Robin G.355 

Lombardo. Anthony P.500 

Lombardo, Jillian D.428, 461 

Lonergan, Julie M.566 

Lonergan. Patricia A.276 

Lonergan, Victoria A.343 

Loney, Lisa R.334, 540. 593 

Long. Amy K.286, 290 

Long, T. Scott.544 

Long, Tracy J.258 

Longston. R. Chris.426 

Longway. Jo A.351 

Loofburrow. David A.375, 500 

Look. David W.271 

Loomis. Greg A.438 

Loomis, Michael J.331 

Loomis. Wesley W.487, 560 

Loonam, Ann E.292, 426 

Lopez, Thomas M.508, 606 

Loposer, Peter A.322 

Loran, Lisa M.500, 590 

Loran, Mary A.281, 459 

Lord, Julie L.585 

Lorenz. Jeffrey D.385 

Lorenzen. Carol L.542 

Loss, Kris A.509, 585 

Lotto, Lucy A.293, 295 

Lotto, Marika S.459 

Lou, Josephine G.430, 550, 556 

Loucks, Melvin D.500 

Loudon. Abigail L.524, 557 

Lougheed. Megan J.288 

Loughry, Sandra A.259, 555 

Louie. Jim W.506 

Louie, Steve B.272 

Loundagin, Douglas H.297 

Lovejoy. Dale E.438, 542 

Lovejoy, Peter A.321 

Lovett, Leigh A.359, 455 

Lovitt, Jon L.274 

Lovrovich, John S.300 

Lowe. D. Miller.299 

Lowe, Douglas A.487 

Lowe, Janis E.312 

Lowe, Steven R.405 

Lowell, Kristin K.361,462 

Lowery, Brett W.— 438 

Lowery. Carter R.419 

Lowery, Robert III.553. 561, 594 

Lowry. J. Michael.325 

Lucas, Margaret J.357. 458, 

519, 562, 594 

Lucke, Nadine M.326 

Luckey, Omar R....405 

Luckey, Wesley R.401 

Ludtka, Janice L.326. 577 

Ludwig, Erich A.J.395 

Ludwig. Janie L.261 

Ludwig, Lisa A.197, 577 

Luebbers, Mark E.274 

Luedecke, Lloyd D.563 

Lufkin, Donna L.316, 318 

Luh, Tony C.438 

Luk, Lai M.558 

Luk. Tony H. 301 

Lum. Natalie C.549 

Lumley. Brent D.383 

Lund. Jennifer A.428 

Lundberg, Jeffrey H.399 

Lunde. Steven M.275 

Lundquist, Charles W.419 

Lundstrom, Jeff W.268 

Lupien, Shari L.293 

Lupinacci, Teresa M.438 

Lursen, Janet L.315, 459 

Lusk, Rondi M.307, 309 

Lust, Ann M.542 

Lust, Lisa M.359. 468 

Lusted. John S.452. 504. 553 

Luton. William E.300 

Lux, Mary A.291, 361 

Lyke, James D.405 

Lyle, Janet R.438, 540, 593 

Lynch, Elizabeth E.343, 565 

Lynch. Sharon R.303, 448 

Lynn, Kathleen A.430, 519, 566 

Lyon. Cathleen A.524 

Lyon. Donna L.363, 448 

Lyon, Jack R.337, 510, 570 

Lyons. Matthew J.322 

Lyter-Smith, Elaine M.333, 363 

Lytle, Jeffry R.287, 290 


Mm 


Maack. Michelle R.334 

Maahs, Cherie L.284 

Maas, Brian D.417 

Macchiarella, Diane M.316, 461 

MacDonald, Daniel C.381 

MacDonald, John.570 


MacDonald, Kimberly A.448 

MacDonald, Martha.338 

MacDougall. Robert.202, 401 

Mace. AJan G.536. 584 

MacGowan, Douglas.503 

MacGowan, Greg K.553 

Mack, Jessica L.289. 290 

Mackenzie, Alaine H.334 

Mackenzie, Colin J.533 

Mackenzie, Lori J.429, 462 

Mackey, Kevin D.430 

Mackey, Kevin L.563 

Mackey, Lisa C.290 

Mackie, Robert J.379 

Macklow, James J.336 

Mackovich, Ronald D.399, 540 

Maclean, Donna J.290 

MacMillan. Randall A.438 

Macomber, Todd E.299, 270, 536 

MacPherson. Anne M.347 

MacQuarrie, Kevin A.429 

MacQuarrie, Scott D.301,516 

MacWhirtier. Bruce D.... .419 

Macy, Keith E.469 

Madden. Michael P.590 

Madden. Raymond W.329 

Maddux, Mary L.549 

Maddux, Perry W.385 

Madison, Brian L.270, 275. 328 

Madison, Kimberly A.347 

Madle, David E.509, 541 

Madlener, Todd A.271 

Madsen, Michael A.272 

Madsen. Steven M.299 

Madson, Tim A.395 

Maekawa. Suzanne J.315, 460 

Maenhout, Maury A.411 

Maesner. Jon E...593 

Maganga, Joseph J.527 

Magdall. Shane P.288 

Magee, Michael P.417 

Maggs, Debra J.258 

Magleby, Anne J.523 

Magnuson, Lesa K.270, 277, 438 

Magnuson, Tracy Leigh.464 

Maher, James R.329, 606 

Mahi, Kalani D.432 

Mahlik. Margaret L.30C 

Mahmododi. Amir S.M.438, 510 

Mahoney. Collene F.262, 363 

Maier, Tammy K.365 

Majeskey. Karen A.264 

Majestic, Lisa E.262, 263 

Maki. Dana J.326 

Maki. Suellen J.345, 449, 591 

Malekpour, Shahram.510 

Males, Melanie K.519 

Malinosky, Michelle L.326 

Malloch, Steven G.383, 520, 580 

Mallonee, C. Maynard.266 

Malloy, Steve. 438 

Malloy, Victoria L.290 

Malnati, Mary L.347 

Malone, Heidi K.....343, 591 

Malone, Maura J.332 

Maloney, Dennis M.500 

Maloney, Edward J.397 

Malsch, David A.438, 527 

Malsch. Douglas M.267, 438 

Malstrom. Lisa A.259 

Mama. Khursheed R.545. 549 

Manalo. Paula.201, 566 

Mandregan, Christopher.202 

Manduca, Anthony J.438 

Manfre, Mike J. 500, 543 

Manfred, Patricia A.347, 500 

Mangold. Glen R.438 

Manion, Mark J.407 

Manke, Mathew D.407 

Manley. Paul R.397 

Mann, David B ....301 

Mann, Richard J.337, 542 

Manning, Anne M.307. 308, 309 

Manning, Peter J. N.503, 577 

Manning, Sarah K.367 

Manning, Steven M.329 

Manning, Suzanne S.357, 500 

Mannix, Florence L.506 

Mano. Janice E.349 

Mano, Richard A.507 

Manring, Karen L.259, 570 

Manser. Karen L.500 

Mansfield, Christopher.431, 511 

Mantyla, Nancy.332 

Manuel, John J.329 

Maples, Alisa D.288, 467 

Mar, Dale C.323 

Marcus, Anne M.287, 290 

Maricle, Robert P.438. 509, 541, 585 

Marinkovich, Dobrila M.353 

Mariotti, Gina M..'.280, 355 

Mark, Josephine N.584 

Markarian. Charles A.430, 552 

Markgraf, Henry A.272 

Markham, Tanya R.363 

Markin, Kathryn J.504 

Markin, Melinda M.304, 309 

Marks, Daniel G.405 

Marks. Edwin T.297 

Marks, Lilinda M.303, 448, 577 

Markvart, Annette M.306, 467 

Marlow, Bradley A.377, 494 


Marfton, Sonya R. 

.276 

Marquardt. Carrie L. 

.307 

Marquez, Lisa J. 

.535 

Marriott, Diane F. 

.285 

Marron, Ronald H. 

.430 

Marsh Celia D. 

.438, 546 

Marsh, James A. 

.515 

Marsh, Joseph R. 

..301. 571, 593 

Marsh, Timothy J. 

. 438. 500, 543 

Marshall, Daniel J. 

.266 

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.425 

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.258 

Marshall Gary A 

.393 

Marshall, Gary R. 

.438, 560 

Marshall, Marja A. 

.438, 500, 538 

Marshall, Morfey. 

.262, 263 

Marske, Timothy G. 

.207, 426 

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..270. 276. 351 

Martin, Clay D. 

.321 

Martin Daniel E. 

.580 

Martin. Dave A. 

.389 

Martin, David F. 

.515 

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.259, 424 

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.451 

Martin Eleanor G 

.438 

Martin, Gerri K. 

.544 

Martin, Hayley L. 

.367 

Martin, Kenneth C. 

.270 

Martin. Magdalena G. 

..280, 281. 552 

Martin. Mary J. 

.343 

Martin, Nancy L. 

.347 

Martin. Richard A. 

.417 

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.500 

Marlin Shirley L. 

.306, 347 

Marlin. Timothy L. 

.421. 438 

Martin. Troy M. 

.274 

Martinec. Kurt C. 

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Martinez. Kurt. 

.583 

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..343, 455. 600 

Martinis, Susan A. 

.363 

Martinson, Alan D. 

.487. 493 

Martinson. Kirstin L. 

.361. 496, 


544, 594 

Marty, Jeffrey J. 

.320 

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.260, 261 

Marvel, Scott D. 

.320 

Marvin, Barbara M. 

.294 

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.367, 

Maryatt Sarah A. 

.456 

Masel, Kenneth S. 

. 268, 291, 425 

Masley Susan l 

. . 359 

Mason David R 

329, 428 

Mason, Donald J. 

.417 

Mason John A. 

.515 

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.270. 276, 591 

Massenburg, John C. 

.274 

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.487 

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.407 

Massie, Craig W. 

.267, 269 

Masterton, Roger W. 

.432 

Mathers. Greg S. 

.335 

Matheson, Iver A. 

.301 

Matheson, Mark K. 

.270 

Mathews, Kelley J. 

.369 

Mathews. Victoria J. 

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Mathia, Ken G. 

.267 

Mathieson, Christy L. 

.285, 429 

Mathieson, Marcy S. 

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Mathison, Jay A. 

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.320 

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Matobo, Thope A. 

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Matsch, Wayne T. 

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Matson, Virginia A. 

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Matthiesen. Krista L. 

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Mattoch. Kevin L. 

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Matuszewski Malgorzat 

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Matz, Ryan L. 

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Maw, Michelle K. 

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.290 

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.298, 427 

May Jack L 

. .. 329 

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.602 

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.407 

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May, Peter M. 

.509 

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.546 

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.409, 500 

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Mayes, Rueben A. 

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.550 

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.359 

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.365, 455 

Mazie, Lorita G. 

.433 

Mazure Patrick C 

.296 

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.385 

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.361 

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.307 

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.331 

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.465 

McAlpine, Duncan G. 

.507 

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.550 

McArthur. Kelley A. 

.289 

McAuley, Lance H. 

.270 


McAuliffe. Robert J.421 

McAvinew. Anthony T.266 

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McBeth, Colene M.316, 357 

McBride. Andrew M.432 

McBride. David J.272, 590 

McBride, Jennifer G.367 

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McBride, Tom A.409 

McBroom, Kara L.315 

McBroom, Lauren A.197 

McCadam. Gerald L.438 

McCafferty. Julie C.334 

McCain, Earlene K.347 

McCammant. Kevin T.438 

McCann, Elizabeth A.563 

McCann, Patrick W.500 

McCann, Robert L.272 

McCann, Sheila R.315 

McCann. William T.540 

McCarthey. Tom Q.299 

McCarthy. Carey A.290. 299, 466 

McCarthy, Kelley A.316 

McCarthy, Sandra L.363, 459 

McCartney, Karolyn K.369, 516 

McCartney, Mary C.315 

McCarty, Annette M.276, 279 

McCaul. Vicki L.525, 584 

McCausland, Mike D.395, 511 

McCaw. Kimberly A.365, 767 

McChesney, Brenda K.307, 309, 458 

McChesney, Terry L.389, 502 

McClary, Kristine E.304 

McClees, Becky L.438 

McClees, David B.506, 515 

McClintock. William C.389 

McComas, Douglas B.536 

McConnell, Andrew J.205 

McConnell. Kelly K.361, 455 

McCord Christopher J.403 

McCormack, Mary L.516 

McCormick. Belinda L.292 

McCoy, Lori A.357 

McCrary. Raymond L.202, 397, 

511. 560 

McCreary, William D.300 

McCue. David W.551 

McCullough, Michael P.407 

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McDaniel. David F.331,428 

McDonald. Eugene T.438 

McDonald, Jannine M.355 

McDonald, Jeffery P.267, 589 

McDonald, John T.510 

McDonald. Sean E.417 

McDonald. Terri L.438, 594 

McDonald. Todd R.403 

McDonough. Beverly D.552, 576 

McDougal. Tom W.375 

McDougall, Jay N.515 

McDougall, Jolene A.333 

McDougall. Scott A.272 

McDowell, Allen L.377, 469, 591 

McDowell, Tammy L.264, 265 

McEachen. Harold A.320 

McElhoe, Scott D.320 

McElroy, Lisa A.560 

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McFarland, Kathy L.438 

McFarland. Michael J.274, 511 

McGarraugh, Susan J.570 

McGee-Furrer, Jenny L.355, 506 

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McGowan, Tracey M.367, 459 

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McGregor, Shauna D.577 

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Mclnnes, Teresa A.550 

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McKean, John S.J.561 

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McKinney, Rebecca A.315 

McKnight, Patricia.326, 327 

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McLain, Ward M.409, 511 

McLaren, Kent L.510, 570 


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McPhee, Scott A.433 

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Meany, Claire M.577 

Meany. David J.419 

Meany, Paul J.419, 538 

Meares, Shelli L.313, 318 

Mears, Karen A.291,448 

Mears, Michael A.274 

Mech, Laura M.264 

Meek. Molly S.520 

Medalia, Steven J.407 

Mediati, Rocco A.271, 273 

Medulla, Larry Z.297 

Meeds, Michael V.430 

Meehan, Jim J.288 

Meeker, Benjamin S.578 

Meharg, Stephen S.301, 428 

Meier, Barbara B.359, 455 

Meier, Jacqueline A.359 

Meiers, Richard M.438 

Meigs, Donna G.F...550 

Meiners, Brian L.541 

Meisinger, Nancy L.276 

Meister. Tamara L.260, 261 

Mekdhanasarn, Atcharee.438, 500 

Mekki, Mahmoud A.438, 516 

Melcher, Sarah A.511 

Melgaard, John A.298 

Mellish, Margaret R.456 

Mellon, Christine E.353, 455, 500 

Melone. Lloyd P.570 

Mefton, Jay D.397 

Melton, Jeff D.389 

Melton, Timothy A.389, 530 

Mendez. David W.300, 511 

Mengert. Matthew J.438, 570 

Mengert, Theresa A.429, 495, 570 

Menin, Debra J.353. 455, 534 

Menke, Carrie L.438 

Menor, James B.288 

Menzies, Joan.543, 602, 603 

Mercado, Richard M.389, 538 

Mercer, John C.336. 429 

Mergens, Debra S.363. 452, 553 

Meriino, Mark L.525 

Merlino. Michael W.299, 427 

Merod, Michael W. 432 

Merrick, Kent G.542 

Mersereau. Kenneth W.430 

Mesick, James L.389 

Meske, Elaine K.506 



1984 / Index 621 










































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Mesler. Melissa A.259 

Messenger. Craig W.419. 538 

Metcalf. James A.289 

Metcalf. Lynelle K.309 

Metller. Kurt A.493. 544 

Meyer. Alan C.557 

Meyer. Hans T.299 

Meyer, Joylyn K.262 

Meyer. Kim.361 

Meyer. Melody H.303, 308 

Meyer. Michael R.421 

Meyer. Susan J.600 

Meyer, Yvonne M.264, 598 

Meyers. Cathy L.263, 520 

Meyers. Connie M.326, 327 

Meyers. Cynthia M.357, 468 

Meyers. Daniel P.266, 268 

Meyers, Gina M ..438 

Michael. Dennis J.330 

Michael. Robin R.438 

Michelsen. Karen L.292 

Michelsons. Ingrid A.500, 554 

Mickelson, Brad M.542 

Mickelson, Ian R.328 

Middendorf. Beth Ann G.361 

Middelton. Ronda K.274 

Miedema. Allen R.270, 274, 278 

Miedema. David W.270 

Mielbrecht. Mark R.274 

Mielke. Robert E.391, 494, 556. 594 

Mih. Rebecca D.598 

Mikkelsen, Sherri L.438. 540. 593 

Mikkelsen. Steven D.438 

Milden, Diana L.438 

Mildren, Thimothy J.274 

Miles, Jaclyn M.293 

Miles, Marcia R.155 

Mill. Kellee S.307 

Millard. Lynn C.293 

Miller, Aaron C.270 

Miller, Anne B.449, 564 

Miller, Bobbi J.288. 290, 520 

Miller. Carol L.365 

Miller, Carol L.292, 466 

Miller. Constance F.312 

Miller, Deborah K.454 

Miller, Diana L.591 

Miller, Donald R.544 

Miller, Dwight E.522 

Miller, Edward A.433. 500 

Miller, Gary S.403 

Miller. Gerald C.336. 517 

Miller, James W.399 


Miller. Jeanne M.314 

Miller. Jim K.284 

Miller, John N.438 

Miller. Karen A.280 

Miller. Kathi A.365, 452. 504, 553 

Miller. Kathryn M.293 

Miller. Kimberly A.277 

Miller, Kirby D.517, 578 

Miller, Kristina J.302. 309, 438 

Miller, Lisa A.458. 535 

Miller. Matthew C.286, 566 

Miller. Nancy D.289 

Miller. Ronald J.403 

Miller, Steve P.438. 515 

Miller, Steven S.511 

Miller, Suzanne K.505 

Miller. Terri J.355 

Miller Thomas M.379 

Miller, Tom K.510 

Miller. Vicky L.518 

Millett, Dorothy D.459, 355 

Milligan, Christopher.322 

Milligan, William M.427, 578 

Milliken. Nancy J.293 

Mills. David R.329 

Mills. Greg A.300 

Mills, Pamela M.546 

Mills, Rebecca A.280, 456 

Min. Yuna.548 

Minegishi, George J.194 

Miner. Jeffrey A.274, 391 

Miners. Randall C.438 

Minnick, Stephen G.324 

Minnig, Barbara J.260 

Minshall. Richard D.377 

Mirkovich, John B.393 

Mischke. Eric H.438 

Miscourides. Demetrios.284. 438 

Miskovsky, Thomas J.285 

Mitcham. Tracey L.290 

Mitchell, Barbara P.438 

Mitchell, Charlotte E.549 

Mitchell, Chris M.438, 542. 549, 594 

Mitchell. Christa A.429 

Mitchell. Debra L.353. 459. 506 

Mitchell. Derek V.438. 583 

Mitchell, Douglas C.510, 570 

Mitchell, Gregory A.503, 577 

Mitchell. Heidi J.326 

Mitchell, Jack B.582 

Mitchell. Kayleen R.326, 327 

Mitchell. Richard W.564 

Mitchell, Robert R.405 

Mitchell, Sandra L.500 

Mitchell, Scott A.297 

Mittal, Manmohan.438, 527 

Mitzel, David A.377, 568 


Miwa. Yoshiya.425. 535 

Mock. David G.381. 560 

Mockett. Paul M.405 

Moeller, Kristen T.454 

Moffatte. Raymond L.287 

Moffett, Richard R.289 

Mogensen. Annette.516 

Mohoric, David L.507 

Mohoric, Kimberly J.262 

Mohr, Louie N.333 

Mohr. Nikki J.333 

Molitor, Shellie A.277, 278 

Moloney. Shawn E.438 

Molrang, Charlotte.284 

Molsberry. Colleen R.305. 309. 494 

Molver. Eric S.385, 560 

Monahan. Thomas W.391 

Monarch. Daniel R.430. 602 

Monell, Michael W.584 

Monlux, Stanton D.375 

Monroe. Michael S.413. 538 

Monroe, Rose M.262 

Monroe, Stacey L.347 

Monson, Ann Marie S.365, 455 

Monson. Eric R.377 

Monson. William A.389 

Montague. Elaine L.546 

Montague, Michiyo J.500 

Montecucco. Janet L.347, 560 

Montgomery, Bruce A.275 

Montgomery. Kari S.540, 561 

Montgomery. Michael R.405 

Montoya. Juanita J.430, 500 

Montoya. Loh L.438 

Monzelowsky, Diane J.359 

Mood. Stephen L.500, 543 

Moon, Jennifer L.312, 318, 453 

Mooney. Donna R.544 

Mooney, Laura K.294, 468 

Mooney, Shawn M.363 

Moore. Candi G.314 

Moore. Daniel J.290 

Moore, Daniel W.. 298, 494 

Moore. David H.500. 560 

Moore, Debbie L.293, 458 

Moore. Ellen P.564 

Moore, Garth E.381 

Moore, Irvin D.331 

Moore, Jeffrey D.419 

Moore. Karen E.505 

Moore. Kelly D.424 

Moore. Kirsten D.516, 544 

Moore, Martha R.276 

Moore. Mary K.334 

Moore. Michael E.541, 585 

Moore, Roger D.391 

Moore. Stuart T.270, 425 

Moore. William S.266 

Moore, Zachary B.297. 427 

Moores. Christopher C.275. 279 

Moothart. Dean E.341, 405, 500 

Moran. Christopher C.296, 572 

Morasch. Annette M.557 

Morasch, Kelly J.500 

Morel. Paul A.285 

Moreland. Matthew C.297 

Morford, Dale E.500 

Morford. Kristin L.367, 458 

Morford, Melaine A.438, 500 

Morgan, Anastasia.304 

Morgan. Charlotte M.549 

Morgan. David G.419 

Morgan Elisabeth K.280, 456, 549 

Morgan, Eric A.289 

Morgan. Julie B.355 

Morgan. Julie R.500 

Morgan. Nani C.343 

Morgan. Sarah A.286 

Morgan. Stacy L.„.409, 505 

Morgan. Steve L.268 

Morgenthaler, Trina M.316, 450 

Mori, Gail M.280 

Moriarty, Kara L.357 

Morice. Lesli A.345, 467 

Moritz. Denise A.318 

Moriyasu, Sharon A.519, 593 

Moriyasu, Sue A.519,593 

Mork, John E.383 

Morley. Paul S.279 

Morrell. Colin P.438 

Morrell. Jenifer L.345 

Morrill. Joseph B.272 

Morris. Kevin L.419, 522, 560 

Morris, Nathan James.425 

Morris. Tanell.500 

Morrison, David F.385 

Morrison, James D.540 

Morrison, John G.438. 517 

Morrison, William A.540 

Morrow, Biff.298 

Morrow, Jams F.375, 602 

Morrow. Michael J.511, 602 

Morrow, Sandra D.277 

Morse, Sharen L.438 

Mortensen, Camille.317 

Mortensen. Todd L.330 

Mortimer. Emily P.519 

Morton. Joel E.271, 425 

Morton. Tracy A.593 

Mose, Pamela A.264 


Moser. Andy.298 

Moser. Brad J.507 

Moser. Carolyn J.504 

Moser. Joan M.506 

Moser. Marilee.638-639 

Moses. Barbara J.345. 542 

Mosman. Michael P.337 

Moss. Brian R.289 

Moss, Samuel L.270 

Moss. William C.375 

Mossman. Kim.577, 584 

Mostafavinassab. Moham.421.571 

Motheral. Judith M.431 

Motomatsu. Karri R.316, 318, 460 

Mouck. Jeff T.399 

Moulder. Wayne T.544 

Moulster. Kathryn E.277, 279 

Mount. Todd J.298, 407 

Moutsanas. Sotirios.297 

Mow. Tammy L.284 

Mowlds. Richard M.417, 522 

Moyer. Kathleen M.280 

Moynihan, Thomas S.407 

Muecke, Alison M.494 

Mueller. Brenda L.260 

Mueller. Bruce W.297 


Mueller, Gregory J... 336, 428, 507, 584 

Mueller, Janna L.303 

Mueller, Jeffrey J.403 

Mueller, John A.504 

Mueller. Julia S.289, 290, 426 

Mueller. Martha A..459 

Mueller. Terry.399 

Mulder, Matthew J.407 

Mulholland, David T.519 

Mull. Robert L. Jr.289 

Mullally, James P.299 

Mullan. Frances H.294, 295, 466 

Mullan. Georgianna.520, 563 

Muller, Carolann.334 

Muller, Susan C.265 

Mulligan. Michael J.555 

Mullin, Shannon M.276 

Mullins, Gregory G.336, 429 

Mulzac, Victor.438, 516 

Mundschenk, Peter R.494 

Mundt, David J.336 

Monger, Chery A.264, 453, 555 

Munizza, Jenny G... 270. 369 

Munnich, Cheri D.357 

Munroe, John D.511. 542 

Munroe, Sarah E.334 

Munsey. Kyle S.403 

Munson. Todd W.500 

Murari, Nina.287 

Murdock, Kristin A.292 

Murphy, Bernard P.393 

Murphy, Brenda L.505 

Murphy. Daniel C.379 

Murphy Edward M....407, 500, 551, 560 

Murphy, Jeffrey B.397 

Murphy. Mark.540, 566, 593 

Murphy, Mary M.347, 580 

Murphy. Nicholas 0.297 

Murphy, Patrick.527 

Murphy, Steve R.300 

Murphy. Theresa M.264, 265, 438 

Murphy, Timothy J.389 

Murphy. Tracy D.554 

Murray, Daniel J.298, 427 

Murray. Diane M.332 

Murray. Michelle L.305, 308 

Murray. Michelle T.448.506 

Murray, Patrick J. 537 

Murray. Paul G. Jr... 500, 538 

Murray, Rena K.359 

Murray, Suzanne K.353, 467, 534 

Murray. Timothy S.391, 540 

Musch, Johathon M.275, 279 

Musil, Michael R.329 

Mustafa, Musa G.267 

Muth, Craig D.397 

Mutter, Terry M.430, 500 

Muzzail, Ronald E.559 

Mwakimaa, Francis N.495 

Myatt. Sean P.395 

Myer, Julie A.317 

Myers, Gordon D.438 

Myers, Lisa A.303.467 

Myers, Machelle A.332 

Myers, Marla K.304. 308 

Myers, Michael J.266 

Myers, Russ C.383 

Myers. Shelly.349 

Myers, Stephen K.399 

Myers. Thomas R.301 

Myre. Janis S.281 

Myron, Kurlis M.511 


Nn 


Nabb, John J.329 

Naatz. Martha J.353 

Nadvornick, Mark J.336 

Nagahiro, David T.570 


Nagel. John C.322 

Nagel, Traci J.314 

Nagle. John P II.205 

Naito. Greg L.329. 428, 535, 996 

Nakahara. Lori F.259, 424. 507 

Nakamura, Heidi K.514 

Nakamura. Koshi.425. 535 

Nakata. Stephen J. 438 

Nalley, Charles M.507 

Namane, Trower M.527 

Nangle, Patrick D.393 

Napoli. Dina K.357. 451 

Nash. Simon J C.202 

Nason. Michael B.407 

Nathe. Christopher P.324, 539 

Natterer. Joseph B.271,539 

Naucler. Bradley J.323 

Navarrete. Jacinto G.330 

Nazzal. Mazen P.336, 510, 570 

Neal. Deborah L.258, 438 

Neavill. James K.389 

Neese, Jeffrey B.500 

Nehr, Tamara L.351 

Nehrhood, Dirk F.433 

Nehring, Robeert B.202 

Neiertz. Bonnie R.S.505, 552 

Neill, Linda L.326, 566 

Nelson, Andrea C.293, 426, 463 

Nelson,Blake H.419, 504 

Nelson. Brian S.430. 511, 519, 548 

Nelson, Curtis E..401, 564 

Nelson. Curtis J.438, 594 

Nelson, David M.540 

Nelson, Dawn M.345 

Nelson, Deanna L.313 

Nelson, Duane P.407 

Nelson, Jeffrey T.551 

Nelson. Jennifer L.333, 363 

Nelson Jodi L.449. 564 

Nelson, Jodie L.349 

Nelson. Jody M.280 

Nelson, Karoiyn J.359 

Nelson, Kevin B.320 

Nelson, Kristin L.345, 467 

Nelson, Laura D.428 

Nelson. Laura K.293, 426, 463 

Nelson, Mark D.389 

Nelson, Marla L.367 

Nelson, Pamela R.541, 595 

Nelson, Patricia K.314, 504 

Nelson. Paula M.260, 261 

Nelson, Robert E.500, 543 

Nelson. Robert S.487 

Nelson, Ronald A.330, 578 

Nelson. Shawn D.267, 593 

Nelson. Todd E.288. 426 

Nemitz. Rodney E.320 

Neo, Angelina C.577 

Ness. Gregory E.393 

Nothing, Lorraine G.287 

Netro. Carol A.326, 327 

Nettey. Samuel T.515 

Neu, Brent E.266 

Neu, Melinda L.306 

Neubauer, Andrew R. Ill.494 

Neubauer, Charles T.564 

Neumann, Mark P.300 

Neumiller. Robert W.401, 500 

Nevan, Christopher F.395, 500, 577 

Newberry, Kim L.359, 500 

Newby. Janet A.302, 309, 544 

Newby, Janet H.496 

Newcomb, Craig A.430, 502 

Newgard, Diane M.349, 461, 607 

Newhouse, JustinaM.331 

Newman, Steve J.407 

Newmeyer, Amy T.294, 552 

Newsom, Nancy L.355, 556 

Newson, Karla K.289 

Newton. Mark E.570 

Ng, Sau Fung D.329 

Nguyen, Hai V.285 

Nguyen, Lan L.552 

Nguyen, Pho M.584 

Nicely, Lori L.306, 347 

Nicholas, Ramona L.262, 349 

Nicholls, Kevin J.299 

Nichols. Clifford P.377, 564 

Nichols. John H.268 

Nichols, MaryK.262, 263, 525 

Nichols. Michael D. 337 

Nichols. Sherie M.542 

Nichols, Timothy J.377, 564 

Nichols, Wes.300 

Nicholson, Carol A.338, 429 

Nicholson. James S.438 

Nicholson, Leanore T.462 

Nicholson. Terri L.438 

Nickels, Allison C.332, 461 

Nickels, Charles W.268 

Nickels, Debra L.504 

Niegemann, William R.297 

Niehoff, Barb L.431 

Nielsen, Erik.583 

Nielsen, Jill M.289, 290 

Nielson, Shelly.584 

Niemela, Glenn Y.438 

Nienhuis. Christopher....299 

Nieves, Robert R.519 

Niklason, Gary R...330 


Nikula. Lynda A. 

Nilan. Patricia J. 

Nilsen. Michele L. 

Nims. Robert W. 

Nisbet, Terry L. 

Nishioka. Wayne M. 

Nissen. Peter E. 

Nixon, Beth. 

Nixon. Duane C. 

Nixon. Michael E. 

Nixon, Rick A. 

Nixon, Steve W. 

Njos. Jon E. 

Noble, Debra J. 

Noble. John F. 

Noble. Lori A. 

Noble. Lynn M. 

Nolan. Darren R. 

Nolan, John A. 

Nolan. Michael J. 

Nolte, Mary K. 

Nomellini, Gina K. 

Nomellini, John F. 

Noort. Sandra L. 

Norby, Eric D. 

Nordahl. Beth R. 

Nordi. Richard T. 

Norick. Kelli L. 

Norikane, Marc T. 

Norman. David A. 

Norman. Joann E. 

Norman, Kenneth A. 

Norris. Brian J. 

Norton-Riedel, Gregory.... 

Norvell. Max H. 

Norwood, David L. 

Notch, Jody M. 

Novotney, Thomas H. 

Novy, Richard G. 

Nowak. Scott D. 

Nowoj, Patti J. 

Nugent, Samuel S. 

Null. Daniel P. 

Nuxoll, Sharon L. 

Nuzum, Anne M. 

Nyberg, Eric A. 

Nyegaard, Lori M. 

Nylund, Derek S. 

Nystrom, Keith R. 

Nystrom, Lisa A. 

Nziramasanga, Chenai E 
Nzuzi. Losso. 


.317, 428 

.361 

.314, 461 

.271 

.353, 466 

.275, 279, 536 

.583 

.292, 495 

.283 


.411 

.324 

.266 

..41£ 

.261 

419. 544 

i 

.38$ 

.275 

.518 

.51 a 

.317 

.324 

.509 

507, 502 
304, 363 

353, 467 

.30T 

300, 54C 

'XA'Z 


.296 

.393 

270. 507 

.487 

.326 

.431 

.32J 

..202 

.302 

439, 50C 

.515 

439, 517 

.433 

.. 32C 

.253 

.2871 

'50': 

333. 428 

.50C 

.562 


Oo 

O'Brien, Christopher J. 

O'Brien. Deborah C. 

O'Briens, Robert M.. 

O Brochta, Stuart F. 

O'Bryan, Mary A.. 

O'Connor. Chad J. 

O'Connor, Rick. 

O'Dell, Jess S.. 

O'Dell, Robert C. 

O'Driscoll. Tod A.. 

O’Hara, Sandra M. 

O'Neal, Lori D. 

O’Neill, Edward J. 

O'Neill, Todd C. 

O’Toole. John W. 

Oakley, Barbara A. 

Oakley, Loren D. 

Oas. Carol A. 

Oatey Jimmy E. 

Obeniand, Kathleen D 

Oberg, Jennifer L. 

Obert, Christine D. 

Oborn, Scott P. 

Oboyle, Margaret A .... 

Obrastoff, Mike V.. 

Obrastoff. Nick V. 

Obrien, Dana M. 

Obrien. Mike F. 

Obrien, Molly E. 

Obryan. Tara S. 

Ocallaghan, P. John... 

Ochiai, Michiko. 

Ochsner, Judy R.. 

Ochsner, Kris T.. 

Oconnell, Daniel B. 

Oconnor, Kathryn A.... 
Oconnor, Richard T..... 

Odell, Michael A. 

Odell, Thad L. 

Oehninger, Juan E. 

Oeser, Oavid E. 

Ohara, Sandy. 

Ohata, Neal H. 

Ohhara, Yoshiyuki. 

Ohl, Phillip C.. 

Ohlund, Diana L. 

Ohnemus, Susan E .... 

Oja, Tammy L.. 

Okada, Laurie A.. 

Okaue, Hiromi. 

Okazaki, Christine R... 


.275, 276 

.288 

.43* 

.43® 

.198 

.395 

.31C 

..202. 299, 427 

.397 

.337, 422 

. 45 * 

.352 

.382 

.412 

..430, 525. 60C 

.204 

.297 

.326 

.355, 452 

.565, 566 

.431. 527 

..277, 278. 272 
..375, 519, 607 

.296 

.361, 455 

.411, 502 

.347, 456 

.525 

.429 

.284 

.305 

..494, 556 

..430, 519, 60C 
..338, 339, 429 

.285. 425 

..202, 300, 427 

. 32 $ 

..550, 593 

.351 

..202, 452, 553 

. 527 

.324 

..425, 500, 5551 

.43(j| 

.4391 

.500 

.272 

.3571 


622 Index/1984 































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Okeefe. Kathleen S.439. 453 

Okeeffe. Eileen V.543, 566 

Okelley. Darin E.413 

Okemah. John L.299 

Okjgbo. Stella E.338, 520, 536 

Olberding, Glen D.487 

Olcott, Alysonn K.591 

Oldfield. Diane L.276, 466 

Oldfield. Marlin P.502 

Oldham, Lynn C.357, 459 

Oleary, Amy R.343 

Olinger. Jasper E.377 

Olivadoti. Kristine M.292 

Olivares Cortes. Juan.527 

Oliver. Brent... 439 

Oliver. Jon A.299, 405 

Oliver, Tammie A.439. 462, 496. 583 

Oliver. Tracy A.500 

Oliveri. Carolyn A.316, 461 

Olmstead, Mike F.501 

Olney. Anthony J.379 

Olney, Jeanne M.456 

Olsen. John R.397 

Olsen. Kathleen M.361.459. 542 

Olsen, Kaurin L.284 

Olsen, Kristine D....314 

Olsen, Leanne E..316 

Olsen, Liane B.316, 448 

Olsen, Per B.285. 527 

Olsen. Peter L.507 

Olsen, Robert R.377 

Olsen. Traci C.203 

Olson, Brett H.379. 525 

Olson, Christa L.439 

Olson. David E.267, 551 

Olson. David H.271, 554, 577 

Olson. Frances K. 556 

Olson, Heidi A.463 

Olson. Joleen M.292, 345. 538 

Olson, Katherine S.345, 501, 538 

Olson. Kermit D.493 

Olson. Kristen L.333 

Olson, Marc W.300 

Olson, Marc.517 

Olson, Margaret J.259 

Olson, Martha G.260, 261, 461 

Olson, Micah J.289 

Olson, Noreen K.276, 549 

Olson, Patrice M.315 

Olson, Peter B.323 

Olson. Robyn C.525 

Olson. Stacy A.315, 450 


Olwell, Kasey C. 

.304 

Omalley Marlin L. 

.552 

Omberg, Susan K. 

.293, 426, 467 

Oneal, Donna J. 

.523, 552 

Oneill, Patricia L.. 

.332 


Ortega, Noberto R. 

Orteig, Dean M. 

Ortengren, Kristina M. 

Osborn, Elsie L. 

.330, 335 

.417 

.262. 263 

.546 

Osborn. Linda L. 

.494 

Osborn, Timothy K. 

Osborn, Timothy W. 

Osborne, Erin M. 

.395,511 

.331 

.365 

Osborne, Karen E. 

.361 

Osborne. Rodney C. 

Osburn, Raymond S. 

Oscarson, Ed A. Jr. 

.527, 541 

.552 

.439 

Osenga. Jon R. 

.546 


Owen, Clara L.542 

Owen, Glenn W. Jr.289 

Owen. Helen M.284 

Owen, John T.439 

Owens, Kevin L.298 

Owens, Molly D.365. 448 

Owens, Sherry L.304, 449 

Owens. Teresa M.439 

Owings. Lisa L.464 

Oxford, Joan M.334 

Oyawoye, Olukitibi J.511 

Oyawoye. Siyanade 0.511 

Oyer. Gordon N.439 

Oyer, Leroy C.439 

Ozoma, Edwin I.562 


Pp 


Pack. Bradley P.439. 561 

Packard. Bret A.509 

Packard, Lawrence B.194 

Packard, Mark N.271 

Packer, Susan K.326. 327 

Padgett. Jennifer S.303 

Paganelli, Greg D.377 

Page, Cindy L.506 

Page, John L.287. 564 

Page, Robert 0.383 

Pagel, Catherine M.313, 318 

Pagel, Gregory M.395 

Pagel. Victor T.395 

Paglialunga, Dean A.487 

Pahre, Steven N.287, 439 

Paige. Steve A.419 


Oneill. Sheila M.;.349, 560 

Ong, Sian T.284, 425 

Oord, John A.439 

Oordt, Christopher M.397 

Opfer, Allen G.337, 510, 570 

Opfer, Gary W.320 

Opoku, Helena.424 

Orchard. Debra J..276 

Ord. Kevin R.301 

Oreilly, Brian P.270, 273, 566 

Orint.Neil W.383 

Orlando, E. Hartwell.431 

Orlando, John R.439 

Ornduff. Ted T.296 

Orr, Janet E.493 

Orsborn, William F.550 


Painter, Lucy J. 

Pajardo, Deborah B. 

.260, 539 

.291, 426, 538 

Palahniuk, Matt A. 

.289, 426 

Pallett, Kelly J. 

.343 

Pallo David J. 

.299 

Palma Velma L. 

.308, 538 

Palmer, Ann E. 

.363, 456, 591 

Palmer, David Neal. 

.389. 538 

Palmer. Mark D. 

.2:98. 427 

Palmer. Nancy M. 

.293, 295, 


439, 520, 536 

Palmer, Ralph A. 

.494 

Palmquist. Mary E. 

.276 

Pantzar, Kevin R. 

.267 

Paoletti. Michael R. 

.271 

Paoletti Mike J. 

.301 

Paopao. Puleimau F.... 

.425 

Pape, Adrienne E. 

.520,563 

Pappas. Dwayne R. 

.301 

Pappas. James M. 

.383 

Parfitt Scott A. 

.413 

Park, Cynthia A. 

.318 

Parker, Barbara J. 

.280, 345, 453 

Parker, Douglas R. 

.407 

Parker, Eric L. 

.290, 565 

Parker. Kristan A. 

.349 

Parker 1 isa M 

.365 

Parker, Paul T. 

.397, 507 

Parker. Rod G. 

.413 

Parker, Sylvia. 

.439 

Parker, Veronica K.M.. 

.291 

Parkhill, David J. 

.413 

Parkinson, Debbie A.... 

.453 

Parkman, Linda. 

.260 


Oshaughnessy, Patrck.509 

Oshie, James M.552 

Ostberg, Stefan B.515 

Oster, Barbara L.514 

Oster, Dwain M.296, 589 

Oster. Helen 1.326, 544, 555 

Osterback, Janet Lynn.433 

Ostlund, Harley E.297 

Ostrem, Todd L.389 

Oswold, Tracey C.407 

Ota, Gregory A.604 


Parmenter, Jeffrey L.297 

Parrish, James C.536 

Parrott, Mike A.403 

Parsh, David T. 403 

Parsons, Allan P.290 

Parsons, Amy R.365, 520 

Parsons. Brian E.511, 602 

Parsons, Galan C.439 

Parsons. Lori S.351 

Parsons, Ruth A.332. 349 

Pasha, Athar N.337, 509 

Passmore, Tamara J.276 

Pate, Rachel D.552 

Patel. Navin C.431 

Patrick. Deborah A.334, 585 

Patrick. F. Robert.275 

Patrick, Heather P.545. 598 

Patrick, Kelly S.»• 297 

Patrick. Mark H.413 

Patrick, Michael J.336, 381, 552, 564 

Patten, Eric A.329, 578 

Patten, Richard L.336. 524 

Patten, Roger W.288 

Patterson, Becky L.506 

Patterson, Deraid L.428, 507 


Paulson, David L.401 

Pavletich. Lynn M.314 

Pavliska, Cindy A.450 

Pavlos, Anne D.316 

Pawlowski, Michael H.540 

Paylee. Chva.439 

Payne, David C.411, 527 

Payne, Pamela G.432, 506 

Pazaski, Kevin F.407 

Pearce, John M.413 

Pearce, Patrick S.413 

Pearson, Dennis K.439, 540 

Pearson. Duane T.200 

Pearson, Lisa L.262 

Pearson, Michelle R.365 

Pearson, Patricia A.277 

Pearson. Randall J.321, 509 

Peaarson. Russell D.324, 325, 552 

Pearson. Susan K.347, 518 

Pearson, Tim T.336, 431 

Pearson, Timothy M.431 

Peccatiello, Lawrence.507 

Pecchia. David Brian.300 

Pecchia, Mary L.313, 552 

Peck. Scott H.194, 275 

Peckenpaugh, Robert S.395 

Peckham. David J.507, 552 

Pedersen, Annette W.285 

Pedersen, Janice E.523 

Pederson, Deborah J.544. 577 

Pederson. Patricia A.287, 290, 546 

Pederson, Robert M.403 

Pedro, Mary J.556 

Pellerin, Thomas E.393 

Pellitteri. Michael J.298 

Pelly, Caleb S.397 

Peltier, Robin G.305 

Peltier, Tracy E.353, 570 

Pemberton, Derek M.407, 502 

Pemberton. Paul E.439 

Pennachi, Michael J.286. 426 

Penner, Tammay G.264, 359 

Penning, Donald S. Jr.439 

Penning, Matthew M.403 

Pennington, Carl R.409 

Pennington. Robin L.367 

Pennylegion, Mary R.353, 466 

Penrod, Karyn A.361, 501 

Pepos, Noellynn A.317, 467 

Peppel. Duane A.383, 501 

Pepper. Nona E.293 

Peppley, Stephanie. L.333 

Perenick. Kimberley A.194 

Perkins. David W.319, 324 

Perkinson, Joseph R.296 

Perrey, William A.286 

Perrigoue, Jeff F.411 

Perry, Alex W.413 

Perry, Christina M.284 

Perry, Linda L.292 

Perry, Magretha D.291, 427 

Perry. Mark Bjoring.297 

Perry, Michael A.411 

Perry, Todd W.270 

Pertzeer, Brett.202 

Pervinich, Mark E.320, 324 

Peters, Brian B.509 

Peters. David W.399, 577 

Peters, Julie A.276 

Peters. Kassie.304 

Peters, Rebecca S.291 

Peters, Sherri L.303 

Peters, Stefani L.334, 585 

Peters. Susan.351, 520 

Petersen, Andrew J.329 

Petersen, David A.395 

Petersen, David W.330 

Petersen, Eric G.337 

Petersen. Ernest P.296 

Petersen. Kurt N.298 

Petersen, Marie E.606 

Petersen, Stuart D.439 

Peterson, Angela F.439, 501 

Peterson, Bradley B.379, 523 

Peterson Bruce L.393 

Peterson. Carrie L.197, 365 

Peterson, Craig A.299 

Peterson, David A.570 

Peterson, Elizabeth G.338 

Peterson, Elizabeth R.369, 540 

Peterson. Jeffrey D.299 

Peterson. Jeffrey E.520 

Peterson, John D.267 

Peterson, Katrina J.357, 506 

Peterson, Leanne R.361 

Peterson, Lisa A.439 

Peterson, Mark A.385 

Peterson, Mark A.570 

Peterson, Michael R.401, 469, 495 


Pettyjohn, Michael T.337 

Pewitt. Sheryl D.347 

Peyser. Todd D.377 

Pfaeltzer. Karin K.307. 309. 538, 589 

Pfeifer, Kurtis E.319 

Pfeifer, Thomas D.541, 585 

Pfeifle, Rod W.439, 493 

Pham, Bernard.527 

Phan, Long H.270 

Phan, Poros Kok H.433 

Phan. Vivian D M.433 

Pharness, Julie D.303, 349 

Pheasant, Susan M ...338 

Phelan, Kathleen L.520 

Phelan, Laurel A.359, 465 

Phelps. Bradley J.536 

Phibbs, Mark D.275 

Phibbs, Scott J.274, 278 

Philbrick, Darey A.393 

Philippart. Eric A.267 

Phifl, David P.381 

Phillips, Brian M.296, 427, 540 

Phillips. Cynthia L.349. 459 

Phillips, Jolene R.549 

Phillips, Jon R.300, 507 

Phillips, Joy A.338, 340 

Phillips. Karen R.536 

Phillips, William C.439 

Phillips. William H.403 

Philpott, Michael S.397 

Phipps. Jay B.385 

Picatti. Doug G.385 

Picha, Russ G.381 

Piche, Kerri L.305 

Pickens. Marla C.501 

Pierce, Cynthia J.259 

Pierce. Kevin A.323. 324 

Pierce, Lisa M.262, 263 

Pierce, Pamela A.439 

Pietras, Dorothy J.544 

Pigman, George R.297 

Pike, Michelle M.367 

Pilet. Scott C...~.300, 427 

Pilgrim, Gladstone E.296 

Pillo, Tim A...297 

Piper, Kyle D.515 

Pirkle, Lance J.393 

Pittman, Craig A.417. 501 

Pittman, Dave W.403. 523 

Pitts, Shannon V.298, 427 

Pittsenbarger, Thomas.266 

Pitzel, Karen M.501 

Pitzer, Jon W.421 

Pizarro, Carlos J.286 

Plaatsman, James P.272, 425 

Plagge, Monica M....280, 465 

Plamondon, Thomas G.439 

Platt, Elizabeth G.361. 451 

Playfair. Deborah F.517 

Pleas, Paula R.294, 293 

Plese, Kim T.345, 518 

Plumlee, Michael R.299 

Plummer, Grant W.195, 389, 538 

Poage, Janece S.501 

Podnar, Denise L.303 

Poe, Alan F.381 

Poe, Charles E.381. 511 

Poe, Rene D.501, 554 

Pohndorf, Robert D.542 

Polcuch, Rene V..496, 544 

Polen, Timothy A.329 

Polenske, Diane K.365 

Politakis, Christopher.385 

Pollard. Deana A.439, 459 

Pollard. Teresa M.501 

Pollock. Monica M.291, 439 

Pomeroy. Todd E.288. 426 

Ponti, Darin J.379 

Pool. David D.381 

Pool. Karl N.586 

Poole. Alan R.439, 577, 590 

Poole, Charles L.330, 335 

Poole, Michael J.571, 593 

Poorman. Matthew R.413 

Popescu. Reagan M.363 

Popoff, Catherine A.345 

Popp, William E.336 

Poppe, Karen R.289 

Poppe. Paul G.538, 540 

Popravak, Terrence G.285, 519, 593 

Porter, David A.337 

Porter. David O.297 

Porter, Jeff H.419, 503, 538 

Porter, Swain W.389 

Porlnoy, Mickey B.411 

Porubek, Mary B.544 

Posakony. Teresa L.315, 318 

Potesky, Jeffrey J.322 

Poths, Stewart.439 


Ott Kris 

335 

Patti 1 aura J. . 

.259 

Peter<tnn Rnhert L 

.271 425 501 

Potter, Mia S. 

.294, 454 

Otto Lori L. 

.305, 309 

Patzer Sandra S. 

.536 

Peterson, Susan L. 

.262 

Potter, Steven A. 

.286 

Ottn Steven D. 

.320 

Paul Michael D. 

.439, 554 

Peterson, Tanya E. 

.293 

Potter, Timothy E. 

.266, 385 

Ottow I eonard A 

. .287 

Paul Tanya 1 

.449, 542 

Pethick William J 

. 403 

Potts, Charles P. 

.393 

Ouellette David P 

274, 278 

Paul Timothy L. 

.. 552 

Petre Kathleen A. 

. 280 

Potts, Shawn R. 

..296 

Oveland Charlene R 

...349, 501, 562 

Pauiini Inge . 

.285, 495 

Petrich Shelly L. 

.264 

Poulsen, Michelle A. 

.454 

Overby, Cassandra L. 

.151 

Paulsen, Charles M. 

.523 

Petrich, Steve W. 

.405 

Power, David H. 

.268, 269 

Overmann Stephen R 

.298 

Paulsen L Marlaine. 

.561 

Petrn Brian K 

.202, 320 

Power Deborah L. 

.332 

Overstreet, Amy E. 

.367 

Paulson, Bryan 0. 

.525 

Pettit, Meridee R. 

.355 

Power, Justin R. 

..393 

Overstreet, Lori L. 

.367, 501 

Paulson, Craig A. 

.375 

Pettit, Morris B. 

.405, 577 

Powers, Marianne. 

.369 


Pozzebon, Robert M.544 

Prasad, Venkatesh.527 

Prater, Rex G.300 

Pratt, Robin D.367 

Pratt, Tony J.439 

Prchal, Lisa A.351 

Preece, Judson W.389, 538 

Preedy. David L.195. 430 

Price, Ann E.361 

Price, Erik S.383. 540. 593 

Price, Jeffery M.266 

Price. Jill A.333 

Price, Michael W.432, 511 

Price, Randy S.298 

Price. Scott A.395 

Prichard. Steven R.301 

Pridemore. David W.197, 385, 537 

Pngge, Michael A.300 

Primmer. Randy I_493, 556, 564. 594 

Prince, Suzanne M.361 

Prince, Victor.509 

Prins, Doug D.383 

Prins, Steve R.383 

Prissinotti, Shelley K.316, 453 

Procter. Ross Reeder.439 

Proehl, Peter H.330 

Proses, Laura M.262, 451 

Proteau. Thomas D.397 

Prothero, Stanley W.439 

Provenzo. Donna M.288 

Prozinski. Kara T.369. 493. 468 

Pruett, Julie A.506, 560 

Pruitt. Ellen C.280 

Pryor, Richard D.329 

Przybylski, Mark A.275.277. 278 

Puaa, Kapaakea C.300, 578 

Pubols, Martha F.506 

Pucher, Robert E.289 

Pugh, Bradley L.548, 584 

Pugh, Mark T.403, 522 

Puhich. Jeanette M.577 

Pullar. Randall J.331 

Pulley, Susan E.312 

Pulse. Kimberly A.363 

Purkett, John C.439 

Purkett, Paul T.439 

Purrington, Everett.494, 549, 594 

Purviance. James W.536. 580 

Puth, Thomas C.399, 536 

Putnam. Erin L.496, 535 

Putnam, Michael D.522 

Pyeatt, Jeffrey A.389 

Pysher, Robert L.310 


Qq 


Quaidoo, Immaculate E.501, 547 

Quam, Lisa M.353. 501 

Quamme, Barbara A.353, 455 

Quamme. Kurt A.433 

Quatier, Bill J.385 

Querin, Randall J.553 

Quigley. Colleen M.355, 463 

Quigley, Tara M.294, 359 

Quillian, Catherine G.292, 452 

Quinby, Benjamin D.300 

Quinn, Christopher J.267, 538,672 

Quinn, Kari L.287 

Quinn. Thomas K.397, 507 

Quirk, Janet L.338 

Quisenberry, Clifford.297 

Quist, Debbie D.516 


Hr 


Raab, Lori D.287, 290, 453 

Raab, Steven W.325 

Rabourn, Shawn A... 306, 308. 309. 520 

Radach, Cathy A.315. 460 

Radcliffe, Richard D.330 

Raekes, Diane M.260, 261 

Rafi, Mohammad N.527 

Raftis, David G.515 

Raftis, Julie G.533, 538 

Ragan, Joanne M...439, 551 

Ragan, Kammy L...439, 517 

Ragan, Tami L.343, 465 

Raghothama, Kashchandr.432, 527 

Rahi, Mohammad Y.527 

Rahmat, Norseha B.285 

Rahner, Mark W.272 

Rainey, Andrea T.288, 290, 426, 501 

Rainey, David J.266, 325 

Rainey, Reed J.409 

Rains. Jeffrey C.425 

Raitz. Michael C.296 

Rakes, Shawn T.540 

Ralph, Kitti D.306 

Ralphs, James L. II. 205 


1984 / Index 623 





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Ramage, Bonnie.309 

Ramels, Peter G.403 

Ramerman, James C.584 

Ramos, Leahmel M.333, 538 

Ramsay, Charles H.587 

Ramsey, Scott L.517, 595 

Ranche, Maria T.520 

Rancich, Nancy L.461, 501 

Randall, Carla R.495, 570 

Randle, Kent A.268 

Raney, Brenda S.258 

Raney, Dawn R.258, 424, 449 

Raney, Paul A.409 

Ranger, Christin L.367, 458, 501 

Rank, Trina L.294, 347 

Rappuhn, Tamara A.338, 339 

Rarig, Douglas M.267 

Rasmussen, Cathy A.516 

Rasmussen, Darin P.329 

Rasmussen, Linda A.577 

Rasmussen, Lisa E.439, 563 

Rasmussen, Melinda A.277, 343 

Rasmussen, Roger C.289 

Rasmussen, Theodore P.272 

Rasmusson, Linda A.349 

Ratclifte, Laurie E.264, 265 

Rath, John D.419 

Rathbun, Andrew M.299 

Rathbun, Jody L.332, 343 

Rathbun, Molly K.332 

Raught, Brian J.297 

Raver, Todd A.381 

Ravichandran, Ramarath.527 

Ray, Kimberly A.367 

Ray, Stuart A.268 

Raymond. James L.439, 578 

Raymond, Jon D.385, 501 

Raymond, Matthew T.515, 583 

Raymond. Mike A.417 

Raz, Donald J.399, 519 

Reaves, Amy N.204 

Reaves, Andrew C.324, 536 

Reaves, James R.389 

Rebar, Patrick J.401 

Reber, Scott A.393, 511 

Recanzone, Paul L.329 

Rector, James P.375 

Rector, Kathleen A.448 

Redd, Leslie H.324 

Redding, Gary R.271 

Redemann, David H. Jr.329 

Redey, George T.299, 427 

Redinger, Colleen M.258, 439 

Reebs, Stephen, R.598 

Reed, Robert M.321, 552 

Reed, Tammy M.277 

Reedy, Lorraine E.326 

Rees, Blaine A.439 

Rees, Donald N.561, 594 

Reese, Garth D.298. 427 

Reeve, Jerald C.299 

Reeves, Cassie L.363 

Reeves, Edward L. Jr.275, 278, 279, 

555 

Reeves, Ramona E.431, 584 

Regan, John T.270, 391, 439 

Regar, Patrick J.469 

Reger, Joseph.407 

Rehberg. Wade A.469 

Rehfeld, Kurt G.330 

Rehm, Todd F.337 

Reiber, Katherine E.501 

Reichert, Fran-Michell.326 

Reid, James E.330 

Reid, John G.544 

Reiland, Heather E.277, 278 

Reilley, Steve.,336 

Reim, Catherine L.306 

Reiley, Marie B.262 

Reim, Marie- Therese.586 

Reiman, Renee N.353 

Reindeer, Renee E.290 

Reinholt, James T.407 

Reisenauer, Lola A.276, 279 

Reissig, Mark A.527 

Reitz, Nila A.259 

Reller, Robert D.298 

Rembold, Kira D.361 

Rendle, Sandra L.262, 263, 506 

Rengstorff, Mike S.403, 536, 580 

Renick, Terrance W.268 

Renn. Kirk F.272 

Renney, Gerald B.379 

Renquard, Kathryn A.550, 556 

Repanich, Lori L.439, 501 

Repman, Paula D.338 

Requa, Stacy A.292, 456 

Retter, Michael R.496, 546 

Reverman, Mary C.353, 459 

Rewolinski, Mary F.270, 277 

Reyers, Edward.337 

Reyes, Lara L.567 

Reynaud, Gordon P.270, 407, 425 

Reynolds, Cindy L.349, 607 

Reynolds, Jolyn G.258, 439 

Reynolds, Lynda A. 259 

Reynolds, Stephanie R.355 

Reynoldson, Michael H.270 

Reynvaan, Juli A.287 

Rhea, Julie A.463 


Rhinehart, Stacey.439 

Rhoades, Gary E.298 

Rhoads, Jennifer A.349 

Rhodes, William C.433 

Riba, Karen Lynn.542 

Ribaudo, Lydia A.431, 516 

Rice, Cathy.595 

Rice, Carolyn J.312 

Rice, Curtis W.377 

Rice, Douglas M.430, 577 

Rice, Edward J.381 

Rice, Glenna M.313 

Rice, Grant C. 493 

Rice, Gregory D.439 

Rice, Jami A.367, 464 

Rice, Janet V.286 

Rice, Mary A.293 

Rice, Noelle E.293, 359 

Rice, Scott J.275, 278, 328, 555 

Rice, Wayne R.319 

Richards, David G.433 

Richards, Jeffrey W. 336 

Richards, Nancy E.549 

Richards, Stephanie A.286 

Richards, Steven S.377 

Richards, Tracy 1.357 

Richards, William M.407 

Richardson, Jill M.259 

Richardson, Rachel D.276 

Richardson, Sandy L.355 

Richardson, Thomas L.393 

Richardson, Tina R.333, 429 

Richardson, Wilie H. 539 

Richert, Lance C. 487 

Richeson, Kimberly A.276 

Richey, Denise K.353, 466 

Richmond, Darryl W.331 

Rickel, Cynthia M.496, 535 

Ricker, Stephen J.337 

Rickman, Colleen L.277 

Riddle, Steve M.515 

Ridenhour, Lisa A.345, 506, 568 

Rider, Amy L.292 

Rider, Curtis D.419, 543 

Rigdon, Jennifer A.294, 427 

Riggins, Dana J.379 

Rikalo-, Jody M.365, 525 

Riley, Jean A.439, 506 

Riley, Jill M.316, 460 

Riley, Julie A.459 

Riley, Sarah L.305, 309 

Rima, Gayle L.548 

Ringel. Richard L.439, 557 

Ringness, Marit B.312 

Rinta, Gregg E.518 

Riordan, Michael J.202, 289 

Rios, Jose Y.270 

Ritchie, Robert F.336, 536, 589 

Ritter, Cheryl A.369 

Ritter, Donald C.-.409 

Ritter, Herbert L.413 

Ritter, Patrick W.329 

Ritter, Richard J.535 

Rivard, Camille M.293, 448 

Rivers, Lisa M.314. 318, 428 

Roach, Arthur J.433 

Roach, Erin J.289 

Roach, Jamison A.361, 501, 540 

Roach. Mitchell J.324, 325 

Roarke, Ian S.401 

Robbers, Richard L.301 

Robbins, James J.421 

Robbins, Tod E.383 

Roben, Michael W.405 

Roberson. Jeffrey C.330 

Roberto, Peter.300, 439, 552 

Roberts, Adam G.266, 269 

Roberts. Brad A.397 

Roberts, Coltrane.296, 427 

Roberts, David M.321 

Roberts, Dennis A.544 

Roberts, Margaret A.563 

Roberts, Mary E.439 

Roberts, Mike J.494, 594 

Roberts, Patricia L.550, 556 

Roberts, Peggy J.355 

Roberts, Rhona A.261, 501 

Roberts, Richard P.407, 537, 560 

Roberts, Vic A.439 

Robertson, Amy L.315, 318 

Robertson, Randall J.385, 439 

Robertson, Shelly J.260, 261 

Robeson, Charles R.439. 503 

Robicheaux, Kimberly A.332 

Robillard, Curtis A.270 

Robins, Scott E.336 

Robinson, David A.324 

Robinson, Jeffrey J.197, 393 

Robinson, Joanne G.326 

Robinson, Julia J.353, 459 

Robinson, Kaydee.276, 279 

Robinson, Kellyann M.349, 451, 607 

Robinson, Kristi E.439, 516 

Robinson, Maggie L.439 

Robinson, Marck R.329 

Robinson, Rob S.398, 397 

Robinson, Scott A.583 

Robinson, Sheri A.327, 591 

Robinson, Steve C.200, 505 

Robinson, Thomas E.201, 274 


Robinson, Zoe L.326, 327, 501, 594 


Robinson, Brian S.298, 401 

Robsahm. Mary M.339, 340 

Rockhill. Wendelyn.549 

Rockness, Lisa H.353, 451 

Rockwell, Brian E.196, 395 

Rodbury, Steven J.320 

Rodd, Joanna R.430 

Roddy, Mike P.487 

Rode, Jill K.355 

Rodewald, Brett L.515 

Rodgers, Jeff T.310 

Rodkey, Grant F.510 

Roe, Michael S.430 

Roe. Sarah A.343, 502, 600 

Roeder, Jaimie J.405 

Roegner, Lisa A.284 

Roetcisoender, Kirk T.301 

Roewer, Steven D.299 

Rogers, Belinda L.494 

Rogers,Daniel A.487 

Rogers, David J.271, 273 

Rogers, Emily V.333, 369 

Rogers, Enetta L.316 

Rogers, Janene L.365, 455 

Rogers, Julie A.351 

Rogers, Kathleen M.347, 520, 561 

Rogers, Linda D.430, 517 

Rogers, Mark A.319, 320, 324 

Rogers, Scott B.397 

Rogers, Sheila A..345, 544 

Rogers, William B.439 

Rohlinger, Mitchell J.300 

Rohman, Libby L.334 

Rojas, Anthony M.419 

Roller, Stephen V.557 

Rollinger, Daniel J.266, 552 

Rollinger, Julie E.552 

Rollings, Elizabeth R.351. 461 

Roloff, Darci A.357 

Romaneschi, Brent A.393 

Romanos, Brenda L.439, 462 

Romas, George.527 

Rombeek, Cynthia W.430 

Romfo, Angela C.343, 439 

Romfo, Susan 1.315 

Romney, Julia C.452 

Romsos, Lynn M.307, 367 

Romstead, Dan R.389 

Ronngren, Jeffrey J.515 

Roof, Bryan T.310 

Roose, Carrie L.516 

Root, Barbara J.363 

Root, Tom R.397 

Roper, Douglas L.439, 556 

Roper, John A.401, 439. 509 

Ropp, Heather C.264, 265, 467 

Rorvick, Alisa M.353 

Rosario, Linda M.280, 545 

Rose, Christina M.280, 571, 593 

Rose, Jennifer.450 

Rose, Roxann R.316, 448 

Rosenberg, Peter W.324 

Rosenfelt, Todd L.507 

Rosenkranz, Charles S.300, 310 

Rosien, Kristine J.302, 308 

Rosman, Daniel V.279 

Rosman, Jonnelle K.365, 468 

Rosman, Randall J.275, 325, 606 

Ross, Audrey A.439 

Ross, Bryan M.323 

Ross, Chris A.301 

Ross, Cindi D.338 

Ross, Douglas A.522, 578 

Ross, James W.379 

Ross, M'lisa L.317 

Ross, Myrna J.593 

Rosser, Guy M.379 

Rossi, Rod W.266 

Rosso, Ronald J.439, 501, 546 

Roth, Caron A.338 

Roth, Christie A.353 

Roth. Gabrielle K.353 

Roth, Gretchen A.357, 522 

Roth, Lisa K.542, 549, 556 

Rothaus, Daniel R.320 

Rothert, Kris D.286 

Rothwell, Lorena B.291, 463 

Rouleau, Thomas M.563 

Rounds, Shannon E.304, 309 

Rouse, Donna J.542, 551 

Rouseff, Daniel.509 

Routhe, Rory A.275 

Rouzee, Jeanine M.560 

Rovai, Stephen R.379 

Rovetto, Mark A.393, 502 

Rowan, Darrin S.331 

Rowe, Eric C....;.409, 511 

Rowe, Gretchen E.355 

Rowe,Julia A.338, 463 

Rowell. Todd T.389, 511, 542 

Rowell, Val W.556 

Rowland, Frank R.399, 554 

Rowland, Tamara L.286, 345, 448 

Rowlson, Sharon L.369 

Roy, Eric E.379 

Royer, Charles.275, 279, 328 

Rozario, A Placidus.547, 551 

Rozier, William A.563 

Rubero, John P.320 


Rucker, Brian L.337, 429 

Rudd, Eric W.301, 439, 577 

Rude, Jolyn M.260, 261 

Rudin, Russell T.527 

Rueter, Anne L.345 

Rulffes, Robin Lee.270 

Rumpza, Dean J.301 

Runyon, Ramona L.286 

Ruppert, John S.389 

Russell, David.425 

Russell, Jay R.267 

Russell, Jodi L.288, 426 

Russell, Kathryn L.293 

Russell, Keith G.524 

Russell, Rodney N.268 

Russell. Sandra K.291, 456 

Russell, Tish.291, 463 

Rustine, Amanda S.294 

Rutkowski, Kevin L.336 

Rutledge, D. Mason.403 

Rutt, Justine G.332 

Rutt. Ted J.518, 551 

Rutter, Joni J.314, 318, 461 

Ruud, ErikT.336, 429 

Rux, Ellen L.315 

Rux. Richard D.433 

Ruzicka, Marvin J.323 

Ryan, Kevin J.584 

Ryan, Michael A.268 

Ryan, Michael M.447, 496, 536 

Ryan, Robert A.579 

Rychiik, Suzanne C.514 

Ryder, Gail M.264, 565 

Ryle Douglas D.379 

Ryncarz, Alexander J.268 

Rytand, Susan.314 

Rzany. Annette F.286 


Ss 


Sabo, Deborah K.345, 451 

Saboe, Susan C.196 

Sadik, Andjarwati.552 

Sadler, Norman J.439, 507 

Saelens, Chad M.297 

Saelens, Roxanne L.519 

Saelid, Tom D.321 

Saffell, Denise A.316, 461 

Sagers, Heidi L.343 

Sagerser, Jeannie L.501 

Sahide, Amalius.527, 552 

Sahr, Elizabeth A.294, 361 

Sailer, Michael J.550 

Saindon, Amy M.365 

Salatino, Thomas J. 266 

Salenjus, Jeffrey H.205 

Salgado, Bernadette D.334 

Salmon, Jay B.337 

Salzetti. Richard A.297 

Salzwedel, Kim C.556 

Samaniego, Joanne 1.287 

Sammeth, Cordia J.522 

Sammeth, Traci A.369 

Sammons, William H.439 

Sampsell, Matthew M.405 

Sampson, Frank S.501 

Sampson, K Scott.301, 552 

Sampson, Roxie L.334 

Samuelsen, Theresa S.439 

Sanchez, Robert J.411 

Sandaas, Leif Richard.289, 540 

Sandbach, Susan E.306 

Sandberg, Steven L.409 

Sandelius, Brian L.195, 393 

Sandell, Tyler D.487 

Sanders, Daniel H.270 

Sanders, Gary R.399 

Sanders, Gerald W.271 

Sanders, Gregory W.322 

Sanders, John W.202 

Sanders, Michael R.511 

Sanders. Robin L.355, 453 

Sandquist, Mark R.487 

Sandri, Gina F.332, 351, 453 

Sands, Shelly R.357 

Sandstrom, Curt L.411 

Sandstrom, Derik H.411 

Sanfellipo, John R.285, 572 

Sanford, Eric W.289 

Sanford, Lauri A.316, 462 

Sangl, Candace C.439, 496 

Sannes, Jill K.291,367 

Santarosa, Julie A.359 

Santarosa, Tracy J.359, 495 

Santelli, Francis D.336 

Santos, Juliet Marie G.439, 503 

Santos, Ma Melet Gongo.264 

Santos. Michele M.284, 425 

Sanven, Michael.554 

Saplan, Peter R.469 

Saretske, Loran M.439, 520 

Sargent, John C.399 

Sasaki, Stephanie F.302, 361, 463 

Sather, Kristen L..294, 359 

Sather, Sondra M.593 


Satoh, Kyomi L. 

.57G 

Satterlee, Perry S. 

.379, 527 

Satterthwaite, Julie K. 

.264 

Saukkonen, Tracy S. 

.355 

Saunderson, Stephen D. 

.41$ 

Saur, Lori L. 

.265 

Sauvage, Janet L. 

.293, 461 

Savage, Myron E. 

.288 

Sawyer, Michael J. 

.268 

Sax, Terrance A. 

.275 

Saxe, Lisa A. 

.584 

Sayan, Stacia B. 

.307. 589 

Sayre, Christopher J. 

.56t 

Scalzo, David J. 

.393, 511 

Scanlan, Sera L. 

.439- 

Scansen, Donald W. 

.272 

Scarboro, Sidney L. 

.57C 

Scarlett, Karin M. 

.57Q: 

Scattergood, Wendy E.... 

.43S 

Schad. Jody M. 

.446 

Schaifer, Janelle K. 

.294, 365 

Schaifer, Karen E. 

..194, 432, 505 

Schaeperkoetter, Robert. 

.31/ 

Schafer. Randy L. 

.32C 

Schambron, Pamela J.... 

.502 

Schaub, Daniel L. 

.430, 52Cj 

Schauble, Robert C. 

. 27 A 

Scheele, Sandra L. 

.369, 502 

Scheibe. Lynn M. 

.433 

Scheibe, Timothy D. 

.510 

Schekel. Kurt. 

.546 

Schellberg, Timothy M.... 

.403 

Schelling, Jill L. 

.333 

Schenck, Kimberly A. 

.302 

Schermerhorn, Mark S... 

.544 

Scherzinger, Richard L... 

.383 

Schiele, Leann M. 

.332 

Schier, Stephan. 

.271 

Schilb, Cynthia L. 

..333, 335, 585 

Schille, Norman C. 

.323, 552 

Schilling, Robert L. 

.274 

Schilling, Timothy E. 

.228 

Schimke, Melana K. 

..388, 440. 452 

Schimke, Rob A. 

.393 

Schink, Linda L. 

.365, 457 

Schink, Susan L. 

..327, 560, 562 

Schinmann, Kevin P. 

.487 

Schireman, Michelle R.... 

.523 

Schirman, Susan E. 

.194, 258 

Schlager, James F. 

.407 

Schlarmann, Nancy. 

.466f 

Schlect, Jeffrey A. 

.324, 589 

Schlender, Timothy W. .. 

.300 

Schlenz, Jeffrey M. 

..271, 273, 517f 

Schlepp, Gwenn E. 

.259' 

Schlepp, Sharolyn S. 

.326, 327 

Schlicker, Lynne M. 

.458 

Schlittler, Bruce F. 

.440 

Schluter, Tamara G. 

..289, 290, 3091 

Schmaltz, Jeffrey E. 

.557 

Schmeeckle, Erica L. 

.430 

Schmick, David B. 

.550 

Schmick, Todd K. 

.395 

Schmidt, Andrew D. 

.330 

Schmidt, Andy J. 

.301 

Schmidt, Ann E. 

.440 

Schmidt, Doyle E. 

.321 

Schmidt. Heidi J. 

.277 

Schmidt, Holly. 

.542 

Schmidt, Joanne M. 

.260, 261 

Schmidt, Mark T. 

.266 

Schmidtgall, Mark M. 

.381, 536 

Schmitten, Raymond C... 

.546 

Schmitz, Margaret A. 

.367. 544 

Schmitz, Michele A. 

.501,600 

Schmunk, Teri L.264, 265, 440, 450 

Schnabel, Frank W. 

.395 

Schneider, Craig G. 

.331, 199 

Schneider, Eric D. 

.557 

Schneider, Eric 1. 

.4111 

Schneider, Jack N. 

.571,593 

Schneider, Thomas F. 

.550. 

Schneidmiller, Gena R.... 

.363: 

Schnell, Kristin M. 

.276 

Schnell, Lori A. 

.264, 465 

Schnelz, Jonathan D. 

.393 

Schober, Cindy L. 

.262, 359 

Schober, Timothy J. 

.393 

Schoedel, Elizabeth L. 

.258, 424 

Schoedel, Susan A. 

.449, 541 

Schoening, Barry D. 

.409 

Schoening, Derek L. 

.409 

Schofstoll, Kathryn A. 

.289, 290, 426, 


594, 595 

Schofstoll. Steven E. 

.323, 325 

Schols, Sharrie L. 

..505, 559, 564 

Scholtz, Robert S. 

.571, 593 

Schonberg, Bonnie J. 

.440, 595 

Schorno, Cynthia M. 

.305, 577 

Schorsch, James F. 

.399 

Schorsch, Yvette M. 

.345 

Schirmshire, Thaniel S... 

.548 

Schroeder, Kelly P. 

.334 

Schroeder, Lori A. 

.388 

Schroeder, Michael D. 

.393 

Schroeder, Rebecca A... 

.361, 563 

Schroeder, Scott A. 

.413, 501 

Schroeder, Steve. 

.538,* 

Schroeder, Steven J. 

.381 

Schroedl, Diana L. 

.332’ 




624 Index/1984 




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Schubach, Leslie A.525 

Schubert, Ernst H.272, 540 

Schuler, Michael J.389 

Schueman, Kenneth C.199. 523, 540 


Schult, Lisa G. 

.347 

Schulte. Andreas M. 

.433 

Schultheis, Edward D. 

.323 

Schullheis. Glenn A. 

.271,440 

Schultheis, Jim C. 

.594 

Schultheis, Kim D. 

.361 

Schultheis, Theresa M. 

.314, 361 

Schultz, Christine S. 

.515, 545. 550, 

556, 593 


Schultz. Rex T. 

.297 

Schultz, Susan L. 

.431, 506 

Schultz. Timothy W. 


Schulz, Theresa M. 

.431, 501 

Schumacher, Jennifer J.. 

.343, 452 

Schumacher, Leslie L. 

.495 

Schumock, Glen T. 

.379 

Schumsky, Steve P. 

.393 

Schuster, Bob C. 

.268, 269 

Schuster, Doug W....272, 273. 425, 536 

Schuster, James B. 

.417 

Schuster, Kellie L. 

.349. 465 

Schuster, Monida M. 

.199 

Schutte, Kristin K. 


Schwartz, Kelly L. 

..367, 459, 591 

Schwartz, William E. 

.381 

Schweikert. Stephanie.... 

.303 

Schwend, Dan J. 

.515 

Schwenger, Jill A. 

.365, 457 

Schweppe, Courtney A... 

..338, 461, 570 

Schweppe, Heather L. 

.369 

Schwinn, Sue. 

.440, 501 

Schwint, Terry D. 

.493, 579 

Schwisow, Rodney K. 

.395 

Schwisow, Scot A. 

.440, 487 

Schwisow, Scott Edward 

.594 

Scofield, Ronald W. 

.199 

Scollan, Jackie A. 

.302, 308 

Scott, Alan M. 

.270, 430 

Scott Bowen S. 

.397 

Scott Daniel J. 

.375 

Scott, Kathryn E. 

.276 

Scott, Kevin A. 

.417 

Scott, Lynn K. 

.294. 549 

Scott, Michael D. 

..331, 440, 577 

Scott. Rochelle A. 

.595 

Scott. Shelly K. 

.510, 570 

Scott, Stephen M. 

.297 

Scoville, Tina A. 

.430 

Scoville Tricia A. 

.430 

Snurieri Mark. 

.320 

Scuka, Adriana V. 

.527 

Seaburg, John G. 

.425 

Seal, Craig A. 

.427 

Seal, Dan 0. 

.299 

Seals, Kana E. 

.501 

Sears, Timothy G. 

.310 

Seberl, David G. 

.299 

Seekins, Lynette L. 

.440 

Seeley, Tracey J. 


Seely, Dan R. 

.271 

Segna Jan M . 

...204, 315. 460 

Seivers, David W. 

.336 

Selby, Kevin B. 

.329 

Selby. Mark R. 

.267 

Self, Scott A. 

.267, 424 

Selintung Claudio M. 

.552 

Selintung, Gladys T. 

.522 

Selintung, James. 

.552 

Selintung, Mary 1. 

.527, 552 

Selintung, Michael. 

.522 

Sell, Jacqueline M. 

.262, 263 

Sell. Kelly J. 

.292 

Sells, Barbara J. 

.262 

Sells. Jeffrey C. 

.381 

Selset, Elizabeth A. 

.468 

Selsor, Paul C. 

.323 

Selstead, Greg A. 

.405 

Semrau, John B. 

.391. 469 

Semrau, Mark L. 

.527 

Sendzicki, Bonnie J. 

.563 

Senn, Steve D. 

.507 

Senuty, Paul A. 

.550, 566 

Seo, Gwang M. 

.421 


Shannon, Kelli A.357, 543 

Shannon, Marc W.519 

Shannon, Mark A.515 

Shannon, R Thomas.270 

Shapley, Michael R.411, 577 

Sharp, Aaron P.202, 300, 427 

Sharp, Anne K.291. 466 

Sharp. Daniel R.587 

Sharp,George H.429, 564 

Sharp, Keith T.270, 274, 501, 543 

Sharp, Kristina E.552, 586 

Sharp, Sally A.355, 464 

Shattuck, Ann F.347 

Shattuck. Jeffrey.407 

Shaughnessy. Pat G.440 

Shaver, Lorine L.294, 326 

Shaw, Kevin E.331 

Shaw, Melinda J.345 

Shaw, Robert S.301 

Shaw, Ron E.440, 509 

Shaw, Susan M.276 

Shawley, Carol R.292, 452 

Shay. Lori J.493. 595 

Shea, C Mathew.430, 577 

Sheard, Dorothy L.345 

Sheard, Laura J.345 

Shearer, Marty J.271, 425 

Shealer, Dave.272 

Sheen, David M.290 

Sheldon, Brian S.501 

Sheldon, Debora L.440 

Sheldon, Kay S.440 

Sheldon. Thomas F.440, 510, 570 

Shelton, Kimberly D.259 

Shelton, Lee Q.517 

Sheneman, Dawn C.203, 431, 

501, 590 

Shepard, Catherine A.506 

Shepard, Cheryl L.303, 309 

Shepard, Melanie A.276 

Shepard, Michael B.329, 335 

Shepard, Patricia J.317 

Shepherd, David B.440 

Shepherd, Phyllis J.288, 426 

Shepherd, Steven V.440 

Sheridan, Teresa A.449 

Sherling, Steven D.301 

Sherman, Marilyn L.430 

Sherrell, M Kirk.487 

Sherrod, Steven G.440 

Sherwood, Teresa L.388, 420 

Shideler, Karen M.365 

Shields. Cornelia M.517 

Shields, Heidi E.440 

Shillam, James E.299 

Shimabukuro. Kathryn J.343, 457 

Shimizu. Hi Sao.285 

Shimogawa, Kathy R.440 

Shin. Sandy.312 

Shinn. Jennifer C.264, 265, 440 

Shirely, Susan L.326, 327, 560 

Shockman, James L.417, 554 


Shoemake, Teresa L.505 

Shoemaker. Christina A.430 

Shoemaker, John R.501, 518 

Shoemaker, Linda M.330 

Shonka. Janet L.307 

Shoop. Karen M.277 

Shoop, Lora L.277, 520, 569 

Short, Brenda J.432, 462 

Shorten. Timothy J.297 

Showalter, Julie M.361, 455 

Showalter, Mark W.197, 379 

Shropshire, Mary A.506 

Shuck, Pauniece.501 

Shuler. Robert R.440, 493 

Shumaker, Mark W.320. 324 

Shuman, Preston W.297 

Shute, Brian J.516 

Sicilia, John D.520 

Sickles, Marc A.507 

Sidel. Art L.503, 533, 590 

Sided. Scott A.395 

Sidi, Anis S.440 

Siefferman. Kendall.302 

Siegel, Joan M.347 

Siegley. Jana L.440 

Seigwarth.Robert E.202, 505 

Sievers, Karen L.201 

Sifferman, Gregory A.430 

Sifferman, Kendall.463 

Sigmar, Susan ..353, 520 

Sikora, Diane H.345, 568 

Siljeg, Deborah A.343, 516 

Silva, Althea L.276 

Silva, Christoppher C.391 

Silva, Gregory A.275, 328, 551 

Silva, Valerie L.550, 556 

Sitvernale, Mary Berni.440 

Silvernale, Michelle M.463 

Silvis, Timothy E.301 

Simanton. Craig T.272, 425 

Simek, Joseph E.432 

Simeon, Richard W.270 

Simmerman, Traci D.332, 345 

Simmons, Belinda L.431. 540, 594 

Simmons, Cardell.288 

Simmons, Jeffery C.301, 428 

Simmons, Jerry P.337 

Simms, Jeffrey K.501 

Simms, Michael J.319 

Simon, Daniel L.321 

Simonds. Andrew R.271, 273 

Simonds, Derrick R.522 

Simons. Deborah A.509, 598 

Simonzi, Maryanna.312 

Simpson, David J.577 

Simpson, Kristie L.494, 594 

Simpson, Stacy M.261, 510 

Simpson, Tracy A.318 

Sims, Karin E.343, 540 

Sinclair. Eden R.355, 451 

Sinclair, Scott A.324 

Singer, Richard A.322 


Singhose, Michael S.297, 427 

Sinnott, Doug M.391 

Site, Perry.607 

Sites. Sheila L.343, 518, 545 

Sivak. Dianne M.280 

Sivak, Tersa L.276. 278, 451 

Sizelove, Lisa J.355, 580 

Sjostrom, Craig D.337 

Skaer. Tracy L.294, 295 

Skagen, Joan M..367, 448 

Skaggs. Ronald L.391, 572 

Skari. Lisa A.332, 467 

Skarperud, Kirsten F.353, 467 

Skavlem, Terrie B..569 

Skene. Shannon L.357 

Skidmore. Richard L.336, 429 

Skidmore, Shirely A.520, 553, 561, 

594 

Skillman, Jennifer L.440 

Skinner. Barbar D..294, 466 

Skok. Sheila M.520 

Skok, Stephen P....440, 509 

Skolrud. Christopher S.297 

Skrinde, Karen M.431, 517, 577 

Skyta. Damon R.195, 419, 543, 560 

Slaaen, Jeri L.314, 345 

Slater, Charles H.440 

Slater, La Nae L.313, 428 

Slater. Lisa A.204, 305 

Slayer, Chalres F.266 

Slechta. Janna.361 

Slee, Robert R.509 

Slenes, Lisa A.303 

Slrvka. Hebe.332 

Sloan, Michael W.275 

Slovenko, Glenn D.440 

Slusser, Linda M.503, 533 

Small, Steven L.202, 540 

Smalls, Zachary S.331 

Smallwood, James G.268, 424 

Smarz, Darla M.288, 290 

Smith, Allison L.195 

Smith, Amy L.361 

Smith. Amy M.280. 281 

Smith, Andrea L.291, 450 

Smith, Benjamin S.337 

Smith, Bradley R.329, 330 

Smith. Brian C.440, 540 

Smith. Bnan C.199 

Smith, Brian W.323 

Smith, Bryan D.285 

Smith. Clinton W.542 

Smith, Damon A.536 

Smith, David F.399 

Smith, Debbie M.440 

Smith, Dougals A.525 

Smith, Douglas F.272, 425 

Smith, Edward D.509, 541 

Smith. Gina.455 

Smith, Jane A.361, 523, 545 

Smith, Jane L.388 

Smith, Jeffrey T.383 


Smith, Jesse K.286 

Smith, Jessica L.343, 538 

Smith, Joe W.523 

Smithh, Jon L.272, 425 

Smith, Judy L.280 

Smith, Karen L.316 

Smith. Kelli G.535 

Smith, Kevin A.297 

Smith, Kyle E.330, 546 

Smith, Laurel L.294, 457, 549 

Smith, Laurie A.293 

Smith, Laurie L.361, 464, 560 

Smith, Linda A.316 

Smith, Lori L.367 

Smith, Mark E.501, 543 

Smith, Michael R.501 

Smith, Michelle K.264. 265 

Smith, Pamela A.259 

Smith, Phillip E.399 

Smith, Raymond C.272. 440 


Smith, Reynolds and Lisa 

Smith. Robert D. 

Smith Rodney L. 

.440 

.271 

553, 561, 594 

Smith Sandra L. 

.523 

Smith, Scott A. 

.538, 572 

Smith, Scott F. 

.560 

Smith Scott R. 

.298 

Smith, Shannon E. 

.327 

Smith, Sherry L. 

.351 

Smith, Stephanie L. 

.345 


Smith, Steven F.331 

Smith, Stuarl M.540 

Smith, Susan M.307 

Smith, Suzanne L.555, 572, 593 

Smith, Timothy R.330, 578 

Smith, Torgun E.273, 425 

Smith, Troy A.559 

Smith, Twanda M.196 

Smith, Virginia L.361 

Smolt, Kim C.544 

Smutny, Kent M.432, 510 

Snider, Connie J.261 

Snider, John R.501 

Snider, Kathy J.440, 557 

Snider, Rodd R.409 

Snider, Wendy J.365 

Snipes. Daniel R.496 

Snope. Matthew J.320 

Snover, Michael R.403 

Snow, David M.202 

Snow. Theresa A.506 

Snyder, David A.270 

Snyder, Gregg L.504 

Snyder, Rhonda S.440, 549 

Sobo, Thomas.440 

Sobolewski, Rebecca A.465 

Solan, William J.550 

Solanzo, Janet S.538 

Solberg, James D.322 

Soldat. Kathryn A.595 

Soliman, Cecelia V.258 


Seresun, Karen R.359 

Seresun, Kelly D.359, 495, 602 

Sergeson, DanieU.383 

Serquinia, Rebecca V.287, 426 

Serrette, Patti J.294, 462 

Serwold, Joan M.347 

Setterberg, Diana L.314, 318, 428 

Settergren, Lynn M.277, 279, 453 

Settle. Scott M.375 

Settles. Delmaria Y.317 

Setz, EricS.393 

Sevedge, Jeanette L.431, 606 

Sexton, Charles D.576 

Sexton, Tracy H.307, 448, 589 

Seymour, Anita K.280 

Shaffer, David W.440, 519 

Shahamad. Anand P.. 284 

Shanda, David W.288 

Shaner, Kyle T.550 

Shang, Marilyn Y.440, 515 

Shanholtz, Michael E.284 

Shanks, William A.542 












































































































































































































































































































































































Solomon, Ashlie K. 

.294 

Solsvik, Nils M. 

.285 

Somers. Sindi A. 

.294 

Sommer. John C. 

.395 

Sommedeld. Kayla B. 

.288 

Songster, John J. 

.320 

Sonnemann. Wendy J... 

.289. 290 

Sonnichsen, Christian.... 

.509, 541, 


585 

Sonnichsen, Roger P. 

.267 

Soran, Stephen J. 

.322 

Sorensen, Eileen M. 

.312 

Sorensen, Pamela K. 

.326, 365 

Sorensen. Rob J. 

.300 

Sorge, Stacy L. 

...349, 520, 561 

Sorgwe. Fodune D. 

.562 

Sotelo. Laurie J. 

.458 

Sotka. Marilyn M. 

.426. 534 

South. Steven R. 

.201.502 

Southall. Kenneth J. 

.413 

Southern, Mark W. 

.268 

Souvenir. David B. 

.337 

Spaargaren, Linda L. 

.291 

Spadoni, Judy L. 

.552 

Spak, Patrick S. 

.487 

Spaniel, Randy S. 

.271 

Spanier, Scott D. 

.564 

Spargo, Mark E. 

.554 

Sparkman, Stephen H... 

...330, 520, 580 

Sparks, Anne R. 

.440 

Sparks, Wade A.197. 413, 501, 537 

Sparling, Thomas E. 

.440 

Spaulding, Scott R. 

.319. 589 

Spearman, Kathy L. 

.427 

Spearman, Sonny K. 

.359, 468 

Speegle. Douglas K. 

.270, 425 

Spier, Pattie K. 

...312, 318, 454 

Spence, Bruce M. 

.259 

Spencer, Diane M. 

.357 

Spencer. Gwen. 

.516 

Spencer, Tami L. 

.357, 517 

Spedich, Liane B. 

.440 

Spiegelberg, Lisa A. 

..515, 550, 556, 


593 

Spiegelberg, William B.. 

.503, 543 

Spivey, Delmis P. 

.310 

Splane, William T. 

.389, 502 

Spohn, Van T. 

. 270 

Sprague, Cynthia L. 

.467 

Sprengeler, Paul A. 

.586 

Sprenger Scott A. 

. 550, 593 

Sprincin. Edy. 

.357 

Springer, Thomas A. 

.405 

Sprouse, Ronald E. 

..507 

Sprugel, Lynne M. 

.363 

Sprute, Diane P. 

.277 

Spunaugle, Anna L. 

.294, 427 

Squetimkin, Annettee. 

.562 

Squicciarini, Frederic. 

.321 

Squires, Kyle D. 

.507 

Squires, Scott A. 

.413 

St. George, Ronald P... 

.519 

Staats, Karen K. 

.292 

Stacey, Carrie L. 

.276 

Stacey, Kimberley J. 

.355 

Stachofsky, Jill M. 

.367 


Stack, David K.300 

Stack, Jennifer L.313, 357, 459 

Stacy. Gregory C.268 

Stadick, Steven T.379 

Stafford. Robert P.493, 579 

Stahl, Laura L.355 

Stahl, Sondra K.314, 318 

Stair, Jill E.260, 261, 577 

Stallone, Shelly M.290 

Stallworth, Todd N.270 

Stamey. Tracy A.315 

Standaert. Richard E.572, 593 

Stanfield. Tonya L.288 

Stanford, David R.329 

Stanford, Kenneth J.428 

Stanford, R Susan.353, 455, 541 

Stangeland. Debbie A.343 

Stanke. Jaclyn.302. 309 

Stanley, James B.417 

Stanley. Jeffrey M.405 

Stansberry, Kevin M.275, 328 

Stansberry. Scott P.320 

Stanton. Viki V.280 

Stanway, Frank O.391 

Starbuck, Scott N.298 

Stark. Carmen K.307, 309, 589 

Stark, Lesa J.466, 496 

Stark, Leslie M.440 

Stark, Lyle R.505, 564 

Stark, Patrick J.323, 324 

Stark, Robert J.395 

Starr. Marilyn L.507, 598 

Starr. Richard J.297 

Starr, Samantha S.260, 261. 520 

Starr, Wade E.501 

Starry, David R.275 

Staudenraus. Randolph ....272, 571, 593 

Stauffer, Steven S.561 

Stavig, Gregg N.301 

Stavig, Michael J.413 

Stavig. Robert M.301 

Steach, John C.299 

Steadman, Diane M.583 

Steadman, Lori L.583 

Steams, Steven R.421, 522 

Stebbins, Kristin M.450 

Stechta, Janna.468 

Steck, Jay B.407 

Stedham. Dawn M.334 

Stedman, Lisa M.304, 468 

Steed, Leslie M.550 

Steel. Robin L.264 

Steele, Gary L.197, 534 

Steele. Jennifer L.440, 534 

Steele. Margaret E.293. 448 

Steele, Ray L.266 

Steele. Robin L.153 

Steele, Tammy C.294 

Steere, John J.604 

Stegmiller. Kathleen G.369 

Steiger, Raymond T.389, 511, 542 

Steiger, Scott P.433, 525, 554 

Steinbach, Mike D.511 

Steindorf, Greg S.266 

Steiner, Darcy M.343, 538 

Steiner, Glenn S.296 


Stelzer. Cheryl K.440 

Stenberg. Mark J.297 

Stender. Eric M.274 

Stepan, Jacqueline M.276 

Stephanick, Elizabeth.284 

Stephens. Amy K.201, 427 

Stephens, Dawn E.280, 453 

Stephens. James A.272 

Stephens, Victor N.515 

Stephenson. Natalie A.306 

Stephenson. Susan C.440 

Sterling. Sharon R.566 

Stetner, Darcy M.455 

Stevens, Donald F.520 

Stevens, Glynn F.284 

Stevens. James W.290 

Stevens, Karen A.361 

Stevens, Keith A.504 

Stevens. Michael A.519 

Stevens. Monica R.264 

Stevens, William S.271 

Stevenson, Kathryn D.262, 263 

Stevenson, Michelle.501 

Stevenson, Sherrie A.357, 506 

Stevenson, Todd W.324 

Steward. Kara J.440 

Stewart-Wylie. Jacqueline.306, 467 

Stewart, Amy D.355, 468 

Stewart. Jeffrey A.405 

Stewart, Jeffrey D.267 

Stewart, John H.375 

Stewart, Keri A.293 

Stewart, Kristopher R.289 

Stewart, Leo R.501 

Stewart, Leslie A.552 

Stewart, Lisa J.359, 453 

Stewart, Maryann A.440 

Stewart, Scott C.298 

Stewart, Virginia A.307 

Stice. Leland E.299 

Stiemert. Karl A.322, 325 

Stiles, Jennifer M.520, 563 

Still. Craig S.397, 503 

Still. Jacey J.292. 365 

Still, Joseph R.199, 411 

Stiltner, Carol M.345 

Stiltner. Mindy J.333, 426 

Stimmel, Mark A.268 

Stimmel, Matthew S.266, 269 

Stimson, Fred C.275 

Stiner, Deborah J.294, 427, 456 

Stinson, Scott E.501 

Stirrett. Holly M.361 

Stirrett, Steve L.407 

Stivers, Lisa D.203, 440 

Stockdale, Linda B.503 

Stocker. Keith J.399 

Stocker, Kristin L.197, 367, 515, 594 

Stocklee, Olga L.568 

Stockman, Kurt J.515 

Stockman, William J.389 

Stoffer, Greg J.399 

Stoffer, Stephanie M.262, 263, 463 

Stohr, Jeffrey R.440 

Stoller. Bruce R.393 

Stolte, Eric V.321, 324 


Stolte, Jenae M.307 

Stolz. Martin J.440 

Stomieroski, Robin L.334 

Stone, Alison F.- 463 

Stone, Frank G.274 

Stone, George W.571 

Stone. Julie G.347 

Stone. Robert P.337 

Stonecypher. Roy W.301 

Stoneking. Scott A.288 

Stopher, Kelly J.381 

Stopher, Kevin T.381 

Storm, Toni L.306 

Storman. Vera R.565 

Storms, Cynthia.520 

Storr, David R.409 

Story. Jayna T.326, 327 

Stosich, Steven C.299 

Stougard, Steven E.274, 578 

Stout, Mary K.326 

Stout, Merridy L.359 

Stowe. Anne M.203, 353. 516 

Strachan. Glenn S.440 

Straight, Lauree M.519 

Straka, James L.541 

Straka. Robert E.319 

Strand, Danielle E.315 

Strand, Eric D.199 

Strang, Shelley G.262, 263 

Stranne. Sherryl M.288 

Straub. Jennifer L.294, 295,466 

Straughan, Eugene T.300 

Straughn, Bruce A.324 

Straus, James R.297 

Straus, Jonathan J.518 

Strausz. Jane E.260, 261 

Straw. Paula R.260, 261 

Strawn, Sandra J.440 

Strayer, Scott A.300 

Strazzara, Carlos.393 

Street, Donna L.455 

Streng. Andrea H.293, 359 

Strickland, Barbara J.351. 503, 577 

Striker, Gary E. Jr.321 

Strissel, Shelly R.520 

Strobelt, Peter M.285 

Strom, Jeffrey S.201 

Strom, Robert M.266 

Stroyan, David P.593 

Strub, Eric A.270 

Struble, Jeffrey S.393, 577 

Stubb, John M.272, 425 

Stubben, David A.393, 518 

Stubbs. Leslie J.440, 549 

Stubbs, Randy N.321, 325, 577 

Stubsjoen. Tor P.515 

Studeman, Kristie E.291, 427, 449 

Stuhlmiller, David K.440 

Stultz, Troy A.205, 385 

Stumpf, Sheryl L.326 

Stumpf, Theodore E.321 

Stuntz, Kirsten A.303, 467 

Sturholm, Suzan F.313, 318, 555 

Sturza, Jacqueline J.365 

Stutterheim, Mark H.577 

Styers, Debbie D.276 


Suakkonen, Tracy S.451 

Sugges, Michelle L.30| 

Suhadofnik, Matthew L.409, 46£ 

496, 54. 

Suits, Bryan D.40]' 

Sullivan, Erin J.315, 450, 53- 

Sullivan, James E.268, 42|i 

Sullivan. Peggy H.50* 

Sullivan, Stephen K.41: 

Sullivan, Steven G.444 

Sullivan, Thomas M.55» I 

Summers, Alice C.... 365, 494, 556, 56< 

Summers, Edward A.321 

Summers, Kip J.299, 42f 

Sunde, Per J.321, 32* 

Sundsten, Mark T.39 

Sundstrom, Christopher.51® 

Sunich, Shelley A.554 

Surdyk, Larry G.41 < 

Surdyk, Leon E.41 < 

Suryan, Mark J.508, 55: 

Suryan, Victoria A.313, 31 f 

Sutherland, Thomas O.55( 

Sutton, Scott G.29BI 

Swan, Melissa A.284, 52. 

Swanlund, Mark E.30C. 

Swanlund. Stephanie A....265, 367, 45£ 

Swanson, Christopher H.57» I 

Swanson, Wendy R.30 

Swanstrom, Steven T.43C 

Swarthoul. Michael.46S 

Swartz, Stephen J.397 

Swears, Cynthia E.201 

Sweet, Jennifer L.317, 462 

Sweet. Martin L.28« I 

Sweigert, Jennifer E.287 

Swenson, Arne E.375 

Swenson. Jennifer L.293, 457, 544 

Swenson, Matthew D.267 

Swenson. Paul J.330 

Swift, Scott M.289 

Swindler, Gary R.267, 424 

Swofford, John B.413 

Swynenburg. Jack.522 

Sy. Ling Y.523 

Sylvester, Scott M.330, 42S 

Sylvester, Shelly A.347 

Symmes, Ashly A.367, 451 

Symms, Stan D.275, 328 

Symonds. Nathaniel M.202. 

Szablya. Kristine L.506 

Szambelan, David J.267, 518 

Szuch, Jenene M.363 

Szymanski. Joyce.363, 607 

Tt 

Tabbed, Diane M.440, 517 

Tackett. William R.594 : [ 

Tadlock, Alan L.501 

Tadlock, Nancy L.517|| 

Taggad, Robed L.440 



626 Index/1984 


































































































































































































































































































































1984 / Index 627 


Takacs, Anthony P.411, 519 

. Takata, Valda M.520, 538 

Takehiro. Deborah T.287 

Takeshita, Ron M.336 

fakisaki. Mary A.508 


Talarico, David J.199, 381 

Talbott, Karol L.284 

Talen, S Marc.300 

Tallent, James M.501 

Tallent, Steven M.503 

Talley, Robin L.440 

Tallman, Kathleen T.317 

Tamane, Jill S.538 

Tamis. Peter G.270 

Tamura, Florence S.314, 318, 506 

Tan. Chek S.323, 325, 533 

Tan. Dorothy P.292, 577 

Tanami. Hiroshi.519 

Tandberg, Eric L.440 

Tang, Christina S.284 

Taniguchi. Janal T.306 

Tanner. Scott J.301, 440, 501 

Tanner, Shelly R.520 

Tappan, Larry S.299 

Tarr, Bryan D..593 

Taruscio, Antionette T.333 

Tarver, Dlynn E.290 

farzan, Stefan A.289, 290 


Tasoff. Jeffrey M.409 


Tatarek, Lynda J.570 

Tate, Brenda M.440, 468 

Tate, John C.324 

Tate, John H.289 

I Tate, Rebecca I.343, 538 

Tate, Robert L.271, 425 

Tate, Robert M.329 

Tate, Robin M.334 

Taub, Beth S.333, 466 

Tauscheck, Gregory P.336 

Tauscher, Jacqueline M.294, 465 

Taussig, Donna L.280 

Tautalatasi, Taivale J.331 

Tavis, Robert L.407 

Tayer, Karen M.353 

Taylor, Andy S.296, 427 

Taylor, Anita L.440, 493 

Taylor, Arthur M.272, 425 

Taylor, Carol J.345 

Taylor, Carol J.345 

Taylor, Gregory C.385 

Taylor. Joseph D.290 

Taylor, Judy I.314, 428 

Taylor, Julie L.276 

Taylor, Kirsten A.262, 263 

Taylor, Kyle H.321 

Taylor. Laura J.292 

Taylor, Leann K.334 

Taylor, Michelle C.430 

Taylor, Norman E.508 

Taylor. Patrick L.393 

Taylor, Ralph G.379 

Taylor. Richard A.286 

Taylor, Robert W.440 

Taylor, Timothy A.440 

Taylor, Wade A.319 

Tazuma, Larry J.287, 426 

Teachman, Michael R.517 

Teerink, Vickie J.315, 353 

Teitzel, Teresa A.544 

Telecky, Anne L.280, 456 

Telford. Brett W.377 

Telstad, David K.268, 501 

Temple, Robert J.381 

Templin. Jessica L.430 

Terry, Irvin L.199 

Terry. Nancy E.293, 349 

Tesdahl, Kirk T.301, 544 

Tews, Kenneth R.299 

Thacher. Scott D.538 

Thaemerl, Todd A.285 

Thalle, Karen B.293 

Tharp. Mark J.540 

Thayer, Carol A.343 

Thayer. David M.391 

Thayer. Diane K.302, 309, 544 

Thayer, Tris K.320, 321. 324, 325 

Thein, Peter A.205, 421 

Therriault, Kathy R.359, 504 

Thibodeaux, Lori D.543 

Thiel, Cheryl L. 388, 429 

Thiery, Ronald C.201 

Thies, Randy L.409 

Thoennes, Mary K.514 

Thoennes, Nancy J.359 

Thomas, Brenda S.334 

Thomas, Chrisdee S.355 

Thomas, Craig E.557 

Thomas, Dana L.334 

Thomas, Dean S.389 

Thomas, Donald F.517 

Thomas, Douglas G.407 

Thomas, Elizabeth A.264, 265 

Thomas, Greg A.518 

Thomas, Jane E.347, 495, 543 

Thomas, Jeffery A.288 

Thomas, Laurel S.353 

Thomas, Mark G.413 

Thomas, Matthew H.584 

Thomas, Patrick A.511 

Thomas, Sheryl A.304, 357 


Thomas, Tommy.590 

Thomas, William C.545 

Thomas. William J.329 

Thomason, Gregory L.270, 275 

Thomassen, Doreen M.312 

Thomasson, Paul G.578. 593 

Thompson, Brett E.300 

Thompson, Christy J.280 

Thompson, Connie D.262 

Thompson. Greg.431, 510, 570 

Thompson, John M.550 

Thompson, Julie A.276 

Thompson, Karen E.363, 448 

Thompson, Kristin M.590 

Thompson. Laura K.361. 591 

Thompson, Lisa C.270 

Thompson, Lorraine A.361, 556 

Thompson, Mary K.333, 466 

Thompson, Mary R.426 

Thompson, May M.290, 501, 555 

Thompson, Michael J.391 

Thompson, Neal B.433 

Thompson, Paula E.363, 448 

Thompson, Rob J.268 

Thompson, Robert H.411 

Thompson, Shea A.317 

Thompson. Steven D.321 

Thompson, Teresa J.261 


Thompson, Thor K.287 

Thomsen, Brooke A.388 

Thomsen. Kelly L.556 

Thomsen, Scott E.201, 469 

Thomsen, Valerie J.351 

Thomson, Cynthia D.365. 468 

Thomson, Daniel R.195 

Thomson, Karen A.365, 388. 448 

Thomson, Sara J.347 

Thordarson. Brent W.433, 508 

Thordarson, Cindi D.260 

Thorin, Anita M.440 

Thornton, Glenn T.586 

Thornton. Lisa M.448 

Thornton, Shannon M.363, 462, 524 

Thoroughman, Jeffrey S.524 

Thorpe, James W.393 

Thovson, Brett L.284 

Thrailkill, Kathryn A.520 

Thrall, Barbara A.315 

Throm, Joan A.316 

Thrulow, Tamara R.294 

Thyme, Ann E.279, 557 

Tibbs, Julie.303, 309 

Tiberio, Laura M.314, 462 

Tiberio. Patricia M.315, 428, 462, 

595 

Tidball, Steve E.323 


Tidwell, Bradley 1. 

.391 

Tidwell, Nancy J. 

.369 

Tihista, Maia R. 

.520 

Tijerina, Luis J. 

.501 

Tilbury, Jan M. 

.347, 465 

Tillman, Beth A. 

.579 

Tillmon Anthony L 

. 395 

Tilschner, Matt R. 

.298 

Tilson, David H. 

.270 

Tinney, Edward J. 

.509 

Tinsley, Janet L. 

.262 

Tipton, Wendell D.... 

.377. 440, 511 

Tirimanne, Brian N... 

.284, 425 

Tisdale, Jeff D. 

.331 

Tisler. Lisa R. 

.456 

Tisler, Mark R. 

.268 

Titus, R Scott. 

.546 

Titus, Raoul S. 

.301,428 

Titus, Viriginia J. 

, 335, 426, 462, 555 

Tjamberg, Susan M 

.292 

Tjemsland, Kris J. 

.194 

Tjoelker Steven. 

.325 

Tobey, Laurie A. 

.294 

Tobin, Dana M. 

.194, 504 

Tobin. Nancy D. 

.515 

Toczek, Ronald J..... 

.287 

Todd, Brad S. 

.320 

Todd, Jeff A. 

.325 


Todd, Stephen D.287, 290, 428 

Tokita, Ken M.267, 538 

Tollbom, Stewart C.296 

Tom, Mark D.275 

Tomany, Teresa A.262 

Tomich, Tern L.201 

Tomlinson, Caprina L.520 

Tomlinson, Teresa D.315, 468 

Tomlinson, Tracy B.290, 577 

Tompkins, Michael C.417 

Tomsett. Charles D.272, 583 

Tonge, Lisa A.....535 

Tonkin, Janie M.276. 279, 524, 557 

Tonnemaker, Kurt E.503, 577 

Toomb, John J.417 

Torgerson. Carol D.305, 440 

Torgerson, David W.329 

Torrey, Linda A.520, 553 

Totey, Michael A.274 

Totten, John L.266 

Tourigny, Carol A.527 

Towner, Bettie 1.326 

Towner, Hilary D.264 

Townsend, Allan S.300, 593 

Townsend, Elizabeth M....306, 308, 555 

Townsend, Mistie L.340. 388, 460, 

555 

Townsend, Peter H.389 














































































































































































































































Traaen, Kristine A.292 

Trabun, Michael A.440, 578 

Trabun, Steven J.524 

Trachta, Patricia A.347 

Tracy, Meghan M.343, 453 

Tracy, Michael J.266 

Tradal, Terri L.349, 459 

Trail, Ruth L.262, 577 

Tran, Bach-Tuyet D.270, 440, 508 

Tran, Binh T.301 

Tran. Dung H.268 

Tran, Mai.259 

Tran, Phat V.270 

Tran, Trang.258 

Tranum. Tod P.397 

Traub, Sherilyn M.204 

Trautenberg, Carol A.634, 635, 636 

Travis, Jim M.278 

Travis, Lisa S.441 


Trawatha, Catherine 1.552 

Trawatha. Susan E.579 

Tredway. Gregory S.519 

Tredwell, Brenda K.262, 263 

Trembiey, James P.433 

Treneer, William A.341, 405 

Trent, Stephen J.441 

Trierweiler, Timothy J.266 

Triesch, Mark F.385 

Trimble, Lawrence E.554 

Tritz. William B.583 

Trolson, Norman K.329 

Trotter, Chris M.286 

Trottier, Edward A.288 

Trucano, Nancy A.261 

Truckey, David B.298 

True, Joyce N.309, 554 

Trueblood, Amelia J.259 

Trueblood, Amykay.262, 263, 565 


Truitt, Dianna L.359 

Trull, James M.266 

Truong, Cuong V.274 

Truong, Quyen M.259 

Trussed, Kevin J.407 

Trussed, Ron A.270, 584 

Tryon, David H.268 

Trzecieski, Martha M.288, 467 

Tsujikawa, Cole E.604 

Tubb, Jennifer M.548 

Tuchek, David W.546 

Tuck, K Noel.456 

Tucker, Bill.538 

Tucker. Charles P.272 

Tucker. Leo W.389 

Tucker. Robert D.323 

Tudor, Luci E.347 

Tuell, Loretta A.294, 427 

Tuell, Patricia M.294 


Tuell, Terry L. 

.516 

Tuffs, Cheryl L. 

.287 

Tunis, Karla J. 

.441 

Tunison, Patricia A. 

.493 

Tuoelker, Ken A. 

.267 

Tupuoia, Folauga M. 

.331 

Turcotte, Deborah A.... 

.519 

Turner, Charlene F. 

.276, 524, 557 

Turner, Dawn M. 

.303 

Turner, Eric L. 

.286 

Turner, Rhonda J. 

.305, 466 

Turner, Rob R. 

.297 

Turner, Stephen M. 

.544 

Turney. James A. 

.432 

Turulja, Dean. 

.329 

Tusnadi, Ernie Z. 

.200, 549 

Tuttle, Jeffrey B. 

.393 

Tuttle, Keith J. 

.275, 328 

Tuttle, Nick J. 

.296, 540 


Tweedy, Jeff R.286, 2S 

Twibell. Carrie F.369, 45 

Twining, Laura L.369, 449, 565, 56 

Tyler. Cynthia K.359, 451, 56 

Tyner. David 0.27f 

Tyrrell. John A.288, 4£ 

Tyson, Arthur E.4« 

Uu 


Uchida, Ted T.430. 524, 538, 54 

Uchytil, Arthur B.44 

Udaeta, Marisol.441, 54 

Uddenberg, Kenneth B.503, 56E 

Ufford. Michael J.441, 501, 51', 

Ufkes, Mark L.49' 

Ugelstad, Jonathan R.27] 

Uhlrich, Sharon H.313, 55 

Ukura, Roberta R.353, 52 

Ulfers, David L.297, 52 

Ullah, Habib.284, 425, 527, 55 

Ulmonen, Harry W.331 

Underwood, Darryl L.301 

Underwood, Linda J.326, 327, 49 

Unger, Bruce T.56| 

Unger, Mary A.29, 

Upton, Bernice M.441, 501, 52* 

Urashima, Bruce J.43' 

Urban. Cheryl L.293, 361, 46* 

Urtan, Michael C.39 

Urcia, Gwendolyn.28* 

Urquhart, Sean T.26i 

Uselman, David J.57 

Uskoski, Daniel A.30C; 

Utzman, Glen H.40§ 

Uwadiale, Grace.441, 50 


Vv 


Vahey, Gena D..326, 327 

Valentine, Laura L.305, 46< 

Valentine, Lisa A.305, 462 

Valentine, Thomas D.487 

Vallandigham, Sydne J.338, 34i 

Vams, Susan.552* I 

Van Batavia, Douglas R.49“C 

Van Beek, Karen S.347, 494 

Van Bronkhorst, Thomas.561 

Van Campen, Elizabeth..334, 436 

Van Doren, Brian L.336 

Van Farowe, Nancy L.338, 466 

Van Nausdle, Kim A.564; 

Van Wormer, Scott D.405, 543 

Van Beck, Steven A.55S 

Van, Cecilia M.280, 363 

Vanbroekhoven, Joyce A.277, 446 

Vanbruwaene, Karen M....315, 428, 459 

Vanbruwaene, Michael R.51 S| 

Vanburen, Carrie J.349, 451 

Vance, Carroll L.544& [j 

Vancleef, Robert K.202 

Vandall, Jamie A.411 

Vandendyssel, James.393, 501, 538. 

594 

Vandendyssel, Jeff.393| 

Vandenkolk, Michael P.395 

Vanderburg, Vicki M.557 

Vanderlinden, Ann M.197. 365. 457, 

577 

Vandermey, Vince E.199 

Vanderveer, Jillian M.286, 288 

Vandervelden, Eric P.417, 501 

Vannderwall, Mark J.395 

Vanderwilde, Heidi M.293 

Vanderwilde, Russell S.550 

Vandeursen, Joanne L.316, 450 

Vandewater, Peter K.285 

Vandiver, Jeffery 1.196, 441, 520 

Vandoren, Julie K.195, 359, 455, 


Vanelli, Carol A. 

Vangelder, Sandra J. 

Vanhalm, Thomas V. 

Vanheyningen, Phil O... 

Vanhoff, Kellie L. 

Vanhoff, Randy S.. 

Vanhulle, Robert J. 

Vania, Jessica A.. 

Vanleuven, Leah J. 

Vanleuven, Susan. 

Vanloo, Brian K.. 

Vanloo, Loren R. 

Vann, Brock M. 

Vannice, Dave. 

Vanpatter, Katherine R 

Vansickle, Keith J.. 

Vanvleet, Dwight J. 

Vanvoorhis, Kenneth L, 

Vanwell, Lisa M. 

Vanwyck, Laurie A. 

Varga, Douglas A. 


501, 560 

.287 

.502 

.5271 

.298 

.334 

.268 

.330 

.304, 309 

.441 

.203 

.524, 557 

.267, 424, 589 

.297 

.323 

.534 

. 298 

.441, 501 

.393 

.517 

.546 

.417 



628 Index/1984 


















































































































































































Varner, John L. 

.299 

Varnes. Susan 1. 

.345, 504 

Vasey, Brian K. 

.329 

Vasquez, Reynaldo R... 

.297 

Vassey, Steve W. 

.202 

Vaugh, Lila J. 

.441 

Vawter, Andrew P. 

.393 

Vea, Danette. 

....432. 501. 538 

Vedagiri, Velpari. 

.527 

Vedder, Cynthia D. 

.441. 519. 


634, 635,636 

Veillard, Scott A. 

.508 

Vekved, Daniel J. 

.322 

Velotta, Anna M. 

.332 

Venera. Bob A. 

.407 

Verburg. Bruce A. 

.266. 589 

Vergara, Mario. 

.205 

Vergel, Anthony. 

.284 

Verhey, Peter A. 

.377 

Verigin, William M. 

.299 

Verme. Monica J. 

.559 

Verstelle, Joyce K. 

.455, 501 

Vert, Julie R. 

.291, 466 

Vessey, Kristin M. 

.345 

Vetrano, John S. 

.566 

Vibbert, Mitchell. 

.268 

Vickers, Mark F. 

.287, 428 

Victorine. Danette P. 

.552 

Viereck, Mona C. 

.293, 361 

Vierthaler, Peter G. 

.375, 602 

Vik, Scott D. 

.413 

Vilander, Bruce A. 

.288 

Vilander, Laura R. 

.428. 494 

Vilhauer. Peter A. 

.403 

Villesvik. John R. 

.268 

Vincent. Joel G. 

.417 

Vincent, Mark F. 

.379 

Vincenti, Joe P. 

.508 

Vining, Steven R. 

.502 

Vinson, Dixie K. 

.367. 455, 544 

Virgil, Julie A. 

.279 

Virtue, Mark H. 

.405, 572 

Vitcovich, Daniel P. 

.201,286 

Vrtums, Heidi L. 

.361 

Vixie, Victoria J. 

.501 

Vogel. Anne M. 

.516 

Vogelman. Lee A. 

.274, 279 

Voliva, Debra K. 

.441 

Vollmer. Arlene G. 

.277, 279 


Vollmer, David P.441, 501, 590 

Vollmer, Richard E.320, 324, 577 

Vonderhofen, Marcus H.298 

Vonracek, Tami L.549 

Voordepoorte. Ardell J.504 

Voris, Michael P.379 

Vorpahi, Tim J.544 

Vosburgh. Mary K.265, 467 

Voyles, Charles F.441 


Ww 


Wachter. Kathryn J.338, 347 

Wachter, Timothy J.403, 501, 545 

Wachtler, Laura J.353 

Wacker, Ryan J.323, 325 

Wacker. Todd L.300 

Waddington, Jerri L.264, 540 

Wade, Patrick S.393 

Waffle, Lisa M.279, 450 

Wagner, Cynthia J.312, 345 

Wagner, Douglas R.301 

Wagner, Jeff L.540 

Wagner, Jennifer L.204 

Wagner, Kelley C.519 

Wagner, Kristin M.292, 427 

Wagner. Onette T„.276 

Wagner, Pamela A.534 

Wagner. Robert L.389 

Waight. Brenda L.351. 517 

Waiss, Candace M.349 

Wakefield. Ann E.199. 309 

Wakefield, Brian E.298 

Wakefield, Jann M.260 

Wakeley, Alan J.330 

Walcher, Ronald J.330 

Walden, Emily V.302, 462 

Waldman, Matthew M.274 

Walen, Michael.428 

Walker, Elliott J.589 

Walker, Geoffrey M.381 

Walker, Ladonna M.264, 265. 456 

Walker, Leslie D.522 

Walker, Michele D.262 

Walker. Norrie A.351 


Walker, Tim K.544 

Walker, Tina R.388, 429. 518 

Walkner, Anita K.501 

Wall, Steve N.419,538 

Wallace. Keith J.274 

Wallace. Marie A.261, 552, 559, 564 

Wallace, Patricia R.333 

Wallace. Scott W.559 

Wallace. Sheri L.307 

Wallace. Tracy L.343, 501 

Waller, Ann M.361, 549 

Wallin, Kristi A.292. 427 

Wallin. Michael J.201. 290, 

427. 524, 586 

Wallman. D Cherie.276, 278 

Walloch, Thomas M.297 

Walser, Jill C.441 

Walsh. Mary E.317, 467 

Waltari, Kevin E. 409, 501 

Wattan, Lori K.367. 464 

Walth, Douglas J.271, 425 

Walton. Alicia L.294 

Walton, Don T.509, 515, 541, 585 

Walton, Jennifer K.518 

Walton, Ty N.441 

Wambeke, Landa L.550 

Wamble, J Lee.583 

Wamhof. Michelle A.518 

Wammer. Scott.325 

Wan, Ida Wai-Min.509. 541 

Wang, Crystal.332 

Wang. Irene S.515 

Wangsmo. Douglas P.503, 577 

Wanless, Cynthia A.278 

Wanner, Scott J.321 

Ward. Charles H.298 

Ward, Marlin A..288 

Ward, Scott A.431 

Wardlaw, John C.275 

Warfel, Ernest N.431, 638, 639 

Warfield, Patricia A.365 

Warinner, Mary F.365 

Warkentin, Hans R.322 

Warner, Douglas P.441 

Warner, Judith A.317, 318 

Warner. Keith C.275, 328, 508 

Warner, Patricia L.196 

Warner, Susan M.294 

Warren, George.335 


Warren, Glenn P.337, 429, 493, 564 


Warren. Lesia K.258 

Warren, Mary J.501, 554 

Warren, Michael D.405, 504 

Warren, Sandra D.338, 339, 340 

Warren, Tamara J.349 

Warren. Teri L.304, 595 

Warren, Victoria A.338, 570 

Warren, William W.377 

Wascheck, Michele M.305, 309, 461 

Wasden. Dana A.304, 308, 459 

Wasemiller Mark A.324 

Washkoska. Todd W.391, 577 

Wasisco, Doug A.419 

Wasley, Nancy A.307, 467. 589 

Watanabe. James M.284 

Watari, Kirk.266 

Waterman, Kelley B.584 

Waters, Jerald A.331 

Watkins. Bradley H.564 

Watkins. Brian K.441 

Watkins. Darin G.520, 553, 561 

Watkins, Glenn A.520 

Watkins, Terry P.441 

Watkins. Tom J.552 

Watrus, Kevin K.391 

Watson, Jannita K.441 

Watson. Scott A....383.524 

Watson, Sharon A.441, 527 

Watson. Sidney G.557 

Watson. William H.300 

Watt. Diane T.518 

Watt, Richard A.519 

Watts, Leanne M.292, 534 

Wax, Lani J.361 

Way, Lori L.326, 595, 596 

Wayerski, Kurtis M.270 

Wauerski, Tory K.515 

Weatherly, Winifred L.264, 571, 593 

Weaver. Debbie K.345, 520 

Webb, Carolyn M.347 

Webb, Darwin D.289, 290, 548 

Webb. Lisa A.357 

Webb, Robert L.196 

Webb, Steve F.413 

Webber, David F.320, 324 

Webber, Greg C.520 

Webber, Michelle G.520, 563 

Weber, Donna R.441, 449 


Weber, Douglas T. 

.321 

Weber, Marcus M. 

.389 

Weber, Richard A. 

..377, 505, 564 

Webert. Kenneth D. 

.320 

Webster. Michael B. 

.207 

Webster, Teri M. 

.429, 448 

Webster, Todd M. 

.331 

Weed, John J. 

..329, 441. 511 

Weeks, Wendy A. 

.264 

Wegener, Gary L. 

.379 

Wehrle, Mark J. 

.274 

Wehrung, Christopher S. 

.275, 328 

Wei Jyh-Jiun. 

.527 

Weibel, Lisa Marie. 

.332 

Weidmann. Karen S. 

.303 

Weil. Roy A. 

.577 

Weil. Shannon L. 

.316, 318, 


428, 465. 552 

Weinand, Joseph F. 

.541 

Wembender, Matthew K. 

.389 

Weinberg, Sharon J. 

.289 

Weinreich, Tami A. 

.315 

Weir, Karen E. 

. 343, 463, 591 

Weir. Kevin W. 

.403 

Weis, Paul D. 

.299 

Weiss, Mark R. 

.268 

Welch. John K. 

.202, 300, 427 


572. 593 

Welch, Kathryn A. 

.340 

Welch. Marcia M. 

.313, 428 

Welch, Ronald R. 

.395, 542 

Welch. William A. 

. 284, 441, 555 

WekJe, Wayne C. 

.336, 569 

Weller, Julie A. 

.313 

Wells-Henderson. Anne.. 

.441 

Wells. Adrienne M. 

.363 

Wells, Candy M. 

.316 

Wells, Cariene L. 

.494. 552 

Wells Dana L. 

.457 

Wells. Jennifer K. 

.441, 496 

Wells, Richard W. 

.300 

Welman, Angelika. 

.305 

Welter. Patricia J. 

.365, 577 

Welton. Leah T. 

.432, 566 

Welty, Crista K. 

.517 

Wendt Kathryn A. 

.294 

Wendt, Kathy L.583, 634, 635, 636 

Wendt, Robert E. 

.383 

Wenger, Scott D. 

.542 


1984/Index 629 


















































































































































































































































Wenke, Curtis L.441, 524 

Went. Eric N.517 

Wentworth, Daniel A.441 

Wentz, Susan L.284 

Wentzke, Ronald M.441, 508 

Werner, Albert R.432 

Werner, Kirk E.413 

Werner. Richard D.441, 509 

Werner, Sally D.431 

Werner, Stefan J.527 

Werttemberger. Leslie.347, 520, 

545, 580 

Wertz, Molly J.441 

Weseman, Eric G.202, 300 

Wessrtsh, AJiice E.288 

West. Anita R.520 

West, Deborah L.566 

West, Eric R.515, 519 

West, Ross R.271, 441 

West, Susan T.307, 308, 589 

West, Teresa L.357 

West, Tim A.202 

West, Wayne T.516 

Westberg, Kristine R.462 

Wester, Melvin L.272, 273, 555 

Westgard, Lisa A.284 

Westjohn, Edward W.289 

Weston, Nancy L.284 

Wetterhus, Cheryl S.388, 545 

Wetterhus, Gregory J.336 

Wetterhus, Timothy S.519 

Weyer, Mike S.515 

Weymouth, Christopher.502 

Whalen. Barbara L.334, 441 

Wharton, Wendy J.388, 452 

Wheaton, Leeann C.361 

Wheeler, Eric J.288 

Wheeler, Kisten D.261 

Wheeler, Mark A.285 

Wheeler, Mark R.515 

Whitacre. Melinda.577 

Whitaker, Heidi A.317, 365 

White, Aileen C.503 

White, Christopher L.441 

White. Daniel A.441, 505, 564 

White, Edward L.551 

White. Karen M.361, 461, 534 

White, Kelly J.277, 279 

White, Kevin M.274. 556 

White, Kevin M.300,391 

White, Pamela.365 

White, Terry U.331 

White, Tony J.271 

White, van M.205. 502. 515 

Whitehead, Herbert L.329 

Whitehead, Jeffrey M.487 

Whitehurst, Christopher.429 

Whitely. David A.584 

Whiting, Robert L.403, 494 

Whiting, Rodney L.298 

Whitlow, John X.570 

Whitman, Susan A.280, 456 

Whitney, Charlotte A.260,261 

Whitney. Paul D.275 

Whittles, Lee J.395 

Whyatt. Greg A.541 

Wichert, Karen B.280, 552 

Wick, Dan R.538 

Wick, Dawn M.453 

Wick. Peter D III.405 

Wickline, Melody L.502 

Wickline, Michael R.487 

Wickline, Paul R.487 

Wickman. James D.297 

Wickman, Susan L.441 

Widder, Mary L.203, 289 

Widener, Shannon L.353 

Wieber, Pamela M.570 

Wier, Wendy L.363 

Wierenga. Scott M.319 

Wiese, Gary G.199, 433 

Wigen, Robert D.298, 427 

Wiggins, Bret R.570 

Wiggs, Todd J.331 

Wight, Cynthia J.427 


630 Index/1984 


Wildi 

Wi 


Wilgi 

Wilki 


Wilki 

Wilki 


Wiitala, Erik R.297, 427 

Wike. Scott A.320 

Icomb, Mark R.441 

ox, Kristy A.355, 456, 506 

er, Cindy M.343, 457 

ildung, Jennifer L.326, 593 

Wiley, Elizabeth L.258 

Wiley. Scott D.509 

|us, John V.268 

, Stacey C.441 

Wilkerson, John H.266, 540 

;erson. Wisley J.432 

:es, Brian K.413 

Wilkinson, James R.417 

Wilkinson, Susan M.292 

Wilkinson, Timothy J.272 

ilkinson, William R.296, 427 

ard, Chris A.441. 515 

cuts, Larenda D.349, 502 

ett, Brian K.298, 555 

ett, Ian A.271 

ams, Alice L.203, 554 

ams. Brian W.550 

ams, Cheryl L.441, 542 

ams, Daniel J.300 

ams, Jay J.194 

ams, Jeanie R.313, 347 

ams, Jeffrey K.502 

ams, Joanne D.355 

ams, John R.274 

ams, Jolane M.194 

ams, Karen M.527 

ams. Kendall A.552, 5Z0 

ams, Kenneth A.441, 554 

ams, Kimberly S.294 

ams, Laura J.333, 502 

ams, Lorraine M.502 

ams, Lynda M.359, 455 

ams, Matthew D.502 

ams, Megyn L.304 

ams, Michael A.430 

ams, Michael B.272 

ams, Michael E.298 

ams, Nancy K.333 

iams, Rolf T.298 

ams, Scott R.298 

ams, Suzanna S.316, 461 

ams, Timothy E.411 

ams, Virginia K.326, 327, 520 

iams, Wendy A.316 

amsen, Susan M.441, 495, 534 

amson, Debbie J.304 

amson, Renee C.294, 347, 607 

•amson, Skip B.409 

ng, Michael J.577 

lis, Charles J.300 

Willis, Patrick G.487 

lis, Richard D.441, 520, 561 

s. Shelly M.302, 309 

ison, Matthew E.290 

sey. Kara L.593 

son, Bradford J.331 

Ison, Carl G.274 

Wilson, Caroline R.262. 520, 553 

Wilson, Charles E.298 

Wilson, Connie M.263 

Ison, David A.389 

Ison, David W.289, 290 

Wilson, Debra D.261, 525 

Ison, Douglas E.288 

Wilson, Hector C.275 

Wilson, Lee K.289 

Wilson. Lisa J.357, 458 

Ison, Lisa S.343 

Ison, Nicholas G.405, 502 

Wilson, Norman B.274 

Wilson, Peter M.502 

ilson, Raymond R.201. 286, 428 

Wilson, Stuart D.441 

Wilson, Teresa D.563 

Wilson, Terry C.323 

ilson, Thomas D.383 

Ison, Todd M.441 

Wiltse, Sherri L.441 

inberg, Debbie L.302 


W 

W 


W 

W 


W 


Winder, Gail M.369, 502, 560 

Windishar, Anne J.277 

Windsor, David L.270 

Windsor. Vanessa J.264,450 

Wing. Nansi E. 363 

Winkelman. Rick G.441 

Winkler, Joseph B.411 

Winquist, Mauritz V.397 

Winslow, Elizabeth H.441 

Winslow, Robert F.381, 516, 544 

Winsor, Wayne E.272, 425, 589 

Winterroth, Jeffrey S.389, 561 

Winters, Mary L.270, 276. 557 

Wirkkala, Jenelle S.286, 428 

Wirth, Carol D...441, 586 

Wirtz, Amy S.277 

Wischman, John L.375 

Wischman, Lori C.336, 365 

Wiskerchen, Michael S.324 

Witherow, Dobbsie A.258 

Witherspoon, Yul L.330 

Witte, Stephanie L.318, 594 

Witter. Gregory M.381, 520 

Witter. John C.375, 520 

Wittier, Jeffrey M.407 

Wittman, Robert L.375 

Wohlman. Robin L.357, 459 

Wojack, Christina M.280 

Wojtanowicz, Amy M.433 

Wolf, Kevin T..268 

Wolf, Sheila M.326, 327, 565 

Wolfe, Anita M.332 

Wolfe, Kelly R.306, 450 

Wolfe, Kevin S.296, 427 

Wolfe. Kim M.357, 556 

Wolfe, Rick L.296 

Wolfe, Thomas E.413 

Wolff, Juanita J.338, 429, 452 

Woll, Roger A.427 

Wolter. Terry D.377, 542 

Womack, Edward P.523 

Wommack, Carl G.290 

Wong, Chai P.294, 533 

Wong, Hong W.547 

Wong, Tzzy.510, 570 

Wong. Yiu-Wing.271, 558 

Wong, Yukwan. 502 

Woo, Barbara E.508 

Woo, Cathy J.441 

Wood-Gaines. Kirk J. 600 

Wood, Barbara L.316, 318, 460 

Wood. Bridget A.334 

Wood, Christine E.457 

Wood, David R.395 

Wood. Glenn L.337 

Wood. Gordon S.275, 328 

Wood. James O.524, 557 

Wood, John A.296, 571, 593 

Wood. Julie A.357, 519 

Wood, Kimberly A.305 

Wood, Tood M. 330 

Woodall, Vernon J.520 

Woodard, Kay L.292 

Woodard, Tood S.433 

Woodhouse, Justin A.431 

Woodling, Jim W.441 

Woods, John R.405 

Woods, Michele D.315, 430 

Woods, Patrick S.395 

Woods, Richard E.268, 424 

Woods, Robin A.314 

Woodward, Julie B.195, 359, 520 

Woodward, Mike B.411 

Woodward, Valeria A.359 

Woodworth, Jill A.365 

Wolf. Susan C.365 

Woolwine, Jill.493 

Woons, Man.265 

Wooten, Scott L.297 

Wordell, Doug R.202, 274 

Worley, Carl E.441 

Worley, Ron R.405 

Worms. Todd A.331 

Worthington, Ryan A.395 

Wospakrik, Frans A.552 


Wospakrik, Judya M.552 

Wray, Michele.293 

Wren, David E.586, 593 

Wren. Linda K.334, 520, 563, 585 

Wren, Pamela J.357 

Wren. Steven M.298 

Wright, Charlie L.413 

Wright, Chris L.385 

Wright, David S.502, 554 

Wright. James E.431, 538, 571, 593 

Wright, James G.516, 552 

Wright, Mark A.433, 511 

Wright, Michele M.314 

Wright, Rooger S.287 

Wright, Timothy W.536 

Wright, Whitney E.294 

Wrixon, William H.391 

Wu, Sylvia.264 

Wulff, Linda R.150, 154 

Wulff, Robin L.285, 441, 577 

Wurm, Michael P.441 

Wyatt, Richard D.331 

Wyatt. Sheri L.288 

Wyche, Tim A.381 

Wyche. Todd A.381 

Wyckoff, Mark L.271 

Wylie, Susan M.543 

Wyman, Nancy T.367 

Wyrick, Gregory W.391 

Wyrick, Joseph A.391, 524 

Wyrick, Susan L.314 

Wysong. Jeffrey J.502 

Wytko, Thomas P.399 


Yoon, Mira.260. 261, 

York, Deanna J.347, 560, 5j 

York, Edward D.14< 

York, Jaci R.502. 

Yorkston, Sara E.301 

Yoshikawa, Izumi.54; 

Youmans, Stacey L.313, 541 

Youmans. Vance J. 

Younce, Frank L.329, 496, 5; 

Young, Brent R.205, 272, 

Young, Charles V. 

Young, David J.431 

Young, Edward T.429 : 

Young, Eric P. 

Young, Glen R.277 

Young, Hilary S.144 

Young, Jeffrey V.144 

Young, Kevin M.144: 

Young, Lisa D.430, 461 

Young, Lynne S.431, 502 

Young. Margaret M.345 

Young, Mary P.359 

Young, Raven J.306, 309, 454 

Young, Runell.309 

Young, RuneJI A.304, 449 

Young, Scott R.144 

Young, Stephanie L.458 

Youngren. Scott R.559 

Yuen. Ricky S.299, 427 

Yule, Gregory J.403 

Yunker, Janet L.315 

Yurczyk, Patricia A.262 

Yusen, Eddy J.411 


Xx Zz 


Xaudaro, Stafa D.298, 427 


Yy 


Yager, Bryan James.606 

Yager, David C.286 

Yagues. Donalee A.. 468, 553, 561, 594 

Yahn, Becky L.457 

Yamakawa, Keith K.523, 538 

Yamashita, Masato P.381 

Yamashita, Naoko.284, 425, 535 

Yamo, Nolene.279 

Yandle, Colleen M.502 

Yang. Elain W.306, 309 

Yano, Arthur L.381, 520 

Yano, Jolene R.277, 538 

Yano, Kathryn K.305 

Yap. Michael.284 

Yarberry. Robert T.144 

Yates, John E.393 

Yates. Kemble R.524 

Yates, Kim B.261, 504 

Yates, Trenton A.144 

Yazzolino, Celia M.204, 302 

Yeager, Mary M.262, 263 

Yeagus, Donalee.540 

Yee, Fook S.144. 502 

Yee, Nathan S.144, 523, 538 

Yee. Sonya S.262, 263 

Yenne, Lana J.305 

Yenne, Wayne G.524, 538 

Yenney, Michele M.332, 335, 585 

Yeoman, Timothy S.381 

Yerty, Wesley S.297 

Yi, Tae S.421 

Yoler, Laurie J.361, 591 

Yong, Yee L.144, 558 


Zalesky, Charles E.268 

Zamora, Karin E.287 

Zamzow, Kelly R.437 

Zappone, Julie A.333 

Zdilar, James J.403, 502 

Zech, Madeline M.292 

Zehner, Christopher M.308, 502 

Zellmer, Alissa L.260, 261 

Zempel, Anthony R.336, 542 

Zenk, Timothy S.606 

Zero, Guy M.323, 325. 576 

Zevenbergen, Terri L.264 

Zimmer, Julie A.505,541 

Zimmer, Michael P.377, 537 

Zimmer, Shannon E.317 

Zimmerman, Mark E.517 

Zimmerman, Mark T.385 

Zimmerman, Mary A.367 

Zimmerman. Mary J.357, 506 

Zimmermann, Karen A.293, 556 

Zink, Shaula K.290 

Zink, Shawn R.267 

Zoellick, Jeannette L.316, 428 

Zografos, Stephen J.383, 523 

Zold, Susan M.343 

Zollars, Michael A.428, 571 

Zuehlsdorff, Brian T.200 

•Zurkammer, Deeann J.334, 585 

Zuroske, Leslie C.502 

Zwaschka, David L.552 

Zyph, Dennis W.432 






















































































































































































































































































































































































































STAFF/FACULTY 

INDEX 


Abbey. Kenneth E.215 

Adams. Betty K...221 

Adkins. Ronald J.246 

Alexander, J E.251 

Andersen, Dale G.236 

Armitage. Susan M.249 

Barnes, Charles.250 

Barnes, Dallas E.219 

Berentson, Lavonne...549 

Berry. Stanley.218 

Besser, Thomas E.549 

Bettas, George A..220. 555 

Bhagat, Surinder K.239 

Bhatia, Vishnu.219 

Bidle. Diana J.603 

Blacker, Donna K.581, 636 

Boyd. Landis L.230 

Brekke, Clark J.233 

Brewer, John T....247 

Bull. Oro N.-..218, 592 

Bums, Jack.223 

Carey. Matthew G.223, 592 

Carloye. Jack C.248 

Carlson, James R.233 

Carlson, Sherrill S.592 

Catts, Elmer P.. 233 

Clark, Ann V.217 

Cleveland, Thelma L.243 

Coates. Ross A.248 

Cochran. James A.246 

Coffman, Norman R.215 

Coil. Alice T.603 

Cooper, David.223 

Crain, Richard W.. 238 

Crider, Anna S.223 

Crow. James B.219 

Davison. Aden D.231 

Defleur, Lois D.247 

Dickens, Jody A.194 

Dickinson, John 0.251 

Donaldson. Edward E.244 

Edwards. Gerald E.244 

Elwood. John R.247 

Engibous. James C.233 

Farmer, Barry L.239 

Finch, Lola J.221 

Flahedy, David C...592 

Fletcher, Dean C.232 

Forar, Ferris L.579 

Freese. Lee....247 

Fry. Richard B.217 


Gamble, Geoffrey L.247 

Gilbert, Frederick F.245 

Gora. Patti S.222 

Green. Francis M.560 

Haarsager, Dennis....217 

Hagood. Richard A.214 

Hartford, George A.215 

Hayden, Carroll M.603 

Heuterman, Thomas.249, 592 

Hillers. Joe K.559 

Hindman. Joseph L.219 

Hinz, Susan C.594 

Hopkins. Ronald H.248 

Hosick, Howard L.244 

Howell, Marlene A.566 

Hulac, Georgia M.237 

James, Larry G.536 

Jennings. Gladys K.595 

Johnson, Glenn L.235 

Kromann. Kelly I.237 

Kennedy, Thomas L....214 

Kerr, Halbed S.234 

Kimbrell, Jack T.239 

Kincaid, Ronald L.559 

King. Larry G.231 

Kleinhofs, Andris.245 

Klopfer, Jean M.232 

Kolattukudy, P E.233 

Kowalik, Janusz S.219 

Kravas, Constance H.217 

Kravas. Konstantinos J.220 

Lama, Robed.580 

Legg. J Ivan.246 

Lemaster. Dennis C.232 

Levy, Mark R.222 

Lincoln, Keith P.217 

Lutz, Thomas E.246 

Maher, Daniel T.603. 607 

Markin, Rom J.....234 

McCadan. Adhur E.„.220 

McDonald, Karene R.581, 636 

Mih, Waller C.342 

Miller. Robed L.249 

Miller. Sidney W.221 

Moore. Kyle J.197 

Morgan. Cyril P.234 

Moritz, Donald A.295 

Morse. Jean F.603 

Nakata, Herbed M.246 

Neese, Susan 1.581 

Nelson. Debra A.222 


Nilan. Robed A.244 

Nyman. Carl J.214, 240 

Ozbun, J L.230 

Patton. Robed J.239 

Pettibone, C Alan.233 

Pierce, John C.248 

Plumb. Ovid A.238 

Potter, Robed E.247 

Powell. Albed E.564 

Price. Dorothy.232 

Quann, Charles J.218 

Rasmussen, H Paul.230 

Rawlins, V Lane.214 

Rayburn. William R.245 

Reinbold. Margaret A.581 

Renfro, Ernest.215 

Richarz. Ann S.595 

Rigas, Harriett B.239 

Ringo. John A.238 

Rogers. Leroy F.232. 556 

Rossman, Lori L.577 

Ruddy, Allan J.592 

Sanders. Thomas H.217 

Savage. Sally P.221 

Sawyer, William.578 

Schmid, Stanton E.216 

Sebold, Douglas D.194 

Simonsmeier, Larry.242. 550 

Smaha. Mark J.194 

Starkey. J Denbigh.245 

Steele, Barrie E. 194 

Stratton. David H.249 

Stromsdorfer. Ernst W.235 

Struckmeyer, Kenneth A.202 

Sumida. Stephen H.604 

Tapfer. Christopher J.603 

Terrell. Glenn.209, 210. 211 

Thomas. Robed.231 

Thomson. William J. 239 

Umbreit, William T.235 

Vanwie, Bernard J.541 

Venditti, Phillip N.555 

Webster, Gary D.246 

Wescott. Richard B.250 

Wilson, Robed B.250 

Wint. Adhur V.218 

Yates. Albed C.214 

Young. J Orville.231 

Young. Robed L.222 

Zakarison, Elaine Y.222 

Zimmer, Jack W.232 








































































































































































































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636 Staff/1984 

















Nathalie “the Boss” Bull.Editor 

Deborah “smut mouth” Chandler.Associate Editor 

Marilee “Here’s the scoop” Moser.Business Manager Fall Semester 

Richard “$” Harris Jr.Business Manager Spring Semester 

Kathy “Legs” Wendt.Clubs Editor 

Alys “Gouda Cheese” Freepons.Clubs Editor 

Suzette “Zetta” Gibbons.Greeks Editor 

Carol “I’m sure Trautenberg. Dorms Editor 

Brenda “Ethel... Bro” Breaux.Off Campus Editor 

Daniel “R.H.” Ivanis.Sports Editor 

Kathy “Chocolate Mousse Royale” Gilbert.Associate Sports Editor 

B.J. “No sleep Duft.Associate Sports Editor 

Cindy “heartthrob” Vedder.Art Editor 

Kirk “Graphics’ Werner.Art Assistant 

Bonnie “two i s” Fujii.Art Assistant 

Eric “the Hook” Anderson.Layout Editor 

Keri “K.L” Lindstrand.Queens & Little Sisters Editor 

Wendy “I’d rather be in Cal Ehringer.Deans & Administration Editor 

Cindy “I’m not anorexic” Reynolds.Seniors Editor 

Debbie “I hate my Spanish teacher” Moore.Copy Editor 

Nancy “Gator” Schlarmann.Staff Assistant 

Chris “Milly” Baumgartner.Staff Assistant 

Paul “forever drunk” Sweeny.Staff Assistant 

Fran “Sexy legs” Mullen.Staff Assistant 

Dale “I’m an officer” Higgs.Staff Assistant 

Scott “never gain an ounce” Oborn.Photographer 

Elliott “shit” Ahola.Photographer 

Ernest “invisible man” Warfel.Photographer 

Stanley Rusty “Opie” Coe.Photographer 

John “I’m staff now” Burke.Photographer 

Dee Dee “woman photog” Anderson.Photographer 

Mike “it’s art” Salsbury.Photographer 

Mike “can you type my paper” Putnam.Photographer 

Ward “no time” Taylor.Photographer 

Jim “woman watcher” Goins.Volunteer 

Bob “hyperactive” Condotta.Volunteer 

Tracy Smith.Volunteer 

Charles Beyl.Volunteer 

Gina “I love men” Jausoro.Volunteer 


UNDERCLASSMAN OF THE YEAR.Eric Anderson 

UPPERCLASSMAN OF THE YEAR.Kathy Wendt 

SENIORS OF THE YEAR.Deborah Chandler/Elliott Ahola 

PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR.Elliott Ahola 

MANARD HICKS “MOST INSPIRATIONAL”.Daniel Ivanis 


1984 / Staff 637 


















































































1984/Staff 639 














I Came 
I Saw 



Conquered 




When I first took the job of Editor, I 
thought no sweat. I envisioned myself 
sitting back and taking a rest for once. 
I was wrong. The Editorship appears 
to be a breeze when you’re on the out¬ 
side looking in, but once you’re placed 
at the helm, the kitchen really heats 
up. 

Unlike many of my predecesors, I 
had no real trouble with keeping up 
with my school work. Other parts of 
my life took a real beating though. I 
learned a whole host of new cuss 
words, not to mention what it feels like 
to give up sleep. Sleep, after all, is 
simply one of those luxuries that 
bored individuals must do to pass the 
time...right? 

All kidding aside, I never would 
have made it through this year had it 
not been for some very precious peo¬ 
ple in my life. My special thanks goes 
out to these people who pulled me out 
of more than a few scrapes. ...I would 
like to thank Tracy “Lynn” Bull for all 
his help with clean up photography 
and his patience with the staff as they 
tried to hold still for the staff photo. 
...A special note to John Conca and 
George Turner, those lucky two who 
only have to spend a month and a half 
in this place...the rest of the time they 
vacation in California. 

...Thanks to Troy “Big Guy” and 
Mary “Lynx (slug)” Bull for correc¬ 
tions, suggestions, and typesetting. 
...My biggest thanks to Kathy Gilbert 


who stayed during the summer and 
helped with the finishing touches of 
the book...all 220 pages of them. 
...To Deb Chandler I only have to say, 
“Why didn’t you take this job?” 
Actually I want to thank her for being 
there when it really mattered and for 
having the guts to yell at the staff 
when they needed it and when I was 
too Mickey Mouse to do it. 

...To all of the backshop crew (Bob, 
Michelle, and Joe) thanks for putting 
up with late changes, uncorrected 
copy, and the wrong colored pens. 
...To Donna, Karene, Sue, and Mar¬ 
garet, thanks for putting up with all of 
the bull that we slung in your direc¬ 
tion. And congratulations for surviv¬ 
ing an entire year with that little rich 
boy from Seattle under foot. 
...Although I never got to meet any of 
the second year architecture students, 
I offer my thanks and my apprecia¬ 
tion for the beautiful work that contri¬ 
buted so much to the George Orwell 
pages. 

...To Frank Myers, our faithful rep 
from Delmar, you made it all seem so 
easy and you never screamed when we 
really “F”ed up. 

...To my father, who was also my boss, 
I offer thanks for all the pushing even 
if it drove me crazy more than a few 
times. 

...And, to my future husband, who 
drove across the state more times than 
his car would like to think about, I 


thank for mellowing me out whenever 
I was about to freak. 

...My last thank you goes out to a man 
who did more for me than he prob¬ 
ably even realizes. To Jeff “Kirby” 
Williams, who encouraged me to go 
for this job in the first place (some¬ 
thing I may never forgive him for) 
and who gave me an occasional phone 
call to boost my spirits when he knew 
that deadline time was drawing near- 
...thanks. 

I wish Troy all the best next year, 
and I have one suggestion, quit before 
it’s too late...only kidding baby 
brother. To the staff I want to say...we 
did it. It was a task, but the book is 
great and I have but you to give credit 
to. There were some doubts going 
into the year, some hard feelings dur¬ 
ing the year, and some tears near the 
end, but all in all we did one hell of a 
job. I will be proud to have the 1984 
yearbook in my possession. 

As everything draws to a close, I feel 
a little sentimental about walking 
away from it all. After four long years, 
maybe I have become a yearbook 
addict...maybe I can’t leave without 
looking back...maybe I should stay 
around a little longer...What am I 
saying. It’s over and I thank goodness 
I made it. Now I leave with a smile and 
a new spirit...I came, I saw, 1 con¬ 
quered. 

Nathalie Bull 

alias “the Boss” 


640 Staff /1984 































.i prcsN run of 9.400 copies. Both the cover and paper were sup¬ 
plied by Detmar. Priming; was on 70-pound Sterling Dull (West- 
vacoj, The enter was designed by Cindy Vodder, Chinook art 
edilor. 

The body type used dmaughout most of the book was I O' 1 1 
Garde Gothic Medium. Outlines were8/9 C aledonia Bold w ith I IPs 

Vuwricjma BtiJd. Pctgnol tight, /apf ItdernatKHt.il and (.hn-rnrri 
Chinook Staff Vyistniu, 

Individual portraits. dorm floor and greck group photographs 
were taken by John Conca and George Turner of Picture People, 
Inc., of Redwood City, California. Queen-, photos wen? taken by 
Student Publications photographer Elliot* A ho la. Clubs and other 
group pictures were the work of the Student Publication's photo 

Special thanks to Delraar representative Frank Myers. All type 
was set by the Student Publit iiion •» coni posing staff under the 
direction of Bob l ama. Color pro* cssing was done by Process nr 
Pullman, using all color Ininspirritrici. 

1984 Chinook Editor